20 Burst results for "Tara Gatewood"

"tara gatewood" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

01:53 min | 2 months ago

"tara gatewood" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Say who your what the thank you for everything what you do for us and then hope you thank you for everything. We appreciate it this my question. I really appreciate it. I love you. You're my friends. Aaron her her perkins in a really appreciate everybody who called the in karen. I see you less. I see you. Marge i see you melissa. Allison i thank you for calling to know. You got good words to share in folks. We ought to wrap things up. But again the biggest. Thanks i guess of ever given on these airwaves goes to everyone. Who's ever tuned in anyone. Who's ever taken our calls Anyone who has ever jumped on these airwaves. Anyone who has ever said. I wanna be a part of this team. Anyone who has ever stood in front of this microphone an anyone who has ever taken anything from these airways and done good in your life or challenge things question things or set the record straight her kim to you into the work and everything that you will continue to bring back to these airways i really appreciate it from the bottom of my heart. Tara gate would go straight to you. Hurt kim big. Thank you and i wish you all good as many more things continue to happen on these airwaves. of course thank you to the crew. Who helped us today to make sure we were connecting with you and the company that supports us too. I'm tara gatewood. Don't worry i'll be back. The association of american.

Marge Aaron Allison melissa karen Tara gate kim big tara gatewood association of american
"tara gatewood" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

04:44 min | 2 months ago

"tara gatewood" Discussed on Native America Calling

"In running over the years. I know i know we got a really really fun to music catching spirit lifting moment when when we have our music makers and then you call in to let us know that these different rhythms are really moving. You always have enjoyed that and I know you understand. You know these stories of who we are they come through the music in why you've had commitment There with k. Unm for so many years and lot has blossomed because of the music. And i definitely wanted to have uh us wrap up this conversation today paying tribute to all of those musicians who are telling our contemporary stories through sound. And you know you have inspired me in so many ways in my big thanks to our song keepers are song carriers and the songs that will here in the future because of what's happening today. Maybe this exact moment in it's really important to recognize all of this and some years ago it even inspired me to do some volunteering on my own at a radio station here. In new mexico que. Sf are in in launched the program indigenous foundation Which i guess. I'm still on air because i'm keeping up with that too. You can find me there. Saturdays three to five. Pm on one zero one point one fm case. If our but runny why is important that we always make space for the music when we're talking about things in in talking about who we are in our survival is native people ronnie be. Oh yes You know music tells the story and it begins with heartbeat drum. But i'm only one of many Radio hosts here k. Unm the senior program which is which has been a remarkable program for many years. That i've been involved with the many people that have come before me. And you know right now we have a small collective but we all are different in our own ways. We're all unique in that. We come from different areas. And that would be our good friends. and and co my constituents janet riley riley David pay online ken. He you know we all have our own unique background which brings a different style of music and different tastes..

program indigenous foundation new mexico ronnie janet riley riley David
"tara gatewood" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:37 min | 2 months ago

"tara gatewood" Discussed on Native America Calling

"The senior see. I didn't show at all You canoe she's chain Yes made it. language is special anyway. Then which is everything Healy who you are. You my I i learned to be speaking a whole Have protected the world to you. Know and I just wanna say everything's beautiful and that's home like that. Everything had to be wonderful future. You know thank you both for that and you know our music is oh boy. I need fifteen hours minimum to being able to talk about The strength of our music and in what it does for us in tina and alfred. Thank you both for reaching out. Got another caller on the line. We have kathy in little pueblo to do. Hey cathy thanks for giving us a ring outta outta you. An listening community. Thanks for dialing in. Oh my god. Why he girl just as i am cry which you what i am so glad you got on this program. I'll never forget that night. And i'm glad he picked you and put you on because boy. Did you ever make this this whole airways go nuts. you're great. I always appreciate the authors and the music that you bought us and a former yummy i love you and the sled a prep should be damned proud that we have a very wonderful Speaker for of issues that are going on today. I love you only. I'm the way you quit hercamp. Didn't bit kathy out of here. we do. Thanks for giving us a ring and you know what the music the music is. The reason i even got involved with native america calling in two thousand and five. I was at the indian pueblo cultural center at a concert. Ati zsa from attaya and covering it Doing some media coverage of it and ran into the crew of native america calling and offered..

little pueblo Healy kathy tina alfred cathy indian pueblo cultural center Ati zsa america
"tara gatewood" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:14 min | 2 months ago

"tara gatewood" Discussed on Native America Calling

"A message from the centers for disease control and prevention. Thanks again for tuning into native america calling and we appreciate you being on the other. Line these great native airwaves today and today you have a special invitation to join us on air to reflect and think about what these airwaves have meant to you over the years in. I am wrapping up my time as host here a native america calling and so i'm using it to say thank you and with us on the line. Today is anton troyer. He joins us at a bemidji minnesota and he has been a longtime supporter of our program. A guest and also somebody who helps inform us and anton you're talking about the language and you know you make the language seem so inviting to learn in another part of asking you to be on. This program is to personally. Thank you for that inspiration. No you have given to me or staff as well as others to take on the language and in no these things and big things to everyone who ever come on these airwaves and spoke in your own language. You've definitely taught me a lot and always enjoy everything that you've been able to teach me and those moments where you're speaking in your language and i'm able to understand some of those words in languages that aren't even my own which really gives me a lot of inspiration for language learners to who feel. It's hard to master. So this level girl learned how to say. Maguire which a whole sheesh meow aqua. Yana musi cho- won't be la squarely. I learned how to do that. I know you can do a lot too. And so antony turn it back to you. Were talking about the language. Glad you know. Learning our heritage languages is a powerful healing and decolonizing act. And it's through no fault of our own that a lot of our people have you know suffered the effects of a long lasting assault on our languages cultures and bodies and i think you know that native america calling has provided a platform for us to speak to the importance of our language is learned from one about what's working to contribute to the revitalization of our languages you know it generates a lot of support and influence and it's really a powerful thing you know i know we've we've also had a lot of conversations you know just around hot button. Topics in indian country mascots And things like that and you know this is another area where i think your program has generated a lot of influence you know in addition to just having a great time talking about this because people are so ridiculous in so many ways i think know. It helps native people who are advocating for these things to connect learn from one another. Sharpen our tool box and talking points so we can be effective advocate and then for everyone.

centers for disease control an anton troyer america Yana musi cho bemidji minnesota Maguire antony la
"tara gatewood" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:05 min | 2 months ago

"tara gatewood" Discussed on Native America Calling

"They're speaking from their heart. Yes in in listeners. Listeners are big one into it and camille go ahead. Put the call out for listeners. To in well i think people should call in to share their story. Maybe there's something a story that inspired you that made you share that Moment with somebody in your your your home or maybe with your family. Maybe learned something from a doctor. That was sharing something about glaucoma. Or you know. I think it's really important for us to hear. What story really had you sit in your car and just turn everything off just to hear the of the story. i think that's the most compelling story when we want to know about so you should call in and share that because Today's terrorist last show. And i think it would be exciting to know what's your what's what what show she brought to you as a listener and what has changed your life or maybe had you go see a doctor or maybe go see an elder. You know i mean we. We want to hear from you so call us here. Native america calling one eight hundred nine nine six. Two four eight is a number. Let's go and go back to the phone lines. We have pablo in number new mexico tuned in on k. Unm pablo. Thanks for giving us a ring. Year on air. I oslo and Would you have been a huge to do it on me. And i didn't even know it..

camille glaucoma Native america Unm pablo pablo new mexico oslo
"tara gatewood" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:48 min | 2 months ago

"tara gatewood" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Unm mattie thanks for reaching out reach out again. Because i think we lost you. Let's go to jordan. Who's in albuquerque new mexico tune in on key. Unm thanks for giving us a ring jordan. You're on air care. I just wanna thank you cry. My mom taught his zia pueblo for like thirty years and our new year is slenda but she taught via but i just wanna thank you for bringing light to the plight and a poet and i didn't know bringing life place Native americans and then no way. That's not a hoity-toity you know. So i appreciate that. And i'm gonna miss. You didn't realize say was your last date with jordan. I appreciate your words and you know what people in radio. They never really go away. Radio stays in your heart so don't worry one day. You hear me again and you know i plan to You know share some thoughts as well on this air in and bring you some more programming in the future so And you know there's a lot of good things. And i really appreciate you giving a ring jordan and what you said is the whole reason. Why of showing up to work. Why i have put in the hours that put in You know stretching those hours in trying to make sure we we're. We're bringing the right information that we find the voices that are important to the conversation. Making sure we're getting those voices that never get heard. It all goes into that and hearing that you are learning boy. You're making my heart stronger jordan. Thanks for giving us a ring and again you can join us to one. Eight hundred nine six two eight four eight is the number and just kind of looking back at some of those early shows that i had a chance to produce or either be a part of the conversation with There were several times that I started to see the evolution of how much you know this medium. Was you know how important it was. And i think there are some shows that really brought that ford in in one that i remember was one that we produced about pageants and we know that is quite the topic in our need of nations and did some research and was just kind of seeing. Okay where does some of this start. Where where does it all come from and along. That research came across mathon way. Shenandoah hines who was auto in pon knee and found her story and learn that. I believe the the miss congeniality came into play when she was a contestant in pageantry and you know just thinking about that and then there's been some really fun and exciting times to In times when we got to laugh remember producing show about bingo to the bone And went out into the field in and found people who were bingo enthusiasts. And just you know some of the stuff that They had to say all. These different aspects are teaching us who we are and a lot of times they are revealing our values which are so important And you know our values are put into us through our communities and sometimes those values come straight from our tribal communities and camille. Are there any any moments that you just want to remember thinking about The years native america calling has been bringing voices ford. You know. i can't think of a particular story. There are so many people that i had a chance to meet..

Unm mattie zia pueblo jordan albuquerque new mexico mathon Shenandoah hines ford camille america
"tara gatewood" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

02:29 min | 2 months ago

"tara gatewood" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Is somebody from our radio community to camilla coppa. A former filling hosts of native america calling my pleasure to have her here. She joins us today out of phoenix. Arizona she is hoping tayla kuta rate ojibway and command a moment to finish your thoughts and your you had is a really good place and and understanding the power of radio. Go.

camilla coppa america phoenix Arizona
"tara gatewood" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

01:41 min | 2 months ago

"tara gatewood" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Know you've been right there with me so again you can call in and celebrate this time with me at one. Eight hundred nine nine six. Two four eight is a number full nine hundred open and give a shout out to the radio people in your own community to click it and athabasca artist rico. World created the us postal services new stamp story of the raven. It's the first stamp by an alaskan native artists. World is also an entrepreneur and actively promotes southeast alaska native design. We'll talk with him on the next native. America calling.

"tara gatewood" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:42 min | 2 months ago

"tara gatewood" Discussed on Native America Calling

"In So happy to be a part of your last show. It seems like at least years went by really fast. I can't believe that it's been sixteen years. It just seems like yesterday. So i'm really glad to be a part of native america calling today. You know what really really has. I spent some time just of going back and taking a look at the list of programs and it was like i kind of felt like chevy chase on on christmas vacation where he's stuck up in the attic and he's watching old movies and just kind of reminisced in thinking about those times in. I'm camile another reason why i invited you to these airwaves. Today is to say a big things some of the things that you taught me in the beginning when we sat across from each other and learn about what. We're doing Just so memorable and one memorable moment was when you were producing a show A native in the spotlight you had invited mill vital vajna winters to the program. And i just remember as you got off the phone with her and you just sat there and we're thinking about everything that this woman did for community and that you are going to get a chance to give her a moment to get a spotlight and talk about the work. She was doing her big hard of opening up her home to so many children. And you talked about. This is what it's about. This is what we're supposed to be doing here. We're supposed to be bringing these native voices to these airwaves to tell their story and so in my own celebration of learning so much. I'm celebrating you as well in some of the things that you help light those sparks with when all of this began and just thinking back reminiscent on some of the times that we were producing shows. And that's where it begins for a lot of people who come into this circle you find the beauty of our people through their stories and so camille just thinking about everything that's important when anybody signs on air whether it'd be right there in their own community station and Just to give the weather just to give a report or even doing something like this. The importance of what's really going on with radio and i know you have a deep understanding of that and so go ahead. Share some.

camile vajna america camille
"tara gatewood" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:52 min | 2 months ago

"tara gatewood" Discussed on Native America Calling

"This is native america calling. I'm coming to you live from my homeland. Russia would do which resum both sides of the rio grande river in central new mexico or my nation thrives. And there's a lot of beauty and strength in our heritage and culture rests in the hearts of those that make up my community. So i signed on air today truly from a special place. And you're invited to this special place to and i've been inviting you For quite some time to this special place as we have been producing native america calling remotely. So i'm on some strong ground right now and i'm glad to be joining you and you know back when everyone was on my space before it was facebook or when tweets or insta- posts and youtube videos. Fill the day. I joined native america calling team in late. September of two thousand five as an associate producer in two thousand and seven. I officially started to share my voice on air and in february of two thousand twelve i became the host of what is deemed as the electronic talking circle. In this time. I have definitely seen an evolution of many things. In our native nations including the retiring of mascots the rise the food sovereignty movement and many other things down to the return of some of our secret items and their ancestors coming back to our tribal homelands and along the way i have talked with thousands if not more people who've had a connection to our native nations and learned a lot. It's been sixteen years almost sixteen years. Since i started my journey with native america calling my how time truly does travel fast. And you know what with all that i.

rio grande river america new mexico Russia youtube facebook
"tara gatewood" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

03:51 min | 2 months ago

"tara gatewood" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Through twelve public schools since two thousand seven the state has provided three point five million dollars per year to support the indian education for all act. This suit says there's not enough oversight on curriculum outcomes or how districts are managing funds. Melody mccoy is a native american rights fund attorney on the case she says public schools are supposed to use the money to integrate indigenous education into the whole curriculum. It might will be that. Some of this is happening. What we're not seeing is that it's being reported and we're not seeing that the state is requiring it to be reported. Mccoy says that funds might be being spent on inappropriate material but without proper documentation. It's hard to know we did find that one. School district had purchased a book about scotto and the miracle of thanksgiving and reported back as an indian education for all expenditure. The lawsuit is seeking that state officials and agencies meet reporting and compliance standards in consultation with the tribes for national native news. I'm taylor stagner a magnitude eight point. Two earthquake hit offshore of the alaska peninsula. This week the national soon nami center issued warnings for much of the gulf of alaska coastline gene carlson as a commercial fisherman and chick bay he says. The earthquake was particularly violent things. Were falling out of the cabinet and georgia. Flopping open looked up. My car was jumping around on the road and it was there was a lot of landslides here too. You could see just clouds of dust. Everyone is so. Yeah then we gather ourselves with one like that. You never know what you're gonna get a title with so people are running all over. The cars get up on the hill. There were no immediate reports of major damage or injuries. It was the state's largest earthquake since one sixty five officials say any waves were likely to be smaller than a foot. Carlson says he had not heard of any damage though he was checking again. Watch the title if we had a little tight because if went out and then came back in pretty good washington over you know the national sue. Nami warning center recommends that anyone with damage to report should contact their local emergency manager or their local national weather service office. Lemme carver's tribal leaders. Members of grassroots groups delivered a totem pole thursday to the biden administration in washington d. c. It was their final stop after a cross country journey highlighting indigenous issues and sacred site protection. Cover doug james says. The totem is a gift for the people animals and the earth for those. That don't have voices that's who are reaching out to. We're just asking each and every one of you to come together with one heart and one mind. I swallow i swallow greens to be of one heart and one mind so that you know i just wanna say hi scud. Stella jesse to all my relations osteo the totem pole event on the national mall with live streamed featuring speakers from the biden administration and tribal leaders from across the country. I'm antonio gonzales. National native news is produced by juan broadcast corporation with funding by the corporation for public broadcasting support.

Melody mccoy scotto earthquake taylor stagner nami center gene carlson alaska peninsula gulf of alaska Mccoy Nami warning center biden administration Lemme carver cabinet doug james georgia Carlson washington Stella jesse national mall antonio gonzales
"tara gatewood" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

01:43 min | 2 months ago

"tara gatewood" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Bryan young. I'm tara gatewood..

"tara gatewood" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:23 min | 4 months ago

"tara gatewood" Discussed on Native America Calling

"This is native america calling. I'm tara gatewood. Joining new line from my homeland assure would be state and federal elections are months away but officials are busy trying to make changes to how we vote on the next election day over the weekend texas lawmakers tussled over new limitations on voting including a measure to rollback mail in ballots. Arizona passed a new law that purchase voters from a mail in ballot list. If they haven't voted in the past two elections and in montana a new law does away with same day voter registration and limits ballot collection. Proponents of the new laws saying bay combat voter fraud but as with past voter restriction measures opponents say they only hinder voters who are native and other people of color. The also say the damage of disenfranchising voters far outweighs the minor threat of voter fraud. What do you think where do you stand in all this. Do you find it challenging devote and would you like to see states pass more laws that regulate or limit polling places mail in voting and other phone forms of voting. Everyone is welcome to the conversation today. The number to join us is one eight hundred nine nine. Six two eight four eight. That's also one eight hundred nine nine native and today we're going to start off in denver colorado with us today on the line is jacqueline daily own and she is a staff attorney for the native american rights fund and she is a slow pueblo. Our pleasure to have her here with us. Jacqueline welcome to native america calling. Thank you so much for having me in so there is a lot that has been going on in terms of voting and so jacqueline tells a little bit about new laws in montana. The new laws in montana are actually A continuation of a long string of voter suppression. That's been going on in montana for the last few years just last year. North defeated a ballot collection ban The reason that it was defeated was because it was found unconstitutional and it was unconstitutional because it just made it too hard for native. Americans vote in montana Natives only get a few days of on reservation registration and learning opportunities You know otherwise leading services are you know upwards of a hundred miles round trip and so You know ballot collection is used because native americans don't have They don't have residential addresses on the homes and they don't have residential mail delivery so People organizations. Pick up and drop off In order make that process easier For people that are facing unreasonable Barriers to casting their vote and the court found that that collection was an important part of how native americans vote to overcome How difficult it is to vote in their communities and so then this year The legislature again tried to restrict Is trying to restrict ballad collection making it the that get out the vote. Organizations cannot Pick up and drop off mail For a native american voters they also banned same day voter registration which is used disproportionately by native american. Voters who again only have registration opportunities a few days a year on the reservation. So we really think these are designed to make it more difficult for native. Americans vote in what has been the response from tribal leadership that you've.

Jacqueline jacqueline last year today denver colorado tara gatewood this year Arizona america texas nine nine hundred miles montana Six two elections rights fund one last few years North days
"tara gatewood" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:23 min | 10 months ago

"tara gatewood" Discussed on Native America Calling

"This is native america calling. I'm tara gatewood. Joining us live from my homeland of sheer doing via skype and people are often inspired to pursue veterinary medicine because of their love for animals but being a veterinarian is much more than just caring for adorable puppies and kittens. it involves years of schooling in the sciences. Today we're looking into what it's like being a native veterinarian. Some vets work with house. Pets like dogs. Cats birds bets also work with livestock. And they're also in an important part of reducing outta control cat in dog populations in and around native communities our guests on the show today. We'll tell you there's a need for more native veterinarians and technicians and we'll hear more from them about their passion to serve their native communities by working with animals. And you can join us to. Do you have questions about what it takes to become a veterinarian. Are there enough that veterinary clinics in your community. Tell us about it at one. Eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight. That's also one eight hundred nine nine native and right now we're going to start off in crown point new mexico. We have dr germain day. She is a director of the veterinary teaching hospital and the land grant program at the navajo technical university and she is today and is our pleasure to have her here. dr day. Welcome to native america calling and feel free to further. Introduce yourself good morning yet. And this is dr germain day. I would like to introduce myself in <hes>. The net <hes>. I am of the touch. Eat ni clan kiani buses. Chain a she does she say they. She doesn't let my pledge there. You said nausea that nasha so to translate that to english. I just said that my <hes>. Clan is touchy knee. Which is the red running into the water. People claiming i am born and for the towering house clan. My grandfather's late grandfather's clan is salt people clan and my paternal <hes>. Grandfather's clan is start of the ridge street people clan. I am from coyote canyon new mexico which is on the eastern side of the navajo nation and i <hes>. Attended the colorado state university in fort collins. Colorado i graduated. I graduated from school in two thousand one. I've been in practice since two thousand one. So it's been about twenty years when i first <hes>. Graduated vet school. I went into private practice <hes>. Mixed animal practice where. I worked on small animals and large animals. In some exotics. I worked in the <hes>. The gallup new mexico and the say benito area initially then moved on to <hes>. Grants to a clinic and grants. Then i <hes>. Did some relief work in georgia. Texas california before returning to new mexico worked in albuquerque <hes>. For a little bit for a few years before i returned to the navajo nation. I started at navajo technical university in two thousand nine as the director of the veterinary teaching hospital and the land grant program. And i've been here ever since. Wow and there's been quite a journey to to those different places but what was it that drew you to this profession. Why did you want to pursue a veterinary career swell. So i as. I grew up on a a ranch. I was exposed to <hes>. Large animals my family owned cattle horses. Sheep goats and <hes>. I just enjoyed and enjoyed being around animals. I <hes> brody horses <hes>. With my sister brother and cousins starting at the age of about three and <hes>. Just spent a lot of time outdoors with animals then later as a preteen and teenager. I did some volunteer work at the local veterinary clinic in gallup and really enjoyed that work then as i <hes> moved into <hes>. Graduated from high school and went on into college. I had a professor. That thought i should go to medical school but i realized at that point that i really wanted to go into veterinary medicine and

tara gatewood dr germain veterinary teaching hospital navajo technical university skype dr day america new mexico nausea coyote canyon colorado state university fort collins Colorado
Native veterinarians

Native America Calling

05:23 min | 10 months ago

Native veterinarians

"This is native america calling. I'm tara gatewood. Joining us live from my homeland of sheer doing via skype and people are often inspired to pursue veterinary medicine because of their love for animals but being a veterinarian is much more than just caring for adorable puppies and kittens. it involves years of schooling in the sciences. Today we're looking into what it's like being a native veterinarian. Some vets work with house. Pets like dogs. Cats birds bets also work with livestock. And they're also in an important part of reducing outta control cat in dog populations in and around native communities our guests on the show today. We'll tell you there's a need for more native veterinarians and technicians and we'll hear more from them about their passion to serve their native communities by working with animals. And you can join us to. Do you have questions about what it takes to become a veterinarian. Are there enough that veterinary clinics in your community. Tell us about it at one. Eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight. That's also one eight hundred nine nine native and right now we're going to start off in crown point new mexico. We have dr germain day. She is a director of the veterinary teaching hospital and the land grant program at the navajo technical university and she is today and is our pleasure to have her here. dr day. Welcome to native america calling and feel free to further. Introduce yourself good morning yet. And this is dr germain day. I would like to introduce myself in The net I am of the touch. Eat ni clan kiani buses. Chain a she does she say they. She doesn't let my pledge there. You said nausea that nasha so to translate that to english. I just said that my Clan is touchy knee. Which is the red running into the water. People claiming i am born and for the towering house clan. My grandfather's late grandfather's clan is salt people clan and my paternal Grandfather's clan is start of the ridge street people clan. I am from coyote canyon new mexico which is on the eastern side of the navajo nation and i Attended the colorado state university in fort collins. Colorado i graduated. I graduated from school in two thousand one. I've been in practice since two thousand one. So it's been about twenty years when i first Graduated vet school. I went into private practice Mixed animal practice where. I worked on small animals and large animals. In some exotics. I worked in the The gallup new mexico and the say benito area initially then moved on to Grants to a clinic and grants. Then i Did some relief work in georgia. Texas california before returning to new mexico worked in albuquerque For a little bit for a few years before i returned to the navajo nation. I started at navajo technical university in two thousand nine as the director of the veterinary teaching hospital and the land grant program. And i've been here ever since. Wow and there's been quite a journey to to those different places but what was it that drew you to this profession. Why did you want to pursue a veterinary career swell. So i as. I grew up on a a ranch. I was exposed to Large animals my family owned cattle horses. Sheep goats and I just enjoyed and enjoyed being around animals. I brody horses With my sister brother and cousins starting at the age of about three and Just spent a lot of time outdoors with animals then later as a preteen and teenager. I did some volunteer work at the local veterinary clinic in gallup and really enjoyed that work then as i moved into Graduated from high school and went on into college. I had a professor. That thought i should go to medical school but i realized at that point that i really wanted to go into veterinary medicine and

Dr Germain Tara Gatewood Navajo Technical University New Mexico Veterinary Teaching Hospital Dr Day Coyote Canyon America Skype Colorado State University Nausea Veterinary Teaching Hospital A Fort Collins Colorado Albuquerque Georgia Texas California Brody
"tara gatewood" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

03:59 min | 11 months ago

"tara gatewood" Discussed on Native America Calling

"This is national native news. I'm antonio gonzalez. The governor of the pueblo of aca in new mexico is concerned about the health and wellbeing of the people of alabama as a reduction of health services takes place amid the pandemic governor. Brian is reaching out to us. Lawmakers for legislative relief in funding after a hospital on academic lands no longer full-service able to offer emergency services or critical care congress and urgent and decisive. Requests were received uninterrupted <unk>. Healthcare an emergency medical service food services at the canyon. Cto laguna service. Unit have moved to primary and urgent care due to inadequate staffing as a number of staff have decided to leave after being notified of a redesign of indian health. Service care for the area. The hospital located off interstate. Forty west of albuquerque has provided services since the nineteen seventy s to the public of aca and laguna and navajo community in july the tribes were notified of potential changes due to an agreement with the pueblo of laguna a majority shareholder in the hospital. At forty seven percent the navajo community moved its allocation for its own facility in two thousand sixteen in september laguna health corporation entered into an agreement with ihs to open a new facility. In february removing it shares from the facility the agreement started the process of the redesign including notifying employees and establishing a working group via says aca did not expect changes in service until early next year and is calling on the indian health service for immediate resolution option it could allocate funding from the one point three billion dollars from of that and we are five hundred million dollars specifically designated provider relief fund all of these funds intended to address the pandemic. And all that meant to deal with just the situation. We are faced with the indian health service director. Michael we ocoee says they're consulting with all three tribes involved we ocoee says. Ihs supports tribal self determination and self governance to assume health services for their own communities. And he says the ihs has committed to the retain services at aecom a- mitigating <hes>. To the extent possible any negative consequences as a result and making. There's just a smooth transition. As possible is the goal and we are looking at every available resource <hes> whether that's coronavirus funding <hes>. Any other emergency funds. That may be available to after your. We're looking at all resources available to the agency can make. There's just a smooth transition possible. Make sure that nobody else for the galileo estimates the funding needs the aca. Hospital is around five to six million dollars. He says alabama has received support from state leaders lawmakers and some members of congress a multi-agency operation took place on navajo lands last week in an effort to put an end to marijuana operations. In the shiprock new mexico area federal state local and tribal officers led the raid on twenty one farms and two residences where marijuana was housed in more than one thousand grow houses about two hundred and sixty thousand plants were radically agents also found nineteen trash bags filled with processed marijuana in baggies about one thousand pounds the navajo nation is on board to crack down on what it says is illegal hemp and marijuana operations in the area more than seven million. Federal transit dollars have been awarded to twenty-five tribal governments for improvement projects on tribal lands. The us department of transportation announced tuesday the projects range from storage to maintenance facilities to helping tribes of an appointment to improve transportation services. The funding supports projects operating costs planning activities. I'm antonio gonzalez.

Jonathan nez Cnn president america tara gatewood Tummy pueblo orlando cruz John
"tara gatewood" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"tara gatewood" Discussed on Native America Calling

"This is national native news making camera in for Antonio. . Gonzales the supreme. Court. . . On Tuesday granted a request by the trump administration to suspend an order by a lower court that would have allowed the twenty twenty cents count to continue through October the move was condemned by the National Congress of American Indians the native American rights. . Fund. . And the National Urban, , Indian family coalition who said the administration is trying to end the twenty twenty cents his count early in order to control the apportionment numbers which determine the number of each state's congressional representatives. . A group of Native American tribes, , advocacy groups, , cities, , and counties had sued to maintain an extended deadline for the count originally put in place by the US commerce secretary in April because of the covid nineteen pandemic that was later reversed NCAA I said in a statement that the administration's efforts will quote result in incomplete numbers, , effectively excluding non-citizens and suppressing the. . Count of minority communities including American Indians and Alaskan natives. . The Supreme Court's ruling puts the count on hold while the trump administration and advocates argue in a federal appeals court NCAA I is urging the legislative extension of deadlines warning stopping. . The census will quote condemn Indian country to a loss of political representation and its fair share of resources for the next decade. . This year, , the FCC opened a window of opportunity for native Americans to secure rights to their own wireless broadband networks as Jacob. . Resnick reports regional tribes such as Central Council of the Clinton and Haida Indian tribes of Alaska are working to establish an intertribal broadband network to improve internet connectivity across coastal Alaska Southeast. . Alaska tribes have few communities connected by road, , and while the Internet has helped bridge gaps from physical distances, , it's often far from fast or reliable tribal vice president will make Lynn says it high is among hundreds of tribal entities nationwide to apply for a special wireless spectrum license to fill gaps in communities underserved by commercial carriers we don't have a profit motive, , our motives. . Delivery of service. . I really be broadband is a an inherent right for our tribal citizens and <hes>. . That is made ever clear to me by the impacts of the covered nineteen. . Where efficiencies and infrastructures became ever more apparent this year, the , FCC made possible by offering a spectrum for wireless broadband to native communities. . Any unclaimed bandwidth will be auctioned off later to private carriers, , but I, , the SEC will need to issue the licenses and when it does of tribes across the US are expected to have a unique opportunity to fill gaps in connectivity in underserved areas, , which describes most of Rural Alaska. . For National Native News. . I'm Jacob Bresnik in Juneau Alaska. . The Alaska Supreme Court ruled this week that people voting by mail will not need a witness to sign their ballots Katie Oh reported the Arctic Village Council and others had sued to block the signature requirement because of the covid nineteen pandemic. . The Anchorage Superior Court ruled in their favor but the division of elections appealed it to the State Supreme Court Natalie Lander is with the Native American Rights Fund, and , represented the plaintiffs. . She told the court voters at a higher risk for the virus including Arctic village residents face a choice between their health and casting their ballots. . It's not worth it to vote. . I have to expose myself to this illness for another person and I think that's the problem, , the unpredictability and the fear that we're putting voters. . Now, , the pandemic is not the state's fault but the requirement is. . The attorney for the division of elections argued changing rules in the middle of the election will confuse voters and that the plaintiffs didn't prove getting a witness as a severe burden. . The court will issue a full opinion at a later date. . For National Native News I'm Megan Camera. .

National Congress of American depression NCAA Alaska Tara Gatewood Supreme Court American Indians America Albuquerque FCC Gonzales US Antonio Jacob Resnick Central Council
"tara gatewood" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

06:11 min | 1 year ago

"tara gatewood" Discussed on Native America Calling

"I knew nothing was nothing is still nothing and this ever happens again. I will never let you down. I was so proud to be part of an absolute native film. I grew up in a generation where it was cool to be Indian. Believe me I've got the scars to show you. I'm so proud to be part of history. An actual native American Indian film by Americans played by Indians. That's something I will always. That would cover it whatever the for the rest of my life and and thank you jeff and the rest of the cast. We're having faith that I wasn't gonNA mess up here and all you. I want to see what's in Indian minds and the beauty the power of it and thank you for for Washington giving us a chance so I gotta say see you again all right stone horse. Also one of our of veterans for his good luck go ahead being an listening to indigenous voices. Go see the film. It's on shudder. You can stream it. It's like less than the cost of a movie ticket to get shudder for months. So everyone goes all right and Ella. Maya thank you for being with us to end anything you want to close with. I guess what I'm saying. You know thank you to everybody for tuning in and thanks for having when your show I think he did a cast and crew and yeah like four said go and see his movie It's a it's a real wild ride and It I think it's it's a really interesting time watching a film like this Yeah thanks and I hope everybody's saying face well And I just want to give a shout out to all the frontline workers Especially at at the Navajo Nation. What's happening. There is a appalling and heartbreaking and I just WanNa you know thank my workers. Who were you know putting themselves on the line all right? Thank you very much in Jeff. Guess what you get more than a minute Anything you wanted to share as we get ready to close this down Just echo everybody else's sentiments but it's been a wild ride particularly for me because it's been over such a long period of time at the finally see realize there's there's so many people that think no matter how many minutes should give me because it stems from my family and my friends and my I might cash to my cool and the people that have been lucky to know and work with of course in my career like I said it's these people that make me look like better filmmaker than I am and I just I. I'm an off the privilege of being able to live this. Life and to make films represented native people on Screen and hell dial back a lot of the damage done by cinema over the course of the year. So it's it's just thank you so much for giving me the opportunity and the privilege and supporting the film and and liking the film because it's it's bigger than me the contents is bigger than me and I think this opens up doors and avenues for filmmakers that it would have normally had so. It's it's been really just been mazing positive experience and it feels good to have king books thirteen years of work vindication. Well it is definitely paid off in Jeff. I think someone or another group of people to think are the indigenous language speakers Who kept that language that we heard in the film alive anything you want to say about that. Well my my mother is uh make my language teacher and so is my my niece. And it's part of our family tradition to maintain that language and the language culture is my cousin so it is undeniable part of native identity to maintain our languages. That's a no brainer. I think that's why you've seen them attack over the course of colonization because the language too finds we were literally defined how you think it changes your brain chemistry so I think it is a huge part of our culture and like I said the put language in a vehicle that has typically been one of the reasons why may have been misrepresented is is using that same weapon who revitalized language. And I've been I've been working on language. Docs for twenty years. So this has been a passion of mine for quite a while. And I implore anybody else there to make an effort to learn native language or teach it if they know it real quick any words in your language you can leave us with not the top of my head. No I'm never really liked I've never really liked off the top of my head over. You know what we catch plenty of it in the film in just want to thank you in all of the actors were sharing this day with us and if you missed anything in the hour you tuned in late you were being a safe driver waiting till you got home to call and now the show is over and you can't call in you can leave your comments on our website of America calling dot com. We're on twitter to at one. Eight hundred nine nine native. You can find us. Instagram and facebook. That's going to do it for the hour. Thank you to everybody. We heard from forest. Good Luck Michael. Gray is Ella my tail feathers Jeff Barnaby and Mr Stone Horse Loan Goldman tomorrow. We're GONNA take a look at some of the concerns. People are having and especially our new mothers the ones who are expecting during the corona virus pandemic. We hope you'll tune in if you have a story share on that go ahead and start the dialogue right now by reaching out or please make plans to join us. We started one. Pm Eastern time tomorrow. I'm Tara Gatewood.

Jeff Barnaby Ella Navajo Nation Tara Gatewood Washington twitter Instagram America Gray Michael facebook Mr Stone
A good new home

Native America Calling

09:36 min | 1 year ago

A good new home

"Tara Gatewood in here with me on the program today out of Saint Paul Minnesota. Is Angela go theor the associate director of Minoshe key and a young and also here too with the with the group is executive director. deb Foster her and she is a Saint Croix Ojibway from Eagle Clan. My pleasure to have both of them here with US and Andromeda turn turn to you. You've done a lot of work. I'm looking at your bio and see That you have worked with the county in family services and just knowing along the repetition or how many times young people are entering into foster care and then they age out and then there's no place to turn talk to me about how being there air at this critical time and offering them a space to not only the rest of their head but also gained a job development skills as well as even just I have to be self sustaining talked me about this critical time period. In what some of the things that the center is working on I I always ask people to reflect on the young people that they have in their personal lives and the natural support systems. That are there error. And how many times when you're C Eighteen nineteen twenty one. Twenty two year olds in your personal life that When they have love family to fall back on at times when they're having a hard time or they've They need a place to stay. Or they've transitioned positioned in their jobs or they're you know. They're struggling in some way when they have a natural place to go back to a lot of the youth that we are working with because as they have spent such extended time in foster care that they've been moved around a lot through their youth. They don't have those places to land The one thing with young and his dad was saying having been Serving the community since nineteen eighty. Three is that it is become that place for a lot of youth and families that they know when they're having a hard time that this is kind of their soft place to land that there are people here that can help and and so this expands our ability to do that for this youth in this age group is that this is a critical time when you are learning learning to live independently when they're wanting to you know find employment and look for career pass and go back to college and when you don't have how those supports Built in because you've been in foster care because you've had time and placement or been homeless this gives you more of that time name and all of the services That you could need as a jumping off point are here for you and we're here to build those relationships and to help them take that next step I'm just excited that we have an opportunity now to work with these US more closely for a more extended period. Take time to help them. Get through this point of transition and so tell me a little bit more about how it works. How permanent is the housing and some some of the support services that are going on Angeles? START US off yeah so youth enter the program Between the ages of eighteen to twenty twenty four years old The youth that are coming in have different backgrounds of homelessness and Foster Care The nature permanent supportive housing is that they could live in this housing forever if they wanted. There isn't a timeframe I'm in which they would need to leave. They just need to enter between the ages of eighteen to twenty four and they have to continue to qualify for the subsidies that are or a helping to assist with their rent During the time that they are there the support services that we have we have to transition coaches that start working with the youth rate rate at the point of referral. And they're the ones who are working with you to collect their housing history. All their vital documents they information that they need in order to you. Qualify for the housing and those transition coaches continue to work with those youth to help them. That goal plans navigate resources and everything that they need on that and they're like housing goals we have a full time youth and family therapists. That is dedicated to the building and that therapists can do individual work Couples therapy family therapy is needed really to really meet. Whatever the needs are for that youth To help them be healthy in their community and their personal relationships. We also have a fulltime cultural specialist. Who is is trained in suicide prevention and post mention that is dedicated to the building? And he's there to help work with the youth To you meet their cultural needs and to help them. Connect back with their own communities as well We have the ability to have ceremonies. We have a cultural cultural activities center. We have medicine gardens and sweat lodge on site and so he's really the coordinator of that for all of the youth We are also adding a safe harbor case manager which is dedicated to working with you who are at risk of or have been involved in sexual exploitation and so the case management will be dedicated Just to that kind of aspect and helping them navigate gate through the resources and the sensitive nature of that and then there's property management that's onsite with our partners that help them with their lease and like the money portion portion of everything and then the We're also staff twenty four hours a day so there's always some support staff here for the residents when they need it into my turn to. Oh you balancing all of this because it sounds like a lot and it sounds like the things that often are left out of the equation win A lot of times we start trying trying to help our youth Trying to get them going faster. Start on life. How is all of this being balanced or is this part of the blueprint to make sure that all of these things were there Not only supplying a place to live. But supplying a place to thrive tell me more dip. Yes we In addition to what Angela has said we have the building was built around The the all of the needs of the young people. So for instance we have Circular gathering centers on each floor where Kids will be able to gather We have the purposely did efficiency apartments because we wanted at their full apartments full kitchen refrigerator. Everything bathroom beds living area but we wanted them to network with new folks And have an opportunity to establish new networks and We also have a workforce training center so A Complete Computer Center Training Center. Where kids can do everything? I'm from working on covering letters Building resumes doing job search learning technical skills And and types of activities. That are involved in building those opportunities for young people We also have a Fitness Center down in the lower level providing opportunities for young people to strengthen their health and and wellbeing physically physically and also the teaching kitchens that you mentioned on each floor to Help kids learn how to cook. And how to cook healthy We also have as mentioned a cultural activities center. So that is where all the kids can learn how to make their own regalia and do beadwork and make their own drums. But more importantly learned the history behind all of these things We have an entrepreneurship program that We have for young people that were putting together that will allow you to work onsite. We have a credit store which which I like to describe as kind of like a mini walgreens and so Use can earn vouchers that they can use in these stores and it has everything a walgreens would have but it also provides an opportunity for young people to work there and they can learn some Shaath work skills such as profit and loss and stocking talking and ordering cashiering things like that Also we have a food shelf and we also have a clothing store so these are all opportunities for young people to garner some software skills And we have numerous or as partners throughout our community. That are going to be working with us as well. And providing internships and workforce skills and Places where they can establish a ged or finish high school learn about post secondary education. If that's what they WANNA

United States Angela Deb Foster Tara Gatewood Computer Center Training Cente Saint Croix Ojibway Angeles Saint Paul Minnesota Associate Director Executive Director. Fitness Center Coordinator
The State of Indian Nations

Native America Calling

06:48 min | 1 year ago

The State of Indian Nations

"You're tuned into native America calling. I'm Tara Gatewood from misled a Pueblo. We're listening to the State of Indian nations address today a day New National Congress of American Indians President fond sharp from the Cornell nation gave the speech earlier today in the first part of her speech. We heard her disgust threats to native nations including challenges to tribal decision making and the Indian Child Welfare. ACT WE PICK UP. We're sharp left off in addition to these existential threats. We have threats caused by federal inaction and indifference difference take severe chronic underfunding of the federal government's trust in treaty obligations to tribal nations powerfully illustrated in the recent broken promises MRS report. This report is a trebling. Glimpse into the pervasive impacts that federal budget shortfalls have on the health and vibrancy of tribal tribal communities. It comes fifteen years after another. Congressional report came to the exact same conclusion that the United States is failing to hold its end. The Grand Covenant is struck with tribal nations in exchange for hundreds of millions of acres of tribal lands invaluable resources they contain needless interruptions and delays in federal funding also pose a significant threat the two thousand nineteen government shutdown. The longest longest in history is the latest example of an incompetent federal budget process jeopardizing travel nations ability to provide vital services to our citizens from law enforcement to healthcare to emergency response and just once in the last twenty two years has congress passed a fiscal budget on time time an inexcusable sign of a broken system in addition tribal nations must compete with one another for federal grant programs a gross gross violation of the federal government's trust entreaty responsibilities to us. Meanwhile Congress left Indian country completely out of the two thousand seventeen seventeen tax cuts and jobs at despite years of hill advocacy by NCI and our partners in promoting Indian countries tax reform priorities priorities. That will clearly boost tribal efforts to build sustainable economies and grow local job opportunities. Congress has also neglected its responsibility sponsor ability by failing to pass legislation that reaffirms the inherent right of tribal governments to regulate Labor permanently reauthorized. The remarkably effective special diabetes program for Indians. reauthorize is the native American Housing and self determination act to curb Indian countries severe housing shortages. And take long overdue steps to curtail the missing and murdered indigenous women epidemic. That is ravaging so many of our communities and families but federal connection and indifference is perhaps no more destructive than with a current failure of the administration and some in Congress to address press the rapidly accelerating impacts of climate change or even acknowledged that it exists as chief. Seattle went said what we do to the earth we do to ourselves. The damage human beings have done and continue to do to this planet disrupts every facet of tribal life from our subsistence life. Ways to our ceremonies to our continued stewardship of the natural world. My nation of quilt is already feeling the brunt as ocean shen sea level rise are forcing us to permanently. Relocate are two main villages to higher ground when it comes to climate change and sustaining humanity humanity on this planet. We have no time left to lose and yet our government is nowhere to be found finally tribal nations face threats from an administration ministration that appears committed to obstructing the express will of Congress take the Indian Trust Asset Reform Act while ratified nearly four four years ago the administration has refused to implement key provisions notably the creation of an under secretary for Indian affairs to protect an advanced it's tribal interests within the Department of Interior and the establishment through a meaningful dialogue with Indian country of trust asset management. Plans eagerly. Disgraceful is the inner agency. Mo Way the administration develop to implement the new four seven seven tribal workforce development law that that law is specifically passed to expand the successful program and play self-determination squarely at the heart of Indian country workforce development yet the MOH was purposefully written to ignore the law by allowing federal agencies to veto individual programs that tribal nations have every right to include in their four four seven seven plans. A dynamic law is explicitly designed to stop despite these darkening storm clouds tribal nations continue to shine brightly. We do so much with so little because our people count on us to find a way no matter what we devise advise innovative solutions to the greatest challenges facing our communities. Because that's what governments do from the sled of the Pueblo of a sled. A WHO's innovative partnership with the State of New Mexico is reducing arrest in incarceration rates among Pueblo youth by providing them culturally appropriate diversionary generic services services designed to set them on the right path to the Miami tribe of Oklahoma. WHO's Miami Awakening Program is bringing back the tribes language wage from the brink of extinction and the strengthening of its people's cultural identity and kinship ties with one another in the process to the court? Elaine Elaine tribe. In Idaho whose education pipeline approach identifies and fill gaps in the systems of academic support for students which has dramatically atakli decrease the tribes highschool dropout rate and increase. The percentage of tribal members pursuing college degrees. Tribal nations are doing amazing things things and we could do so much more. If the federal government would finally once and for all abide by the timeless pack it made with a so long ago to create the country that we share today. We have upheld. Our end of this arrangement is long past time. The United States upheld its end of the agreement meant

Federal Government Congress Pueblo United States Indian Child Welfare New National Congress Of Ameri Miami Tara Gatewood America Cornell President Trump Seattle Elaine Elaine Idaho Department Of Interior New Mexico NCI Oklahoma