17 Burst results for "Tanya huff"

"tanya huff" Discussed on The Worldshapers

The Worldshapers

07:25 min | 3 months ago

"tanya huff" Discussed on The Worldshapers

"To either it me you know. Are we look at. Or it's some he's ready to go out when editors come back usually were already into The the line and I'm lousy at punctuation. I i have a real problem with With some persuasive some of the more complex corporation I really struggled with it as a kid Not efficient structure and You know reading in in all of that I always really great but some of the comic stuff in some of the paragraphs stuff. I i could never seem to get ireland's rice The way i wanted to do it with nelson classics do it And so. I was really worried when i started writing. It was going to be a big problem. And i found that my editors tend to just fix that stuff so i've been getting a great lesson in punctuation as as i've gone through her writing career but The often it be it'll be the microsd up And it usually. Is things the things that i think a problem. The things that i think are going to be. You know neutral blocks on my goson asking written it. And they're not gonna let me get away with that scene and that too obvious they're never say that my editors echo on it's always things that were completely off my radar. They were things that i would never consider Like a characters development or background on a character or just things that are completely my blind either either complete blind side to And that's that's also the reasons why i am. Y tend not to do many rats. Because i've seen practicing all my novels that the things that need work is not the things that i would of with thinking work With a huge value editors have lied to me over over. The years are all the editors worthless So it's yeah so I think it's almost like what you're talking about with We were talking about with with writing about something you know really well you know your world and your characters you feel you know. They're really well. And and sometimes you forget to put in some things that the readers would also like to know. So it's like you're not it just doesn't occur to you because of course well. Yeah i know all that but it doesn't show up on the page and then of course get the same sort of thing. My editors My main editor. Sheila gilbert thome one of the top editors in the field at dot books and she seen since the eighties. She's been an editor on science fiction fantasy and she's read so much that she will find those things like this. you know. there's not enough information about this character. And so as a result my rights usually longer than my original book for putting in some of that stuff too sometimes find that as well. No so i all my novel almost all novel i tend to finish about one between one twenty and one forty thousand words Every i've written hit that mark And so typically. Were knocking about ten house. Had for too much your up link where we're usually knocking out and it's usually seems that i think are integral to. It'll be something that i think is a great for the novel maybe like not going And you know the one thing just working with more feel i'm sure you find Hope find similar. It's might taking a master's class Working with editors all your work like it's a lotta wins. I think it's better than an mfa Because you're getting a very indepth picture into what we're calling in your writing so You know i find that. I'm i'm best when i'm as concise as possible. Even though my answer is nothing particularly concise on this you know in in my work the less flowery language. I use the better You know i'm better. I'm best when i'm making the words disappear. When don't see the words in not noticing the language in when my stories from out And for a while there i was trying to. You know i was trying to improve my. You know my writing vice Trying to be more in literary and and that's a bad for me and it was my editor pointed that out. We have a saying among authors and their several canadian authors jewish anita and tanya huff and several of us. And we occasionally. We'll of course get together in cancun in ottawa. Sheila's been there a couple of times and you know we'll have a will be up there talking about working with her and something that keeps coming up is that all of us have now after years of working the sheila. There's this little voice in the back of our head. That's telling us what she was going to say about what we're doing. And if you ignore that voice you will get the actual voice later. Because we've we've pretty much turn these things. We just don't necessarily do them every time as we're as we're writing draft so yeah it's it's great working with a good editor. Well we're getting close to the end here. I have my three philosophical questions. I want to ask you the first one is. Why do you write the second one is. Why do you think any of us right now. You're actually you know genetics and evolution and all that stuff way to human beings. Have this desire to tell stories and the third question is why stories with fantastic in particular. Because i don't believe there are such things as zombies in the real world. So do you have this this desire. And why do any of us have this desire to write stories of fantastic so those are three big philosophical questions. I'm going to talk about one. About why people rate white humans tell story And i think is because we're trying to conceptualize world lara's We got that ability to do storytelling. We've got that ability do context. And i think we're desperately trying to put together. Contexts for ourselves were desperately desperately trying to You know to to make to make things around us. Make sense and you feed the hero's journey in agriculture out there You see the journey Version of it everywhere. So i i think that's the reason The you know. Why do i write. I write because it's just a way to put a bit of my cellphone. the page. i think i love stories. And i'm constantly telling stories to myself.

Sheila gilbert ottawa cancun three philosophical questions Sheila second one third question first one eighties canadian jewish one twenty three big philosophical questi sheila anita tanya huff forty thousand words nelson one thing
"tanya huff" Discussed on The Worldshapers

The Worldshapers

03:45 min | 7 months ago

"tanya huff" Discussed on The Worldshapers

"To another episode of the world. Shapers the podcast. Right talk to other science fiction and fantasy authors about their creative process. I am myself an author of science fiction fantasy. My name is edward it alloy. Also right under the pseudonym. Abc blake and once Arthur chain at my main publisher is dot books in new york and my books from our the world shapers series which world shaper master of the world and most recently the moon net world a set in a vast labyrinth of worlds in which the people who have shaped who came from our road originally actually live. So it's bit like authors like the authors. I interview on this podcast giving inside the world's they create so the first adventure which introduces my main character. Shana keys who's on a quest put on a quest to save all these shaped worlds from the adversary by taking the knowledge of their making gathering it and taking it to a mysterious gray at the center of the labyrinth. That first world is very much like our world with a few differences because it's not really our world and then Book to master. The world's takes place in jules verne like world so there's weird airships submarines and floating islands strange weapons and all that good stuff grace deemed puckish and then book. Three master of the world is i like to say where walls and vampires in peasants. Because it's that kind of world so that's my latest stuff. From doc i also published books Some of which have been abandoned or orphaned by previous publishers. And some do it's through my own little publishing company shadow press and you can find that at shadow pop press dot com and among those titles is when under the aforementioned dc blake pseudonym blue fire. That just came out. It's a big young adult fantasy epic about two three very different young people who have to work together to save their their kingdom. One of them happens to be basically giant cat He's been his. His race has been transformed to be quite so. That's blue fire if you want to look for that Shadow pop press dot com shadow. Press has also put out the first anthology. A featuring guests of this podcast. I kick started that about a year ago. It was called of worlds. It's out now. And he book and trade paperback and it has a new fiction from sean maguire. Tanya huff david weber ellie modest junior. Dj butler christopher rocky. Oh john c right shelly. Edina and me and there were also stories by john. Skulls david brand. Joe haldeman julius eastern ada fonda delete doctor charles e gannon gal pal derek could skin and three a dire. That was so successful. I am now building the kickstarter to do a shaper of worlds volume two featuring guests from the second year of this podcast. It's going to be bigger original fiction new fiction from kelley armstrong. Marie brennan helen. Dale kansas jane. Dorsey lisa foils susan. Forrest james alan gardner. Matthew hughes healthy. Kennedy lisa kessler adria lay craft irony. Garth nix..

Matthew Marie brennan helen Edina Joe haldeman sean maguire new york Tanya huff john second year ellie susan One Dale kansas jane Kennedy lisa kessler shelly first anthology john c Dj butler Shana keys first adventure
"tanya huff" Discussed on The Worldshapers

The Worldshapers

03:25 min | 10 months ago

"tanya huff" Discussed on The Worldshapers

"The grand vizier was not to Install themselves on the throne but rather to create like a socialist. And when my mom was in grad school my dad used to turn on the tv and we would watch judith. Merril introduced Doctor who on tv ontario. And i was very Excited to watch doctor. Who and my dad knew judy through radical political circles. And when i was about nine or ten years old my school went on a trip to the space out library. Which is the the science fiction reference library. She founded in toronto where she was the writer in residence and she came out and said you know kids. If you write a story you can bring it to me and critique it for you which is really a remarkable thing that that the closest analogy canadian analogy. I came up with wing coming out and going look look kids. If you're ever having a pickup game and you want some tips. Just just give me a call. And i'll come by and help you out with it. So you know except judy wasn't a torian. Gretzky is but that was like very inspiring and then when i and i knew judy from tv and recognized her and so it was like doubly exciting to to have her invite us down to the to the library to give her manuscripts and then within a year to we also went down to boca science fiction bookstore. The oldest science fiction bookstore in the world and Again in school trip and the one behind the counter was writer. Who was just about to sell her for a story. Tanya huff and i i was you know maybe ten or maybe eleven and i had a dollar and tanya asked me what kind of like to read i told her and she me back to the use section and she found me a copy of little fuzzy. That was a dollar by h beam piper. Was the first book ever spent my own money on. And i started bringing manuscripts to judy and to tanya I had started writing a few years before. The first thing i remember writing was after seeing star wars at the university theater blur street and you know having a really exciting time. Not because it's the greatest movie ever written. But because kids audiovisual material was so poor like david and goliath a few other terrible shows and then just having a complex narrative was very exciting for me really chimed with me and i went home and i just started writing out the star wars story over and over again like a kid practicing scales on the piano and so i started writing stories and started. Bring them to judy and to tanya who bless her socks would would actually like while working in the bookstore allow you know callo fourteen year old to bring her stories and would critique them for me and give me writing advice and judy what she would do is use these workshops or these one sessions as a way to start workshops so she would find writers who are writing about the same level and get them to start meeting together and the you know the library spare room and so on. So that's how i started work. Shopping eventually with the ceaseless street irregulars which you know. It's cross schrader and David nickel and peter watts from time to time and madeleine. Ashby and Hugh spencer and many other writers really exciting group of people and i also started writing Going to writing workshop at my high school this groovy alternative school in downtown toronto and and it was run exactly like all these other workshops..

judy tanya Merril Tanya huff judith Gretzky ontario toronto goliath david cross schrader David nickel Hugh spencer peter watts Ashby madeleine
"tanya huff" Discussed on The Worldshapers

The Worldshapers

04:38 min | 10 months ago

"tanya huff" Discussed on The Worldshapers

"Another episode of the world. Shapers the podcast right. I talked to other sites fiction and fantasy authors about the creative process. My name is edward role. I am also an author of science fiction and fantasy Are we start by giving you idea of some of the stuff i've been working on and of course the main thing right now is shapers of worlds which i'm not exactly working on it because it's out it's an anthology of short fiction featuring some of the authors who were guests during the first year of this podcast and it's quite amazing list of authors There's new fiction from sean maguire. Tanya huff david weber. Eliadah junior dj butler christopher rocky. Oh john c rights chevy dna and some guy named edward willett and there are also stories by john. Scouse e david brin joe haldeman. Judy scher asia. Funded the doctor charles. Egan gareth l powell derek. Coon skin three dire so among that group you have winters of every major award in the science fiction. Fantasy field international bestseller's and the like so. It's a really great collection. I hope you'll check it out again. It's called shapers of worlds. It's available and e book everywhere. The trade paperback is out there and can be ordered to bit it's not Immediately in stock in some places but you can order it and you can also go to your local bookstore. They can certainly bring it in or you could go to your library and have them bring it in or you can order it directly from the publisher which is my publisher as in the publishing company. I own called the shadow pop press and that's just shadow. Press dot com. You can download the e book directly from there Or you can order the trade paperback directly from there. I've already started working on the second. Shapers of worlds anthology. This one having been successfully kick started earlier this year. Now planning to run a kickstarter for a second anthology. Probably march of twenty twenty one and the authors that are already lined up include c. new fiction from jeremy shaw brian thomas schmidt kelley armstrong.

edward role sean maguire Tanya huff dj butler christopher rocky edward willett Judy scher Egan gareth powell derek david weber joe haldeman david brin john c Coon asia john jeremy shaw brian thomas schmidt kelley armstrong
"tanya huff" Discussed on The Worldshapers

The Worldshapers

04:31 min | 11 months ago

"tanya huff" Discussed on The Worldshapers

"Welcome to another episode of the world Shapers. My name is Edward Bella time. You are congenial host. And this is the podcast where I talked to other Science Fiction and Fantasy authors about their creative process. I say other because I am myself an author of Science Fiction and Fantasy and this initial part of the podcast is kind of the the tickets. You have to pay in order to listen to the rest of the podcast all I guess you can't just skip ahead if you want to but this is where I mentioned the the projects I currently have on the go and the first one, of course I want to mention is Shapers of Worlds. This is the kickstarted and pull that features authors from the first year of the world Shapers podcast and it's quite an impressive collection. We have new stories from seanan McGuire Tanya Huff off David Weber the Madison Junior DJ Butler Christopher Rocky. Oh John seawright Shelia, Dina and me and reprints from John scalzi. Joe Haldeman David Brin, Julie Eastern Ada Van de ve Phil Powell Derek coonskin, dr. Charles Lee Garden and for a tire that came out on September 22nd in ebook. It's available everywhere. You might want to go shopping for an office or you can download it directly from Shadow press.com. That's the publisher Shadow press is my own little publishing company named after our black Siberian cat Shadow Pop and if you go to Shadow page, you will find it and can buy it directly from there and whatever format you like a paperback version is coming the kickstarter backers have a paperback but the commercial release will be coming out on November 7th and will be able to buy that wherever you like to buy your paperbacks. It's a trade paperback not a mass-market paperback. And again, you can order that directly from Shadow, press you'll be able to get it through Amazon or chapters or whatever book store you want or your local bookstore? If they don't bring it in you can certainly ask them to order it in which would be a wonderful thing to do for your congenial host here. I'd also like to age In My Own latest novel which is the moonlit world. This is booked three in my world shape or series published by. Books and New York. It's what I like to call it werewolves and vampires and peasants. So my the overarching story here, of course is that there's a Labyrinth of shaped world's the Shapers of those worlds live within them. They're all from our world originally. My main character is Shana keys off in the first book World shaper. She loses her world to the adversary who's going from world to world and trying to to take them all individually to destroy them all if he can end to kill a gray who's the mysterious woman Life Center of the labyrinth who put all these Shapers into these worlds found them in our world and put them into their shaped world's Sean and discovers. She's a shape where she kind of forgotten that fact when Carl Yachts are shows up in explains why she's been able to do some amazing things that she's been able to do like making a terrorist attack that killed her best friend suddenly not to have ever happened and the first book she has to get out of her world because Carl thinks she has the power off. Together the knowledge of the shaping of other worlds and take it to a gray hair which would save.

Shadow press Joe Haldeman David Brin Edward Bella John seawright Shelia Tanya Huff Carl Yachts Shana Phil Powell Derek coonskin John scalzi Julie Eastern Ada Van Dina David Weber Amazon woman Life Center Carl Christopher Rocky publisher New York Sean dr. Charles Lee Garden
"tanya huff" Discussed on The Worldshapers

The Worldshapers

04:56 min | 1 year ago

"tanya huff" Discussed on The Worldshapers

"Welcome to episode 67 Believe It or Not of the world Shapers the podcast for I talked to other Science Fiction and Fantasy authors about their creative process. My name is Edward Willett. I'm your boss. I am myself an author of The Science Fiction and Fantasy and this week. I have three of my own projects. I want to talk to you about before we get into the meat of this episode. Now the first one of course I mentioned before but if this is your first time listening you may not be aware of it beginning of this year back. Well, not quite March. I kicked started an anthology featuring some of the authors who were guests on the first year of the podcast wage and I asked everybody that year from that year and ended up with eighteen stories of mixture of original fiction and reprints. So if you are interested, you can find the e-book version of Shapers of Worlds available everywhere. It features new fiction from Shannon McGuire Tanya Huff David Weber LD modesitt Jr. DJ Butler Christopher Rahi, ho Jaan see right off. Shelia Dina and reprints by John scalzi David Brin, Joe Haldeman, Julius. Turn Ada. Jual. Evo7 Ada. Try that again. Fond of the Doctor Charles egad and Gareth El Pollo Loco Chicken and tire among that group of authors. There are Hugo Award winners. Nebula Award winners British Science Fiction Award winners debt more Award winners, Aurora Award winners winners of all the major science fiction fantasy awards from around the world and nominees as well. So please look that up. You can find it. As I said everywhere. You can also download it directly from Shadow Papyrus. That's my little publishing company that published it. If you go to Shadow press.com, you can purchase it directly from there and download it directly from there. There will be a commercial print read the print version of the book will be out November 17th at which point you'll be able to order that of course online as well or any bookstore if they don't have it will be able to bring it in. So please check that out. Second project mind to mention is of course book three in my own series World Shapers which not surprisingly shares the name with this podcast as they started at the same time book one was World shaper took two mastered the world and book 3 is the moonlit world..

Nebula Award Edward Willett British Science Fiction Gareth El Pollo Loco Chicken World shaper Tanya Huff David Weber LD Aurora Award Shadow Papyrus Doctor Charles egad The Science Shelia Dina Butler Christopher Rahi Shannon McGuire Joe Haldeman David Brin John scalzi Jaan
"tanya huff" Discussed on The Worldshapers

The Worldshapers

05:27 min | 1 year ago

"tanya huff" Discussed on The Worldshapers

"Welcome to another episode of the world Shapers the podcast where I your genial host Edward Willett talk to other Science Fiction and Fantasy authors about their creative process. I am myself an author of Science Fiction and Fantasy. My latest book is called the moon lift world. It's book three in my world shape or series from Dahl books and it's could go by wage. It's the title that ran through my head which was werewolves and vampires and pest it's so my because that's the kind of story. It is in the world shaper series. There are a series of shapes worlds in the Shapers of those worlds live inside them. It's a bit like authors living inside their own books. And in the series my main character Sonic he's came from a world very much like ours, but she actually shaped it and I was chased out of that world by the adversary who wants to take over all the worlds and eventually destroy them. She ends up going through a series of Worlds accompanied by Carl. Sir this mysterious stranger who showed up wage. Plane to Iraq was going on told her that her world was lost but that she had demonstrated the power by resetting time during an attack in which her best friend was killed which is how she discovered she had this power that he she woke with him. She thinks he thinks that she can gather the knowledge of the making of all these worlds get it to a gray hair and protect the Labyrinth and all its people from the adversary that was all set up in the first book with paper which takes place in the world much like ours book to master the world which came out last year and in came out in Mass Market paperback just in August is set in a world shaped by someone who really wage Jules Verne. So it's got you know, weird are ships and submarines and floating islands and strange weapons and all that kind of good old steam Punky stuff. And then the new one the Moon that world as I said Is werewolves vampires and peasants. So my is shaped by someone who really likes werewolves and vampires and Shawna and Carl have to make their way through this world find the Shapers gather that knowledge of the world without getting either turned into a job. Dead creatures of the night or either turned into a lycanthrope are just eaten by what so that's the Moon that world. It's out now in trade paperback and ebook off. The other thing that I really want to mention though is actually connected closely to this podcast back in March. I kicked started an anthology called Shapers of Worlds, which features authors were guess during the first year of the world shape first podcast and that's a pretty impressive list of authors and 18 of them said they could take part so the book which is out now in ebook everywhere, you can find wherever you buy e-books and we'll be out in Prince November 17th as new fiction from Shawn and McGuire Tanya Huff David Weber.

Jules Verne Carl Edward Willett Tanya Huff David Weber Dahl Iraq Mass Market Shawn Shawna
"tanya huff" Discussed on The Worldshapers

The Worldshapers

05:26 min | 1 year ago

"tanya huff" Discussed on The Worldshapers

"Welcome to another episode of the world Shapers the podcast where I your genial host Edward Willett talk to other Science Fiction and Fantasy authors about their creative process. I am myself an author of Science Fiction and Fantasy. My latest book is called the moon lift world. It's book three in my world shape or series from Dahl books and it's could go by wage. It's the title that ran through my head which was werewolves and vampires and pest it's so my because that's the kind of story. It is in the world shaper series. There are a series of shapes worlds in the Shapers of those worlds live inside them. It's a bit like authors living inside their own books. And in the series my main character Sonic he's came from a world very much like ours, but she actually shaped it and I was chased out of that world by the adversary who wants to take over all the worlds and eventually destroy them. She ends up going through a series of Worlds accompanied by Carl. Sir this mysterious stranger who showed up wage. Plane to Iraq was going on told her that her world was lost but that she had demonstrated the power by resetting time during an attack in which her best friend was killed which is how she discovered she had this power that he she woke with him. She thinks he thinks that she can gather the knowledge of the making all these worlds get it to a gray hair and protect the Labyrinth and all its people from the adversary that was all set up in the first book with paper which takes place in the world much like ours book to master the world which came out last year and in came out in Mass Market paperback just in August is set in a world shaped by someone who really wage Jules Verne. So it's got you know, weird are ships and submarines and floating islands and strange weapons and all that kind of good old steam Punky stuff. And then the new one the Moon that world as I said Is werewolves vampires and peasants. So my is shaped by someone who really likes werewolves and vampires and Shawna and Carl have to make their way through this world find the Shapers gather that knowledge of the world without getting either turned into a job. Dead creatures of the night or either turned into a lycanthrope are just eaten by what so that's the Moon that world. It's out now in trade paperback and ebook off. The other thing that I really want to mention though is actually connected closely to this podcast back in March. I kicked started an anthology called Shapers of Worlds, which features authors were guess during the first year of the world shape first podcast and that's a pretty impressive list of authors and 18 of them said they could take part so the book which is out now in ebook everywhere, you can find wherever you buy e-books and we'll be out in Prince November 17th as new fiction from Shawn and McGuire Tanya Huff David Weber l e modesitt Jr. DJ Butler Christopher Radko John seawright Edward Willett Shelia Dina and reprints by John scalzi David Brin, Joe Haldeman Judah Eastern Ada Fonda The Doctor Charles E. Shannon Gareth L Powell Derek coonskin wage. And for a dire as I said, the book is available everywhere. The print book will be available November 17th. You can.

Edward Willett Jules Verne Carl Charles E. Shannon Gareth L Po Dahl Iraq Tanya Huff David Weber Butler Christopher Radko Mass Market Joe Haldeman John scalzi David Brin Shelia Dina Shawna Shawn
"tanya huff" Discussed on Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

05:26 min | 1 year ago

"tanya huff" Discussed on Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

"Hello and welcome back to the Corey Dr a podcast. My big news. This week is that I got an email from the Canadian science fiction and Fantasy Association asking me if I could be free for a video call on the fifteenth of August, because I'm being inducted into the sea sff as hall of fame. Boy that was exciting and wonderful news and the other hall of famers include basically everyone whoever mentor me to Maryland Tanya Huff from William Gibson all these people are so important to me growing up and it's such an owner and so amazing to be in their company that's on the fifteenth of August, and it is a public free video conference along with the rest of convention. which is the virtual event where it's being presented. So if you can join us there, you can hear me get all for Clemson. Come over all weepy about the role that these other hall of famers played in my life and what it means to me to be inducted into this incredible event. You can catch the details for that at my other upcoming events if you go to. Pluralistic. Dot Net click on any edition and scroll down to the bottom and there you will find my upcoming appearances. Some other appearances I do have coming up on August the fourth, which is Tuesday I'm appearing at word on the street festival to interview the author of do androids during electric cars a superb book about the future of Mobility in cities that's a kind of leftist critique. Of Mosque and Uber and the fantasy of a self driving car and the need for public transit and on August the twelfth I'm interviewing Christopher Brown for his new book failed State is Third Book it's a standalone book that loosely connected to the other two tropic of Kansas in the other and they're really good books. Sort of legal thrillers sat in a post ecological collapse authoritarian USA. That's pretty chillingly familiar. All stories about redemption and clinging to your values in the face of adversity and the kinds of compromises that you have to make even when you commit to that and Chris himself as a recovering environmental lawyer maybe even a practicing environmental lawyer and really gets into some great verse. there. The other things I've got coming up, of course, our books the big book that is coming up is attack surface. It's the third little brother Book and it drops in. October. We are nearly finish mastering the audio and there will be preorder kickstarter for that very shortly with some pretty cool bundles and some interesting high dollar items as well if anyone at. There feeling spendy start counting your pennies there as well as some pretty good bargains on little brother books and audiobooks, and so on. If you're a fan of the little brother books, you probably know that you can pick up a new omnibus edition of Little Brother and homeland with an introduction by Edward, snowden and a new cover by will S- who's the guy..

William Gibson Tanya Huff Clemson Fantasy Association Maryland Christopher Brown Chris Edward snowden USA. Kansas
"tanya huff" Discussed on The Worldshapers

The Worldshapers

07:27 min | 1 year ago

"tanya huff" Discussed on The Worldshapers

"Welcome to another episode of the World Shippers podcast where I talked to other science fiction and fantasy authors about their creative process. My name is Edward Willett Tendai. Say other authors because I am myself an author of science, fiction and fantasy. I actually have a brand new release. It's from my own publishing company, Chateaux press and it's called the from the street to the stars. It's book one in my young adult. Far Future Adventures series called the Andy. Nebula Interstellar Rockstar, which was the original title of this book this is. Is a revised edition of a book that came out a few years ago. It was short listed for a Manitoba Young. Reader's choice award and it was named to the our choice list of the Canadian Children's book. Centre and I think my favorite review of it actually came from a young reader who captured it pretty well. I think he said that to. This book is like Star Wars Plus Drugs Plus rock and roll awesome set in the far future, and that's pretty much. It as you might tell from the title. It's a lot of fun. It's out now in A. Book and A kindle sorry Amazon version of the paperback. With. A more generally released paperback version yet to come. And sit is book one and there was a second book called double trouble, which I'm working on right now. other things I have coming up the mass market release of master of the world, which is a book, two of my world shaper series. Comes out in August from Daw Books and then in September book three, the Moon World will come out as I often say that's the one that can be summed up as werewolves and Vampires and peasants. Oh, my. The world shape or series, of course, which I mentioned many times on here takes place in a labyrinth of shaped worlds. The people who shape those worlds live inside them. They're sort of like authors living inside their own books, and my protagonist who's been chased out of her own shaped world by the adversary is trying to go from world to world with her companion Carl Yachts, or her name is Shana Keys and together the knowledge of the making of those worlds, the shaping of those worlds to take to agreer the mysterious woman at the center of the Labyrinth order to save all of these worlds from. Eventually, being destroyed by the adversary. So the book one was set in the version of our world. It was called world. Shaper book to which is the one coming out in mass market paperback in August Master? The world is set in a Jules Verne like world and book three as I just said, is that a world with werewolves and vampires peasants so? Look for those and also look for from the street to the stars which just came out. The other project of course closely connected to this podcast is shapers of worlds. That's the anthropology of short stories by authors who were guests on the podcast. During the first year there are original stories and reprints kind of mixture and big names involved from John Sculley to David Brin to. Dr Charles E. We got Joe Haldeman. Tanya huff. Jewish Anita is a wonderful collection of short fiction and still waiting on a couple of stories to come in, but then I'll be putting that together. Hope to have it out I. Hope for Aug it might be a little later. Maybe this fall, but it's definitely coming. All Right? That's the introductory material out of the way except to say that this podcast is part of the CISCO PODCAST network. Now. Let's get to this episode's guest Adria lay craft. Pre Nights editor fiction author. End would artisan. Adria craft earned honors in journalism and ninety two, and has always worked with words and visual arts. She Co edited the urban. Green Man Anthology in two thousand thirteen, which was nominated for an Aurora award and launched her debut novel, jumped ship hope which will be talking about as an example of her creative process in twenty nineteen. Look for her short stories in various magazines and anthologies both online and in print, Adrian is grateful member of Calgary's imaginative fiction writers association if one I think I'm kind of. Honorary member maybe. The proud survivor of the Odyssey writer's workshop and you can find out more about her online. We'll talk about where you can connect with her soon. She also has youtube channels. Carving the Cottonwood and girl gone bag abondoned, which says soon to be renamed girl gone to ground, so maybe that's already happened I. Don't know Adria welcome to the world shapers. Thank you. It's wonderful to be here now. I say I'm kind of an. I feel like I'm kind of an honorary member. The F. Word because we've known each other for a long time through conventions in Calgary and. So, although I've never really been a member of the organization, I've been part of the writers at the Improv that that group does every year for many many years now. That is so much fun writers at the Improv. I've done it a couple of times as a program. In fact, I did it. When I was writing residents that through of public, library, and I did it again this year at the Saskatoon Public Library except. Did. Show it was just before everything closed down and I think people were little, if he. And I had all I had was an English as a second language class, and none of them wanted to compete so what I did was I just took? Words from them, because for those I guess I should explain registered the Improv is like any Improv. You get worse from the audience and you write a story using those words. I wrote a story on the words that they gave me so that was kind of fun for me. It wasn't quite the usual kind of a process though it. Enough about me actually here to talk about you, so we have known each other long time, and you've been a writer all that time that I've known you, so let's take you back into the mists of time as I like to say, how did you get interested? Well first of all in science fiction fantasy, and ended writing, which which came first, or how do those two things come together for you? I I have definitely been a reader and a fan of science, fiction and fantasy. Since before I could even read According to my mom I demanded to be taught how to read before kindergarten. because I was tired of waiting for people to have time to read to me. So. I I've always been a reader I read Laura the rings at age eight for the first time and I reread it several times and launched that launched me into reading Heinlein and stuff that I. Hadn't even. Thought it was old, enough or yet, but always always been a very avid reader, and then somewhere along the way when I realized I had to have a job in the big wide world. I realized that. That writing the books that I love so much. Could be a thing. Well! Did you studied well first of all? You grew up in Calgary. I presume, or is that correct? Or they're number two. So when you went to When you were in school, did you start writing stories and sharing them with your friends and that sort of thing? Yeah and I was I was attempting to write novels at that point I I am. I was still. Still Uncertain about short fiction, but I was always a book lover, and I I was attempting to rate at.

Calgary writer Adria Edward Willett Chateaux press Daw Books Jules Verne Tanya huff Amazon Manitoba Canadian Children youtube John Sculley Saskatoon Public Library Carl Yachts Anita Shana Keys Aurora award Pre Nights Green Man Anthology
"tanya huff" Discussed on Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

11:04 min | 1 year ago

"tanya huff" Discussed on Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

"I originally started publishing as PJ Schneider in science fiction steam punk paranormal romantic fitness. You didn't say I was originally John Norman off the no wrong answers and actually. Pj was derived because of my handle on prodigy. Way Back So that was always fun. And so The reason why I chose a pen name because I had a lot of people say hey. Why aren't you proud of your work and in particular there's also a question for Asian Diaspora as to why you pick a pen name. That sounds please excuse phrasing but rather white bread and there's a whole lot of complexity that you dive into that but from a professional standpoint. The reason why I picked a pen name was because I do maintain a parallel career in a corporate environment. While most of my co workers and colleagues all know that I write as a parallel career my clients do not and my clients could potentially feel that there is a conflict of interest or conflict of focus if they perceive that I'm working on stuff Other than their project or their particular objectives and goals so I opted to use a pen name so that I continue to have this parallel career already published with white papers and speaking publicly under my real name and I wanted to keep that content separate and that's at risk of trying to bucket things in in a way that makes it look like it. All fits That the idea of of message If your name has become associated with one message using that name to send a different message can be difficult. Yes if your name gets associated with a message as an author and the message is I write. You Know Fun. Hanky panky which I do which you do. That message may not fit well with your tech customers in your day. Job The spicy Cajun problem. I just thinking about that Cajun. All that said I have to say that For me being someone who's one inch deep and ten miles wide and is known for having a lot of different things going on has been a real strength It for one thing at it. I think it makes people think of me in lots of different contexts. Right in the end People think of me as as having something to say beyond just the narrowness of the field it. I think redounds to my favor in terms of getting invited to forums that are not necessarily just science fiction forums and there is in in terms of like mark different market. Planning you know You can try and get a bigger piece of the science fiction. Pipe fiction pies. Not Very big the when you look at kind of runaway bestsellers. They're all books that appeal to people who just don't buy books right it's JK rollings capture hundred percent of the book reading public. She captured five percent of the non book reading public. And that made her one of the bestselling novelists of all time right and so having being known for lots of other stuff is kind of interesting. Did want to say that You know the the I can't speak to women's experiences a writer but I recently read a book called the Futures Female by Lisa Yazbek from live Library of America Press. And it's a book about Women Pioneers in Science Fiction and my mentor was Judith. Merril who moved to Toronto after the Nineteen Sixteen police riots. She didn't WanNA raise kids in the states so we benefited in Canada from presence. There and Judy plays a big role. In and one of the editors theses from having talked to these writers in their editors and their children and so on is that a lot of the women who wrote under pen names did so not because they didn't want to be known as women but because they all had high powered careers a bunch of them were spooks And like so they were working in. You know the officers strategic services was the precursor to the CIA and they just didn't want to be associated with like they just had to keep a separate identity because it's sensitive military industrial roles which I was really fascinated by one of my other mentors Tanya Huff who began her career writing under t us half but switched to Tanya huff. I think in part because it became an asset to be known as a woman who writes military after that was like that was Not so much a curiosity as a benefit that we all know what dudes right like when they're ready military us have women. Writing military are interesting and and Have a like a our our break from the fair as usual? You know I agree but one of the things about this is that we are dealing with Systemic issues right. Sure so we can go down this rabbit hole of pretty long way but One of the things that happens. Is that publishers. Actually print more copies of books by men were males sounding name because bookstores by more of them because reviewers review more of them and so- book the publishers. Then recognizing the higher demand print more books by men so the bookstores. So there's the cycle that happens sure In the United States Forty eight percent of the book of Science Fiction and Fantasy is written by women and fifty two percent is written by men but when you look on the shelves only eighteen percent is An and that's an average I have been into stores where it's the only person only woman that they had shelved was Ursula Kayla Gwen literally not I used to follow your tweets about being in the airport and counting. How many female authors were were in the science fiction fantasy section versus men and it was just very it was. It was a clear demonstration. How does that Bertone Indy versus Being in so that's a great question it is that is something that is The what I have found is that it is slightly better on the inside but not universally Yeah and and one of that. Is that a lot of India. Bookstores are owned by women and also best ratio. I've ever found was thirty. Four percent and also we want to take into account the fact that we're acknowledging and we are respecting now. There is a non binary factor to this consideration as well so pen. Names don't necessarily have to indicate gender but stemming people will default towards what they think the name should be Case Alexander for example is a great great great author. Amazing she used to be a cooper. And that's when I met her and she wrote Steamy Steamy Steam Punk And then she changed to k c Alexander and then Actually she there that they I apologize case. I forgot and that's terrible. I will fix it in notes. But case Also writes as case. Alexandra really really got sci-fi and case is non binary Um and there are a lot of people who are queer or nine nine point. Yeah and it's something that is is difficult to track in a bookstore. Yeah so basically what we're saying here. Is that when you're choosing your pin name? You're thinking about the relationships but you're also there's not an easy answer there and it's it's also answer that he's going to shift over time and across genres and across genres. Like if you're in a romance it it you are and that was another thing When you look at the Where women who write science fiction and fantasy gets shelved a lot of times. They shoved in way even if they are actually writing something. That is a dellwo. Sergio mass comes to mind is But also if you cross genre I was asked to switch from. Pj Schneider to a new pen name. Because I wrote Paranormal Romance and Saifi and steam punk and I was switching to romantic suspense and so they asked for a new pen name to give me a fresh start with readers would not normally be open to my previous. Jonah thought to so dear listeners. What we're saying is it's complicated and it changes all the time. And there's it's a moving target. It depends Nancy. Kress was one of my writing teachers a clarion and one of the pieces of ice sheet for women. Writers was that you're probably GONNA divorce your husband. Statistically so think long and hard about whether or not his name is going to go on your spine. Because she hasn't been married to Mr Crescent a very long time that is a fascinating terrifying and also here like I can't comment on that one just like I'm like well that's I mean that's a that's a that's A. Yes that's a statement. Yup that's that is that is a thing that someone said No. I'm not terrible advice. I think that you know picking up her name. If you've if you've just taken a married name picking a pen name. That isn't your married. Name is not the worst idea in the world. Yeah so tames complicated complicated. Online life complicated This was very helpful. I think we've left you with as many questions as you started with We're going to wrap up by giving you a homework assignment. The homework assignment that I'm GonNa give you is. I want you to think about what your pin name would be. And it's very easy for women to think about this because we've seen a lot of examples of it but I wanNA make sure that everybody thinks about this. I want you to think of a name. Opin Name That is decidedly female. I want to pin named that. Is Non Binary that you can't tell could anywhere could be anywhere on the spectrum and I want you to pick a pin name that is decidedly male and see what those things feel like as names. But here's the catch. I want them to feel like you added. Bonus Challenge Practice. The signature for one did anyone. Was anyone else smart enough to not use the signature that they use in their check. Books I still I. I'M DUMB YEAH. Bonus content at the end. Make sure that your legal signature in your autograph do not mad get Corey to sign a book for. This has been writing excuses. You're out of excuses. Now go right. This episode of writing excuses was recorded by Bert Grimm and mastered by Alex Jackson. Your hosts for this episode. Were Mary Robinson Colo Piper j Drake Howard Taylor and special guest Corey Doctor Oh..

Science Fiction PJ Schneider writer Alexander Tanya huff John Norman Corey Doctor Canada Toronto Bertone Indy CIA India Jonah Mary Robinson United States Merril Judy Lisa Yazbek Alexandra Ursula Kayla Gwen
"tanya huff" Discussed on The Worldshapers

The Worldshapers

07:01 min | 1 year ago

"tanya huff" Discussed on The Worldshapers

"About This podcast world-shapers. I'm honored to say one. The Aurora Award for Best Fan Related Work in twenty nineteen The Aurora awards are Fan nominated voted on awards here in Canada sort of the equivalent to the to the hugos in the United States. So I was very honored to win that award. And I'd like to tell you about something that's coming up with the world shapers now. This is the final podcast of twenty nineteen. So my next one which will feature candice chain Dorsey. We'll be the first one of two thousand twenty Eddie and something else I wanted to see happen in twenty twenty or a couple of books related to the podcast. I have my own little publishing companies shadow. Press which you can check out at shadow press dot Com and jess. It is named after our cat and that's his pictures is our logo. I am hoping to put out an anthology of original fiction. Some reprints from guests of the first year of the podcast which was from August twenty eighteen to August two thousand nineteen. So Oh that's people like Sean. Maguire Tanya huff four and the number of others of that ilk in and level who have said they will take part in that I will most likely be doing a kickstarter for that sometime in the new year. So keep your ears and is open for that and I will certainly of course talk it up on the podcast as I get more details and also in the new year. I'd like to bring out a collection collection of nonfiction based on the interviews on this podcast of writing advice and and writing related topics so I hope to find time to work on that during the New Year and bring that out in that again would focus on the first year of the podcast and as the podcast reaches its second year which will be August twenty twenty now then I'll look hopefully At doing an anthology and also nonfiction book based on the second year. That's my plan. Anyway I am of course a one man operation and I have my own books extract the aforementioned World Shaper series is up to book three. I'm writing well editing. It right now revising it for submission it will go to my editor in January very so. That's taking up a bit of time right now. It's called the moonlit world and if you go to my website that I mentioned previously you can see cover art for that and read a bit of a description and the working title for a long time where Vampires and peasants. Oh my so. That's the kind of world that my character Sean. McKee's WHO's traveling from world to world and tried to gather the knowledge of these shaped worlds within this vast labyrinth and take them to ige rare. WHO's the mysterious figure at the center of A? She's going to be in a lot of different worlds in this time around. It's a vampire empire and Werewolf sort of world so that's kind of fun. I should also mention before we get onto the meat of this podcast that Despite despite cast is part of the subscription podcast network we are supported by connects his credit union. All right. Let's move on to this episode's interview Mary Robinson Cole Mary Robert. Cole is the author of the Lady Astronaut Theology and historical fantasy novels the glamorous history series and goes talkers. She's a member of the award. Winning podcast writing excuses and has received the astounding award for best new writer for U. Awards the RT Reuse Award for best fantasy novel. Double the Nebula and locus awards stories have appeared in strange horizons Asimov's several years best anthologies enter collections. Word puppets and sending the Dark Arken other stories. Her novel calculating stars which we will be focused on. This podcast is one of only eighteen novels to win. The Hugo Nebula and locus awards in a single year as professional puppeteer invoice actor and Mary Robinson has performed for Lazy Town at the Center for puppetry arts. Jim Henson pictures and founded other hand productions. Her designs have garnered to USA citations of excellence. The highest word in American puppeteer can achieve and she records fiction for authors. Such Sean Sean Maguire. Who's been a guest on this program? John Scotty who's been a guest on this program. Doctoroff who hasn't yet been a guest on this program but maybe someday lives in Nashville Bill with her husband rob and over a dozen manual typewriters. Welcome to the world shapers. May rapid death. Thank you so much for having me glad to have you and I have to confess. I haven't quite finished calculating stars. I was working on it so I'm about. I don't know three quarters of the way through but you won't give spoilers anyway because I'm going to get you to do synopses. I sit here and a little bit. So the For people who read it so okay but I've I'm enjoying it very much and not least because I'm married to an engineer. So yes identifies with some of the situations starring. Yes yes I found that people instead. That have a strong connection to certain aspects especially women it instead. Well before we get to that. I'll take you back into as I always say this. It's it's becoming cliche on the podcast out. We'll take you back into the mist of time to find out how you first of all became interested in writing and specifically writing science fiction. And you know how you got started in other words and maybe a little bit about where you grew up and all that kind of stuff. So I I grew up in North Carolina my dad worked for IBM and he used to take me to to visit him at work sometimes They had the it was. It was in the days when the computers were still cajal rooms and we didn't yet have personal computers. There were tubes connecting. The building at the first programming that I did did was my name with punch cards and should not was The it felt very science fictional It felt very much. Like what you'd see on the jetsons and things like that and then we also would watch I like I got connected to doctor who Tom Baker. It was my doctor and and we listened to hitchhikers guide to the galaxy on the radio so there is not a point in my life where I remember birther like I remember. Discovering science loses something that was just always present. I unlike the earliest books that I read that I have concrete memories of things like in chances from the stars I remember that one and Lasko good and you know of course. Other things like wrinkle in time and all these books that were just shelved as books but I gravitated to ones that had a fantastic elements. When I started writing which I did pretty young my mom sent me too a writing workshop the camp and And I I would was basically writing the things that I was reading and since I was reading science it's fiction and fantasy. It seemed only natural that that's why I was also writing My friends also were into that so some of the earliest stuff off.

Sean Sean Maguire Aurora Award Mary Robinson Cole Mary Robert Tanya huff Dorsey Mary Robinson Eddie United States Canada Tom Baker Jim Henson North Carolina Lady Astronaut Theology Lasko McKee editor John Scotty writer Nashville
"tanya huff" Discussed on The Worldshapers

The Worldshapers

11:04 min | 1 year ago

"tanya huff" Discussed on The Worldshapers

"Mm-hmm welcome to another episode of the world shapers winner of the two thousand Nineteen Aurora Award for best fan related work work. I'm your host Edward Willett. I started this podcast where I talked with science fiction and fantasy authors about their creative process. Because I am myself a science fiction I and fantasy author author of Os Twenty novels at this point with The latest one master of the world being tenth novel For New York's DA books Master of the world is the second book in my World Shaper Series which started with world. Shaper the year before. And it's a it's a fun series right It said in a labyrinth of shaped worlds where the people people who shaped those worlds actually live within them rather like authors living inside their created worlds My main character. Shana keys is the shape of the world. She lives in which is very much like ours though. There are a few differences. But she doesn't know that she has somehow forgotten that she shaped this world until a mysterious stranger. Carl yet so shows up and tells me this and then next thing you know. They're running for their lives across her version of our world pursued by the adversary who has stolen the knowledge of the making of her world and can take over complete the if he can just kill her Shawna and Carl escaped spoiler in the first book. And then she's on a quest to travel to as many of these shaped worlds as she can in the vast labyrinth And take the knowledge of they're making a greater the mysterious woman at the center of the Labyrinth. So in the second book she ends up in a world that is inspired by Jules. Very shape was a big fan of Jules Verne. And that's the title master of the World Comes from of course and so it's a world with lots of steam punk elements with submarines and strange flying devices uses and floating islands. And all kinds of things like that. I had a lot of fun writing it. And he's a first person Character and oddly enough she shares my sense of humor. So there's a lot of. There's a lot of Geeky pop culture references and jokes in these books. I'm just finishing up the writing of three Nestor sorry the moonlit world. Yes master the world is the second one the moonlit world which is where Wilson Vampires and peasants. Oh my and that will be out next. September the first two books are out in a trade paperback AUDIOBOOK and e book and mass and World cheaper is also out in mass market. Paperback master the world. Mass market. Paperback should Out in August. I should also mention another book project coming up that to. You might want to help me out with. I plan to to start in January launch a kickstarter to fund an anthology featuring some of the guests from the world shapers first year and we have have some major major names who have said they will contribute a story including Sean Maguire. Tanya Huff Christopher Rocky. Oh He's already he's already ridden run for me. Charles Gannon we also have some reprints from John. SCULLEY has agreed to provide a reprint and there might be some others. Those rose and Joe Haldeman is even said he will provide a poem so it should be a very exciting anthology if we can fund it. So I'll provide more details on that as we get closer to the launch date which should be in mid January twenty twenty. I hope and then one more thing I should mention. Is that the world shapers. PODCAST is part of these Lisa schedule and podcast network which is supported by connects his credit union that is the introductory material out of the way. Let's get onto this episode's guest guest Rebecca Roan Horse Rebecca. Roan horse is a Nebula Hugo and locus award winning speculative fiction writer and the recipient of the two thousand eighteen astounding formerly Campbell Award for best new writer. Her novel trail of Lightning Book. One in the six th world series which is the one we will talk about. The most today won the locus award for best first novel and is a Nebula Hugo and world fantasy finalist it was also selected as an Amazon Barnes and Noble Library Journal and NPR Best Book of two thousand eighteen eighteen among others book to in the six. Th World Series Star of locusts has received starred reviews from Publishers Weekly and Book List and her next novel resistance reborn as Part Art of Star Wars journey to the rise skywalker in his out in November. Twenty nineteen be about the time this goes live her middle grade novel race to the Sun for Rick reward and presents percents. Imprint will release January and twenty twenty and her epic fantasy novel between Earth And sky will follow late twenty twenty s off a few things out there. Her short fiction can be found at APEX magazine. New Sons the mythic dream and various other anthologies and she also writes nonfiction which can be found in uncanny strange horizons than how I resist in hope for new generation published by Macmillan She lives in northern New Mexico with your husband bought her and pups and it says in her bio here from her her website that she drinks a lot of black coffee. Which I'm having some right now? So they go. You can't we'll talk about where you can find her online later on but to welcome to the world shapers Rebecca look for having me I always look for connections and we have A. We haven't met but you were born in Arkansas Lived in Texas and went to university in New Mexico and I was born in New Mexico lived in Texas and went to university in Arkansas. So there's a certain certain certain. Although I live in Canada and I was born in Silver City New Mexico my parents were living in a little town called bared down there so but didn't live there. Yeah that is south that I'm in the north but I know where it is so Let's go back into the mists of time as I like to say to my guests and talk about where you grew up how you got interested in writing. And in speculative fiction in particular Most of US start with readers and I think from reading leading and I think for meeting some of our other interviews that suck. I was kind of the case for you too. Yeah absolutely always a huge science fiction. Fantasy Fan As long as I can remember I've been reading in the genre and I seek really my first sort of big. Wow book was Dune by Frank. Herbert read that one in that blew the doors wide open. You know in the fantasy room I of course I read that Bulgaria. I read All wheel of time books like those were well. Okay not all of them. That's true good point. I haven't read the last few I think I'd tapped out like I don't the probably book five or six or something now. I can't even remember but I'm very excited for the Amazon show. That is coming. I'm really curious to see what they do with it So you you were born in Arkansas. You grew up in Texas But then you ended up in in New Mexico and you didn't and actually studied writing university. Were you writing as a kid. Yeah absolutely so oh Grew up in Fort Worth Texas. M My mom is actually from okay when gave Pueblo which is in New Mexico And so I. I didn't return into New Mexico into law school actually so I did my undergraduate on the East Coast and a master's degree But when I was in Fort Worth I was already writing. I think I wrote my first I would say my first science fiction short story when I was in seventh grade. I always joke about. We had a science if I answer report and we were supposed to like is some very dry facts about the planets like you know how big they are and how far apart they are and that sort of thing and I turned added into this very dramatic telling of this astronaut doing research. Who for some reason? I can't remember now to like commit suicide by driving giving into the sun at the end so it was very much like tell my wife and kids I love them. You know dead and I turned that in for my science project checked and my that is impressed as I had been with my own work and I think I gotta be a B. Plus or something because because that was not the assignment but Yeah you know from there. I was hooked and I've been sort of writing my own stuff every since I kind I only got serious about writing. I just did if my own pleasure I was a practicing attorney for ten years before that I was A computer programmer programmer. Actually for ten years and Just writing was in the background. It was just something that I love to do for myself. I never even thought about getting published Until about two thousand and sixteen when I decided to take it a little more seriously now Did you show. You're you're writing to your friends when you're writing as a young writer. I often ask that question because it's something. I urge young writers to do when I'm teaching writing because it's the way to find out if you can tell stories that people back. Apparently your teacher was not completely impressed with your first effort. Did you share your stories with other people so in eighth grade. I had a great great eighth grade English teacher and we actually did a group novel like each week. You know came up with the whole story as a class. And then we each were responsible for chapter and It was I don't know there were some. I gotTA dominated the as I recall a lot of the The world building. 'cause I was really into it and there was an smugglers and there were some You know sort of Galactic police said this sort of thing and I definitely share shared that one I probably over shared that I fought morstead on people and then am all through high school or at least my last couple of years of high school. I guess I was as an editor for our creative writing magazine. And so not only did I get to do some editing and which was basically like picking what stories we're going to be in a magazine but I put a lot of my work into that as well and a lot of that was poetry or short fiction. Like excerpts of you know I I don't know what you would call vignettes or something maybe a little flash fiction but I don't think we called it back then but yes I think those years I was always sharing probably probably over sharing and then I'm I guess for some of my time I had a friend who wrote as well. And we you would share stories like she would write something we'd be critiqued partners But only for fun and it was never really serious But I was never I I about showing my work per se. Well I was also interested when you you didn't study writing but what you studied is very interesting because you received a B in religious studies from Yale and a masters in theology from Union theological seminary..

New Mexico writer Texas Arkansas Os Twenty Jules Verne Aurora Award locus award twenty twenty Edward Willett Shana keys New York Sean Maguire Joe Haldeman APEX magazine Nebula Hugo Rebecca Roan Carl Tanya Huff
"tanya huff" Discussed on Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

13:51 min | 2 years ago

"tanya huff" Discussed on Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

"Connors on each episode we invite an author for young adults to take US inside their work. And doing so you talk about the writing process or inspiration for writing for young readers and the General Ins and outs of earning a living as a professional storyteller. So whether you're a compulsive reader an aspiring writer teacher or librarian or simply frustrated reader. Who's counting the hours until you get home and dive dive back into that novel? It's waiting for you on your nightstand. This is the place for you. Hey everyone it's November first two thousand nineteen man. My the only one who feels like fall just got started added an already. It's ending. I don't know maybe I'm in denial. Or maybe I just don't want to accept the winners around the corner. So let me get started by thanking you for tuning into this this plucky little podcast believe it or not. It's on the air for just over a year now and like the little engine that could it just keeps plugging along my guest. This month is core for Dr. Oh and as a science fiction dystopia Geek. I'm particularly excited to share this conversation with you. If you're not familiar with Corey's work he may well be the busiest writer in America. In fact he may be the busiest person in America. And I'm not kidding. In addition to writing science fiction and Dystopia for adults and young adults doctor rose the CO editor her of the weblog BOING BOING and popular blogger as well. He's also technology activist in amongst his many commitments. He serves as a consultant to the electronic frontier on Tier Foundation which is nonprofit civil liberties group that defends freedom and Technology Law Policy Standards Entreaties Dr O. holds an Honorary Mary doctorate in computer science from the Open University in the United Kingdom whereas visiting professor and as though that weren't enough his an MIT media lab research affiliate Eh visiting professor of practice at the University of South Carolina's School of Library and information science in the realm of young adult fiction doctors arguably bass known for his little brother series. The first book little brother is inspired by George Orwell's nineteen eighty-four and tells the story of a group of teenagers whose lives Are Radically changed. In the wake of terrorist attack on San Francisco on the Department of Homeland Security arrives and begins using technology to track and survey Oh people all essentially turning the city into a police state the protagonist and his friends decide to fight back using their own technological know-how little brother was nominated for the Hugo gored in two thousand eight and in two thousand Thirteen Dr O.. Published a sequel homeland his other books for young adults include higher cinema for the win. Then and a graphic novel in real life in addition to writing science fiction for young adults. Doctor Oh also writes Sifi for adults and his most recent novel radicalized came out just this year between writing traveling consulting commenting on topics related to technology and speaking to international audiences. I have no idea when Corrie sleeps or if he does sleep so is beyond excited when he agreed to sit down and talk with me about his work. I hope you enjoy our conversation in my experience I found that people who are interested in science fiction can often point to a person or persons who introduce them to the GINA and supported. They're entering the SCIFI fan them. who was that person for you? Do you recall. There are a couple of entry points that that really mattered entered in terms of my own development was my dad who's big science fiction fan and when my mom is GonNa Teachers College we would say home in the evenings and he would wash a doctor who me and in those days doctor who was An Ontario at aired on our public broadcaster. Tbo where it it would be introduced every week by Judith. Merril who is one of the great titans of fields Judy was an editor and writer and critic and she had been married to Frederik Pohl another prominent writer of her era and after the two thousand eight police riots in Chicago she decided to go effectively voluntary exile with their kids she. She couldn't bear the thought of of living in the US anymore. Given what had just happened and and so among other things. She became a TV commentator and every week. One doctor who eric she would explain how Dr who episode fit into the wider context of the history of science fiction and who sometimes she had been in the future in house when some writer another head actually meant to the trope that was now being explored Florida and that and then as I grew up judy continued to play a really important role in my life. She established with her personal collection. The Science Fiction Reference Collection Election at the Toronto Public Library which was then called the spaced out library When she died they renamed it the the Merril Collection? She wouldn't let them name it after her while she was alive. And she served as writer and residents and so you could bring her manuscript and she would critique them and so from a very early age as a tween. I was bringing in her stories that she was critiquing. One of the things that she was always looking out for is writers who seem compatible and she would put them together and writing workshops. And that's how I ended up. In a a group that still going to see street irregulars that includes people like Peter Watts and Carl schrader and David Nicole and Madeleine Ashby at the same time. There was a science fiction bookstore in Toronto. It would be the oldest science fiction bookstore remaining in the world which is called Bawku books and again at the age of nine or ten. I went there on a school trip and it was is always a place where writers worked as they were trying to get their career off the ground and the woman behind the counter dot was already earning Tanya huff who had yet to sell her first story three and Tanya Quiz me on what kind of books I liked and then took me back into the US section and found me a one dollar copy of h Beam Piper's little fuzzy. Was the first book ever bought for myself with my own money and Tanya would also critique my manuscripts when I brought them down to the store and buy ten years later when she quit to write full time I got daughter job and went to work at the store so it was an amazing thing to grow up in a city that had as close to a formal science fiction apprenticeship as you could hope for and there's more I could talk about. We had a TV show on TV. Ontario call prisoners gravity that I was a consultant to and Judith Merril these six times a year potluck dinners call also Hydra that was based on these New York. Dinners at the future in house. Used to do where we gather at different people's houses and Pay a modest entry fee to pay for the beer and every writer and editor and Librarian and critic and academic who is working in the field with gather together and made for a very solid community. It seems like science fiction is genre that people either love or they hate. What's your argument for the genres value? Why should people read science fiction? You know I don't eat a lot of people who hate science fiction these days although I guess that's partly due to self selection but you know like literally in my in my life the circles. I've run just never really encountered that formal Prejudice against the field. My case for why science fiction matters I guess at its best. Science fiction is a kind of emotional fly through like an architect's rendering of what it might feel like to live under a technological regime before that regime Murat's to to let us start to develop a critical vocabulary for what we might want and what we might like fear about technological events that are on our horizon and at the same time it acts as a kind of oracle not of the future but at the present you know if you WANNA or no what. A science fiction writer is worried about hopeful for look at the stories. They're telling if you want to know what our society is hopeful for fearful of look at the stories stories that we're paying attention to and you know this question of where our technology will lead us in terms of our social and economic structures. It's one of the most urgent questions as we have. It is bound up intimately with things like climate change and gender justice and wealth inequality and racial inequality and so on. You published your first young adult novel little brother in two thousand eight prior to that you'd written fiction for adults including down out in the magic agit kingdom and someone comes to town. Someone leaves town. What motivated you to try your hand at writing fiction for teenagers? Do you recall you. There was a series of motivation. was that I started to connect with With colleagues who were doing it for example. Kathy Kolja who's this wonderful Waterpolo horror writer who lives just outside of Detroit. came out to speak to some of my students when I was teaching at the aquarium Shop back when it was Michigan State University in in East Lansing and she described the pleasures. Cheap hod she reinvented herself as a young adult writer and specifically how consequential Shaw was to write. Why how you know adults might read for pleasure but hit three to figure out how the world works? And that certainly jive with my recollection of my reading experience Syrians and then I ran into other writers like Scott Westerfield and just marvelous Che who were writing science fiction for young adults. And they really you know they reiterated some of that with their own spin on it and then at the National Science Fiction Convention Australia around two thousand six or seven when I it was a gust of honor I met a young adult writer on. I don't know who I used to think was garth next and I asked him. He so definitely wasn't me so I met some Australian young adult in WHO said that? They think that the thing that drives science fiction for young adults or young adult fiction more generally is that there is a kind on a built in a dramatic Mechanisms shoe why a fiction in that people doing things for the first time without. I don't know quite how they'll turn out is intrinsically dramatic You know if you've never told a lie of consequence and then you tell about live consequence. You don't know if these wings of tax that you fashioned are going to support you as you jump off the cliff or they're going to be Dash to your death when you hit the bottom and the only way to find out is to is to jump off and see what happens now telling alive conference thousands times just the now ready to make a sociopath right but helling it for the first time is incredible and you know this this is of course why so much young adult science fiction have these these. These virginity loss seems as fair but literal and figurative climate because each which one of these is a kind of virginity loss. You know you're going through a doorway when you pass through it you can never pass back right. You've become a different person and so all of that together really combined and you know I. I have such on memories of the way that was really important to me in a particular writers like Daniel Pinquater. Who really kind of made me the person Ryan today so it was very exciting to kind of revisit that mode of storytelling unlike to pick up on a point that you just made regarding how young adult literature richer is viewed in the larger culture in two thousand eleven? You published an essay in your book context in which you argued that and I'm quoting you here. The lack of regard for why fiction and the mainstream isn't an altogether bad. Then you went on to state. There's something to be said for living in a disreputable. Wrap eatable ghettoized both. Can you talk about that. How does young adult literature is marginalization constitute a potential afford INS- writers trainers can capitalize on? Well it's it's not dissimilar to science fiction you know. Science fiction had this long period of disrespect ability in which you had writers like Rod Curling or or even Judith Merril who were telling very sharp and pointed political allegories that would have been beyond the Pale in the mainstream of literature who were able to smuggle these end? You know if you look back moral panic over comic books the Seduction of the innocence panic. What you find is is this kind of shock? Discovery on the part of kind of blue knows moralize irs that all of the ideas. They thought they had stamped. Out of the mainstream were thriving in in this. Bill regarded corner of the literary world that despite its some disreputable ity and its lack of attention from the mainstream culture culture was nevertheless hugely culturally significant ride babies vote underground and wildly popular with which is quite a combination. And why was like that got as well. I think less so these days in part because of the things that drove Y Renaissance things like jk rollings which drove a lot of adults attention to these books. And you know. It's not a coincidence. That banned book week focused on Y literature a couple of years ago because is it is one of the most contested categories now in libraries and schools because parents have twigs to the factor. You know the kind of parents who who are want to stamp out a certain kind of of portrayal of sexuality or drugs or or any other so-called controversial subject that they've tweaked to the fact that Y is where this stuff was getting smuggled in in the same assay that I- looted to a moment ago..

Judith Merril US Ontario Tanya huff Connors George Orwell America Toronto Public Library Toronto Merril Collection Sifi Corrie GINA Frederik Pohl United Kingdom
"tanya huff" Discussed on GSMC Book Review Podcast

GSMC Book Review Podcast

05:32 min | 2 years ago

"tanya huff" Discussed on GSMC Book Review Podcast

"Take author of master of the world we were just talking about Shawna's you said you're working on the third one is there anything you can tell us about that is it was never going to be on the book was werewolves and Vampires and Peasants Oh my and we get a glimpse of it in master of the world because on at one point gets a glimpse into the the next roll are peasants after navigate their way through through that fate talk about it well the got other recent and it's called the city board and sorry is this giant metal city very hierarchical the rulers live at the top and it gets progressively rubbish heap down there and a girl from the top of the city literally falls into the and then all of a sudden everybody chasing them and they have to find out why so of the book I wrote years ago called spirit singer Habitable Publishing Company called Chateau back when it came out and brought it out in a brand new revised updated which actually reminds me how would you classify the world shapers series I mean Sean is twenty-seven uh-huh making up something after the fact to explain something I do establishing is it did get a long listed for Sunburst Award December's towards our jury award a teenager in the book no no it rained a little bit like a way but new adult novel maybe that would be that that's another category that sometimes get used on your website there is some information about a podcast the name is not a coincidence I've always been interested in talking to other authors I don't I see who I can get and start this podcast so it's to me so their hour-long chats with people like John Skulls you saw your Tanya huff Jewish I spent an hour we talk a little bit about.

"tanya huff" Discussed on Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

03:42 min | 4 years ago

"tanya huff" Discussed on Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

"The toronto public library system and she opened a library that was then called the spaced out library because it was the late sixties and is now called the merril collection because she's dead in can't stop them from putting her name on it anymore and she was the writer in residence there and so as a kid i could go down there with my stories and she would read them until me how to make them better and even more importantly she hooked me up with other writers and so i ended up in this writing workshop that still going called the c street irregulars and that was hugely beneficial to the way that i wrote and then to add to that we had a new used science fiction bookstore it's the oldest science fiction bookstore in the world and it too is still going to call baca books and when i was a kid as with today the people behind the counter where writers and so i went in for the first time it his nine or ten years old in this writer named tanya huff who sometimes writes under tes half she led me back to the us book section and found a book for me h being pipers little fuzzy that was on sale for a dollar i still have it and i went home and i read it and i came back for more and you know when tony quit when she quit to write full time i went to work in the store and today still it is full of science fiction writers who are at the start of their careers or even well along so between the store and the library and the writers groups it was really easy for me to fall into the john ra you say that with science fiction with your fiction writing rather that there's less planning its voyage of discovery for you but you're writing also involves world building which in my mind which is a mind that does not write science fiction world building would seem like it would need an extraordinary amount of planning when i will build there are some elements that i kind of come into it knowing that i'm going to write but there's also lots of like well i've said a and b does not imply a see that i can use here like i brought along these pieces of furniture what goes with them and so it's not so much built as it is grown you know as the circumstances dictate you know if a novel should only have the things that it requires nothing else that a lot of world building will necessarily be extraneous but on the other hand if there are elements of the world external to the characters that highlight or playoff of what's going on with the characters than bringing them in becomes a very kind of salient thing and i think that science fiction is the thing i learned for my editor at tora wonderful editor named patrick nielsen hayden he said that science fiction is sometimes it's a little cog wheel and a great big wheel in the little wheel is the story of the protagonist and the big wheel is the the world and the little wheel turns the big wheel and the little wheel goes around and around until the world has made a full revolution and so the the life of the character gives you an in the round view of the world in which they live and you can build the call teeth of that world as you go you don't need to know what they're all going to be you just need to know what the next two is and you can build these irregular gears these eccentric gears that meshed together that are dictated by the demands of the story your first novel down and out in the magic kingdom you published it under a creative commons license i want you to tell me you're thinking about that sure well there's at least three different things that go into the decision to allow people to freely make use of it so part of it is the rail politique right this is like twenty seventeen copying never going to get harder from here on in your grandchildren will sit around the christmas and fifty years and marvel at the days when you couldn't buy six thumb drives for a dollar the cvs that could hold all the music movies books photos and words uttered and.

toronto fifty years ten years
"tanya huff" Discussed on Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

03:42 min | 4 years ago

"tanya huff" Discussed on Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

"The toronto public library system and she opened a library that was then called the spaced out library because it was the late sixties and is now called the merril collection because she's dead in can't stop them from putting her name on it anymore and she was the writer in residence there and so as a kid i could go down there with my stories and she would read them until me how to make them better and even more importantly she hooked me up with other writers and so i ended up in this writing workshop that still going called the c street irregulars and that was hugely beneficial to the way that i wrote and then to add to that we had a new used science fiction bookstore it's the oldest science fiction bookstore in the world and it too is still going to call baca books and when i was a kid as with today the people behind the counter where writers and so i went in for the first time it his nine or ten years old in this writer named tanya huff who sometimes writes under tes half she led me back to the us book section and found a book for me h being pipers little fuzzy that was on sale for a dollar i still have it and i went home and i read it and i came back for more and you know when tony quit when she quit to write full time i went to work in the store and today still it is full of science fiction writers who are at the start of their careers or even well along so between the store and the library and the writers groups it was really easy for me to fall into the john ra you say that with science fiction with your fiction writing rather that there's less planning its voyage of discovery for you but you're writing also involves world building which in my mind which is a mind that does not write science fiction world building would seem like it would need an extraordinary amount of planning when i will build there are some elements that i kind of come into it knowing that i'm going to write but there's also lots of like well i've said a and b does not imply a see that i can use here like i brought along these pieces of furniture what goes with them and so it's not so much built as it is grown you know as the circumstances dictate you know if a novel should only have the things that it requires nothing else that a lot of world building will necessarily be extraneous but on the other hand if there are elements of the world external to the characters that highlight or playoff of what's going on with the characters than bringing them in becomes a very kind of salient thing and i think that science fiction is the thing i learned for my editor at tora wonderful editor named patrick nielsen hayden he said that science fiction is sometimes it's a little cog wheel and a great big wheel in the little wheel is the story of the protagonist and the big wheel is the the world and the little wheel turns the big wheel and the little wheel goes around and around until the world has made a full revolution and so the the life of the character gives you an in the round view of the world in which they live and you can build the call teeth of that world as you go you don't need to know what they're all going to be you just need to know what the next two is and you can build these irregular gears these eccentric gears that meshed together that are dictated by the demands of the story your first novel down and out in the magic kingdom you published it under a creative commons license i want you to tell me you're thinking about that sure well there's at least three different things that go into the decision to allow people to freely make use of it so part of it is the rail politique right this is like twenty seventeen copying never going to get harder from here on in your grandchildren will sit around the christmas and fifty years and marvel at the days when you couldn't buy six thumb drives for a dollar the cvs that could hold all the music movies books photos and words uttered and.

toronto fifty years ten years