20 Episode results for "Tanya Moseley"

Introducing Truth Be Told, Hosted by Tonya Mosley

Truth Be Told

01:56 min | 2 years ago

Introducing Truth Be Told, Hosted by Tonya Mosley

"Let's talk for minute. I am obsessed with getting and giving advice I can't get enough. You're Abby mismanaged. I need your help. But sometimes, let's be real a lot of the time. The most popular advice shows in columns. Leave people like me people like us, black Brown indigenous, and Asian folks out of the conversation. Is it okay to feel huge phenomenal amazing joy when it seems like the rest of the world is burning? I'm Tanya Moseley. Welcome to truth be told the advice show you always wanted we need to love women of color, more and kind of be more generous, Mike. Yes. Each other high fives and here over that, if the other shows are telling you how to blend in and behave we explore how you can be you in a world doesn't always want you to just fully. A place where you can laugh cry bitch Mon every day, I wake up and I'm just like okay so how am I going to handle this, or how am I going to do this? Yup. We all have different experiences in this country. But truth be told his intentional when we say people of color, this show is a place where we meet at the intersection of not only are oppression, but our resilience allowing us to ultimately discover the truth that lead us all closer to feeling whole. What would you do if you weren't afraid when I'm really honest with myself about the answer to that question? That's exactly what I'm supposed to do. Each week me and a brilliant, special guest will unpack your questions predicaments and experiences about race and culture. And these United States truth be told we see you, we feel you we hear you listen for free on apple podcasts NPR, one or wherever you get your podcasts put that little subscribe button now so you won't miss a minute.

Abby Tanya Moseley United States Mike NPR apple
Oct. 16, 2019: Zombie Homes Haunt Cleveland; Pulse Nightclub Memorial Controversy

Here & Now

43:26 min | 1 year ago

Oct. 16, 2019: Zombie Homes Haunt Cleveland; Pulse Nightclub Memorial Controversy

"No one laid a glove on Joe Biden when it came to Ukraine and Bernie Sanders had a heart attack hard to tell twelve Democratic candidates met for three hours in the all important swing state from NPR and WB. You are I'm Tanya Moseley I'm robin young it's here now so Elizabeth Warren may need some ice packs today she took a lot of verbal punches in last night's democratic debate after weeks of president trump and Rudy Giuliani telling falsehoods about Joe Biden claiming he had a Ukrainian prosecutor fired because the prosecutor was investigating a company and he wants the conversation to be focused on Donald Trump. What I was fascinated by was the degree to which the moderators did not pose any of these questions ten tag she was it last night that that that's right I mean she came under scrutiny I would say from so many sides specifically the night began much clarity on this and most specifically they say she has not explicitly acknowledged that taxes would likely increase if we were have been prepared for many of the candidates have been previewing these criticisms for weeks ahead of the debate but look this is the turf that that she they weren't just from one direction we had amy Klobuchar we had The mayor of South Bend Indiana Buddha Judge Also Multiple Times Push Elizabeth Warren and say you've got a to be on that board the optics terrible Anderson Cooper did ask one question of Biden but did you get the sense Biden if the candidate could handle this topic any saying that she's supportive of Bernie Sanders Medicare for all plan but some of the candidates said they wanted more from her they felt like she was being evasive that she's not offering moment in the debate last night you're right that Anderson Cooper asked one question to Joe Biden about this Joe Biden very quickly said essentially I did nothing wrong my son did nothing wrong plan for everything how is it that you have not articulated a plan for for healthcare and more specifically how you intend to pay for this all and these are lines of attacks in some ways I would say she should said that and I think we owe it to the American people to tell them where we're going to send the invoice so she Elizabeth Warren was taking most of those verbal you know hit did she handled it in your mind you know that that's a really interesting question I think that she definitely seemed flustered at times by the sort of an insult of attacks in part because aging immigrant children on the US border let's bring in NPR's political correspondent Osma Hollywood and Aswa Elizabeth Warren she rose in the polls to match Joe Biden and one result Biden's son was on the board of fact Biden and others one of the prosecutor to investigate more but biden son hunter also said this week it was wrong for him on the stage with Donald Trump. Gosh that's a really tough question to answer I think Robin in part because I was fascinated by the brevity of this entire one single question from a moderator and they quickly changed gears shifted the cory booker came back later and said he thought it was an insult that it was even asked because it was based on a falsehood but adopt Medicare for all plan she essentially that's a disingenuous question that total healthcare costs go down so she doesn't want to go there she says the money will go to pay for other things Republicans are saying Anderson Cooper should have pushed harder so that's it's they're Bernie Sanders seemed to be very vigorous despite having had a heart attack a couple of weeks ago here's Senator Klobuchar of Minnesota at least Bernie's being honest here and saying how he's going to pay for this and that taxes are gonNA go up and I'm sorry Elizabeth but you have not the front runner because we did not see so many direct jabs at the former vice president Joe Biden as we saw directed at Elizabeth Warren well let's go to Joe Biden in this debate the other candidates so we don't know essentially how Donald Trump would handle this debate because or or sorry what how Joe Biden would handle this debate because he wasn't piled on on this issue there was everest after sort of a a little bit of question around impeachment we moved very quickly to healthcare and Elizabeth Warren has often said when she's pushed on healthcare questions that she's with burr on November the donor threshold as well as the polling requirement that candidates will need to make it onto stage become higher there stricter requirements and so oh but just you mentioned the impeachment question candidates gave a range of responses where did they seem to be an agreement there there's really unanimous agreement that they all feel the pressure and threats of sanctions from the US Turkey invaded Kurdish controlled northern Syria earlier this month following president trump's decision to withdraw US troops has to play on at this point to me it was also an acknowledgement across the board from candidates that they now see Elizabeth Warren as a very clear threaten as the potential dance shifted things on the ground it's created a vacuum of because US troops are moving out and Syrian troops are moving in and there's a lot of around who might we not see in the near future after after last night I mean so to to that question robin a number of candidates action much you're welcome Turkish President Jeep Type Air John says he will never declare a ceasefire in northeast Syria defying international as a result that's why we saw someone like Amy Klobuchar from Minnesota punching up at times because she has not yet qualified for that November debating that being said border area and if they do take control of these aid groups have been operating in the region without regime permission and so they've been literally burning their documents impeachment inquiry should be moving forward in the house they feel like it's necessary I mean there's gradations when they're asked about this whether or not they feel like this process needs to sort of play dog kind of wandering around it's remarkable visual and symbolizes the shift in power the US out and Russia playing a bigger role a out through the appropriate mechanisms in Congress or whether they're sort of like Elizabeth Warren who has been very vocally calling for impeachment for months ever since the Mullahs report came out in quick lightning with Russian troops in Syria showing himself standing at an abandoned US base in Syria is even presses a button to operate a checkpoint barrier and aspects for a ceasefire if at all no sign of a ceasefire yet a US official told me that Turkish led forces are still carrying out their offensive and Vice President Mike Pence is leading a delegation to Turkey this week but it really sounds like he's going to get a cold reception air to one as we said gene troops moving in Russia's playing a major role here a Russia's been an ally of the Syrian regime it's been fighting along the regime for many years the Russians are the ones who actually brokered the deal between the Kurdish forces and the Syrian regime There's even one video on twitter apparently a Russian reporter embedded led by a seventy year old man the patriarch and he said that they were fleeing heavy fighting in their town and they were on the run for the last three days Syria it's become too dangerous to be with all the fighting and also too risky because the Syrian regime is said to be taking control eventually of the entire really are still in this race who were not on the stage last night I think for example Montana Governor Steve Bullock there's a whole bunch of them who were not actually on stage when asked about the Turkish operation today in a press gathering in the Oval Office the President said quote it's not our problem let's bring in NPR correspondent Daniel S it's to destroy evidence of who have been there for their own security and they're also worried about their local aid staff getting in trouble and then aside from the Syrian comes as we were driving into Syria we saw pickup trucks on the side of the road packed with mattresses and we pulled over and we met a family of more than twenty people actually not Turkish completely themselves they're militias who are Syrian Arabs some of them had been driven out of this area and they have a motivation and we met another grandfather at the very end of our trip who was also crying he was kissing his four year old grandson goodbye his grandson was crossing the border agreement with the US not to get close enough to threaten US troops on the ground so still a lot of tension here and the ones who have been fighting on the ground I have to say teary eyed and they were reflecting on the fact that this could be a closing window on Syria if the Syrian regime comes and takes when he's in the city of Dough Hook in northern Iraq Daniel on Sunday Kurdish forces partnered with the Syrian army to combat Turkey's invasion. How has this alive I don't anticipate all the candidates who won't make that debate to necessarily drop out some of them have been building up operations in Iowa New Hampshire we'll see and pure political correspondent us Mahalo thank you so much it won't agree to a ceasefire until the Kurdish militia which we should also point out he views as a terrorist group leaves northern Syria what are you hearing about there were sleeping in the desert and he said his sons were not with him they were stuck in in town with heavy fighting where the roads were cut off and he said they are surrounded into Iraq fleeing the violence with his mother and the grandfather said he didn't know when he'd see his grandson again so many stories like that at the border this message comes from NPR sponsor mind salons find book and pay all in one place owners can join the network at mind body online dot com slash NPR over this this border crossing and it really feels like a momentous point in history that's NPR correspondent Daniel Estrin speaking body mind body connects millions to the widest variety of local fitness classes and they offer the same experience when it comes to massage and acupuncture spas to keep fighting because they wanna come home you mentioned the international aid groups on the ground and how risky it is for them you've been reporting on this impact of the in their town and then he broke down crying and and he wiped away tears with the scarf on his head and it's just horrible to see a grandfather cry in fact yesterday and official said that Turkish backed forces came very close to a base where US forces were and put those US forces directly at risk of violating an engine in Cleveland we took a tour of the neighborhoods hit hard by the two thousand eight housing collapse? Cleveland is beautiful but there were still swaths of abandoned and a very chaotic scene I can imagine yes and and as we were leaving Syria across the border we met many reporters who were fumbling homes who recently went back to see what's changed the answer not much will have pictures at here now dot org but come with us as we visit again mind body your access to the largest consumer wellness network and marketplace back in two thousand sixteen during the Republican National Committee into us from northern Iraq near the border with Turkey and Syria Daniel thank you so much you're welcome fighting and the impact that it's had on people who live there tell us about some of the people you've met over the last few days well it's been really heartbreaking meeting people fleeing their home out you'll see there's been a great deal of demolition unfortunately it's not enough I have approximately just around three hundred structures and repair anything but the question is if homes are selling in a forty to fifty thousand dollar price range on a given street in Nicol says no one will take responsibility and in time the houses around the blighted buildings also plummeting value they do we have had that structure is eighty thousand then it doesn't make any economic sense can you get people to build a lot since the meltdown two thousand seven two thousand eight because they can't get loans it's like the illegal practice of redlining I believe it's red lining bike community by ZIP Code Ardinger Cleveland's Greater Colin Would Development Corporation where we met up with the city's longest serving city councillor Michael Plavsic who represents east Cleveland's Eighth World Komo international aid organizations especially one aid worker told us that almost all aid groups are pulling out their international staff out of northeast Oh is that they're out of their home and many of them find a rude awakening because all of a sudden now you start prosecution and who comes up them they made I haven't had a new house built and are not one new house but who would build on a block with zombies will explain so far behind on their taxes they don't put another dime into the property and then at some point they just leave it so the county word and is trying to get some of the worst blight taken down okay we've stepped outside the office here incorporate so you can see reading directly good about why are these foreclosures happening because people got loans that they shouldn't have this story predatory lending when we walk right to the corner Cleveland is under four hundred thousand population why is it happening as a people who can't make their mortgage payments Make their mortgage payments or they have fallen the Caucasian families. We'll tell you the same thing they can't get alone they can improve their property have a situation Ohio where the banking industry has had a great deal of influence and power so when they foreclose on an individual they don't have to put the property and and has to spend over two million dollars a year cutting grass people might say well go get those people who are victim Jalen find them all those people what was your what did the person put down on the home forty two dollars and thirteen cents never given alone so people got loans that shouldn't have many have been addicted but councilman polemic says current homeowners who wanna stay but need to fix up their homes can I need to come down that one of the debates though there are some people who don't want homes taken down they want the rehabbed but the cost is phenomenal well it goes back that old saying you can fix anything you're gonNA see newer homes that were built by Development Corporation here one of those home sold I think it was for two hundred forty two thousand dollars it went in a four prostrate with this is an old dairy that had been taken down because it was abandoned same thing right over there was a single family home at lot so as we're out in the about these homes sitting vacant for years the vacant house rate there so you had predatory lending then you had absentee landlords who virtually clearinghouse they take abandoned structures once they go through to foreclosure process and or vacant land and then they can sell it off for racial consideration still factor in some cases without a doubt but if you look at in general my word is racially ethnically diverse it's predominantly African American but I has done a terrible job of collecting taxes we have the worst collection record in the State Kaga County and what happens is were we it all depends on who you talk to between twenty and twenty five thousand manufacturing jobs we have four thousand over four thousand abandoned structures in the city right now think foreclosure means it's not yours exactly and now they're being told somehow you're responsible the cut the grass and maintain well wait a minute I haven't lived there for three years what are you talking people's homes get foreclosed on no I don't but at the end of the day look at the end result it's a system that broke down milked the property and then the county where we could have saved these structures had there been a reasonable foreclosure process these we start a drive through councilman district I asked him why people bend now ten years after the housing collapse the economy contrary been a vicious cycle in this city in this county it is amazing you see free standing homes attached three deckers whole apartment buildings name the VIC though resident the house sits there empty but it's not in the name of the bank thanks not responsive bank is not responsible for maintenance so that's why the cynically is property taxes so to county doesn't collect the property tax had collected or had they foreclosed within a reasonable period of time you wouldn't have house had failed and as a result those people who live here who are tempting to play by the rules they wound up getting screwed because the value of their bank if it wasn't for the landbank guide only knows where we'd be at this is another abandoned one right here what does that to the Cobb county landbank is so that's abandoned that's abandoned that houses abandoned the one thing that has worked is the creation of the county land still hold the deed as we just heard many states require the bank name on the deed Ohio does not so the mortgages are well zombies we drive by small the story on all the amount of homes that have been abandoned and we just wondered you're taking such good care of this home I wondered if you had any thoughts about that yeah well what's it like to live with all stand out as a beacon of hope in a desperate neighborhood as we leave we pause at a demolition site collect property taxes it starts a chain reaction a domino effect a neighborhood disinvestment neighborhood the spare now do I wanNA see tractors and backhoes tearing down a small abandoned apartment building nobody is more frustrated I am about dealing with this stuff because I see private development but the landbank is only as successful is the amount of properties that come to them when the county failed yeah well maintained home next to an overgrown empty lot to find the Morris's Mrs Morris tending the lawn her husband Archie beside her I sir we're doing or by Hurricane Michael or whatever this was a man made natural disaster came through the city of Cleveland and other areas lender's banks wash their hands of the home take a loss yes but don't have to do upkeep or pay taxes because they know the homeowner does breeze went on for years and years here's another band in one sitting right here you say there's not a reasonable foreclosure process the county collects tax here's taxpayers have paid the ultimate price for this can down because then you're gonNA have empty lots which is better well if they take them down what they can do is board it all the way around Pinson somebody now why did other areas survive much better because of the state laws they hit on the books especially as it pertains to Zombie mortgages and again the taxpayer the sitting six seven eight nine years vacant both houses would have gone in for sheriff's sale and would have been sold and put back into productive use so if not that create what we call the Zombie mortgage the Zombie mortgage homeowners believe they no longer hold the title to their property because they've been evicted and to support our schools this is pure insanity here but it's man made the again this we weren't hit by Hurricane Katrina Down with it was a house over there and it's been years right then demolished so if an empty lot I'm sure would you rather have the Zombie houses of Ohio healthcare was hot immigration hardly mentioned except for who Leon Castro line about DONALD TRUMP LETTING ISIS prisoners escape in Syria while I want to put their anything but they got to keep that up Archie Morris tells us he's considered leaving but wouldn't be able to sell no one is buying so for now they'll historically is a senior member city council I see what this has done to my community every one of these empty lots that's a property that isn't paying taxes to what some people think is still very very rough neighbors like this this community on the north side of the cynically lost leave the need to make a change it got to be a change somewhere you and your wife here she's carefully seating your Lawn you've got beautiful picket fence and all these decorations the home has diminished substantially the state of Ohio has to have laws in effect that if you foreclose on somebody you put the house in your name there's so many homes boarded up falling parable is terrible but they need people getting killed in the mountains Brayton beat up and all kinds of things cracks together but you know people's ain't GonNa go let us state it don't trash in your yard because she yard clean we can see where you know up to this lot was there a house there that was taken is it to Cleveland City Council Michael Sex Eighth Ward which is represented since nineteen seventy eight he's convinced with new banking regulations and quicker action on tax delinquent. See this can be fixed but we will remember Archie Morris it's obvious he doesn't want to disappear along with his Zombie neighborhood he very much wanted you in another move that weakens environmental onerous regulation if you prefer to see it that way but it there would be a lot of steps left before a road could go in or a new area open when you sign up at indeed dot com slash NPR podcast terms conditions and quality standards apply Nice Guitar from here for originally and lawsuits and So the trump administration wants to lift the rule entirely and this would basically open up the ability very large areas about five hundred miles the entire panhandle of Alaska pretty much so if you've been on a cruise to Alaska for logging for road construction really to develop what is a forest at this point it would lift this one layer of protection or into Clinton era rules that limit logging and road construction in the forest saying that those restrictions hurt the local economy joining us now comes to hiring you don't have time to waste you need help getting to your shortlist of qualified candidates fast with indeed post a job in minutes set up screener is Liz Ruskin Washington correspondent for Alaska Public Media. Hi Liz Hi Tania well let's I want to ask for those who are not familiar awesome then zero in on qualified candidates and when you need to hire fast accelerate your results with sponsor jobs new users can try for free in this message comes from NPR's sponsor in being the US Department of Agriculture announced its proposal to exempt the Tonga's from the rule yesterday what exactly does this entail and what does the trump administration protections the trump administration is signaling it wants to expand logging access and Alaska's Tonga's national forest the talk is often referred to as the crowd shrunk down to very just a ghost of its former self so there are many local business leaders who say no logging 's not coming back with the Tonga's can you tell us a little bit more about it sure it's the largest national forest in on the phone service in the nation it covers a up to logging there's the timber sale there's the environmental review for any road there's a lot of steps left to go I see so this is got likely you've been in the Congress yes yes yes those familiar with those cruises will be familiar with that there is this road lois rule from two thousand one this area of southeast used to have a thriving timber economy logging economy and there's a little of it left for a variety of reasons it has unwanted change well ever since the Tonga's or ever since the road less rule went into a fact it's been the subject of a lot of disputes NBC news is facing increasing criticism after allegations in journalists is the first step but a significant step the argument has been that it will help the local economy what other things have you heard from from folks there yeah and things like that and they say it's foolish to try to bring back a logging industry that's really gone we wanna be and the final rule is expected next summer Liz Ruskin is Washington correspondent for Alaska Public Media Lists thank you so much allegations against NBC today show host Matt Lauer NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik has been following all of this and David Farrow alleges that once team's friends reeling from the effects of climate change clear cutting old growth trees and the Tonga's national forest release significant amounts of carbon into the atmosphere and make things worse Harvey Weinstein but he began that reporting while at NBC and claims the network tried to stop it afraid that Weinstein would reveal sexual misconduct your time thank you. Tanya and honor and environmentalists are also reacting to this proposal the center for Biological Diversity Says Alaska is already in in Pharaoh's new book catch and Kill Farrow won a Pulitzer Prize for his reporting in the New Yorker about sexual misconduct allegations against Hollywood producer by trying to dig up dirt on Lower Star he'd often been in the tabloids there've been rumors and claims of marital infidelities of affairs he'd had he's all jewel of the US Forest Service and the most intact temperate rainforest in the world state officials actually plot this move however many have wanted to see back in this area is more valuable for is the tourism industry the Commercial Fishing sport fishing clear that this is not a done deal what are the next steps for this proposal he yeah there's a sixty day comment period that kicks off now and not that claim it says it's ludicrous it to think that pressure from national enquirer would or anyone else would cause them to shy away from the story they were we're trying to dig up dirt on Matt Lauer to keep NBC quiet tells more about that claim right we'll catch and kill is the idea of you catch stories and you kill them part of Uh case of the allegations denied by Dylan Howard the head of the national enquirer but nonetheless the allegation is that the national enquirer reporters out to make to inflict pain on NBC if you go after Harvey this way well and Pharaoh says that's why NBC News Chair Andrew Lacking NBC News President Noah Oppenheim tried to tamp down his reporting on Weinstein Eh an institution like NBC or people with claims of abuse or people with problems like Matt Lauer obviously had but is also firm some of them since his departure or at least having had some since his departure from the network but this was a represented in Farrow's book as a warning shot across the bow to NBC that Hayward which by the way would become the incredible reporting that launched the metoo movement about Weinstein's behavior so what's the network saying court on reporting they've done at times tough-minded reporting on sexual abuse allegations they say why would this one involving Harvey Weinstein be different Farrow's book focuses on am I the parent company of the national enquirer how they would catch stories and help him help Harvey Weinstein basically stop them from getting depressing this related to the reporting on the story and lacking Oppenheim each day call in which they said we'll get back to you if we need to give you comment on that so let me see says this is less than might meet finalist questions you spoke with rich mccue whose former supervising producer for the NBC News Investigative Team he worked with Pharaoh he left the network with Ah Pharaoh appoints to numerous calls that Weinstein made NBC news executives the top of figures NBC News chairman lack NBC News President Noah Oppenheim links and so they may not have had a pressure point in terms of going after lower that's the tension there yeah well you know there's so much going on here there's as we said the metoo movement and how are women protected lower how did how well is the network thinking about this journalistically how's the networks thinking about this as an employer seconds but pharaohs gone lowers gone any sense NBC says that it didn't feel the reporting was ready for air didn't pass its muster that's what it said publicly but two months later wins the Pulitzer yeah that's right in about two months it's published in the New Yorker Pharaoh had left up in allowed to buy NBC News President No OPPENHEIM whyy's Peter crimmins reports it's become a model for other cities there are over fifteen hundred pieces of public art scattered around the city plus more than twice that many murals zero and he had this to say about NBC doesn't make any sense that you'd let a one of the biggest stories of the the the year of not more walk out the door it was good enough to be developed somewhat further under David Remnant at the New Yorker really you know define the story and helped propel as you say the metoo movement and I think there's a lot of questions within me indigo everything we can on your biggest star you're huge moneymaker almost a half billion dollar a year in revenues the today show is for NBC and we're GonNa inflict pain on you art is mostly sculptures and statues but there are some more unusual things like this public park in the fairmount neighborhood it's called connections it's a two Acre city park can investigation we've spent so many thousands of dollars just go bye bye and we're GonNa let the New Yorker put the ball on our reporting isn't it true that that's one of the damning things here mm-hmm MSNBC President Phil Griffin NBC says in Response Look He called a bunch of times Griffin took a number of the calls but wasn't really the I I think a lot of people look at this and say the difference between Harvey Weinstein and some of these other folks that NBC may have reported on his they didn't have access to friends at the national enquirer they didn't have these giving Philadelphia one of the largest collections of public art in the country over six hundred of those pieces were created through the city's percent for art program the public create a percent for art program in America in which developers who acquire public land to build on are required to spend one percent of construction costs on public art take his reporting with him mccue stayed on for some months left in two thousand eighteen th with he felt is basically is trust and heart broken over this story which he felt was one of the defining ones the Glenn Town Corporation mandated by the city when it built the surrounding neighborhood development the percent for art program administered by The Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority the Redevelopment Authority's chairman at the time whose name was Michael von Martius or and he wrote we are under a particular obligation to make our cities places of which we can be proud town there was an urgency at the time to make sure that the rebuilt downtown was people friendly so says the current chair of the PRI Gregory Hiller it came from thanks Rick Fry eats lunch here almost every day he's a teacher at the nearby community college and he says the real beauty of connections is the magical silence just moments ago just before heading in the booth to talk to you here in Npr New York I got a call from a senior a spokeswoman at NBC Universal The Parent Division of NBC News Party was started in one thousand nine fifty nine that was the era of Ed Bacon the legendary city planner in Philadelphia when he was aggressively redesigning the cities down designed in one thousand nine hundred by the Greek American artist Athena Tasha she made a huge centerpiece with swirling tiers of plantings and arrangements of rock outcropping criminal justice center built across the street from City Hall in Nineteen ninety-four for this building there was a five hundred thousand dollar percent for art budget they say that the news leaders retain the confidence of their corporate employers but let's just say every person I talked to an NBC before I even get a question out of my house say do you think Andy Noah there are actually two percent for art programs the one run by the PRI is for commercial development and there's another one out of city hall for Public Projects Like the art concept sixty years ago it's been adopted by many other cities some of which do it better so says the two thousand nine report by Harris Steinberg then ABC Among staffers I've talked to about their confidence in their leaders both in terms of handling story of this and and in terms of handling their own problems not just lower but particularly it's a sculpture of a law library made with real books stretching twenty feet high at the bottom the artist Philip Simpkin made a bronze podium and multiple artists that created pieces that are really integrated into the architecture of the site Berga standing in front of one of those commissions out on the sidewalk interactive map we'll give out prizes to those who submit pictures of the artwork for here and now I'm Peter Crimmins NBA stay on it's still INFLEX NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik. Thank you you bet well pivoting here a sixty years ago Philadelphia was the first city three years after a gunman killed forty nine people at the pulse nightclub in Orlando Florida plans are now moving forward to build a museum wow that just looks just like that new building was built there which is interesting because the fact that was built before the skyline was built the park was commissioned by the front hand a memorial but that plan is not moving without controversy Danielle prior with member station w. m. f. e. has more of the University of Pennsylvania the report criticized the percent for art program for being weak Steinberg who's now with Drexel University says there was little enforcement component developers take five percent of their one percent for our contribution and use it for public education to mark the sixtieth anniversary the PRA and who lack in no time the top managers are you know there's pressure to push them out what's funny I asked that question for four days did they still retain the confidence of corporate leaders there was four days lectern he sort of envisioned this piece as sort of a

Joe Biden NPR Alaska Aswa Elizabeth Warren Donald Trump Cleveland US prosecutor Tanya Moseley Tonga Bernie Sanders Liz Ruskin Ukraine David Farrow NBC NPR Anderson Cooper amy Klobuchar president Syria
A Scholarly Look At The Rolling Stones; Tennis Star Bianca Andreescu

Here & Now

42:51 min | 1 year ago

A Scholarly Look At The Rolling Stones; Tennis Star Bianca Andreescu

"From NPR and WB YOU are. I'm Jeremy Hobson Im Tanya Moseley it's here now and in northern California right now a raging wildfire has forced the evacuation hundreds of homes in Sonoma's county and a rural area near Geyserville a little later in the program I'll be talking with cal fire chief Tom Porter about how bone dry accusations they sent out a bunch of wireless alerts and they had deputies go blaring horns and sirens neighborhoods where there were mandatory evacuations the wind gusts were very strong we're talking about sixty seventy miles an hour it spread extremely quickly so you know this morning when we came in to the newsroom it was ten thousand isn't northeastern Sonoma's county. You may be familiar with a bunch of geothermal facilities that are located in this area in the far portion of of the county at around nine o'clock last night the fire was ignited we understand from the National Weather Service is that in the area where the fire started at around the time the fire was ignited fire amid very windy and dry conditions so at this point you know I think we're all wondering what caused the fire at we don't have any sort of official 'cause yet there's obviously definitely there is some damage and the community of Geyserville has been ordered evacuated there's another nearby community there in in cinema county that was ordered acres and you know we are getting reports that there are some homes that have been a reports I should say that not being confirmed my caught fire that some buildings have been destroyed mark under these conditions could be catastrophic. It's not just those that are utilities joining us now for more is Kiki Dee's Ted Goldberg Hi Ted turn your good to be with you so this fire is now being called the kinkaid fire tell us more about this area where it's burning and the conditions there or so this is and knock on doors and as you know Tanya in some of these cases not everybody wants to leave and he did say that there were a number of cases in which residents refused to leave today afternoon so on Wednesday afternoon at around three o'clock in this was sort of a gradual thing tens of thousands of customers in that area and in created and other residents in some of those nearby locations have been told you may have to pick up and leave before this fire began we've all been hearing about the state's largest is the kind of information and I know Tanya because you've you've followed these kinds of fires in the past and reported on them that we we will learn over time so you know right now it is a very chaotic and notified and where they're actually going so I spoke to a sergeant with the Cinema County Sheriff's office they're the ones that are in charge of the mandatory and Sort of advisory their homes. Oh Wow do you know if there's been any injuries off officially we've not heard of any of that and you know at this point this you're okay one thing that we often talk about and we've talked about in previous fires is how people get notified of these evacuations do you know how these folks ability PG any shutting off power to about one hundred and eighty thousand customers to try to prevent these fires do we know if the people in the evacuation has been a very chaotic scene in that portion of Cinema County so some information you know we'll sort of bleed out over the rest of the day and in the coming days so you know at this point some concern that maybe it may have been some sort of other electrical infrastructure either with PG or another company at this point we have no official cause of the kincaid other parts of Sonoma's and Napa county wine country lost their electricity because PG he put in place these this plan to prevent its infrastructure from igniting a wild down had power or not PG knee says the area where the fire started and we're a number of the people who've had to flee from their homes is one where they shut off the power yet nothing confirmed but a fire like this moving so fast we would not be surprised to hear of casualties yeah and you mentioned those high winds what does the weather forecast has tell us are is that area GonNa get any relief from the wind and the heat anytime soon so the National Weather Service spoke meteorologist this morning indicated that the we means died down a little bit from what they were last night when the fire started still windy and actually several of my colleagues in the area have said as they drove to the area of fire e even farther away closer to here in Berkeley that the winds were really strong overnight reminding them of years pass and I'm not just talking about last year for the Campfire or two years ago with the North Bay fires I'm talking about the Oakland Hills fire I mean this is the kind of stuff that we have sort of a memory about that comes back when the at the beginning of something but right now the situation is not over Ted thank you so much for this update Ted Goldberg is senior news editor at k. q. e. d. and these winds sort of resurface so the National Weather Service says we are not fully out of the woods yet and in fact in the coming days they're expecting a stronger wind event than the one that we got grabs and right now Republicans have a slim majority in both the House and the Senate in Virginia and for the First Time poll show that a majority of voters see gun policy as and you pointed out PG Knees Power Shut offs program a little while ago we're expecting another round of shut offs in the coming days So this you know hopefully will not just be San Francisco thank you tone you well Vice President Mike Pence is scheduled to make a stop in Virginia ahead of state elections there November fifth he'll be there for a get out the vote rally actor Alec Baldwin visited this week to stump for a Democratic candidate for the state Senate why all the attention because control of the State General Assembly is up for OP issue an unusual shift for the state that is home to the National Rifle Association and that has some of the most lenient gun laws in the country Danielle Czeslaw W AMU has our story and a warning you'll hear the sound of gunshots that one group of men take turns firing shotguns at Orange Clay Pigeons at the Isaak Walton League skeet shooting range it's in the Washington suburb of Centerville on a Friday morning tiny margins and in November Democrats hope to flip the legislature gun policy has become a big campaign issue for members of both parties and away this is one of the thirty firearms he owns in Virginia you don't need a permit to buy a gun or openly carry it there are no restrictions on high capacity magazines and Chavez wants to keep it that way goes just a tool and if used properly they don't commit crimes Josh that used to be dogma enrichment where Republicans have controlled the house of delegates for two decades and the state Senate for five years but they're down three out of four voters say it is their top concern according to a Washington Post Shar school poll released early October this is a retired crew fully users they use their own shotguns a joy they say if you appreciate a well-crafted firearm this is a Japanese Virginia Democrats and their supporters says Karl Tobias Law Professor at the University of Richmond and Democrats have been rather cautious I think in the past organization funded by Michael Bloomberg it's committed a record two point five million dollars to Virginia's elections more than ten times with the NRA has spent mass shooting after mass shooting would enrage me and the current political climate in reach me and I thought okay you have to choose an issue so here we are you know if you're not going to stand up and have a conversation and listen truly listen then we'll vote you out ten moms demand action volunteers trained to canvas for a democratic gun control candidate the group is part of every town for gun safety a national moms demand action has twenty three groups in Virginia five of them formed just this year Veronica Bartlett is a new recruit she lives in Arlington. It's just like for an assault weapons ban we also want to figure out how we can do that in a way that is most effective this bold stance on guns is new asked with some exceptions but now I think it has become an important issue for many voters in this climate some Republicans are recalibrating yeah the volunteers emphasized red flag laws and universal background checks those are popular in polls find says that's just a start we are Tim. Hugo is the sole Fairfax County Republican in the House of delegates and he's backing a red flag law even though he opposed it in the past Randy Menchu is she's not seeing Republican gun ads it pains me to say this but I don't really see much gun stuff even conservative issues advertise much and I wish they would could be a bellwether ahead of next year's presidential race for here and now I'm Danielle Czeslaw to recover a seat he lost to a Democrat in Leesburg and he's called for stronger gun laws although he's an NRA life member Gabriella Hoffman is a media consultant nobody standards apply no matter how old you are the rolling stones have probably been a part of the soundtrack of your life we do something one of those mass shootings was in Virginia Beach in May when a gunman killed twelve people democratic governor Ralph Northam called a special times at night you would rather have something and not need it rather than need something and not have it still Huffman concedes the Democrats are getting their message across and fast with indeed post a job in minutes set up screener questions then zero in on qualified candidates and when you need to hire fast acceler lead of session to discuss gun laws but Republicans abruptly ended it Beth fine leaves this mom's group it got shut down in an hour and a half which is just ridiculous career conservative in Liberal Alexandria she fund raises for the NRA and she has a permit to carry a concealed firearm which she says she does some time give us firsthand accounts the deep musical knowledge the along influences that stretch back into the Delta into country music into American vernacular India is the only state holding legislative elections this year that could switch power between Republicans and Democrats gun policies prominent role in this vote take called s gone out of business and I have multiple barrels for this I can change the barrels Dave Chev is sixty four from front royal about an hour idioms as well as presence in film they're huge cultural impact those issues are all brought together in the Cambridge companion and it was and there are shelves of books about the rolling stones but a new one takes an academic look at their legacy joining us now is victor this message comes from NPR's sponsor indeed when it comes to hiring you don't have time to waste you need help getting to your shortlist of qualified candidates adapting to and in many cases anticipating new or retro trends in popular music during their long career the stones went into rock folk psychedelic funk punk rolling stones in fact the essays have a ton of footnotes what is the goal so the stones have been approached by biographers and by themselves you know there are so many autobiographies by the stones that right your results with sponsored jobs new users can try for free when you sign up it indeed dot com slash NPR podcast terms conditions and of their their musical template in the nineteen seventies and eighties and in fact the book started out as a book about the stones starting from around nineteen seventy eight when in fact they were trying to navigate reggae disco and others but remained true to the fundamental stylistic roots and sound of rock and roll R&B country and the blues so many wchs and grunge so the book was always positioned as a way to understand how the stones are adapt to styles and and when they adapt time to look back at the Stones Krier as as a vital part of music history not just in popular music history and music history itself and you write in this book and I love this I t. hi hi my name is Katie and Eric Canvas seen her Matthew Trans did another election on November in the basement of a church in Willio Co editor of the Cambridge companion to the rolling stones just out welcome to here now thank you Germany needs to be here and this book is a serious academic look at up David still remain true to this the fundamental influences and that all comes full circle in their last album blue and lonesome which is really a the commando cry the choppy waters of stylistic change and all the new things that were taking place and then the coming into digital the digital age and dance music and discotheques the three periods is being England on London specially and then America which is the big opening up in nineteen sixty eight and then the last period is this donnas associated with the stones yeah and career they were able to manage all those genres reggane and disco and punk were all parts is the significance of those years in the band's story so I call those the exhilarate years the years where they almost make themselves a self imposed exiles like very famous exile it makes music neither old nor new it's it seems the balanced both sides well let's listen to one song from that era this Gimme shelter again to turn towards American turn towards the deep musical traditions of America they've left their confrontation of aristocratic England's and those child ages of class behind that are all about satisfaction and Ruby Tuesday in a number of different songs of that period and now turned towards America and they moved deeper and deeper into vernacular styles influenced by Gram Parsons and recruiter and some great American players and they start to pick up dialects and they there NFLPA Post Nineteen eighty-nine which I call second life in which they curate their own history almost as a as a performing museum but this period is when they be and the song anticipates this so amazingly with this howling in the background the the the minor key Alexa are dialects of Mississippi and of Bakersfield California and of country and Western of new guitar styles and these dialect start to infiltrate their their music I was in the history of culture whether it's Dante or Solzenitsyn or the devil the first exile it's a turn away from England I mean they're first period I always see very much nine hundred sixty nine the same year as Moonshot it's also the same year as woodstock but nine hundred sixty nine ends up being a year that has one of the shot away so the students set up the song as a way to narrate sixty nine and sixty nine is not about really woodstock it's still about Vietnam Yeah Ah let's go back to the early days and in your first essay you write about what the stones during between nineteen sixty eight and nineteen seventy two opening the descending progression that continues throughout the whole song and then the climax of the words rape-murder the sister what do you hear when you hear that song every time I hear I hear something different but there's one fundamental thing I hear and that is the beginning of this album which is quite dark the darkness is the place that led me to other styles they were the ones that guided me I I was not able ten years younger a little bit more than the player and so at a musicologist so for me I was not that interested in in who the stones were going out with in clubs they went and things like that I was always interested in music still about violence in the streets it's still about protests still about a darkness that involves most of America Woodstock is is more a memory from later this is the reality and and they led me to to to country music and so it was through them that I began to listen to market Merle haggard them I started to think about how were you able to learn so much about the rolling stones and why they did what they did and how they were influenced as they were writing the music through the decades so I'm well not zero and for all the years and all the love of the stones that you have what's your favorite song it changes all the time but right now I and that was first and foremost so when I teach my rolling Stones Class I teach it from behind a guitar it's it's always about music and it's always about influences the students were for me with some people have called the Pearl Harbor of Woodstock and that was the stones concert at Ulta Mons in which one of concert goers died stabbed by a hells angel willingly followed and I let them just lead me on to their musical traditions conditions contribute to these kinds of fires he says even if power is shut off to places at risk it's important to recognize that fires can still happen any they led me to Bulgakov's master and Margarita to read that so they let me to other groups as well and they led me to reggae so that's how you know I was able I just make Keith in the in the boys so I did not come to Chicago Blues Revival like they did I had to be led to it so there are also the ones who led me Robert Johnson had that sound and again it's it's the sound of the stones which is the most important thing they look like a great blues men that's what they look like and that's that's who they should be looking at is a style of music history and I see the stones if they're aged just like I would see a conductor at the age of seventy five do your students share your like rock is is an interesting genre because we're still because it's it's completely gone beyond the fact that it's a youthful pastime rock is is it the whole repertoire cold at the same time there's some people who've never heard of note of the stones so it's it's it's no different really than any other music that I teach some people know at all fill in all these different tunings they're the ones who led me to all these different styles they led me to to French new wave cinema was only Dr Love of the stones I've been teaching a stone class since probably right ninety four and so the stones are continuing to see if you have a stones concert you'll you'll see songs that are back to their list a couple of years ago a couple of years ago did they still Mick Jagger still got the energy but I mean do they still feel the same as they once did yeah I mean it's always the same because they still the whole range of of people the other day I played a Gig and we brought a young guitarist up from one of the classes I'm teaching on the stones and he learning to listen to a lot to street fighting man which is from beggars banquet and again it's it's something about the sound of that recording I've been focusing a lot on sound these days because we've lost a lot of dynamic of what sound is because we all listen to music through headphones we music that is compressed an MP three four Madison the students music just John Breath when was the last time you saw the rolling stones comps off the record you know and when you put the needle on vinyl that sound comes off in a way that is impossible to duplicate with headphones and street fighting man is one of those the Qatar sounds in the studio he they place a microphone on a tape recorder of Keith playing than that that that riff and so it it comes out and asking states to voluntarily share driver's license records there are mainly interested in these citizens information in those records no states have agreed to share that information so and you can read an excerpt from the book at your now work at mind body online dot com slash. NPR mind body your access to the largest consumer wellness network and marketplace this message comes from NPR sponsor mind body mind body connects millions to the widest variety of local fitness classes is moving forward with trying to compile government records on citizenship which includes driver's license records what exactly's going on their Census Bureau is as States the census will determine the number of congressional seats Electoral College votes as well as how roughly eight hundred eighty billion dollars in federal spending is divided the summer because the trump administration attempted to include a citizenship question even though the inclusion of that question was struck down by the courts we learned the administration editor of the Cambridge companion to the rolling stones which is just out he's also professor of Music at Boston University thank you so much for joining us thank you Jeremy and the offer the same experience when it comes to massage and acupuncture spas and salons find book and paid all in one place owners can join the far the bureau's going to rely on records from the Department of Homeland Security State Department and other federal agencies the ministration originally said they worry that the census isn't going to get those jobs filled what exactly is going on Census Bureau has a very short window half a million workers need to be trained each year to help break all of this down we have with US NPR census expert Honsi Lo Wong High Hansie how are you I tell you I'm doing well Kasi Okay we're less just once every ten years this time around there's great concern that this could be especially hard challenge for the bureau okay so the census got a lot of attention used to be a problem next year but the stakes are very high if there are any delays in getting these half million workers on board ready some households might not get Senate these households that don't respond to the sense themselves and these are households likely to be disproportionately from communities of color I'm curious has the census ever dealt with something I meant fewer people are looking for jobs and I've also uncovered delays in processing background checks for early rounds of sensors Workers Census Bureau says it doesn't expect those delays and and ready to work essentially by next April these are door knockers who are gonNA visit households that don't respond to the census themselves it's at a time of very low unemployed oh boy like this before during previous census counts well this is always a massive challenge this is the largest mobilization of the federal government outside of wartime every time we do essentially he's the census the national population count that happens every ten years is almost here and with it potentially a whole new understanding of who and what we are in the united he now wants this information so that after the twenty twenty cents is states have the option to use this information when they're redrawing voting districts then five months away until most households can start filling out a census form it's a big job that's expected to generate half a million jobs but there's also so that they can draw voting districts in a way that's based on the number of citizens old enough to vote rather than the number of all residents living in a given area it's well you know this is going to be the first US census to allow all households respond online it's also going to be the first us to take place since the rise of social media not clear if that's a legal way of redistricting but we do know is that a prominent gop strategist Tom afler before he died concluded that it would but a CNN poll yesterday Joe Biden the widest margin over his competitor since April NPR's Scott d'etre joins us now he's been covering the twenty twenty campaign hi Scott about give a political advantage to Republicans and Non Hispanic White People Oh wow so what are you keeping an eye out for as we move through and get closer to this count want this data in order to better protect the voting rights of racial language minorities but after the courts blot the citizenship question president trump said Chris men from Ohio what does that tell you you know to be honest I don't know if it makes too much of an impact on the race over all Ryan with somebody who three months to go it's crazy I know and we today have one fewer candidate on the democratic side Tim Ryan ending his run he's the moderate cod just over one hundred days until the first votes are cast in the two thousand twenty presidential race in the Iowa caucuses so let's check in on twenty twenty a quinnipiac unit allies at stake it's about money it's about power money and power that's NPR's Hansie long thank you so much for this update you're welcome there instill the front runner nationally in the average of polls but his campaign has less than nine million dollars in the bank he is caught up in the impeachment inquiry in the sense and with every one of the people who stand for our children every day it's got itchy the emerging defied for the first couple of debates this summer but was on the far end of the stage without weighing in on a conversation too much he had not qualified since then he had been one of the many candidates that's why I'm running I'm running to rebuild the backbone of this country the backbone in this country is the middle class you know this time versity poll out today shows Elizabeth Warren opening up a seven point national lead over Joe Biden Bernie Sanders and Buddha judge the only other candidates to reach double digits front runner and what about the Democrats who think that she's too liberal to win I think she certainly is I think you saw that on the emerging front runner you mean yeah yes that is looking into president trump's request that Ukraine investigate Biden and his son hunter here's Joe Biden in Scranton Pennsylvania yesterday trying to stay on message wjr today too many middle class working class folks can't look their kids in the it longer and say it's going to be okay and meaner run and and and find that there wasn't much of a market in the overall Democratic Party for for a white man in a race where or a lot of candidate the contrast of that to the way that the races has whittled down to about four candidates three of whom of are of course white men okay and so let's talk about one of those white men that would be Joe Biden it's going to be happening in the middle of the presidential primary season and the big question is will any for an actress try to influence the census results so there's going to be a lot to watch out for and again in in Iowa with the caucuses just three months away he is quietly moderating some positions not talking about his support for progressive ideas like the green new deal or D. Criminal the picket line on Tuesday I'm here to stand with the low wage workers in the Chicago schools I'm here to stay on Joe Biden like we saw the first few debates they were trained on Elizabeth Warren that is going to continue because she is really the only candidate who has seen a steady so I think this has been a very static field for the most part and that has really benefited Joe Biden you know the impeachment situation on one hand is a great thing for by it staffers on the ground that you need to make contacts and Organiz to win the Iowa caucuses you need that money to Air TV ads but at the same time since he's got up kicking you off your private plan keeping America safe around the world and all the other things that are really on the minds of of individuals as they size up this democratic field that's got because I think the real heart of his campaign is that Donald Trump has abused the office of the presidency in he's back to restore normalcy but the downside is as you mentioned it keeps coming up with question into the race he's been at the very top of the polls or or one of two candidates far outdistancing anybody else and not much has changed over the six plus months that he's been in the race he really he got outraged by a lot of candidates he spent way more money than he raised and that does matter because it comes down to the resources that you can use to put the volunteers on the about Biden and his son hunter and their business dealings any overlap Elizabeth Warren has been rising rising in the polls she joined striking Chicago teachers on it's a really entered a lot of voters rather a really energized by bringing some diversity to the party which has been a very constant trend talking to voters and it's been interesting to see think he could be a surprise winner in Iowa Yep I do Scott what do you think about that and what would it mean for the race if Buddha judge were to take Iowa that is the main thrust of the attacks that you've seen against her and I think a key moment that I'm really anxious to see how it plays out is in the coming days leising border crossings he spoke with the Las Vegas Review Journal this week approaching the caucuses I think the biggest question on most folks minds is house my life going to change I zero elective office before he was elected he's in the mix of candidates for sure okay and let's talk about Bernie Sanders who is ramping back up after his heart attack he won the endorsement of inch if you become the president versus one of the others and we've laid out a message that explains how we're going to focus on making sure the economy works for everybody getting everybody healthcare with that in the coming weeks she has promised to lay out the details of her Medicare for all healthcare plan specifically how she would pay for it that's Scott what is the state of the Biden campaign right now you know vulnerable but durable I think is the way I'd put it you know you mentioned the the nine million dollars back I stand against everything that she represents and that if I'm elected president if I'm the Democratic nominee and elected president that she won't be it also hasn't really grown I think Bernie Sanders has has a very enthusiastic base. He raises the most money consistently of all the candidates in the race but he's really shown earlier this week I spoke with Democrat and former North Dakota Senator Heidi heitkamp kind of the moderate wing of the Democratic Party about Buddha judge listen brothers and sisters I have no doubt that the politico revolution is going to sweep this country is the most and you know I think his message is cutting through I think that being said there are still really long odds against him and it's a question of do Democrats want to go with growth in the polls over the last few months to the point where now she's leading a good chunk of national polls in in in Iowa New Hampshire polls that come out but to the question of liberalism a million dollars to spend according to the last report he has been using it to consistently run television ads in Iowa striking out his message presidential campaign thanks Scott Thank you let's turn now to professionals somebody who's a millennial mayor of the fourth largest city in Indiana that is just such a strikingly nontraditional candidate to go for and his argument of course is the President of the United States she's been in kind of a spat with Hillary Clinton after Clinton said Gabbard was a favourite of the Russians who could run a third party spoiler campaign on Fox News last Friday Gabbard radishes are really worried about in a general election or does she look for some sort of other way to to fund what would certainly be a very expensive plan let's talk about Pete Buddha judge now in third position to control me she won't be able to manipulate me she won't be able to continue to Work from behind the curtain to continue these these regime change wars thousand people listen when I look at this you crowd I am able to accomplish my big dreams and play monks all of these top players the momentum from the other big progressive candidate in the Race Elizabeth Warren he needs to show how he can grow his coalition though all right I wanna ask you about one more candidate and that

NPR Tanya Moseley Geyserville Sonoma Iowa Census Bureau California Gabbard Hillary Clinton Ted Goldberg Jeremy Hobson Tom Porter National Weather Service United States Fox News Senator Heidi heitkamp assault Elizabeth Warren Kiki Dee
Kids On Planes; Answering Your Questions About Coronavirus

Here & Now

42:57 min | 1 year ago

Kids On Planes; Answering Your Questions About Coronavirus

"From NPR and WBZ. Im Tanya Moseley. I'm Jeremy Hobson. It's here now. Super Tuesday is tomorrow a critical day for the Democrats running for president and we will get to that but first the global death toll of the novel Corona Virus is now more than three thousand including two in Washington state there are at least eight cases in the United States and almost ninety thousand infections worldwide on every continent except anarctica joining us now is Kathleen civilians who served as the secretary of Health and Human Services during the Obama Administration secretary civilians. Welcome back to here now. Thanks Nice to be with you. And what are your biggest concerns right now when it comes to Kovic. Nineteen the new corona virus. I'd say the number one concern is to instill some confidence in the American public that they are getting accurate scientifically based information and not political spin. And I would hope that we would let the scientists people like Tony Out. She a world renowned expert. Who's sitting in h? You will be leading the vaccine development and the folks at CDC. I work closely with Dr. Anne shook it and she's fabulous but let the scientists do the talking on a regular basis. Tell the American people what we know and what we don't know that's step one. It does seem. We are behind the curve on testing. Now that the disease is presenting with some ferocity in places outside of China. I would think we'd want to update the testing protocol about who gets tested when they get tested. Visitors coming from a whole variety of areas Americans who have traveled to those areas. Getting ahead of this disease means testing and then isolating as quickly as possible. Is it possible at this point to control the spread of this virus? It has reached so many places and in many people? There are no symptoms. It's hard to tell who has it and who doesn't well I think we've lost as some of the epidemiologists say a couple of critical weeks. I still think there are containment strategies that worked pretty well. What we know is that most people will have a very mild version but also it can spread very very quickly anybody who's in the hospital right now for respiratory illnesses probably should be tested immediately healthcare workers because you know you wanNA make sure don't lose healthcare workers first and then have a bill tragic situation so catching up with the testing but also getting state and local governments prepared. We need to look at hospital searches. We need to put in place plans and most hospitals have this and have drilled on this but I know there have been really serious cuts in preparation bunny serious cuts in CDC which is often the backbone of state and local government health funding You know we've been talking to people who are canceling trips that they were planning to take because of this There was a huge convention of eleven thousand physicists. From around the world was supposed to happen this week in Denver. They just canceled it at the last minute. Some of those people were coming from China. But I think there's just a general concern. Do you think that it's rational for people to be staying away from conventions to stay off of airplanes? Not Travel things like that. Well I'm in about an hour going to the airport to get on an airplane So I I am very carefully monitoring what is going on right now. The presentation in the United States is very low. And I think it's really important again for people to pay attention to the updated guidance the CDC website is very good. But I do think continuing to do you know. Business as usual makes good sense decisions about things like closing school and teleworking and should be put in place. Plans should be put in place out. But all of those have real downsides as well as possible protective sides and I think they need to be dealt with very very cautiously. We don't want you know. Millions of workers to suddenly not have a paycheck and not be able to support themselves. We don't want kids to be roaming around the streets because they're not at school and they don't have breakfast and lunch to them. I mean there are some really important safety and security issues that come with preemptive decisions that may not be scientifically driven the other thing. I think it's really important for people to understand the likely paths at. This disease is a big spurt in the spring and as it gets hotter in the summertime to diseases likely to receive a bit but it will come back in the fall. Let me ask you one more question. You're obviously the former governor of Kansas. The former governor of Indiana now vice president Mike Pence has been put in charge of this crisis and when he was governor of Indiana he was criticized for how he handled an HIV outbreak. Because at first he didn't want to allow a needle exchange program And it is thought that that made the situation much worse before he finally did accept a needle exchange program. Do you have confidence in Mike Pence to handle the corona virus outbreak for the White House? What I've seen so far out of the administration and I would distinguish the administration from the experts and government. The administration has done everything possible to deny and confuse the public about the severity of this situation. And about what is going on right now. I also worry about this. Administration's pattern of firing people who have opinions or make statements or bring information that is not seen as politically advantageous. Nothing could be more dangerous. That is Kathleen civilians. Who was the secretary of Health and Human Services during the Obama Administration? Thank you so much for joining us. Great to talk to you Jeremy. Well let's get more now on the situation in Washington state where two people have died from. The new corona virus. More cases have also been confirmed over the last couple of days. Joining us now is wellstone. A reporter at K in K X in Seattle. Hi Will Hi Tania. Well what more do we know about the people who died? What we know is that the first death was a man in his fifties who had a number of underlying health problems and it was one of the things that prompted the hospital to test him because he had an unexplained respiratory condition and they knew he was at significant risk. There's no indication he had a connection to the second death which we learned about last night that was an elderly resident of a nursing care facility east of Seattle who also had underlying health conditions. And he was in his seventies at the moment. It doesn't appear there was any connection between these two deaths. Okay so since Friday. We know the number of cases has jumped significantly and a lot of have been linked to that nursing facility and King County. They include residents of the facility and healthcare workers. What more do we know about those cases? That's right there's been a cluster of cases that we've learned about over the weekend including one health care worker who was there and has been tested positive. Last night we learned. There are three people who are in critical condition at the hospital nearby. All are in their seventies or older and have underlying conditions and we are waiting to hear about a number of other tests. We know that quite a few people there are presenting symptoms the CDC's on the ground right there helping to investigate that outbreak. We're also hearing. Some schools are closed today. What other things are public? Health officials doing to respond to this cluster. Public health officials had been very aggressive with their messaging. And they've really taken on a massive mobilization of public health resources. There's just a lot of information coming at people right now. That's evolving hour by hour and public. Health is really just putting a lot of messaging out to the public not to panic but to also take proper measures and make sure if there's any risks that they could be exposed that they contact health authorities as quickly as possible. I'm wondering about concerns over testing protocols. There we've been hearing about that in other states. What are you hearing about the testing process? What we do know is that because of delays in testing and the ability for states to run the tests themselves instead of sending them to the. Cdc We did not learn about all these cases perhaps as soon as we could have but at the moment the state lab is able to run tests. They've assured us that they do have the capacity to test all the people who need it but that may change and they are working with a number of commercial laboratories and other places so if there is a need to run more tests they can do it. It's also helped that. The testing criteria has broadened so people with unexplained respiratory conditions can now get tested Even if there's no indication they had travel history. Of course we're learning of a number of people now in the community who have no known leak linked to an affected region who are testing positive. I'm just wondering about that. Messaging now that the testing has been opened up to everyone who who might be exhibiting symptoms. How are medical facilities hospitals in the Greater Seattle area responding to it? Are they seeing an influx of folks? Who WANT TO BE TESTED. What's it like there right now? I think that the hospitals all are under quite a bit of pressure with the public and they've assured everyone that they will run tests on anyone who really seems at all at risk but there will be a point perhaps where they'll be widespread transmission and being able to test everyone and chase down. Every case will not be feasible. At that point we may see more dramatic measures in terms of canceling events. Here and other things. I'm just because they won't be able to do this kind of disease investigation that they have been doing with these cases up till now we'll stone as a reporter at K. A. N. K. Ex in Seattle will thank you so much for this update. Thanks for having me Tanya. This message comes from here. And now's sponsor indeed. Are you hiring with indeed? You can post a job in minutes. Set up screener questions then. Zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started today at indeed dot com slash. Here now we are just a day away from Super Tuesday and the field of Democratic presidential candidates vying for the more than thirteen hundred delegates tomorrow has narrowed billionaire. Tom Style dropped out so did former. South Bend Indiana Mayor Pete. Buddha judge he won Iowa but after coming far behind other candidates in South Carolina. He said yesterday he could not see a path forward for his campaign in a divided nation. We saw fellow Democrats join with independence and yes some of those future former. Republicans to choose a different politics to choose a politics. Define not by WHO WE PUSH AWAY. By how many we can call to our side and we send a message to every kid out there wondering if whatever marks them out is different means they are somehow destined to be less than to see that someone who wants felt that exact same way can become a leading. American presidential candidate with his husbanded aside. The conventional wisdom is that Buddha judges exit from the race is good news for Joe Biden. Ahead of all the voting. That will happen tomorrow. Biden almost fifty percent of the vote in South Carolina with Senator Bernie Sanders coming in a distant second place with about twenty percent joining us. Now is congressman. Tim Ryan of Ohio. Who is a Biden supporter congressman? Welcome and what is your reaction first of all the mayor. Buddha judge dropping out of the race while I think it was a really smart move in a courageous move. You know it's it's never easy to put so much time and effort in for such a long period of time and then have to get out but I think it's a signal that the moderate to liberal lane is consolidating Around Joe Biden and I think the writings on the wall for that When you saw the huge African American support he got in South Carolina and just winning by almost thirty points and a lot of other candidates not able to get support in the African American community which is a huge part of the Democratic primary. Moving forward so think it's a great sign for Joe Biden. And you know. Hopefully we can just keep it. Rolling was a deal made between Biden and Buddha judge. Some people are wondering that today. I don't think so but I don't know that You know I think a mayor Pete you know is as sharp as it gets and if he wants to be a part of helping this consolidation. I think a natural fit for him would be Vice President Biden which be would be a huge boost For Joe Biden moving forward. So you know we certainly would welcome Mayor Motassedeq campaign. He has a great team around him and we welcome his support. Do you think that the presence in the race of Amy Klobuchar and Michael Bloomberg are going to hurt Joe Biden tomorrow? Well I don't necessarily think so. I mean if Amy Klobuchar does really really well in Minnesota. You know those delegates that she's going to get that you know maybe Bernie Sanders wouldn't get Which would keep his numbers down a little bit So I think her in the short-term given the next couple of days. It's NOT GOING TO BE UNHELPFUL. To have her in the race. I would say after that and she's going to have to evaluate like I had to do Mayor Pete how to do at some point. You know whether or not you can make a realistic run at it. If she does get out of the race I would think a lot of her. Supporters would go to Vice President Biden as well and so you would begin the consolidation process in. It'll be a sprint. You know through March and April. How is Joe Biden? If he becomes the nominee going to win over supporters of Bernie Sanders in a way that Hillary Clinton clearly had some trouble with for years ago. Well I think Donald Trump has a way of sharpening the minds of of Progressives and Democrats. I don't think there's anybody in the Democratic field or even a Bernie Sanders supported at doesn't think that Joe Biden who passed violence against women's act to help. President Obama secure the auto industry in the United States or provide universal health. Care for everybody in the United States isn't leaps and bounds better on policy than Donald Trump has been or on the environment. I mean the the argument is really going to shift. Because it's going to be okay. You know the worst thing you could possibly do. If you're interested in climate change is have donald trump be president for another four years in the worst thing you could do for women's rights or human rights or the New Economy would be have donald trump in office for another four years. Talking about you know chasing smoke. Stacks and going back to nineteen fifty. Joe Biden understand this new economy. He's been very progressive on a lot of these issues but he has the working class sensibility so I think those Bernie Sanders voters while they may not like it. Because there are you know. They like their candidate. They like him a lot. But I think at the end of the day staring at the prospects of Donald Trump getting another four years nominating people to the Supreme Court Rolling Back Environmental Regulations privatizing public. You know public schools government schools. He likes to call them. I think the Sanders voters are going to know what the right thing to do is for the country. What is success going to look like tomorrow? Well you know. Obviously there's a lot of states so you know we're not sure exactly what it looks like. Or what the map looks like tomorrow but you know. He's got to have a lot. A number of successes. There's no question about that and I think mayor peak getting out also helps but I think the more successful he is tomorrow. You know the better chance of maybe a Michael Bloomberg getting out down the road or somebody you know Amy Klobuchar getting out down the road. So I don't know what it looks like. You've gotTa have some some significant wins. And I think he will and then you know. We'll wake up on Wednesday morning and see what the next steps are. That is Tim. Ryan a Democratic Congressman from Ohio. Supporting Joe Biden for president. Thank you so much. Thanks for having me tomorrow. Also marks the first time that another candidate will appear on the ballot that would be former New York mayor. Michael Bloomberg from Bloomberg's campaign. We're joined by Antonio Vera Goza. Who is the mayor of Los Angeles from two thousand five to twenty thirteen in his supporting Bloomberg for President Mayor? Thanks for being here. Well thank you for having been on your show. What do you think the result of your fellow former Mayor Pete? Buddha judge getting out of the race will be a lot of respect for Pete. I think he Surprised everyone went beyond anyone's expectations. I think he saw that. There was no path ahead and like so many of us. He's willing to do whatever we can to BEAT DONALD TRUMP. And on that note. We're all in the same boat so super Tuesday is the first time Michael. Bloomberg is going to be on the ballot. What does he have to do tomorrow to have a path forward toward the White House? I think it s a continue to show progress. I expect that We're GONNA show very well in a number of states We've thought that from the beginning. there's a reason why in those debates everybody ganged up on him. He was the candidate who was on the ascendancy. And so I expect that we'll see more of that in tomorrow but a lot of people thought that he didn't perform up to expectations in those debates Do you think that he hurts other? Moderate candidates like let's say Joe Biden by staying in the race. Absolutely not the fact of the matter is though society didn't do as well as he could have understand that they had a year on him of debates. I think eight days before that he got better in the second one. I think you'll see you'll get better still going forward. He got in the race late in no small part because most of the candidates didn't seem to be getting traction and because he's got a track record and a plan for the future. What do you think that he can bring to the presidency? That Joe Biden cannot a one of the things I think he brings is the resources this going to be a tough race Donald Trump has already raised Somewhere around two hundred plus million dollars the expectation is GONNA race a lot more. We need somebody that can take them on in all fifty states. Someone like a Michael Bloomberg. Who's committed to support whoever the nominee is and keep those offices in the battle ground state open and fully staffed you are from. California obviously represented Los Angeles as the mayor for many years. Why do you think Bernie Sanders is doing so well? They're so much better than the other candidates in the polls he's doing really well Among young people He's doing really well among Latinos in no small part because the population is much younger. He's doing really well because he's campaigned. Before and had a large operation in California and is doing really well because he's argued that everything should be free college. You know medical care to the tune of some ninety trillion dollars. Last time I looked. We don't have the wherewithal to spend ninety trillion dollars. But certainly he is doing well. Finally Mayor let me just ask you. Are you happy? California is going this early in the primary process. You think that it achieved what Democrats were hoping for when they pushed it up on the calendar. Yeah I am happy. I mean look. We've been an ATM for the longest time they come over they raise money and California were donor state and have been for a very very long time and you know not much campaigning in our state. And so it's great to see that the candidates and particularly Michael. Who's been out to California more than any of the other candidates I think people appreciate that. They they want to play a role in. Who'S GOING TO BE THE NEXT PRESIDENT? And as you know it's a state that is very Strongly opposed to the policies of Donald Trump the divisiveness of donald trump and going to support a candidate who they ultimately think can beat him. That is Tony. Vera goes The former mayor of Los Angeles who is supporting Michael Bloomberg for President Mayor. Thank you thank you for having me and elsewhere in the show today. We're speaking with Congressman Ro Khanna who's a supporter of Bernie Sanders Campaign for president. Tomorrow Will be the big day of course but if you missed that conversation on air you can hear it at here and now dot org and if you hear that you can also hear interviews with almost all of the presidential candidates. Don't you feel better when you're prepared? Well with the spread of the corona virus. This is a good time to make a plan. I'm Aubrey. Npr's life gets has a whole episode on what steps you can take to protect your family. Listen and subscribe to life kiss as if flying was not stressful enough. There are now new challenges for parents flying with young children. The problem stems from economy fares that don't allow seat selection and the result is that young kids are sometimes being seated on their own a petition by consumer reports is taking on the issue. They've gathered more than one hundred twenty three thousand signatures from angry parents. On a latent is with consumer reports member of. Her team will testify tomorrow before the House Subcommittee on Nation and Ana. Can you start by describing the problem? We did some work last year where we started asking families to submit Complaints Department of Transportation and people buy basic economy understanding that at this low price. They can't pick their seats but it doesn't occur to them that that means they'll actually seated a completely different part of the plane and their children and you've heard stories from parents all around the country. What are what are some of the things you've heard we've heard from people whose babies were seated to rose three rows away from them? Who HAVE SMALL CHILDREN? Who were scared and the airline says. There's nothing we can do. They go to the gate agency. Says there's nothing we can do to get on the airline? The flight attendants don't help. I know this because I'm a parent so what happens often. Is that the person who bought the ticket? The parrot is then forced to ask other passengers. Can they switch seats with them? Exactly and with seat selection fees. The more fees were charged to do each thing on the plane. The less likely it is that people want to switch and you say this is a safety issue. It's it's really not a matter of preference I mean. Obviously when you have a baby or or anyone under ten years old seat it with their parent that is a safety issue absolutely and we all know that Safety Lecture. We get at the beginning of the flight. Take care of yourself before your kids. There has to be a responsible adult there. I think about if there's an evacuation and my child the seated ten rows behind me. Am I going to calmly exit the plane or am I going to disrupt the entire evacuation by going back and making sure my child is okay? Your colleague is testifying tomorrow before the House Subcommittee on Aviation. What do you hope will happen so four years ago? Congress directed transportation to look into this and if appropriate issue a rule requiring airlines to let families sit next to each other with no extra charge. The public transportation decided not to do anything about it. So what I'm hoping. Is that at this? Hearing tomorrow the members will hear that department transportation did not follow up on what they had directed. We also are sending letters today to the three major airlines calling them on them to do this themselves. Have you gotten any reaction from the airlines on your petition or the push for them to change? This rule Delta says that they are doing a lot and they're fixing on a case by case basis. American Airlines has a great policy on their website that says children fifteen and under will be seated with an adult on their ticket and united says. Don't buy basic economy if you want to sit with your kids but none of these policies are working to actually ensure that. This isn't happening. You Know I. I'm just wondering the meantime do you have advice for families who are travelling but can't afford to then just by higher priced premium price ticket parents. Just don't imagine a scenario where buying a basic economy ticket will risk their three year old four year old sitting ten rows away from them so the best advice we can give families is by ticket. You can afford reach out to the airline. Make you a case to the airline wraps everywhere you can and look at the websites. American Airlines website has a lot of advice about how to ensure you're seated together and then if something happens please let us know complained to the airline complainant apartment transportation. That's on elite and director of Financial Policy on consumer reports advocacy and mobilization team. Thank you so much for talking to us. We want to take some time now to answer some of your questions about covert nineteen and the corona virus causing it and to do that. We're joined by Dr William Schaffner professor at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. He's in Nashville and Dr Shattner. Welcome back to here now. Good to be with you Tanya so we spoke a few weeks ago and one question that We had early on and we still have from lots of our listeners. A is whether masks are effective in slowing the spread of the virus. They're selling out everywhere. What do we know about how it is transmitted and is there any evidence? That CORONA VIRUS IS AIRBORNE. Well what we know about masks used in the community is that the data supporting that is scant Could they have a small role in preventing the transmission of the virus? I suppose so one of the things they do is prevent you from actually touching your nose and your mouth which might interrupt transmission if you happen to pick it up on your fingertips but the use of masks is more a comfort and assigned to others that you're doing your best rather than an actual prevention of getting the corona virus or influence of for that matter. We've heard though it might be a little more effective for those who are sick versus using it to prevent yourself from being sick. What's The science on that? Yes that would be correct. And we would then recommend that to be used within the home. It's not a license for sick people to go out in vowed which a lot of people misinterpret Okay let's get to some of our questions from our audience Petra and Portland Oregon asks. How long can the covert nineteen virus survive in the environment where transmission of the virus be possible via contact with goods produced in an endemic areas? We think that that risk is very very low because the virus can survive for period of hours but then it just dies off because that's not a comfortable environment for the virus and the way to protect oneself from potential environmental contamination. Just Brown and about is lots of good hand hygiene wash those hands use those wipes and jails and. That's the way to protect yourself. Another question sort of related to all of this is about climate Do we know about whether the virus can live in warmer climates? Or is it more susceptible to folks and colder climates? This is an interesting question because we know that the flu and the cold often comes during the wintertime. But that's not necessarily because of the temperature. Is that correct well? We don't exactly know why. Influenza and common colds are so seasonal but they are and there has been a hope that the corona virus will have read. The Textbook. And we'll know what to do and kind of go away once. The weather gets a bit warmer but we don't know that this novel Corona Virus New. Humans will do that. Here's a question from Don in Ann Arbor Michigan Don Asks if you get it and recover. Are you then immune to getting it again? You Know Don. That's a very very interesting question. The Normal Human Corona viruses give us some protection for a period of time and then over a period of months and years that protection. Wayne's and we can get reinfected so this is a new corona virus. Will it follow that pattern or will it give us durable protection for a long period of time akin to measles we don't know the answer to that yet And and we are. Seeing reports specifically one person who had corona virus was treated for it and hospital and then went back into the general public and got it again so. I think that is also where this question is coming from and I guess your answer to that is we just don't know right now. I'm afraid Tanya we just don't know and was that a biological fluke one in a million more. Is that a phenomenon that could repeat itself more frequently. We'll try to study that find out Jonathan from San Carlos. California is a preschool teacher. And he wants to know if there are any particular risks or precautions recommended for children and pregnant women What about that? Are they more at risk? Well Actually Jonathan. One of the most provocative aspects epidemiologic features of the corona. Virus outbreak. Is that children are remarkably spared. Not One hundred percent but you don't see many many ill children in China for and so this is a peculiarity of the virus that we haven't yet really understood the recommendations regarding children and pregnant women are the same as for all of us lots of good hand hygiene avoid people who are coughing and sneezing and pay attention to what. Your local health department is saying about the risk in your particular neighborhood. We'll find out more about that as we test more. Broadly around the country in the next couple of weeks Joe From Massachusetts wants to know I think this is a question a lot of folks have what is the most up to date status globally for producing an effective covert nineteen vaccine. People are working on this in a number of venues the National Institutes of health any number of vaccine manufacturers both in this country and abroad. But we shouldn't get our hopes up for the near term developing a vaccine that is demonstrably safe and likely to be effective will take months probably a year or longer. We certainly don't want to give a vaccine. That's either unsafe or doesn't work. It will take time to determine them. Yeah some ways away There's an interesting question about other forms of vaccines for pneumonia and meningitis. For example Cindy wonders if getting the vaccine for pneumonia does any good to defend against corona virus. The vaccine against pneumonia might provide some protection against the complication of pneumonia. Which of course accompanies corona virus. A now we're going to get into the weeds here a little bit actually as I read the early clinical data. It looks as though the virus itself is causing most of the pneumonias rather than a complicating bacterial infection against which the pneumonia vaccine would give protection. Okay okay this is a question that I have to so ALEC. In Silver Spring Maryland has a question about underlying health conditions It's something that many people also ass he writes does having asthma. Make me more at risk. Do we have any data on what conditions make one more susceptible to the severe infection? Alex we're beginning to learn about that. The Chinese experiences telling us that first of all advancing age is a disadvantage. The older you get the more likely you are to have a severe infection of end. Of course as we age we pick up underlying illnesses diseases of the heart. The lung diabetes. In the like I cannot tell you specifically about asthma and of course in China. It's a much more polluted environment than we have here. And many people particularly men smoke so in China there may be many persons who have an underlying lung disease so the long camp responded as well is more susceptible to severity. Okay travel many people asked if they should cancel their vacations or other travel. They have coming up especially overseas. What do you say? Tania has been the most frequently asked question at least as come to me. In the last week it has a great deal to do with your risk tolerance. How nervous would it make you To either pick up a virus over there and be treated in one of those locations or might there actually be traveled barriers? That are put up. Which would make it difficult for you to return home up. Making those decisions is kind of dicey right at the moment. I'm afraid yeah. Yeah finally I want to know from you Are there any misconceptions about this disease? That you've heard that you want to dispel the one. That's come up just recently is whether food could somehow be involved in the transmission of this virus. There's nothing to do with food and the transmission of this virus. You can put that thought aside. That's Dr William Shatner professor at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. He's in Nashville Tennessee. Dr Shattner thanks so much for answering these questions. Always a pleasure. Thank you and your questions and comments are welcome at here and now dot org. Many Democrats are concerned about the possibility of Bernie Sanders leading the ticket. This November some have compared him to George McGovern. The South Dakota senator who became the democratic. Party's nineteen seventy two presidential nominee only be trounced by Richard Nixon. In the General Election South Carolina Congressman James Clyburn who endorsed Joe Biden? Brought up McGovern's failed campaign in his interview with Tanya Moseley. Last week I was around in one thousand nine hundred ninety two. And that's what I see happening here today history or the be instructive and I may be wrong about this. I hope I'm wrong. I just don't think I am Derek Thompson has been looking at the comparisons between McGovern and sanders. He's senior editor at the Atlantic and he joins us from Washington. Hi Derek Hi Jeremy so you have a piece in the Atlantic with the Headline Bernie. Sanders is George McGovern. Though you see big differences between nineteen seventy two and today let's start with just a reminder about what happened in seventy two and how McGovern became the Democratic nominee. Well let's start by listing all the ways that twenty two thousand nine hundred. Seventy two are eerily familiar in both years and ethically dubious. Republican is the president in both years. The early front runner in the Democratic primary is a veteran east coast senator and in both years. The establishment favorite falters in the early primaries and the anti-establishment left wing. Senator takes over the front runners spot so we know who these characters are in the twenty twenty version. This story trump is the President Biden was the establishment front runner. Sanders is the insurgent. But all this was happening seventy two. Nixon was the incumbent Republican president for most the Democratic primary seventy two the most likely challenger seemed to be the long-serving Senator from Maine Edmund Muskie Muskie's downfall however provided an opening for one George McGovern and that. Left-wing senator drew a lot of enthusiastic support from an ethnically diverse younger Crowd a lot of newly enfranchised teenagers and he won the Democratic nomination. Before as we all know getting trounced as you said by Nixon in November by the way this brings back to one of the greatest political books I've ever read which was the The Hunter Thompson's fear and loathing on the campaign trail seventy-two all about this campaign here is McGovern accepting the Democratic nomination At the convention. Seventy two where? He touted his plan to guarantee a job for adults. A program to put America back to work demand that work be properly rewarded. That means the end of a system of economic controls in which Labor is depressed but prices and corporate profits run sky. High means a system of national health insurance so that a worker can afford decent health care for himself and his family. Sounds Kinda familiar? Derek this is why I said and the headline of the Article Bernie Sanders is George McGovern McGovern called healthcare. A human right. He wanted a as he said right. Hearing National Health Insurance System he wanted to increase social security. He wanted to boost union rights. He wanted to raise taxes on the rich. He wanted a work to be a national guarantee. Sanders stands for all of this. So yes twenty. Twenty is different than nine hundred seventy two but in many ways sanders is running on a platform. Whose first draft or maybe second draft after FDR was written by George McGovern and why did McGovern lose so badly to Nixon? The easiest answer to that question is its because Richard. Nixon was extremely popular in nineteen. Seventy two that's weird to think of. In retrospect because we know what happened in the In his second term but Nixon was a really popular president seventy to his approval rating for much of that year hovered in the mid sixties. Donald Trump's approval rating has not exceeded fifty percent. Since I believe his first or second month as president so the incumbent in seventy two was much stronger than the incumbent In Two thousand twenty and that is largely why McGovern lost. There's other reasons like for example you had less polarization so in fact you had a lot of Democrats move over and support Richard Nixon. Who in fact was a rather liberal president given his Republican identification at least compared to today but most importantly it's because Nixon was hugely popular while trump is not so then is McGovern not a warning for Sanders supporters. I think it's a complicated issue. I think that on the one hand It's clear that lots of far left. Candidates have run for president in the US and they all lost unless they were running arguably in the middle of a great depression and this hooks into a lot of public political science research that seems to indicate that L- far left wing or far right-wing candidates tend to be riskier than moderates at the same time. Twenty twenty s really. Different than seventy two. There is more income inequality there is more diversity. There are new changes to the electorate like the gender gap and women are almost certainly going to vote democratic over Republican in two thousand twenty by a historic margin. The country has moved to the left on a hosted issues that McGovern himself champion whether it was gay rights healthcare itself or income support for poor workers. So this is a really really different year and I think it's always risky to compare one year to something that happened. Forty eight years ago but history is vibrant said it can be instructive so it's important to listen to both the rhymes while understanding the differences. Dare Thompson senior editor at the Atlantic will link to his piece adhere. Now Dot Org Dirk. Thank you thank you. Tanya key believe that we're almost here it's Super Tuesday and you were just in South Carolina. The other day I know and before you know will be Wednesday morning. The threat will be here Here now it's production of NPR WBZ in association with the BBC World Service. I'm Jeremy Hobson. I'm Tanya Moseley. This is here now.

Joe Biden Senator Bernie Sanders president Tanya Moseley Donald Trump George McGovern McGovern Michael Bloomberg CDC Jeremy Hobson United States Democrats South Carolina China California Richard Nixon Mayor Pete Buddha Seattle NPR
How Lack Of Security Let Extremists Storm Capitol; State Of The GOP

Here & Now

42:24 min | 3 months ago

How Lack Of Security Let Extremists Storm Capitol; State Of The GOP

"From npr in wbz. You are tanya moseley. I'm peter o'dowd this is here now as the world processes what happened yesterday at the us capitol this morning. Former general william bar called president trump's conduct of betrayal of his office and his supporters bor- who had been one of trump's most loyal supporters said that orchestrating a mob to pressure. Congress is inexcusable congressman. Mark wayne mullen. A republican from oklahoma joins us now. He was inside the capitol building yesterday. Congressman welcome back here. Now thank you for having me on again. Peter sure. And i know you were on the floor of the chamber yesterday. Helping to barricade the doors from the mob on the other side. That must have been terrifying. What was going through your mind. Well i mean listen. Troy nehls He's a sheriff from From texas who is a newly elected member he was there me and the capitol. Police sergeant were phenomenal job and We both felt like we could be an asset and so We we were there to help. Help help those guys. Just as much as they were helped and they were going to defend us. As i way i look at it. Their families is just as important to them as my family is to me. Well i understand you also saw the woman who died. Get shot inside the capitol. Tell us what you saw. Well we were in close proximity They we were at the front door. That was where we were defending and and and the agitators the I don't know if you want to call them protesters or not but definitely writers and they had tried to go around the back at the same time We had thought shots were fired at the front of us because They look glass had broken. It i it did sound like shots were fired and while that was going on we heard glass break in the back and that's when we knew that there was a lot more of them around and there's a tenant there that had to make a decision and as unfortunately young lady had Breach the door by coming through the glass He had to make a life changing decision. not just for him but for her family also and from what you saw. Congressman was the shooting justified. I i believe so because what happened at that. Point is that crowd dispersed and there were still a lot of members and a lot of staff That was That was on the floor. And and the capitol police in the sergeant arm said gave her a multiple warnings To stand down to stand down to stand down and she kept coming and if she would have made it through everybody else is gonna come through and then it was going to get it was the situation could have been much much worse. Impossible a lot more lives lost is so with some hours to reflect on this. What is your response to the security failure at the capital. Well what questions do you need answered about how. I wouldn't call this security. I think capital police. Sergeant did the best they could with what they had they were outnumbered And and there was a situation a lot of people have to make a decision or you really going to use lethal force On a on a us citizen especially in the us capital. And i think our our men and women and and law enforcement showed a great restraint and In a situation did escalate out of hand. But i wouldn't call it a failure because afterwards peter. I went down to the triage center and there was a there was more than twenty five. There could have been twenty five or fifty Law enforcement officers down there. Men and women Sound word capital. Police were with the dc police and they were beat up. They had they'd been hit with clubs one young man that I doubt if he actually keeps his eye. He was in surgery yesterday. I was literally outside of his socket and and they were willing to fight and defend. I think they did the best they could with the resources they had. So here's the elephant lurking in this room that i know you said on. Abc's good morning. America today that you disagreed with your colleague republican congresswoman liz cheney and other republicans. Frankly who said that. The president lit the flame of this insurrection. And i want. I do want to hear from you on that. But first let's hear the president's words to his supporters just before they stormed the capital. We've got to walk down to the capital and we're to cheer on our brave senators and congressmen and women and we're probably not going to be cheering so much for some of them because you'll never take back our country with weakness. You have to show strength and you have to be strong. He told them to go to the capital. How can you say the president had no part in this. We're all responsible for our own actions and these these these flames have been getting Fan for the last five years from from the media to the far left to even our side and what we need to do as a country is realized first of all. We can't be trying to place blame on anybody but ourselves. We're response of our own actions. I and full stop Outside of that we need to find a better way to debate. We need to find a better way to have cordial conversations. We can adamantly disagree on points but we. We can't be going to violence like this but with respect sir You can say that there is blame to go around for everybody but this is the president of the united states. The man with the biggest bolt pulpit in the world. These people were brandishing his banners. They were echoing. His false claims that the election was stolen in the video that he posted afterwards when he told them to go home he empathized with their cause and again wrongly said that he won the election in a landslide. You have members of of his administration. Who are resigning over. This is this leadership i mean. How could you say. The president doesn't shoulder. Some responsibility president has been very consistent on his style of leadership from day one and we've seen hundreds if not thousands Actually i would say thousands of pro trump rallies. We've never seen violent take place This was different. Every one of the injured officers i visited with every one of them. This is the common theme. I heard they was the processor for moving. This group broke away from the protesters and they said they had evil in. There is ahead evil intent. And as i said we're responsible for our own actions that every one of us These this agitating the crowds have been taking place since before. President trump was even sworn into office. You can't place any blame on anyone but yourself. And that's all of us taking responsibility for the actions of what we what. The tone of our political debate has turned into congressman. Mark wayne mullen republican from oklahoma inside the capitol building yesterday when the violent extremist stormed it congressman. I'm glad you're safe. Thanks for speaking with us. Thank you peter. Well amid yesterday's chaos democratic sweep in georgia where the party picked up two seats in the. Us senate. john. Also will be georgia's first. Ever jewish senator after beating republican senator david purdue and this follows democrat raphael. Warnock's win over kelly. Leffler making him georgia's first black. Us senator the democrats now have control in the senate with vice president kamala harris serving as the tiebreaker. And for more. Let's bring in georgia public broadcasting's stephen fowler and steven. This time. Yesterday we thought the story of the day would be the outcome of these runoffs. What's the reaction in georgia to these historic winds. That's right tanya. i mean it is groundbreaking to see to record record-setting senators from georgia to democratic senators for the first time in a long time coming on the heels of giving joe biden the state's electoral votes the first time a democrat has received that and almost thirty years. And it's notable because people across the state or celebrating just how broad of a coalition had to come together to elected these senators and historic levels of runoff turnout historic levels of black turnout and really just people from all over. The state are soaking in the history of having us off and worn represent them in the. Us senate You know there. I mean you know of all people. There's been a lot of pressure on georgia. Since the presidential election the president is we know made that extraordinary phone call to the secretary of state last weekend. Asking him to find votes from november's election georgia has had three presidential election recount since november. Has there been any call for recounts in these senate races. No and that's because of georgia law so if a candidate loses by half a percentage point or less they can request a recount and with the final ballots being tallied in the race. Jon ossoff is pushed north of that limit. Which is why you saw media outlets call the race for him and raphael warnock won by even more than that so there is no way for a recount and while it's a relatively small margin compared to some races. It is still a decisive win for these candidates. And what's next is counties to certify the results and eventually send these to up to washington stepping back just a little bit. What do these two wins. And joe biden's victory. Tell us about the changing makeup of politics in the state. Well georgia is not a red state. But it's not a blue state either it is squarely in the middle of purple right now. That the demographics of the state as well as the political participation of the state is really fifty fifty. And it's going to come down to who gets turned out the most in future elections and what kind of candidates run i mean. I think i mentioned yesterday that the republican that got the most votes in the race was actually a public service. Commission candidate a utility regulator. Who kept his head down and didn't really himself to trumpian politics and he got more votes than the other. Two republican senators did. And so there's going to be a changing republican party in georgia but also for democrats have brought so many new people into the fold and really both parties have brought so many new voters into the fold period. That it's going to be an interesting few years especially when you consider republicans there's going to be the ones in charge of drawing the maps for the next decade. Yes and we know that. Senator kelly leffler who had fully intended to object. The certification of the electoral votes yesterday had a change of heart I have less than thirty seconds. While you think well some of it is because potentially because lost and was no longer having to be loyal to trump and the other. It's really really interesting to have a change of heart when people are literally trying to beat down your door and it was just stunning appearance. Stephen fowler covers politics for georgia public broadcasting. Thank you thank you. The list of trump loyalists jumping ship continues to grow several staff members including former white house. Chief of staff mick. Mulvaney have resigned after yesterday's insurrection. Even senator lindsey graham of south carolina said this last night trump and we've had a hell of a journey. I hate it then this way. Oh my god i hate it for by views consequential president but today i think you'll see all i can say is count me out. Enough is enough. What is next for the gop after being a relatively united party for the past four years for that answer question and answer. We're going to have alice stewart. Cnn political commentator and former communications director for ted cruz presidential campaign here with us now to talk about this and alice. Several democrats have asked for invoking the twenty fifth amendment to remove president trump from office. And now we have republicans like illinois representative adam kensington calling for this to happen. He says quote. The president is unfit. The president is unwell. Do you believe this action should be taken. Thank you for having me. It's an important inconsequential day in in our history. For sure i think or brought up some very important points. What what the president has done in the last forty eight hours is is reprehensible and i think there's certainly room for censure and consequences for the actions of of this president and others who called for this mob march on the capital. Yesterday i am concerned. The fact that we have two weeks left in this administration and what potentially An angry donald trump can do in the white house. And i think being and social media time out is not enough so whether it is removing him from office or taking strong actions to censure him and some other way. is not out of the question and i think we're probably be hearing more voices like this because the uncertainty of what could come Looms large okay. So you are very concerned you see the twenty invoking the twenty-fifth amendment as a possibility senator mitt romney of of utah. Who who has long been a critic of president. Trump has strongly condemned the president's actions. He actually also made a plea for truth telling. Let's listen what happened here. Today was an insurrection. Incited by the president of the united states. Those who choose to continue to support a dangerous gambit by objecting to the results of a legitimate demand election will forever be seen as being complicit in an unprecedented attack against our democracy fairly or not. They'll be remembered for their role in this shameful episode in american history. That will be their legacy. I salute senator langford and leffler and braun and danes. And i'm sure others who in the light of today's outrage have withdrawn their objection for any who remained insisted on an audit in order to satisfy the many people who believed that the election was stolen. I'd offer this perspective. No congressional audit is ever going to convince these voters particularly when the president will continue to say that the election was stolen. The best way we can show respect for the voters who were upset by telling them the truth alice. Do you think this coal to reason is going to work taking this question about what's next for the gop How how do those in the republican party that agree with senator romney addressed the fact. That trump space is still very much invigorated and not likely to just disappear after inauguration day. It's such an important aspect of this and Tanya i think the chaplain when he spoke this morning said it best when he said that lies have and what we need to make sure is that we speak truth and we need to make sure that we know that words matter. The power of life and death is in the tongue and more that people in congress. Republicans and democrats can speak truth to power and truth to these election results. The better because i agree with cinder romney a lot of these people that came to washington and storm. The capital are not going to believe the election results unless they are told repeatedly by other republicans but by this president that the outcome of the election is sound and for the president to come out and say he will agree to a peaceful. Transfer of power is one thing but also needs to fully explain that there was not widespread election fraud. He needs to say that it has time to accept the results of this election and stop misleading the american people and get them on board with this idea because until the president acknowledges this himself those people will not acknowledge it either and the more we can continue to speak truth about this election. That will go a long way to absolving some of the tension and anxiety that we have here. Look i am all for freedom of speech. I am all for making your voice be heard but your voice is heard at the ballot box and it was heard on november third. It was heard this week in georgia and in any questions to the contrary should be dealt in in a more dignified way and not by storming the capital and alice that appeal to truth seems to be resonating with some trump supporters. Last night. a woman who says she voted for trump. Her name is tammy from boise. She called into c span. And ask this. let's listen. I do have one question. I wouldn't know if my president lied to me today. And if he did. I want me him to tell me and more importantly i want him to tell the family of the woman that got shot and killed states. I voted for his loaded for his salary. Alice can the party in its current state. Regain the trust of voters like tammy who after seeing what happened yesterday. Actually feel misled. Yeah tanya that sound is is heartbreaking and there's a lot of people that feel that way and to answer her question yes he lied to her and yes. He has been inaccurate about the election. Results and the good news is that there are people in washington and of the republican party. That are not going to lie to the american people mitt romney being. We had tom cotton. Who stood up from the very beginning Senator from arkansas saying that we need to be truthful about these election and accepted results and repudiate this mob violence so while what we saw yesterday was horrific and disturbing. Those people are not representative of the republican party. And here's out there in the republican party that have stood up and condemned that activity and stood by the election results. Those were the voices that will continue to hear and will continue to come to the forefront because while we have two more weeks of president trump in office the the good thing in the positive aspect for the republican party it is bigger than one person. It is bigger than one man. It's bigger than one movement. The heart and soul of the republican party tanya is wrong and the policies and the values that people stand for in. This party are strong and and they will. They will be there when donald trump leaves office. But at this point do you feel like that's still aspirational. Because we still have other wings of the party. Which include your former employees lawyer. Senator ted cruz of texas and senator josh hawley of missouri and several other senators. I mean what is the strategy. There are those that continue to stick with president trump banking on him remaining a leader in the republican. Party or the jockeying. Well that's the question. Certainly that they would have to answer. But obviously they do see some value in having the support of president and his supporters. But we also have people like senator. Kelly leffler the ran for senate in georgia. She came out after the violence yesterday and said that she is not going to oppose the certification of the electoral votes. So as more daylight put on the reality of the danger of of the actions of this president will republicans will understand that. That's not where this party needs to go. And that is not being pollyannaish about it. That is being actual. The people we saw are not representative of the party. We had more than seventy million republicans come out and vote for the republican ticket and their voices were not reflected in washington yesterday. And i think it's important to keep that in mind that what we saw was not the republican party that was a small faction of angry far right supporters and it's not reflective of the party as a whole perhaps a small faction fraction. But do you think that there's a third way. Then we've heard quite a few people float this idea of going beyond a two party system. Is that something that we can seriously consider the idea that perhaps a more moderate or pro trump supporters actually create another party. I can see tanya truthfully the if trump decides he wants to to continue to be involved in politics and wants to raise money and have ax to grind against people that have stood up to him Not out of the question or realm of possibility for a trump party to form or some version of that. But i've been a republican long enough and have enough trust in our party that it will survive this and there have been tough times and we will have an autopsy after this election and look at action items that need to be done and learn from this and grow from this but but as i said This party was strong before. Donald trump came and i believe took over this party and it will be strong when he leaves. There is a lot to consider and continue to examine and the days weeks and months and years ahead will be talking about this moment in history for quite some time. That's alice stewart. Cnn political commentator and former communications director for ted cruz presidential campaign as always alice. Thank you so much. Tanya thank you. We're hearing a lot of reaction from around the world to the insurrection. We watched yesterday at the. Us capitol including questions from other world leaders about the efficacy of our democracy cnn. Chief international correspondent. Clarissa ward is following that reaction from london. She joins us on skype and clarisa. What are we hearing from world leaders. It's it's a mixture certainly from. Us allies were hearing shock horror. Boris johnson the uk. Prime minister talking about disgraceful scenes in the us congress Heiko maas the woman. Foreign minister saying that trump and his supporters are to stop trampling democracy also the chancellor. Angela merkel Merckel herself saying we've seen the disturbing images. I was made angry and also sad by these images. I regret very much. That president trump did not admit defeat in november. And again yesterday. Essentially what you're hearing there is a collective condemnation of president trump which we haven't really seen before and then as you mentioned you have the reactions of countries that frankly are more used to being on the receiving end of admonishing press releases from the united states. We have russia saying Through a russian parliamentary speaker that the us political system is in deep crisis and also from venezuela similar rhetoric. So really this has provided a lot of countries with an opportunity to say that the us is no longer in any position to be schooling people with any real moral authority and in iran. The news agency fars call the us of fragmented democracy and the country's pro-government twitter account gloated posting tweets with the hash tag downfall of the us. We even heard from from nato's secretary. General which is actually really rare right. What did he say. It is rare Essentially he did what many others are doing which is to urge americans to respect the outcome of the november election. I think across the globe. There's this collective sense of horror. Frankly that the. Us appears to be tearing apart the powerful symbolism that so many countries in the world look to as a shining example and there's a frustration and indeed a genuine anxiety that what's happening in the us is out of control and can the us withstand another thirteen days of this because at the end of the day fundamentally even countries that view the us as an an adversary don't necessarily want to see a d. stabilized. Us that is dangerous for many countries across the globe. Whatever their feelings about america may be. You know. A serious as this is joe. Biden's first job as president will be dealing with this pandemic. I mean. I think a question that probably will come up over the next few weeks. Will he have the bandwidth to work on improving america's image and the rest of the world. And i guess the bigger question is and you've kind of late this out. Is that even an important task right now. The rest of the world needs to see that. America's still has skin in the game that america's still accepts understands and embraces The privileges and responsibilities that come with being the world's leading superpower because if the us is not willing to accept an embrace those responsibilities than other actors will step into the void. And we've seen that happening in the last four years. That's claris award. Cnn chief international correspondent. Thank you so much. Thank you don. The justice department is promising to prosecute people involved in yesterday's insurrection. At the capitol. Some charges are expected today in washington. Dc police say sixty eight people have already been arrested. But how did the extremist get inside the capitol in the first place. Malcolm nance is a national security analyst and he joins us now on skype malcolm. Thanks for speaking with me. My pleasure and from security standpoint. What did you see yesterday. I saw a national security disaster unfold and then turn into a national security catastrophe. I monitor right wing extremists. Chat groups Their telegram channels. They're private internet forums. And we saw this coming along time ago as you recall a couple of months ago there was a plot revealed by The us attorney's against six men in michigan. Who were planning to kidnap and try and execute. The governor of michigan gretchen. Whitmer the plan. B for that group was to take two hundred men storm the state house bring out all of the democratic and liberal or as they designate them people in state house try them and execute them by shooting or hanging them from the state house that viable plan was the first thing i thought of when i was monitoring their livestreams yesterday and saw them move away from the mall and go towards the capital. I said this is going to turn into something bad. Will you're right. The playbook was out there and it had i mean. We reported on it before the violence was happening. We were reporting on this chatter on social media on these online forums for anyone to see that were urging people to come armed talking about how to sneak guns into washington. Dc so the question is what happened. How is it possible that the police were so unprepared. You know i have to compare this to the protests that we saw the black lives matter protests in washington. Dc this summer and it's quite simple this summer. All of the resources of government were mobilized the protect the white house and to confront the black lives matter protesters because they were under the explicit orders of donald trump. in the attorney general. Bill barr to bring out every resource in the united states federal system. They brought in a riot response teams from the federal bureau of prisons. The be a helicopter as well. By the way they use the national guard with a protected. Symbol on it and actually body national guard from three other states and they use them like an iron mailed fist on those protesters in this one because it was after a speech that president trump had attended. They viewed this. I suspect that these protesters were about to exercise. What i could only identified as the ultimate white privilege. They were seen as live with law enforcement when they got to the western side of the capitol. It was open warfare with law enforcement but the ones that went to the eastern side. That's eventually penetrated the building. They were almost cooperating with them as if they were an extremely large. Is school tour group. It was an utter collapse of the capitol hill. Police responsibilities and their protocols everyone in that organization's management must be fired and then all officers need to be investigated to see whether they were complicit in this. We should point out that there are reports that vice president. It was the vice president. Mike pence who approved the order to deploy the national guard. It wasn't the president himself. Who is the commander in chief. What do you think about that. Here's the real reason that we saw any response whatsoever. And that we had the president of the united states seemingly report that they did not want the dc national guard mobilized through the department of justice. The reason that there was any response is because mike pence and kamala harris the incoming vice president and the special security force for nancy pelosi which is part of capitol hill. Police made an emergency call for immediate response from federal agencies that the vice president was under immediate an imminent threat. That is why the fbi is a strike. Teams moved out. That's why other police forces mobilized but they didn't call the metropolitan police department which has jurisdiction for every other part of the city other than capitol hill and it was the fbi and the secret service that really evacuated that building with the assistance of some elements of the capitol hill's emergency response forces as well an utter abject failure. It was mike pence who through his secret. Service forces called on the state of virginia to send military police national guardsmen. And only later did the department of justice authority for the washington dc police to mobilize all twelve hundred of its national guardsmen. And then the mayor was given cooperative authority to allow the metropolitan police department to respond actually secure capitol hill apple hill. Police ninth largest police force in america. Two thousand two hundred men guarding nine buildings. So why they couldn't respond in their own is because they thought the protesters were on their side. I'm speaking with security analyst malcolm nance about the security failures yesterday at the capitol when insurgents broken malcolm i. You're bringing up an interesting point here. That i think is important for anyone who's not familiar with the way law enforcement works in washington dc. It is a complicated place because there are so many jurisdictions there are capital police. Dc police there are federal troops. You've been talking about this. How should it have worked. It should have been an integrated network of all law enforcement brought into support all of the disparity operations that were going on the most important of which was the fact that you were in a joint session of congress. All of the members of the house of representatives and all of the members of the united states senate or in one room that alone should have constituted a national security threat which means every resource of the united states. Government should have been there in place exactly as it was for the state of the union. The only thing that was missing was the president of the united states so why they failed at. This is beyond me but more importantly it was taken like a routine day of mike pence. Going out to the golf course instead of having an complete integration of all law enforcement with a fbi national security ready room ready for all resources to respond from park police. The dc police enhanced swat units and two channel. Those protesters more towards union station and away from the capitol itself. I think that donald trump was quite pleased with that response. And this is why. We're not hearing from them. And it became incumbent upon the security details of the vice presidents in order to secure the entire for the capital. It's disgraceful. I can hear the outrage in your voice and so i'm guessing. I'm assuming that you are not confident. In what will happen next. In other words. There were many dozens hundreds of people inside the capitol building yesterday damaging. It people were seriously injured. There are photographs of people inside that building. What do you expect from the investigation going forward as we try to. I don't know out some kind of justice for what happened. Not being flippant. When i say isis is infuriated that they never came up with this idea of coming in through. A mass protests. Doing hostage barricade in executing everybody inside the building because that was viable yesterday. And i don't know if the people that had five firearms on them or the news that was set up outside the capitol whether they fully intended to have a murder cell in there who would be completely a wholly independent from the protesters enter. That building lay siege to and start every person in management failed every person in that part of the capitol hill police force who allow those protesters. And who did not guard the building failed. Now there's a template for taking over the united states capitol building all you need is a mass protest of people who looked like anybody other than black lives matter in antifa and you can just take over a state building. It's happened before. And i think that in many state houses across this country they fear that it's going to happen again very soon. Malcolm nance national security analyst. Thank you for your time. My pleasure For the first time. Twitter and facebook have taken the extraordinary steps of locking president. Trump's accounts facebook. Ceo mark zuckerberg said today that president trump would not be able to post on the platform until at least after inauguration. Day the twelve hour ban on the president's twitter account is set to expire today. These changes come. After the president's tweets stoked insurrectionists to storm the capital far-right online platforms also ran rampant in the days before with calls for violence to smuggle guns into dc and even killed if they encountered resistance. Let's bring in rematch srinivasan. A professor of ucla's department of information studies to talk about the significance of all of this ramesh. Thank you and welcome. Thank you for having me. Yes so twitter and facebook locked. Trump's accounts at least temporarily. Why do you think they waited so long. When he's actually been pushing baseless claims of election fraud for months yes absolutely. I think you know there were there was the labeling practice that was labeling some of trump's tweets in particular in in terms of saying this could be misleading or. There are disputing sources to this. But i think that the social media companies by and large have been very slow to act in decisive ways regarding president trump's behavior partly because a huge draw those platforms themselves are trump's posts as well as the kinds of content that trump and his supporters have been posting on these platforms. So now that we are seeing that the actual content being posted by trump is having real life violence violent consequences. I think far greater steps need to be taken not merely temporary d platforming really considering banning president trump from these platforms. Yes because the argument is is there any sign that flagging trump's tweets as dispute it as has done. Does that even have any real impact. There's very little evidence around that i've yet to see evidence. Put out by the technology companies or any independent third party researchers that flagging something to actually convince users to not believe what they see. We are presented with the completely opaque some use. The term chamber worldview when we go on these platforms many of president trump supporters including sadly many of those who rioted and committed what i believe to be. Domestic terrorism. Yesterday were influenced by complete worldview. That they felt was in complete agreement with themselves and actually of anything Made their worldview more hardened and amplified their views because that was the world they were presented on the technology platform itself. It was a closed view into a so-called wider media world and we also know that these technology platforms are making more visible content. That is more sensational is predicted to grab someone's attention it's something they call maximizing user engagement and we know that trump has seen twitter in particular but social media more generally as his mouthpiece to the people his divide and conquer strategy of disorienting and riling people up and really fragmenting our country and our democracy as we see right in front of us right now. Let's talk a little bit about some of those other platforms. Besides facebook and twitter. There had been warning signs of what was to come on far right message. Boards like parlour. There were called to bring guns to storm the capital to kill if needed what happened in the monitoring of these types of boards. Why why did these warning. Signs go under the radar. What we're seeing happening is on what one might think of as fringe platforms like discord or like cunanan or four chan or even. Read it in the past. There would be this bubbling up of conspiracy theories and very quickly of violence the discussions about violence and retribution and taking the country back and essentially insurrectionist kinds of rhetoric would emerge on those platforms. And because again they're closed box platforms people see their experiences on those platforms as the reality and now we see very clear. Evidence that parlor in particular was the birthplace and was dominated by a great amount of discussion about specifically about violence and guns and actually overtaking the capital as of yesterday. But has there been an acknowledgement from parlor or any of these other message boards. You talked about in their hand. And inciting this insurrection. Not at all and actually this is an issue across the board because we don't see any sort of liability or you know actual progressive steps taken by any of the big technology platforms or even these smaller ones to actually take any responsibility for what emerges and goes viral on their platforms. We need to push public third party. Governance accountability transparency and i would say even audit of all of these platforms moving forward to ensure that business interests are protected in our country but not at the cost everybody else not at the cost of our democracy not at the cost of this kind of horrific violence we've witnessed and not at the cost of our workers and our minorities and those who are marginalized in our in our country right. Now that was ramesh. Serena vaas on a professor at ucla's department of information studies. Thank you so much. I was great to join you and here now is a production of npr in wb. You are in association with the bbc world service. I'm tanya mossley. I'm peter o'dowd this is.

georgia united states republican party Mark wayne mullen senate trump alice stewart ted cruz tanya donald trump washington peter o president trump wbz tanya moseley william bar Troy nehls dc police liz cheney President trump
Joy  Episode 1

Truth Be Told

30:47 min | 2 years ago

Joy Episode 1

"Support for truth be told comes from the East Bay community foundation. There was this question my daughter asked me a few years ago, but still haunts me. She was about seven. We were driving for San Francisco. The music was bumping son was out and from the back seat. She yelled out, mom, why are the homeless people Brown? Outside of our windows. I saw them black and Brown people and despair, begging for helping hand I was speechless. How do I begin to explain that what she was seeing where the impacts of systemic racism? I mean, I'm a journalist, I think about these questions all the time. But what's the right way to tell a child, how racism can ravage our bodies and our minds, I settled on an age appropriate answer, but I wish I had a place I could go for that advice to talk it out. This is that place. I'm Tanya Moseley and you're listening to truth. Be told the advice show. You've always wanted where hard questions understanding ears where we people of color can be candid about the frustrations. We're feeling come together in search of solutions. Dear truth between truth be told told I need your help. Our first question comes from someone. We're calling finding joy, I'm Muslim. I'm a woman. I'm brown. The weld is not safe for people like me to walk through it. Finding joy has seen a lot. I'm a doctor. So I've seen suffering very up that people die in my arms. I can't always be optimistic and know how things end often, she's also consumed by the vitriol endeavour station. She sees on her Twitter and news feeds, whether it's here is an India, it's in the DRC where the second-biggest our be Bolas raging and no one seems to care. And yet, despite that suffering finding joy has actually found joy. She is living her best life. I was just in the car with my friend, the other day, filling him in giving an update on my life. And how happy I am and book deals, and all these amazing things the monastic wait, is it? Okay. The I am happy. And that's where she feels conflicted. And my question is, is it okay to feel huge phenomenal amazing joy when it seems like the rest of the world is burning so many of us feel this way, including me, not just is it? Okay. But how to feel joy when they're so much chaos in the world to answer that. I knew I had to go to the place where I, I felt joy, a place that has always been burning, ladies and gentlemen. Welcome to Detroit. Michigan for the local time is three oh, six home. Detroit, Motown the motor city capital of the world. This city is the epicenter of pleasure in the midst of turmoil. My hometown even with all that it's gone through it is still a joyous city. I mean, I've lived in seven states but nowhere. But Detroit can I run across two guys who just met each other jamming out on their trumpets in the parking lot of a Starbucks. Joy, I cannot live without joy. That's detroiter. Kevin jackson. I'll just breathing the first year. Ming. Good people hear happiness has of ood just feeling good each and every day. Kevin comes from a long line of black people who had the audacity years ago to break from the shackles of a racist and oppressed. South his people, my people created mobility in every sense of the word through automobiles home ownership and culture. It was vibrant black poor like my grandmother, Ernestine, Moseley she and my grandpa migrated from Mississippi to the d- when I was seventeen years old, this summer. She'll be ninety three that was just like a kid. L A store. I never am seen so many likes. It was just beautiful. Her enthusiasm for the city was contagious, and our home. It has always been a place of refuge. My grandma's cooking and baking. That's her top talent hands down. Well everybody in my family's house, both day cake. Some, they will born German chocolate cake was my favorite, but my grandma has also been here for the city's lows. The nineteen sixty eight riots the loss of the automobile industry and the jobs that went with them, the rise in crime. The city's bankruptcy in spite of it. All my grandma is still joyful still has unspeakable joy. I don't think I've ever really seen her in despair, you know, this, the difference between joy and happiness, you know. Well difference. Well happened that sparked. Unhappy right now. I'm just happy to see you. That's different from joy, the joy. The joy is in your heart and it staves with you. My grandma at ninety two could probably write a whole book on joy, which takes us back to our question from our question asker finding joy this so much conflict because how Darrae how come I be full of joy is conflicting? Well, if. Beverly Bev big. That's question this minute and yet is so easy. I get joy out of helping people. Doing. That's what my joy it comes in. Oh. Mon- joy comes in. What I can talk to someone and live, you know, if, if I didn't say something to make them feel better. If I can do some little something for them to help them. And the spine of everything in the world is still beautiful biz Abuna pool world we've got here and we got to change it. We have to get up there and roll up sleeves, and do what we can to help people because in helping somebody else you help you self twice as much. I came to Detroit to seek answers, not only from my grandmother, but also someone who has made the practice of teaching about joy and pleasure. Her life's work. My name is Adrienne Maree Brown, and I am the author of pleasure activism, the politics of feeling good and. Live in Detroit in really, really, really a pleasure. Goddess, and what exactly is a pleasure, goddess, so a huge portion of the pleasure, activism concept for me is about reclaiming saying, like, so much grief and harm and abuse and terror have come to us as people of color as women as a price, marginalized people, and we have to balance that out and reclaim our right to joy. And pleasure Ray like if you have privilege, you get to go have massages and have a hot tub and have a lot of space. And like if you have money you have time for sexual expirations and traveling for fun and all this kind of stuff. Yeah. You heard that, right. We went from grandma to sex. And if you don't you're supposed to just be happy with a simple life and just work, right? And I'm like that's bullshit, Adrien. Marie Brown lives about ten miles away from my grandmother in downtown. Detroit, the Cass corridor. It's a neighborhood that was once known as the cut. It's now kind of trendy. Did you know this is my hometown? Yes. So I'm from here. Hey, can I just say everything's about Detroit is whenever I meet a black person is not currently living here. They're like, here's what I did or here's my family list, like, yeah. Yes. Black America's essential dot com. Even though there is a half-century age difference between Adrian and my grandmother, they share similar wisdom. Certain while a joy in improving itself in taken Baz. I'm thinking thoughts them writing books. I'm watching shows. I'm getting hi, I'm cooking. I'm doing some yoga Adrian, Murray's house feels like an oasis pink and blue scarves draped her dining room, windows, where would you like to sit down to let's lounges where you wanna go. We get cozy on the couch with our team. Die. Pose the big question is it okay to feel joy when the world is burning? And how do I feel joy burning in reading, so much of your work? Yeah. Just felt like I'm think about this all the time. I mean, would you answer? What do you feel the answer is? That's the question for you. Oh. That's what we traveled all this way. So this is like. I feel like this has been my for a long time. It was kind of, like my secret discovery was, oh, I still, like I still need to feel good every day. Right. Like to feel joy feel connection like because I think it's good to like break down. You know, when I say, like what is pleasure? Even you know, it's like satisfaction contentment joy, it's not, you know, twenty four orgasms in a twenty four hour period, although that is possible for people. And if that's your bag, you should definitely do it, and I think all women should do it, at least once because our bodies can do that is kind of wild, what we can do, but I distract myself. So the assumption inside that question is that joy is extraneous, but joy is something to the side of life that joy is something that you have to earn or it's just something over here, poet, Audrey Lord wrote about this. And uses of the erotic. It's one of Adrian's favorite books. She quotes it heavily in her own words, fear of our desires keeps them suspect and indiscriminately powerful Adrian is, especially drawn to Lord's idea that when we're afraid or suppress our desires, they hold power over us and make us weak. What she kind of she flips that upside down, and she's just like no joy is our birthright. Pleasure is our birthright, feeling are radical lioness that is all ours and his oppression and marginalization and years of abuse, that have made us believe otherwise and once we reclaim it, it will no longer settle for suffering. So it's like it's actually not just. Oh, is it okay? To have a little or should I keep my eyes on the prize? It's like in order to keep your eyes on the prize. You need to be fully experiencing. You're alive erotic self. Yes. Right. Right. What I'm hearing from you is that I you just have to take the moment, though, to get to know yourself and to understand and awake. In yourself, so you can hear those messages. So, right. If I was to say, step-by-step, I you have to get to know yourself, the more, you know, yourself, the more you'll know what it is. You're actually supposed to be up to in the world, right? You'll be able to hear like, what is the calling because I really do think that a lot of conflict comes from people being in the wrong place that they're not responding to their actual calling, and they're miserable. And I think misery, begets, misery, begets misery. I think that a ton of people now are like starting wars maintaining wars, and having a basically a conflict approach to all life because they have an inner misery. They don't know themselves, there's no center in peace in pleasure in their lives. So a lot of is this other concept of talked about of attention liberation is like, how do you actually take your attention away from things where you can't change it, and it, doesn't it doesn't actually help to pay attention to it, and how you start to bring your attention to things that do help? So I'll say one one area. We're pleasure. Activism has been happening for me. Is I will take my when someone's telling me the news, I take my attention off of just like whatever the habits. Yeah, I bring my attention immediately to who is working on the solutions, and it brings me so much. Pleasure to see what humans do to work on the solutions, and that's where I want to pay attention to. So say if there was a shooting. Yes. Right. So there's a shooting like the parkland shooting is a great example, this, right? There's this tragedy. There's a huge amount of grief, it's going to happen. There's nothing that I will be able to do about that piece of it. There is stuff that I can do around gun lobbying. There is stuff that I can do to support the young people who are now stepping forward to be incredibly coherent leaders around gun violence, right, bringing my attention, even though it doesn't it's like is that pleasurable? No, right. It's like this is a hard situation but because I have access to pleasure. I have access to what my attention was to go towards that. I'm able to feel in myself. There's no usefulness in me just paying just regurgitating the same stats about gun violence. There's usefulness for me bringing the. Light beam of my attention over to what these folks. These young people are doing for solutions and bring other people's attention. There. This idea of attention liberation, it doesn't just work for our shared communal tragedies for personal wants to grandma. You've been through a lot. You've lost two children gif. And so sometimes, I think if my grandma can still laugh and have joy. What is that? The burden skits heavy. Just like. Do you have the scar? The boroughs is like. Take shoot through what you know that sweep. I thought I could never laughed for did you know have like a bread. In my chest. Who wouldn't go away? It was every day every. Heavily, but I still have responsibilities. And I still love the law. Do it all. And. It will never go away, but it will ease God is God gives me joy. That I can't explain it makes possible to. To live to, and it makes you stronger, and with this, my grandmother, chooses to liberate her attention by focusing on all the beautiful things that God has created by him in the whole world. Look look at sun and the moon and stars trees, grabs every vein that you can you see this God and especially mad. Another. I'm looking at God right now. I couldn't hear face. Up next. What else are you devoting your attention to and how might it be robbing you of joy? Plus, when was the last time you walked around the house, naked Adrien, Marie shares all of us should practice this ritual of self love when we return. Support comes from the East Bay community foundation. Proud sponsor of truth. Be told to meet today's social and economic challenges. The East Bay community foundation partners with donors social movements and the community to eliminate structural barriers and create equitable outcomes for all East Bay home. Learn more at ABC F dot org. Your attention is the gift it can be the curse. But it is the, you know, life animates you. And then you are giving your attention. And so what you give it to is what you grow in your life. Right. So if you give it to tyranny, if you give it to bullshit, if you give it to gossip and complaining if you give it to tearing other humans down, if you give it to petty thoughts, if you give it to horrible, self thinking, if you give it to a miserable job. Right. That's what you will grow. Right. The job is a great, great way to understand. This is like you might be like, I hate this job Lee show up every day you grow the skill sets about job. And then that becomes the path that you can escalate along some like if you hate that job, you better get out of it, as soon as you can because you're going to keep going on that Pat need to get yourself on another path. They've how do the work though. Like, I know you're not therapists, and we can't be there all night. But like if you were like to say to some. One. Okay. You have listened to this tonight. You're listening to it, and here's your first step, I want you to take. Oh, that's good. I would say to do an inventory of yourself of your life right right down the places where you're like I feel completely deeply in alignment with myself in these areas of my life. So might be I feel deeply in a line with how I am as a as an life for me. I'll say as an auntie I'm just like I show up as an auntie I am super present when I'm on T alike. I create we're going on Sundays that you created. Like I feel like I'm just like you are there. I guess you are the one for whatever right? Yes. I'm showing up and then where the areas where you're like I'm actually out of alignment here. Like I say, I care about this, but I do this. Right. So I'll say years ago, I had an area like this rows food Justice yet, like food, sovereignty food Justice. But then when I went to the airport. My lucky thing to get on the plane wasn't McDonald's sausage, egg mcmuffin. Yeah. Meal, number two, right? That was my I was like this is my lucky thing. And I was so the more I was talking food Justice. But then I was going and eating McDonalds. We're not traveled. Yes. And I had a whole justified house finished my lucky Faye. But that guy's a place where I was like, pulling my Hooda, pulling a hat, on, I hope no one sees me doing this thing. And I and that shape, I was like this, because at Mahato mime it out of the line. So that's a great way to know. You're out of alignment is if it's something that you're like I try to hide this from others. Yeah. I would be embarrassed, if this was in my bio, what brings you joy, I get a lot of joy from, from my physical body. I'm very much like both both. How how have come to feel about my body? So, like when I walk by mirror, naked. Yeah, I will stop and just be like, okay, okay. We are doing the damn thing today of it. You look great. You and to be there at the age of forty to feel like I have had to reclaim and work so hard. Right to unlearn all this bullshit, that people told me about my miraculous body. Yeah, just have had to do so much work. And so. The joy is in relationship to that work, right? It's like this just come. It wasn't like everyone was a firm made me my whole life. And then I was like, oh, yeah, it I am great. It was the opposite. You know, as people were telling me all the time, how I needed to change my body, and I still found a way to tell you, something, so, yeah. So reading, pleasure activists and reading all of this and your steps s to this, I literally had to keep looking up. Like I read if you line that had to look up and think, and that actually turned my husband said, she's telling me to walk around naked your. It was like. For that. She's telling me to look at myself in the mirror, and like find parts of myself and take pictures of myself. And I just want to say that there was just this one moment where I had, and I felt so joy for me is like freedom. Yes. And there was just the second of freedom that I actually felt not getting there is a process like you said, is it is an Al act. Got practice it practice. Yes. That's exit work. So then taking that being naked in the ocean. And just feeling the ways you know, it's like this other level of sensation. I feel so much joy with the sun or with water on me where I'm dislike. I wanna love myself the same way the sun, does son does not shoes some parts that it sinks are great. The sun is just like if I can touch it, I can nourish it a warm. It's going to be so good, right? And the water's the same way. It's not you know, there's no judgment. There's no withholding. But then I withhold from myself affection, or I said, this part is good. But not that part. Yeah. Let's get a lot of joy from being alone like. Like. I love it so much. And I love it every day as I age. I enjoy it more and more, right? My grandma said the same thing. 'em all age. I'm like being loan. Sometimes it's meditation. I can meditate for. Oh my goodness. I can just meditate now. At the core of our question. And our question Aster is built. Yes, she saying, is it okay to feel joy because she's already feeling it. Yeah. I think it's not just okay but have slightly necessary to feel joy in these moments. And I think if you look at people who have actually survived apocalypse genocide. Laughter. Intimacy and connection finding ways to be generous with each other even in conditions where it looks like we have nothing. Those are always always always the ways that we have made it through apocalypse. And those are always the ways that we have felt like oh, like my goal is not to assimilate into those people who genocide at me or took over something. My goal is to continue maintaining, this community in this culture. This family humor keeps us. Humble keeps us connected to each other, and it helps us move through these moments. Nothing if we couldn't laugh, we would not make it, right. Right. We would not make the other thing I wanna juxtaposed into this is Bobby Sands who's the one of the hunger, strikers, for the, the IRA prisoners, one of the things he says, one of his poems is our revenge will be the laughter of our children. Oh, you'll be the laughter virtual to me that quote holds it. All right. It's like yes. Harm suffering. All. Has happened to us but we transmute that harm into something else. And so what we offer to the next generation is something healed. After is important. Your joy is important is not a guilty pleasure. Right. It's actually, like, a, a strategic move towards the future that we all need to create the one in which our children are laughing. Our children are free. Our children can go wherever they need to go. There's no borders. Hold them, right? That's I mean you know what I'm saying? That's it makes me cry, too. Like that's what I'm fighting for. That's what I'm living for. And that's what I'm loving for. That's why pleasure to me is like freedom freedom journey, you know. And I think it also throughout space in time, you know, like in my imagination, I go back and make sure that Harriet Tubman was getting her feet rubbed. He you know what I'm saying? Like we just have to think about is what we do to ourselves now. Actually think of your body as conduit across space and time so that you can buy healing the present body, you can heal back and then your healing forward. And I love that idea to that. I'm just like my grandmother. I don't know if she ever got her feet rubbed. Yeah. She should. Have she should have? It's funny. Adrian says that my mom and unskilled, my grandma weekly foot massages. We say it's to keep the circulation going in her feet, and it's that, but it's also an act of gratitude a thank you through touch an act of love, you know this morning. I woke up trying to see the day I visited my grandmother, she woke up with a song in her head. I can't sing. I mean, more. But I still love to sing. To doing the pulse will. To fight. The N P fo. I know that song do you know this? Aw, I woke up this morning. Singing that song. And I was just I was all caught up in that song because. Oh, wouldn't this we beautiful world? Everybody felt that way. Oh, I'm gonna go. I'm gonna I'm gonna make it happen. Stills tro o with the last so. Two. He unbeatable fall. Is it okay to feel huge phenomenal amazing joy when it seems like the rest of the world? His burning. The answer is not only a resounding. Yes, it's imperative essential to our progress and our survival. And that's why we're doing this show. I also wanna know some ways you stay sane in this beautiful. But crazy world I need all the tips, I can get y'all at me at truth be told show on Twitter and let us know what brings you joy. While you're listening on apple podcasts. NPR one YouTube or wherever you get your shows. Please take a second to leave us a review and a rating. It helps other people find our show. Thank you on our next episode of truth. Be told I can't swipe right on Asian guys. Hey like him. Because of his blond hair, his blue eyes, we're going to unpack all of your colonize, desires colonized desire is when the colonize person has a set of beliefs around beauty and value. That's based on the colonial power that has colonize them. That's next time on truth. Be told. This podcast was produced by Christina Kim and edited by Sondhi Dirks are sound engineer is in Rico, Benjamin, thanks to kick. You dis head of podcasts. Julie Kane cake, you managing editor for news Vinnie tongue executive editor for news. Ethan, Lindsey and chief content officer Holly, Kernan a special thanks to my mom. My grandma Nandy corner and source bookstore in Detroit truth be told his funded in part by grant from the California wellness foundation with a commitment to diversity equity and inclusion, the foundations vision is for every resident of California to enjoy good health and experience, wellness truth be told as a production of cake you in San Francisco. I'm Tanya Moseley. There's this uncon- unspeakable joy by Kim English, and it's like it's like a house track. And it's really like, Gino, it's like. Unspeakable joy because they did not give it they can take it away. Unspeakable joy is every time over the song. I'm like, you know, I can't even she's like when I wake up in the morning. Yes. And if I started and I'm gonna funk by the end of it. I'm like. Both joy.

Detroit Joy Adrian Tanya Moseley East Bay community foundation Twitter San Francisco Michigan Adrien Marie Brown Brown DRC Kevin jackson Audrey Lord Starbucks Adrienne Maree Brown ABC America
No More Shame

Truth Be Told

30:04 min | 6 months ago

No More Shame

"Truth be told is made possible in part by production grants from the Housing Simon's foundation and the California Wellness Foundation. From K. Q. E. D.. Okay I am always real with you but I'm GonNa. Tell you something really personal. Mental illness runs in my family and never called it a secret, but we never talked about it not even with each other until recently. Two of my uncles who are now deceased suffered from mental illness and there is not a day that goes by that I don't think about how their lives might have been different if we just had a better understanding of what they were going through. But I think a lot of the reasons why were so bad at understanding is because society tells us that mental illness is a personal failing a weakness. Here's the thing though as we learn more about how the mind works, we gotta try harder to understand the people we love who are suffering. I'm Tanya Moseley and that's the topic we're taking on on this episode of truth be told. Their to be told, Dear, truth through toll. Dear Truth be told your truth. Be told I really need your help I need your help need your help. Support for truth be told comes from land t Lou. Williams and company introducing season three of seventy million of peabody nominated podcast about criminal justice in jail reform. Each week starting September fourteenth. A team of reporters around the country chronicles how communities are taking action and addressing criminal justice reform in their neighborhoods from the bail system and racialist policing to the school to prison pipeline and the spread of Covid in jails listen to seventy million today at seventy million pod DOT COM or search for seventy million in your favorite podcast APP. Back in the two thousands Bassey, Igby was riding high. Give along the Fourth Woken Bassey AP from Nigeria. Bassey was popular spoken word poet touring the country with HBO's Def Poetry Jam. Walked onto the land of the so less here no souls rest black equals target for bullets and we march tomorrow mourn another murdered in silence where do our screens go but those highs were more than the high that comes with success. These highs were manic and the lows they were the can't get out of bed barely able to walk to the bathroom kind of lows at twenty seven years old betsy finally had A. Name for this thing that had ruled her life for years bipolar disorder after her diagnosis with bipolar to she chronicled her journey in a best selling book of essays called I'm telling the truth but I'm lying and found it the seaway project a nonprofit that promotes mental health awareness throughout the global black community. Bassey. Is Our wise when this week and we started off our conversation talking about what those highs and lows feel like. It feels amazing in exhilarating and you feel powerful than you feel like the most amazing person in the entire world and that's a that's a good feeling. You, take on a lot I know I was very active. I was meeting up with friends. I was writing a lot. Performing I was doing all these things but once you stay up there, it gets frightening because there's no down and it feels like there's no ground beneath your feet. It's disorienting. It is shocking because you're supposed to feel the ground. You know you're supposed to feel even at some point and to not feel that it also triggers like paranoia sugars insomnia triggers all these other things that come with it. People don't realize how physically uncomfortable it is. There's a physical discomfort that comes with it that that I I was hoping that I could kind of describe in the book by laying out the picture showing all the parts of it I'm not just the parts that people see the parts that we feel and are able to articulate one of the things that I've been sitting with and I was really struck by something you said it was in reference to Kanye West and I think the question was. How can we? Differentiate his mental illness with his misogynistic behavior or with his outbursts against certain people are his support for President Donald Trump and you said. We cannot. It's easy for us to dismiss. The impacts that mental health has on people because again it feels it looks it appears to be a personality disorder. So if we're not able to link this medical condition with behavior, then it's easy to dismiss people. It's easy to to turn our backs and turn our empathy off because the person is saying or doing something we don't like because the person is doing or saying something that we don't agree with or is socially unacceptable. The reason why someone like a conjugate West is saying these things without filter because usually we have a filter, right? We think all kinds of things I know that I. will go to the grocery store and think why is are here like that. But I wouldn't say that you're right because because I have a filter odd. If my personality were different, I probably would say and I think that. Doesn't seem to be the most likeable person. So the illness enhances that unlike ability in like. Like you. You gave the example of then based on your personality how your highs might exhibit for you. So you might actually then be obsessing on whether or not you've offended someone or or or something like that. Yeah. It just turns the switch up you can't disconnect it. I don't think it's fair to but I also think that people do it because it's easier we've come a long way when it comes to mental health awareness but there are still aspects of it that I think people are resistant to because it's confusing because it's not easy because there's no set pattern of behavior. So there's no set pattern of response, right? I wish that people were were more. Attached to the empathy part of it and I don't think that we are yet. It's GonNa take a little bit more right now we have all the language we have all the words we have ways to relate. You know my nerves are anxiety sadness depression, my hyperactivity, your high energy mania, but it lessens it. It does make it much more difficult. I think for people who experience these very large diagnosis it produces what we go through I think. I mean, how do we get there though because there is not a person in this world who's not impacted by mental illness either themselves someone they love someone they work with I mean. You're nonprofit specifically works with trying to really change this perception about mental illness and really bring about that empathy. But I'm thinking about specifically for the black community actor Kendrick Sampson was saying one of the biggest barriers he sees is the myth that as black Americans, we always have to be strong and that mental illness is perceived as a weakness. But think about what's going on in the world now and I'm thinking about how much? Black people are forced to endure on A. What feels like a daily basis now and Not. Having, permission to break is something that's going to break us. Long after people die from from corona or police brutality or racism people are going to keep dying because our emotions our spirits are will to live is being challenged because I see. So many people just falling into a despair. What's the point? Right? What's the point of voting? What's the point of doing this or that, and that's part of what's hurting us and and I feel like we need to fake it until we make it and not in the fake it everything's great until we make. But the pretend we get it. Pretend that we have empathy pretend that we're making space for people to feel so that when the time comes for us to support each other in a real way, we've already built the foundation for this actually brings us to our listener question comes from bree. She was diagnosed with bipolar disorder over a year ago and she's been able to manage her disability on her own throughout college. But now she wants to be honest on job applications when they ask you do you have a disability because bipolar does impact how she moves through the world, but she's not sure about this. Let's listen. Dear two-three to- My name is bree and I live in Detroit. Michigan. So looking for jobs has been like really hard just because it's so coping in like I don't really have an essential degree I guess degrees in English and creative writing. Whenever I get to do you have a disability part in high see like all the bullet points I'm just like I mean if you want to be technical yes but I always put no. Matches people like to say they're not GonNa get any against you. They definitely will if they feel like it. I just don't think. Take it seriously I. Think People look at me different intrigue me oddly, and I noticed that whenever a job application is like, can you do this without reasonable accommodations? I'm just like that combination someone would need who? You. Know wasn't physically able in versus where I would need are completely different. So for me to just mark. No I can't do this without reasonable combinations of severe because Mike Combinations don't look the same and I think that's very vague of them to ads people. My question is, how do I as a graduate who is looking for jobs navigate my disability in work? Thank you for this question first of all Bassey your advice for free. Yeah. Based on on the question I do wonder. If she's doing completely on our own meaning the she's figured out. You know the crutches and the coping mechanisms and and things like that things that I did for quite a long time the issue in I'll get to her question but the issue is that those crutches break that coping mechanism falls apart. Because of how unpredictable this illness can be can be fine for five, six seven years, and then just one morning you're not embassy can you lay out for some the ways that you did that for yourself? What that looks like my twins is a little different because I don't work nine to five. So pre diagnosis I was on tour with death poetry jam and. What I'd figured out for myself was that when I was feeling that I was slipping into a depressive episode, I would just disappear I would stay in the House I would sleep or lounge whatever it is I need to w stay away and then when my energy kicked back up, I would want around do all of the things that I didn't do before I couldn't do and so I got this reputation of my friends like, Oh, she'll. She'll be back she does she disappears and then she comes came right exactly became a personality traits. So did my coming back high-energy? Let's go out. Let's do this. Let's have lunch. Let's you know all these things. That became part of my personality until I got the tour and on the tour I had to be. In, my dressing room at seven PM I had to be on stage at eight PM. I had to give three hours of my life performance non-negotiable. I couldn't disappear I couldn't do all the things that I had. I had constructed for myself to to make this thing easier for me whatever this thing was at the time. So listening to Bre-. Let's say you get the job if you're not doing this with. A therapist or a doctor those ways you've learned to manage are GonNa fall apart because you have to be at work at nine and and as much as I would love world where mental illness was treated the exact same way as a physical disability it's not and it's very easy for people to be dismissive of it I personally I never check. I never check it because I know what the questions are. That despite people's best intentions there is a bias. Yeah we're. By conscious by exactly to navigate that before you even get the job. Is Tough. It's tough. So I I I hate to say don't check it because I don't know what her needs are like she says that her needs are different. I wish in college I would've been more vocal about it because I think that it would have made my college experience easier. I probably would have graduated because I could say to my professor I can't get out of bed today or you know I can I didn't have confidence to do that then I could definitely do that now now I'm. Nothing is more important than than my mental health. So with bree. I. WanNa. Know Washing. Feels like she should. And also why? She feels like she should without the aid of a of a medical professional, right those are questions definitely that she needs to be seeking a medical professional. But how how do you manage finding a healthcare provider that you can truly trust a therapist friend says it's like finding a hairdresser barber. Just. Got To keep trying. Right one you need a haircut. You need your hair done and you can find the one that you go to permanently. But if you need it today, you need it today. So there's certain things that are I would say like emergency situations where you just need to talk to somebody where you're either a danger to yourself or others you know this, you want to have a conversation you need to talk to. Get something out the therapist you see may not be the right one, but you're not married to them in a perfect world. My answer would be one thing but the world we live in now, I would advise not to check off the disability until you get the job and then when you get the job be clear with yourself, what your needs are so that you can be clear with your employer because. The question is kind of vague because there's so much. We don't know about her situation in so much that we don't know about the even the field that she's trying to get into she said English and creative writing right is her. So her she has a yeah she has. Yeah. So are you trying to work in a newsroom and yet to think about this to their certain careers that I personally would not? Oh, this is interesting. Yeah. Yeah. I personally would not even attempt because for me it's too high pressure being Zayed's it'd be too much the. The the frustration could trigger depression. There's all kinds of things like I couldn't run a fortune five, hundred company because CEO's work long hours I. Have Friends who are in the medical profession who who live with mental issues may have to be very very. Strict about everything. Right in order to make sure that that pressure doesn't affect them like it's very easy for me to say it affects nothing you can do anything you want to it changes nothing but that's not the truth. The truth is, does it does affect the way that we that we are able to function in certain situations, which is why you would need the aid and the. Help. So I think I'd just be very clear with myself the jobs that I'm looking for the opportunities that I'm looking for and whether or not I can actually handle. A job that says that you need to work three nights shifts in a row which MRS? Up. Your sleep. What I'm hearing from you or two things that that you definitely want if bree, if you haven't already to to find medical professional to help me through this. But then also what I'm hearing from you is that it's encouraging to hear someone her age who is in tune with herself and her diagnosis and being able to listen to the things that you need are so important as she navigates trying to find a job understanding what her pressure points are understanding, how she navigates. Those are the two most important things I think for bree right now, as she goes through what is such a difficult time for everyone to to kind of live through at this moment which I want to know from you, I, mean. How were you taking care of yourself? I. was working out for for a while and then my my medical physical doctor said that I need to stop. Because I have other health issues that were being affected, I was playing tennis I was doing all these things and now they're like, you know your your heart's not great. Let's it's calm down on the on the cardio so I have to. Readjust, which is what happens. Right this is what we do. I'm staring at Yoga chime like trying to like you know how do the work I have made? This twenty year quest I like it on it every few years, and it's like I gotta make myself like this but. I like it. I i. just I try so hard but it's just not for me but I I need to do something in in that calming that Meditative approach to it I am. Watching Hamilton a lot. I am giving myself permission to do the most. UNAPOLOGETICALLY. Joyful joy filled things that I possibly can more than anything. The most important to me is is what I'm giving to the world and if I can't give it to myself, there's nothing left for the world. So I'm I'm being very careful and tender gentle and graceful with myself in that just means that that's that's a that that means something different every day means something different every morning this weekend I built a dresser 'cause I've had the box in my bedroom for a month and a half and I was just I'll just call tasks, grab it. I'll just find the time get someone in here to do it and I was like I'll do it and it's crooked. You know the bottom of the list of the top George get the bottom door to slide. But I did it again and I'm very happy about sheets. I'm doing these things that that I I have neglected to do because I didn't think they were big enough. And they're just I'm stacking enough little joyful things to create something big and like I said, it changes every single day. It does I have a friend who she's been putting off painting a room in her house and so she's like you know what I just said to myself. The other day I'll just paint a wall a day or a wall, the week or wall every three weeks we have to kind of be kind to ourselves to do that I mean time is relative now it doesn't even. You have to do what you feel in the moment it changes day to day. Is that kind of your advice for all of us? I'm kind of worried about everyone and everyone's mental health right now it really is alive you. I'm also very one of the things that guides me is I celebrate the inches I think that. Quite. Often, we don't know how far we've come until we turn around and look and I think that every step forward means the celebration. Every step Ford needs to be acknowledged. I celebrate every minute every inch everything that seems en- feels like it makes me feel good. You know like I, think that we don't give ourselves permission especially now we don't give ourselves permission to feel good because the world is in chaos right like people. Are Dying literally and people are losing their jobs and people are are not okay. So it feels it feels almost offensive to to find joy for yourself and I think that that does a disservice to those people I believe in collective kindness and I believe in collective joy i. believe that if someone sharing good news with me like I troll twitter for good news people like Oh Mutasa my birthday I, don't know you would have birthday. You know my birthday was a couple of weeks ago and I posted on basically I want presence I don't think I've gotten birthday gifts since I was a teenager I want gifts and I got some gifts. It's the little things in the in the little things aren't little right. Now you've grown into that though I can imagine or have you always been someone to be able to tell others what you need. I've grown into it. I spent a lot of time not wanting to be. A burden because I felt like a burden to myself, I felt too big for my own head. So what what, how, how, large for the rest of the world's I I I package myself small in order to avoid an explosion that took up too many people because I could feel that. My my psychiatrist. This morning said you are hypercritical of yourself in a think that I am also hyper vigilant because I am very aware of how. I'm very aware of the fact that people aren't islands that we're all interconnected and so I feel like it's my responsibility to make make sure that my island is taken care of and make sure that no one else has to take care of my island and that doesn't mean that people don't care for me. It just means that because people care for me, I have a responsibility to myself and I have a responsibility to those people not to give them too much care about. United. I'll clean up this little spill. But if I, need help I'll call you betsy at work it's long time. It took it took a long time. But really what's so remarkable about you and I wanNA thank you personally is that by you laying yourself bear like this and sharing your story it's a way for us to have a deeper understanding about the people we love in our lives. While I want to say that because have. People in my life with mental illness. And We Watch the people we love suffer, but then I've seen. Tremendous growth and understanding. In the last ten years. In ways that. I feel hopeful the future but I also WANNA be a part of the solution in bringing empathy and understanding and learning myself. And you've been a big part of that learning. So thank you. Thank you and just from the other side that the fact that there are people who are. Willing to. And willing to do. The work it takes takes a lot of work to understand into. Allow Allow us to humanity because I think a lot of it becomes pathology is or becomes criminalize especially for black people so to feel. That we are not going to swipe so like I, take it. So personally because it's so easy to feel like you're going to be thrown away and so. The difference. It makes when you realize that people are going to love you anyway It makes me want to work harder and I think that if people realized. That people are going to love you anyway it gives you. It gives me. The desire to keep working at it and and I I think that. Not Giving up is the most difficult thing. In, the world so having people who don't want you to give up, it's it's why I'm still here. So I want. This all day. Yes. Yeah. We've got to be better at loving and understanding and having empathy to. We just got to be better at it for the collective good of all of us. For Bree. I understand that S- Feeling useful and productive right now feels like what we need to be doing, but there's so much happening. There's so much. We have to deal with that. If it is possible for you to take a step back, not put so much pressure on yourself to get a job because you graduated or to get a job because someone is telling you to the take that step back because there's nothing that's more important than you and there's nothing that's more important than your mental health and if you feel like you've got that together and now you want to go out there and work. That's fantastic. But if you're doing it because you feel that you're only worth something if you're working. Then I would I would I would ask I would beg I would plead I would. I would ask for for you to to think a moment and consider whether or not. You are capable of doing that right now for you. Are you doing this for you or you doing this because you feel like that's what you need to do I think that especially black women we get so into this. Excellent I tell people all the time I am fine with black mediocrity excellence is exhausting and and it is a lot to live up to. So if you're black average fantastic, do that to let's celebrate that. Yes. Take your time. If you just graduated college, you have times as I promise. Yes I'm absolutely. Thank you so much bessie. Think you and thank you so much for for all that you're doing to further. The conversation it is is priceless. So thank you. That was Bassey. Be Of the book I'm telling the truth, but I'm lying and founder of the nonprofit the seaway project whose mission is to promote mental health awareness throughout the global black community. On our next episode journalist Variety Today on why she thinks women of color are politics sleeping giant women of color are very diverse group, which is why I say not just a demographic but a super demographic but we're pretty poorly marketed to and pretty poorly understood compared to our political power. Women of color are the secret sauce that's next time on truth be told. Hey there I'm Susan roadshow the editor of truth be told first off. Thanks for listening to TBT. We have a small favored ask though kick you D is hoping to learn more about how you listen to podcasts and would love about them. So if you've got fifty minutes, we'd love it if you could head over to kick U. E. D.. Dot Org. Slash podcast survey. Your answers will help everyone at k. you indeed and droopy told continue to make shows that you want to listen to. That's K. Q. E. D. Dot org slash podcast survey, and thanks. To be told, US produced by susie Rocco Isamuddin does and Katie mcmurray. GEEKY WE DS leadership team includes Erica. Aguilar Ethan Tobin Lindsey and Holly Kernan and is always a big thanks to Kiana Moga. Damn truth be told as a production of Kiki Dee in San Francisco I'm Tanya Moseley. Our Canadian friends at CBC PODCASTS are back with the new season of seat at the table hosted by longtime friends, Martine Saint Victoria and Isabel. Roscoe this season there end up conversations focus on personal stories about the power of the black lives matter movement. We said all the time the black community is not monolith. We're not speaking for the black community or experiences are very personal, very personal and unique listen to seat at the table on the CBC listen APP or wherever you get your podcasts and stay tuned there's more to come with Martine Isabel on truth be told.

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Truth Be Told: Protesting For The Soul of America

Bay Curious

36:32 min | 11 months ago

Truth Be Told: Protesting For The Soul of America

"From Eighty. Hey everyone, it's Libya. I am. Sitting in front of the microphone and I'm going to be honest. It's really hard to know what to say. When Minneapolis Police Killed George Floyd. They added another name to a list that should not exist. Racism is at odds with the values that we proudly call American the belief that all are created equal. And yet here we are. This week. We're not gonNA. Aaron episode of Bay Curious. Instead we're GonNa Sharon episode from Truth. Be told made our colleagues Tanya Moseley, Isa Beth, Mendoza and suzy route show. They explore the question. Where do we go from here? These are the voices to listen to not just right now in this moment, but always so subscribe to try told and share it with a friend. I am Carville. Wallace and I'm about to read to you an excerpt from an article I wrote in June two, thousand, seventeen called. If you're black in America riots are spiritual impulse, not a political strategy. Summer of Nineteen, sixty seven, the city of Detroit burned. Milwaukee Buffalo Cincinnati Newark. We're all engulfed in flames. Even forgotten towns like Kiro Illinois in Cambridge Maryland descended for some nights in that toward summer into anarchy. The havoc to be catching. The fire in one town sparked the fire in the next. America's seemed to be coming undone. Yet for most Americans the riots of that summer were viewed from afar through the lens of the Evening News in front page headlines. They were not seeing their own homes burned their own streets occupied by uniformed troops from this safe distance, the uprisings looked like senseless violence, the reckless and shortsighted actions of damaged people people with no strategy, no hope. But the truth of riots. Is something entirely different something entirely more sacred. America is unsettled land. And it remains so because it was founded. White supremacy and white supremacy is by nature and unsettling force. The centuries long attempt to subdue the continent by nakedly ransacking its resources, only for the benefit of some creates by Cecil of vast army of angry people who will forever for the sake of themselves for the sake of their children before forced to resist. Far from an ugly side effect of our nation's character, white supremacy is a core American principal. This country didn't just end up this way. It was made this way. To be black in the country like this is to forge your entire life in the Dank valley between Kaz ideals and its actions. We are told we have been created equally, but we are treated as a separate class. Told that we live in a nation of laws, but we watch as violence is visited upon our families with no hope of legal recourse to be black in America and survive is to be of dual consciousness on the one hand. You must believe what all humans must believe in order to survive that you have a future that your children will be safe and cared for that things. Will somehow some way get better, but on the other hand you're very survival depends on never trusting on seeing the ugly truth for what it is on remaining ever vigilant for where and how precisely you are being conned. To keep safe, you must expect to be attacked. To be black and live is to constantly expect to die. For Black People in America, the psychic toll of having to tie your fate, the fate of your family to a world designed to subjugate you can only be withstood for so long eventually inevitably, a truer more direct action calls, and often that action is abrupt. It is violent and it is loud. It is sparked by anything that underscores the maddening discrepancy between what we deserve as human beings, and what we experience has black human beings. Buildings Crumble and fires burn and glass rains down upon everyone. Even the children why it is asked with these people burned down their own neighborhoods. Someone more sympathetic, but still removed might argue that a riot is the only way for a desperate people to gain the attention. Their plight deserves. The problem with both of these readings is that they assume the spontaneous uprisings to be tactical. A coordinated strategic attempt to bring about a particular, social or political change. It is not. It is a liturgy. A spiritual grasping for emotional justice for an assertion of self. It is attempt to bring back into wholeness that which has been split. It is meant to refi the dual senses of life and death, hope and fury that circumscribe the black experience. To Be, white in America. is to be, innocent. Not of the crime, but of the knowledge of the crime. James Baldwin said quote. People who shut their eyes to reality simply invite their own destruction. And anyone who insists on remaining in a state of innocence long after that innocence is dead, turns himself into a monster. And yet. On the horizon. Visible from the whittled down lawns and decks of conscientiously chosen would, there is an amber glow. A blanket of thick, acrid smoke, the smell of burning plastic and gasoline. Bodies Lay UNMOVING on the asphalt. The government has said its troops. The clack of gunfire echoes from the ACACIA trees. The people wish for the lights of the fires to illuminate your monstrosity to usher in the end up your innocence. The people wish for you to see them made. Complete. People have made the demand. Thousands of US have taken to the streets. We're in the midst of a rebellion. And the demand is simple. Justice! We'll be right, back. Support for cake you weedy comes from Sierra Nevada Brewing Company family owned operated, argued over since nineteen eighty proud supporter of independent whether that's online over the air or in a bottle more at Sierra Nevada dot com. Eddie glide is a scholar and chair of the African American Studies Program at Princeton, and he describes this moment we're in as the expression of an accumulated grievance for black people and the last one. We experienced something like this of this magnitude was fifty three years ago as carvel referenced. I spoke with Eddie earlier and man. It was healing as one of my friend says Eddie Glide is centered and focused and right now it's exactly what so many of us need. Eddie Law has also written several books and clothing. The forthcoming one begin again James Baldwin's America and it's urgent lessons for own. Welcome Eddie. Thank you for having me? How are you? I'm. I'm? Upright Yet of this is that's a good thing in these times, right? Yeah, I mean it's true. You know we've been seeing quotes from James Baldwin all over social media right now. We just heard a very powerful one from Carlisle Wallace, but the one that people often referred to is this to be a negro in this country, and to be relatively conscious, be a rage most of the time What is one of the lessons from James Baldwin that sticks out to you in this moment in. The problem isn't us. Bobigny gauges in amazing inversion. Right that there's no such thing as the Negro problem. He? He would insist innocence. He says if there isn't a problem, is a problem. That black people have with white people. White people as the source of it known what he means by that is. There's a famous line in you know. He says I'm not the inward. Never been never thought of myself as that. Yeah, the question is. Why did you need to invent the inward in the first place until you figure that out? We're going to be in this mess right so he converts the White Man's burden. Right so may become their own May. In some ways. And so I think it's really important for us in this moment. That seems so much like groundhog's Day. To understand that we're not the problem, but you know what Eddie when you say that I mean. It's like it's just like. Almost so powerful that it's hard to. Take in like I feel really emotional in that, because even in this moment we're talking about. The looting and the activity of protesters in like we're focusing in on the actions this calling out in this crying out. And not the reasons for it. I mean and then when I say we I'm talking about collective society and the news media, and what we're seeing on the news, and then that gets back to the idea that while it's not being said explicitly. The implicit message is that it is us that it is our problem. You know what I mean. No absolutely you know. And, could because you know in some ways, this aversion of of the question, the question is always asked. What is it that the Negro blocks and so they think we want canal? They think we want Gucci. We might want those things out, but those things are really symbolic up the deep inequality that defines this country right there. We're catching hell. We're dying. Because of covid nineteen in these people are making billions of dollars right so when asked that question in the context of looting and rioting quote unquote. And violence of protests at it says. What else do they? What? Oh, they just want. Still Things We really don't want to confront. What's really motivating this? Because dealers a nation, it says something about who we are. Yeah, specifically about who they are. You know when I was a little girl. I remember reading about nineteen, Sixty, seven, sixty eight in. It felt like such a far off distant event. It felt like from a child is. That, we were so far away from that type of desperation. And yet we're here. When you think back about nineteen sixty seven you that you wish you were born in those times or how did? How did you view this as distant past? My parents were very vocal to me about that time, and about the oppression of black folks and the importance of the civil rights movement, and so when I thought back to that time, they were young themselves. They were children, themselves and so. You know as a young child, and then you're thinking to your to your parents as children But then it was also you know because you grew up in this country. What we turned Martin, Luther. King Junior into and so we turned him into this sort of. Card. Character where he was talking about love and unity, and we didn't really know so much about the desperation, and the chaotic nature of the Civil Rights movement, and so while I would see little glimpses like we would see little clips of the rioting that was happening during that time or the rebellion. We should say and when I learned about. All of the sacrifices, and then the ultimate deaths of all of our leaders. It just seems so far away from the reality of of the moment of the late eighties in the nineties, but now we're in this moment and you know my kids are right outside the door here and I'm thinking about their in this moment. and. We're here. In also thinking about what this moment means, know so. Let's say this I asked you that question because when I used to think back about nineteen sixty seven. And Sixty eight. And even before then you know thinking about the panthers thinking about when black folk were struggling, I always thought I was born out of space. Time. Oh, yes, yes, that I wish if I was if I was. Back there. I would be how we in the band panthers out. Breakfast is right. I thought that too young Mississippi. Working with snicking, always thinking that I was born out of space in our TAB, not understanding that I would be fifty one years old in this time. In a time that we never could have imagined and so I'm so. Angry. All the time. Because we could be better. Off This is voluntary evil. Right people choosing this I mean. In the context of covid nineteen. They're choosing food lines. They're choosing massive unemployment right right? This is a choice in the response to it. To Kobe nineteen and also the systemic racism that is led to the economic inequality that we see right now. Yeah, and it could be different. Assault we need to do is look at your. Yeah, they haven't universal basic income, no not consistent with on where the poet. Think about all of the when you think about the fact that the virus is metastasized breakages and indecision of our society and you think about. My best friend and he called me. He tells me that his in law died of it nineteen That his wife, who's Haitian American in the eldest woman had to say goodbye to her via. A cellphone facetime initially couldn't go barrier. She was afraid she would bring the disease back to our children. And our choice so when I say I'm angry all the time, and it's a blue south anger. It's. Great mom used to say. What it means to wake up being black all the time. You know is so powerful what you said in and then also what year grandmother said because I I have been thinking over the last few days. I'm an emotional person Eddie so if I cry during its just know it. You know I was thinking about. My place in what I'm supposed to be doing right now, and if I'm doing enough and I was trying to articulate to a friend that. Just the sound of my grandmother's voice is making me emotional when I call her, and I hear voice, and part of that is because I feel like I understand now to be in this moment like I understand what you what you said about. About this is what it means to be black in this country. I've always known it on an intellectual level. I've also. I've also known on an emotional level, but never the deaths of this emotion and I was thinking too was trying to also reconcile thinking. Is it that I? Am now a pessimistic person and realizing that your your fifty one. I'm in my early forties. I don't ever say what what exactly. I'm in my early forties and We're in the same moment like nineteen sixty seven. and. You know I should say this. I said you know is what it means to be black in America. I don't I, don't WanNa? I don't WanNA confuse that with. You Know Al Green and tried fish on Fridays of course yes. Yes. I don't WanNa confuse that with the joy. Absolute pleasure guests of being black. Being this being this buy, yes. having the inheritance. That makes me who I am so oftentimes what we do when we say blue soaked. We think that it is. It is the totality of our experience and this is. This is what Jimmy was trying to suggest for nate when he was arguing with which right over negative side, he was like Bra. If you render black life in this way, we can account for you. So on the one hand, I'm angry. Almost every day in my privilege I'm angry. But. You know. Man! You know give me a kitchen and calling on. Calling my Mama Say I'm trying to cook the chicken because offer Mississippi. Yes, yes, so call it more I can't quite do this or when when I cook a recipe and I cook something sendo follow, and she's like Oh goodness, that's great, but to revel in the beauty of black life amid the tragedy of white folks crazy. At best the ballast I'm trying, try to render. Yeah absolutely and that that joy is you know we say it all the time on this show. It is our tactic survival. It is what has kept us. Kept US whole for generations, generations that joy. Making do is never the ending. Condition for the possibility flourish. Over my grandma used to make pinto beans on the stove, she bought with diamonds. Being domestic on the coast of Mississippi. And she would wake those Pinto. God is the Best Pinto beans on you probably tried and you can't get it there. Was Hot water coil. Brandon no me. Yes, which I made for my my children, the other day I made hot water cornbread. They are filling it I'm. I'm giving a couple more chances. They'll they gonna I'm GonNa? Make them like it. But it gets back to what you're saying. We have we have an amazing inheritance in the midst of all this nonsense. I WanNa ask you though what justice looks like we're in the. We're in the midst of chaos right now. You know there have been attempts. To bring justice to the latest events in ways that perhaps we haven't seen in the past you know in, Georgia even though it was several months late, there were arrests and the killing of a MoD. RB, this white woman in New York City a calling police on a black man. She's been fired in Minneapolis. Police officer accused of killing George Floyd has been arrested and charged The. Police Chief in Louisville has been fired and yet we are in the biggest moment of civil unrest in recent history. We know what the long-term systems. That needs to be dismantled. What does immediate justice look like? Oh my goodness, I wish I had to answer. You know. We know that they can arrest folk, and in those they're not. Look at the copper killed Tamir Rice will not only the acquitted. He went and got a job at another police presence right and reside later but still. You, know so, what does justice look like? Now. How can I put? This is pretty pretty quickly. It's like this. Anger according to Aristotle I'm going to be a professor now. Anger. According to Aristotle is almost a precondition for virtue. You have to have the capacity. To be angry and if one is angry in excess. That's not good. Anyone is never angry than what is a full. And so what he says is that anger is a result of accumulated grievance. Abut accumulation of disregard. Of contempt of insult in spite, and so when anger caps off, it's never about simply that single moment that's right out the accumulated effect of disregard. An analysis that something has happened here. And we'RE NOT GONNA. Take it anymore. We're serving notice. So what might just is look like? When we tangible evidence that these people are not disregarding are standing as human. Right when these people are according the dignity in standing requisite of the beauty and brilliance of who we are. Evidence itself in arresting these people, but having a judicial system that is fair and equitable is going to evidence itself right in a set of social arrangements that don't carry forward this idea that because you're white-shoe valued more than others now I say all of that to say that in this current mum until we are satisfied that these people are not disregarding us again, yeah. The there'd be no sense of justice. Do, you feel optimistic. Neville. Optimism. Is Like Pangloss Voltaire's Candy. Optimistic beliefs that you think to to your garden, win the best of all possible worlds. In the art of the will bend towards optimism. Is this idea that in the everything will be alright? Pessimism is just the flip side of that coin. When when the only of the world issue in the mouth, and suddenly you pessimist, see I'm neither optimistic or pessimistic Amelia and with enemy. And with that means is it's up to us? The world could either go to hell or be or could be saved. It all depends on what we do. There's no guarantee. So if I looked at our history. Will Fail. We fail miserably in these moments. If I look at our history, but I have to have an abiding faith in our capacity to choose to be otherwise. Does that make sense or my just running my? No it makes complete sense. At the same time I'm thinking about. As you put it at the beginning of our conversation. We're not the problem in. It's really up to then white folks. To be the solution. And I don't know if I I. Don't know if I see it right now. I, we've got a president. Who has essentially said he can, and he will take military action. Every in every state in the country where there are protests. A know he's talking to his base people. He's not talking to US I. Know This. But. I don't know Eddie. So so this is why I wrote begin again. Right because he's grappling with this so the formulation. That the Baldwin put forward that we're not the problem. In the five time in nineteen sixty three. He says that. We have to love them to get them to see themselves otherwise. But then. Through the murder of Medgar. Malcolm and Martin. He experiences. A power. Of of power he sees what it's all about, and so most people will say that the late Jimmy Baldwin lost his step. He's like an old man. That's gone bad teeth as. Folk don't really read at least I didn't his later fiction? They think his later criticism. Visit really doesn't really take on the same power as the fire next time I think most important and most powerful piece of nonfiction is known aiming to St Street. Written in Nineteen, seventy two. Yes, and what happens is at Baldwin still holds onto the belief that. We're not the problem. Is They're problem? But he gives up the idea that we have to save. So what he says this, we can't spend our energy. I'm paraphrasing along. We can't spend our energy trying to convince white soak to hold different commitments. We have to spend our energy building a world where those commitments had no quarter to brief. Not About. Is Not about our salvation, being contingent upon them, realizing and white Mrs Evil No. It's about US building a world with those who are like minded to a willing to step outside of the straitjackets of these categories. To imagine a world that is just it allows us to imagine ourselves in the fullness of the creation that we are and then. Build a world where whiteness doesn't accord you any benefit. And so if you choose to. I mean this. This is what I meant when I wrote in Time magazine, I get less than damn with white folks in. I'm tired of trying to convince them to hold other commitments. I WanNa build a more just world only have a finite amount of civic edge. Yeah! And we've been trying to convince them since since we got he yeah. I've seen instances where white allies have stepped up I actually got a note from a former co worker who just left his job as a radio host and. He. He actually wrote this really beautiful piece that I sat with in cry for a while where he said we don't need any more white guys at the Mike Anymore and he's been given job offers, and he says. You need to give these physicians to black people, specifically black women, and he went on to say like it's time for us to step aside. It's time for us and I felt like that was such a powerful move. He's basically saying I. Don't you don't need to hear from me anymore? I mean you're not an optimist by for for me, who considers myself maybe I'm now gonNA. Use the term that you use I'm neither pessimist or an optimist. But that feels like hope for me. That feels like there is a changing of the tide I. Don't think I would have heard that five years ago. That hope is very different than optimism. That's that's a very different distinction, but you're right so I made the distinction between. There's white people in their people who happen to be white. I love a lot of people who have to be white. Yes, yes. This folks who happen to Byu boys in who am I close partners, and who may help make me possible right and when I say when I make that distinction. I'm talking about somebody who's engaged in an ongoing interrogation. That's right. Of how Whiteness over determines their lives? There's a wonderful line paragraph. I WanNa read it to you really quickly by Wendell Berry. Small Book called the hidden wound. And I think every every person who struggle with being an anti-racist should read this is. I'm trying to establish the outlines. Of An understanding of myself in regard to what was faded to be the continuing crisis in my life. The crisis of racial awareness, the sense of being threatened by my history to be if not always a racist always limited by the inheritance of racism. Condemned to be always conscious of the necessity, not to be racist to be always dealing deliberately with the reflexes of racism that are embedded in my mind as deeply at least as the language I. Kentucky on Kentucky premed. Mitch McConnell like whiteboard right. Talking about your ongoing. Interrogation so that he can emerge as a different kind create. I happen to love a lot of people who happen to be white, but then they'll wipe yeah. Eddie. What's your message for for young activists out there right now? Keep fighting. Courage and commitment. In the face of Imaginable talents. You gotTA keep fighting. We need. You desperately is your time. Seek complexity. And Nuance. Exemplify the very values that you want in standing in the world in the very way, he struggled. And fight for your Mama's and your daddy's ing children. Fight for people now fight for love. Thanks love. Understand we got shipped back. We got shipped back. FIFA lot. Thank, you Eddie. Thank you, this is wonderful. Eddie Glide he's the chair of African. American studies at Princeton and his book is Begin Again James! Baldwin's America and it's urgent lessons for our own. It comes out in August. Let's go now to more from those protesters. We're going to hear from two MEKA Mallory IANNA. Woodward and missed a FAB. Go young people are responding today that they are in rage, and there's an easy way to stop it. The. Charge the cops charge all the console. Not just some of them, not just here in Minne- Minneapolis charge them in every city across America where our people are being murdered. Them everywhere. That's the bottom line chives. The cops do your job. Do what you say. This country is supposed to be about the land of the free for all. It has not been free for black people and we are tie it don't talk to us about looting y'all the looters America has a loaded black people. American loaded the native Americans when I came here. Is what you do. We learned it from you. We learn violence from you. Learn violence from you. The violence was what we learn from you. So if you want us to do better than dammit, you do better. Say! that. The. Enrich new. Camera. Assassinating. To celebrate. We have. In America. Better relationships with the police number one. We you within the school district. That's number two. Dairy and all the generations city. We cannot do to go all. Out. To. Dictate. US Talk to us. We don't. converstation at career table. Talk about how these goals full circle. Stop worrying about. Whereabout US best. They're gonNA. Take you from. In all we got in is. Auger Young. Main. Do we know that I. AM. To stay. Oh look around. And see what's being done to my. Reading! I'm being home. That's key drawn Bryant on instagram. Singing? A song written by his mother Janetta. She told the today show when she heard George, Floyd call out for his mother. God spoke to her and gave her these words. Moon. You know what's been keeping me standing up straight and holding my head high during all of this. US. Getting to hear my mother's voice, hugging my children, reading my friends taxed and you. Being right here along with us. If you WANNA talk to us about this moment we're in. We want to hear from you. Email us at truth be told Kqed.org or leave us a voicemail at four, one, five, five, five, three, two, eight, zero, two to. Be told US produced by Susan Rocco, Eastern Mendoza Katie mcmurray and Rob Speight get you at ease. Leadership team includes Erica, Aguilar Ethan, Tobin, Lindsey and Holly Kernan. A big thanks to Kiana Mogadishu. People at NPR west truth be told as a production of K., Q. E. D. in San Francisco I'm Tanya Moseley. Future Aliu this country. Is Precisely as bright or dark is a huge country. It is entirely up to the American people. And now representative, it is entirely up to the American people. Whether or not! They're going to face and deal with and embrace the stranger, lame alliance or not. Why people have to do? Is Try to find out in their own hearts. Why was necessary avenue in the first place because I'm not a nigger? On the met.

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It Is Not In Your Head

Truth Be Told

29:44 min | 8 months ago

It Is Not In Your Head

"Truth be told is made possible in part by production grants from the Housing Simon's foundation and the California Wellness Foundation. From K.. Q.. Got a question for you. How well do you know your body? I don't mean what you see in the mirror. I'm talking about the things your body tells you every day the little messages, it sends you about your physical and mental health. Recently, I heard someone say that there's no such thing as a mind body connection our brains are part of our bodies. It's one big system working together to keep each of us alive and functioning. But how do we tune into the alarm bells? Our bodies are ringing what are those aches and your back that persistent headache or you're clumsiness actually telling you about your overall wellbeing I'm Tanya Moseley, and that's the subject we're taking on on this episode of truth be told. Their truth be told treat veto dear truth be told your truth be told I really need your help I need your help canoe your help. This is Shapiro from NPR's all things considered public radio entertains in spite years informs and helps you feel a sense of community. This is true more than ever right now. So today public radio stations across California are banning together to ask you to show your support for this vital and free service. Independent media is essential and it only works when you support it with a donation help keep public radio strong in the Golden State. Here's how to give visit Donate Dot K. Q. E. D. Dot Org Slash California. Are Wise when this week is Rasma Mena. He's a therapist and author of several books including my grandmother's hands and rock the boat House US conflict to heal and deepen relationships. Resume, has been listen and act upon the messages. Our bodies are giving us, and during the course of our conversation, we got into another related subject inherited trauma. You know researchers have been able to pinpoint how the trauma of our ancestors is passed down through our DNA, and this trauma has a direct impact on our health. Hey Rasma. Welcome to truth be told how are you would I've been saying that people lately when asked me home doing? I've been actually telling people just how I'm sleeping and how I'm eating my eating is starting to get back to where it was before sister Brianna was murdered my sleeping is still off. And I'm still processing rage a little bit not not as hot as I was but I'm still processing it. I want to tell you how I'm doing. So what's weighing heavy on my mind is conversation. I. Just had with a friend through text I texted him to see how he was doing and he told me that his best friend is fighting for his life in the hospital from covert nineteen. His cousin just died to his co workers moms died and what I was just thinking about is it is it even possible even if we aren't directly. experiencing. Covert nineteen or direct attacks on our bodies is it is it even possible for us to protect ourselves from the impacts of the trauma that we continue to feel in the midst of this pandemic? Speaking to a friend of mine and he said to me, you know we're now dealing with cove in nineteen but many of us especially those that are descended from enslaved black people have not gotten over sixteen hundred, sixteen, eighteen right and when he said that I had this impact in my belly right into me, the belly is kind of like the experience enter right when he said that I was like you know from an embodied place the idea that Kovic Sixteen nineteen has an affect on our literal body is something that I don't think we talk about enough then the weathering effects of enslavement and genocide and colonialism the weathering effects literally weather's the nervous system. Literally weather's the brain architecture literally weather's cardiovascular system right and when you when you just said the piece around your friend. We don't have enough of a communal language to explain. What actually is happening to us right and so when Kobe nineteen hit would it did was took advantage of a ground at had already been permeated by the ravaging effects of white supremacy and the ravaging effects of racialism action, and we have to begin to develop a communal language to talk about the stuff right as opposed to thinking that we're just dealing with it individually we're not there is a global grief. In a global horror and a global terror that black bodies are experiencing constantly and things like brother George floored and things like cove in nineteen just remind us of how much we are actually dealing with day to day to day persistently. Right how do you even begin? To have that kind of level conversation I mean. You, know we're having with each other because we're talking about the trauma that we're experiencing but where does it go from there? So would we have to do is talk about it and then get into the body communally right that the healing pieces a lot of times we come up with these individual strategies like I do yoga or or I've started Paleo off started these different types of things but would happen to our people says did not happen to US individually would happen to our people happen to US communally, and we've lost some of those communal ways of moving through. We haven't put the communal language around it. So when I'm doing workshops and doing embodied gatherings and different things like that would I'm really doing is helping people begin to lean. And work with the body what up into gut what shows up in feelings here with was up in the head and not just genuflect to trying to think our way out of it. But actually beginning to what I say is get some reps in around tempering in conditioning our bodies to be able to withstand and hold the charge of race Race has energy to is one of the reasons why we don't WanNa talk about it because won't when we begin to talk about it all the grief, all of these stories, the intergenerational, the persistent institutional, Anna own personal grief, and trauma also show up at the same time. I it. Just I just came into consciousness in the last five years or so how Ev inherited trauma, which which you talk a lot about and you teach. But then also how racism impacts the body it just wasn't something that I had considered. And so when we've been talking forever about fibroids, for instance, in Black Women and people said Oh you know, well, we don't really understand why black women just about every black woman you know has fibroids and it wasn't until I heard someone say, Oh yeah. That's a manifestation of a lot of things building in your body. One of the things that has come through my office really a lot lately is describe Roy thing black women did not have any stewardship over their bodies for four hundred years think about that for most of our existence on this land. The white body has had full an unfettered access to your body. And when I mean full and unfettered I mean every idea every orifice, every understanding it, your children, your loved your everything that was black. Yeah. The white body had full and unfettered access to the Henrietta lacks story is so profound to add. That you know her cellular data has been used so many times but but what initially happened to her was the using of her body. You Ceuta me dash what I mean in that using of of her body in black women's body creates a bracing. You can't fight in you can't flee. So there is a construction that happens in body right? That is what are called a traumatic retention. So is like this the way my mamma taught me in a way that my dad taught me was not just by instruction. They also taught me by what they leaned into and what they recalled from. right. So their nervous systems literally taught me even if I didn't have a language for what they did what they. I knew I pay attention right? Something just happened. She just pull back. He just leaned in Ucla me. That peace is not because something was wrong with my parents was because something was passed down from near Mamas Mamas Mamas daddies that his daddy's Mamas Mamas Daddy right and by the time they get it this all decontextualize. and. So when I get it, I don't have a context for because they didn't have a context for so that weathering right in the body. Gets passed down as notion, and so do not talk to me about Black People's health issues in two we begin to account for the impact of Racial Association and White Body Supremacy, right if you don't start with that as a notion for what is happening to our bodies, then whatever you come up with is going to be skewed and explain white body supremacy as opposed to our understanding. Of White supremacy what's the distinction? Sure. So when we talk about white supremacy, many times, we genuflect to the head right when I talk about why to supremacy I'm starting with one rule and I believe this rule if we don't understand as rule, everything else will confuse us about this society and that is the white body is the supreme standard by which all bodies humanity shall be measured. Whole F- for Sec the white body. Is The supreme standard by which all bodies humanity be measured that crazy rule I made that's a structural rude. They may right and that structural rule when they took on structural rule would happen was is they wove structural rule through every institution through media through fashion through law through economics through military, and here's the thing. At the moment that White folks began, Scott's the idea that the white body was the standard of humanity to moment that they began to ensconce. That is that the also ensconced the notion of that there was an antithesis. To the stand. Yeah. Brighton. Renault. There were two groups that were the antithesis to the stand. The black body and the indigenous body, the indigenous body was rendered invisible and a black body was rendered nine human juxtapose to the humanity of the white body. Right. That's what we're struggling with right now right in black people also ingested that. That's why all over the world black dark people are putting on whitening creams. That's what we do those Pesawat now get relaxers best ready diet until we're sick Shrek best rat. Edit ain't because something is defectiveness does nothing wrong with you since you are not defective something has happened and continues to happen to your people. What you're saying actually brings us to our dilemma this week the question comes from Nia etta she thirty years old lives in New York identifies as Dominican American and she's a survivor of childhood sexual assault Nia says she grew up with a parent who was emotionally and sometimes physically abusive. And now she's trying to tap into how her body is exhibiting this trauma. I've always been known as that kid that was clumsy and I never thought to connect to my trauma or to the ways that I was actually disassociating from my body and so that's a way that it definitely shows up. I'm not the most graceful person I'm dropping things a lot. You know everybody's being the most deserving persons like I'm book smart but a book in front of me but it's like in my environment what's happening around me I don't always see everything and I and I've learned now that those are symptoms from body disassociation, the ways that we disassociate from reality for my body in order to protect ourselves. I never realized how not present I am in my body at times. My question would be I have found practices for me that help and so journaling is one of those practices. Yoga has been really really helpful for me learning how to be more present in my body. But I am always open to learning what are other practices and I know that in different stages of my life for whatever reason should not have access to writing should not have access yoga. I WanNa know what are these other practices that I can engage in to continue to kind of heel and realigned my body myself Oh. Wow. Thank you so much for that first off. Let Rasma. Less powerful system NIA I wanNA save you that took a lot of a lot of courage to To really be that intimate that was a very intimate thing. You're just it until as somebody like myself who also is a survivor of childhood sexual assault I know what? It's like to disassociate yourself from your body right to to not be present and assist said it is a protective mechanism and here's one of the things I. always want to say particularly black and Brown bodies is that it is a protective measure, not a defective measure. It is not an indicator that you are defected is an indicator that things have happened continue to happen and your body starts to protect itself whether your brain thinks this should or not. Writing, and so and so one of the things that I that I think as I was listening to to assist talk. is she says, something I was really profound around the clumsiness stuff. Yeah. The different types of things I see that all the time. All the time really what happens beers an awareness see see there's this thing called neural newer receptively and is is how your body moves in space right but if something throws equilibrium off, right the things that you should be oriented to you don't because you are associated from it into protected pieces. That's how you survived. Right that strategy of survival over time becomes decontextualize. Let me give you an example. Trauma in a person decontextualize can look like personality, right? In a family. decontextualize can look like family traits trauma in a people can look culture. Say it again, just say and I don't mean that. 'cause you know like what you're saying is so powerful, we kind of have to break it down here at twice. So trauma over time becomes decontextualize if there is no reprieve. Is No repair right? So because you have you keep moving on so it becomes decontextualize and so what people a lot of times can tell us about the trauma, but they can't tell you about what should have happened that did. Right, and nasty language piece, and so if you're walking down the street and some brutal happens to me. If you see me two weeks from now and I'm out in the street and acting crazy and I'm doing something a little off you're likely to come up to me and you brother wrestler here. Bra. You need to get some help I'm fine. I'm no. That's stuff that happened to you. Last week or a couple of weeks ago I really think it's affecting right so. I will help you. Let's get you some help I. I can't stand to see you out here. Right you as a loving person you would do that correct yet. What happens if you're my child and you didn't know what happened to me twenty years ago but now? I'm raising you and I'm recoiling from things and leaning in things that feel a little bit off right. Now is de contextualized right and now it looks like daddy just crazy yep. Yep Right and in overtime, the family lore is your leaderboard loan boil all. Right, and in the culture, it looks like these people is just running wild. No something happened and continues to happen. So would I say that sisters this? Yoga is fine. journaling is fine. I do this thing called soul striving were a half people write down what they're experiencing but right down in a particular way when something happens to you, you don't just experience like a sister Neha when she was talking when that when the stuff happened to her, it just didn't happen in one domain. Experienced it in a vibe Tori sense. She experienced an image in thought since she experienced it in a meaning making sense you experienced it in a behavior and urge since she experienced an affect feeling says, and she experienced in since eight cents what felt on your skin, all those things were happening at the same time that was happening says she was experiencing the charge of it, the weight of it, the sense of it and the speed of all at the same time. That's why she couldn't be in your body when it was happened that's why she had associate his protective mechanism right when you practice that skill long enough it becomes your go-to right so the other skills don't get practice so. When I tell people to to Seoul scribe what I say EST go slow don't do anything big and in go through those questions was the vibrant Tori sense when you when you bring this up was to images in thoughts right and you may get overwhelmed when it happens and when it happened stop get away from it don't run through just leave it alone in back to it later get another repin later get a little bit more and then leave it alone go back I mean and because so often what we do when we're dealing with trauma whether it's whether it's historical or personal what we do is we try and take on too much of it at the same time into overwhelms So I tell people to do so surviving and then I tell them after you write down what you subscribed. Then go back and read it later but not in that moment but go back and read it later go rack and read it later 'cause you'll start stuff will start to stir in quake and ne-new right analogy by an all of a sudden things start to unfold right and you do it slow so you can begin to metabolize pieces of it what you're saying though sounds like it also would work when you don't even know what happened to you yet. You know when you know something is wrong. And you feel it in you know it in your body sitting down to just take the temperature, the vibration that you mentioned, and then you can put the pieces back together again in a way that gives you clarity. Sometimes, what happened will we're experiencing our body as something is offer something happened to me may not actually be ours. Oh. Somewhere. It might actually be the point of the pass throughs at never got resolved in your Momma's Mamas. Mamas Daddy. I'm about to cry at that. That's powerful asthma. And you know why? Why is also really powerful is because? For so long. As black people in particular. We we say to each other all the time like we need to do better we need to all the ills in our community we need to to just basically pull ourselves up. We do it to ourselves is not just white people do it to us we've internalized and we also separate ourselves from our ancestors. It's like this didn't happen to me. I'm starting a new. We cannot think of ourselves as like we're starting a new best. Doesn't. That's it. That's it. This idea of reclaiming this. is so important. These pieces that show up that we know there's a notion of it, and we think will what happened to me in might not be what happened to you might be what happened to your people because they never could get it healed and repaired we had to keep moving. Thinking about Nia you gave the advice of the soul subscribing. What are some other things that she can do she'll show scrubbing his one. The other one is reclaiming the home right? We were coming the harm in reclaiming the touch, right? Sometimes have you noticed earlier I talked to you about you know what happens in the belly. So the belly is really the experience center of the body. The chest is the feeling center of the body, and the head is that thinking center is also in the hip area there's a thing called the. So as muscle right the so asthma so is actually a big fluid muscle that connects actually the top part of body with the bottom part. About right. It comes added out of the spine and connects wanted to things that happens when you have experienced a lot of trauma or when you're people have experienced a lot of trauma that part of the body can really get stuck. Right think it spine as kind of electrical highway, right? So something may be happening to me down here near the hip area, but I'll be experiencing the bracing an electrical current in my neck and my shoulders. So I keep going man last month neck and wise my jaws and stuff like that and doing all that still but really was happening is that my so as is so tight that the elected with the showing up up here or I'm having problems in my hips, but the issue is really up. In in the neck air right and so one of the things that I have people do is just do little rocking back and forth right just rocking back and forth in the hip area just a little bit Iraq and right it's just a wiggle right? The other one is the pump right in the pump is is just like that right? Have people start to begin to do that slowly and then stop and pause and see what happens after the Paul. You know we often see children do this to the front like. A way of comfort company is dust because all of the things that block them from using their bodies eight, there is not there yet. So, there's a reclaiming so the humming and rocking and the pumping and wiggling. That we can begin to do now imagine if we did that not only individually but we scheduled time five minutes a day or five minutes in the week or two minutes or thirty seconds to where I'll call you up since I said a, let's just talk and then we wiggled and we pumped a little bit I witnessed you and you witnessed me right this is not verbal. Yep Right this is the body beginning to sent into resource. Right, and over time what will happen is you'll notice you have more space available to you and all of a sudden your body will begin to recognize the resource that is their. Right, but we haven't conditioned it yet. So what we do is we say, why do Yoga while I'm gonNA. Do this we have you noticed that all the practices that you used to be able to do that would give you all of this relief. No law give you the same type of relief since George. Floor. Keel own. Yeah. Oh. Yeah. Because we're trying to do individual things too. That's dealing with communal grief. Wow. It's true I mean. Do you know that I have not been able to run. Since George, Floyd like I go out I have been walking and walking when I run it just feels so heavy and what's wrong with my body nothing nothing you're dealing with communal grief let me tell you I was doing a thousand pushups a day. I. Had to bring that all the way down to one hundred. Right, because my body was fatigued and I was like, what's wrong with me I used to be able to do this and stuff like this and realize. That ain't what my body needs right now. I need to break all the way back and then start with just the walking again just give my steps him again, right? Right. Just the building back up just a building backup take it slow. So often we want to get back to where we were at was booed best not acknowledging that something happened. Yeah In many ways what Nia has done with her individual trauma. Is. She has done that hardwork already because she is acknowledged what has happened to her and she understands how it is impacting her body. Right. That's what I said what she was really intimate right that was very intimate. Now, what I would say for her win safe to do so fine. One person that she can wick with Rasma. This is a lifelong journey this his work. Yeah. It is but the beauty in it is that you learn so much about yourself in the process of transforming but you have to get to the sufferings age. You have to get to the repetitious. You have to get to the level of of being able to get some reps in and tempering condition your body to be able to withstand the charge that it takes to transform like many of us. Yet know how to metabolize all of this stuff as in our good. Resume so much for this conversation. First Muffler joining us. I really. Thank you for inviting feeling. That was author and therapist resume Menachem talking about inherited trauma and what our bodies are trying to tell us about our health and how to work through it. All his latest book is my grandmother's hands, racialist trauma and the pathway to mending our hearts and bodies. Truth be told as all of you know is about you. So if there's a personal dilemma or question you've been grappling with, let us find a wise one to help leave us a voicemail at four, one, five, five, five, three, two, eight, zero, two or email us at truth be told at. Dot Org. Truth be told is produced by susie Rocco Isa Mendoza and Katie mcmurray ed. Leadership team includes Eric Aguilar Ethan Tobin Lindsey and Holly Kernan a big thanks to Kiana gme damn truth be told as a production of K. Q. E. D. in San. Francisco I'm Tanya Moseley. Hey this is elsia Chang, your NPR, all things considered host based right here in California a place where so much news is happening and the diversity of voices is rich. That is why it's important to have strong public radio stations in this state. Your local station not only brings you national programming that keeps you informed, but also shines a light on your community bringing everyone closer together on this California Public Radio Day of giving think about what California and public radio mean to you and give to the station. Here's how visit Donate Dot K. Q. E. D. Dot Org Slash California.

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Americans Report Mental Health Concerns; Social Justice In A Pandemic

Here & Now

41:42 min | 11 months ago

Americans Report Mental Health Concerns; Social Justice In A Pandemic

"From NPR and WBZ YOU are. I'm Jeremy Hobson. Im Tanya Moseley. It's here now. The Labor Department said today that nearly three million people filed for unemployment last week bringing that total number to nearly thirty-seven million over the last eight weeks. Thirty seven million in it's more evidence of the economic devastation being caused by the corona virus pandemic which has already killed more than eighty five thousand. Americans. It puts more pressure on lawmakers in Washington who are considering more economic aid for states localities companies and workers joining us. Now is Republican senator. James Lankford of Oklahoma senator. Welcome and you're on president. Trump's corona virus economic task force advising the president on reopening the economy after the shutdowns. How are you approaching the balance of public health concerns with economic concerns? And when you see today's unemployment claims report do you think the cure is getting to be worse than the disease is very difficult right now. And what's been interesting is a lot of people that are in quote unquote nonessential businesses. That have been shelved during this time period. Tell you it's not not essential to them into their family into the people that work there. It is their livelihood and so it's a very difficult balance that you continue to be able to protect the people that are most vulnerable. But you've got to be able to re-engage business and we're not seeing that here. In the United States with over half of the states already open in thriving and the other half looking quickly now at what their next. When they're going to start reopening but Spain Italy Germany South Korea many countries. That have been very hard. Hit By cove. Nineteen they're also in the process of reopening. When you say that more than half the country is open and thriving. What are you thinking about when you say that? Because I don't think you could describe any place right now. In the United States is open and thriving other than grocery stores thriving. No there's there's not a place that's really thriving as they were if you went back just three months ago but Their restaurants are starting to be able to open for limited. Sit Down They're starting to allow some events again. But you're correct there's there's nowhere that's thriving at this point But they're open in cleaning and preparing to try to get things back open again after a very long difficult season. What about the people who are laid off or furloughed or working in situations where they're not gonna make the kind of money that they were able to make before? Do you think it's the government's responsibility right now to bridge the gap to keep money coming into people's pockets if they're in that situation until things can open back up and they can get their jobs back really. There's three different layers of assistance and safety net for us as a country. The families of the first safety net the second safety net or are not for profits around the country and the third safety net. Is the government. All of those are trying to be able to provide some assistance to help people get through this. The difficulty is none of those are going to be able to make people whole For individuals that have lost wages for businesses that are teetering on the edge of going out of business. There's no way to be able to borrow enough on the world currencies and to be able to try to find a way to be able to make every business and every place hole but we can do what we can to help people be able to get through it and so the safety net. That's out there right now. With with twelve hundred dollars that's been since individuals has a paycheck protection program which is helping about fifty million people get their existing paycheck The additional money. That's been put into unemployment assistant so we can get through the end of July. All those things are designed to be able to help people get through this but we're very aware of most people will not be made whole during this time period but we're trying to be able to help people survive. It gets the other side of it to be able to get our economy restarted again. Well and what about the the next possible package and Democrats want to spend another three trillion dollars including aid to state and local governments which have not gotten a lot of aid yet. In the previous packages well actually state and local governments have received one hundred and fifty billion dollars so far in a state like mine in Oklahoma are average or typical budget for the year for the State is about twelve billion in the state received one point five billion for assistance during the covert nineteen. So that's a very significant amount. Now there does need to be additional flexibility for those dollars that have been given to the state and I'm aware that the has proposed a package almost a trillion dollars additional assistance to states. But I would say to you. States and local counties and cities will be in the same struggle as the federal government that we're all trying to be able to manage the tax dollars that are out there and services that are there All of us are struggling as we go. This which individual family whether it's a small business large business city county state or federal government as well. It sounds like you're saying that you think the states have enough help already that they don't need more assistance from the federal government. I can't imagine any state or any city or county saying they wouldn't like more help from the federal government the balance that we have is every layer of government has to be able to figure out what they can do at this point so there will. I'm sure be things that will happen in the future to try to help cities and states Try to be able to get through this in very specific ways but certainly not a three trillion dollar package or one trillion is that going to cities and counties and states with unlimited ways that they can be able to spend that senator. Let me just finally ask you one more thing. I could really ask this anybody that I talked to. But this is appended all of our lives. Is there anything when we go back to normal? Eventually it'll happen. Is there anything that you'll miss about the current situation? I do have to tell you I. I've actually spent more time at home with my family during the last time period than I have in years and years I I'm grateful. I love my family and getting a chance to be able to spend time with my family. has been the hidden gift in the middle of all of this. Chaos are very looking forward to a vaccine being on the market Having the capability to be able to look in the rear view mirror on a covert nineteen. But I will always treasure Times that I could spend every single evening Having dinner with my family and getting more time with them Senator James Langford Republican of Oklahoma senator. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you let's go to China now. And the city of Wuhan where the Corona virus outbreak was first discovered testing for the virus. There has resumed and this time authorities want to test every person in the city. That's eleven million people with the goal of stopping the disease from making a comeback. Npr's emily. Chang joins us now from Beijing and Emily explained the timing of this move to test everyone in Wuhan. They're doing this testing move now. Because they've discovered six new cases and this comes after more than a month where they reported no new cases whatsoever. I should note that these six new cases come from one cluster. One residential compound all starting with an elderly man who says he actually felt sick two months ago. His symptoms were on and off and he never got tested until now so. This is not so much a resurgence. But a lack of testing that led this cluster to emerge which is why they've decided to go to the other extreme and test everyone in case there is some dramatic areas meaning. They show no symptoms whatsoever. Some state scientists have come out and said this is actually overkill. You should focus on key groups instead of testing. Everyone but one of the reasons why they might be reacting so drastically is next week. Big Political meetings are supposed to begin in Beijing. These were delayed because of Kovic nineteen. But they've now been rescheduled and th- authorities are really fearful. They might see more new cases in in in the run-up to these meetings. I read that they want to get this all done in ten days. Eleven million people in ten days at really sounds ambitious. How are they gonNa make sure that everyone shows up to get tested in every tiny city including Wuhan? You have something called. The Neighborhood Committee. And every residential compound has essentially these local officials who normally oversee things like domestic disputes and waste disposal. But in extraordinary times like this oversee things like quarantining contact tracing and testing the other thing is one does not have the capacity to test all eleven million people who live there within ten days they contested about one hundred thousand people a day. They will not be able to finish the entire city in ten days. Emily you wrote about a new book coming out called Wuhan Diary. It's it's now being translated in English. What can you tell us about it? It's written by this woman in fong-fong who was actually quite a well known novelist already before she started posting these daily updates about what it was like to live. Life under lockdown in China and these entries were very raw. They were reactions to the news that she heard from day reactions to conversations and phone calls she had had with doctors and the frontlines friends who had had family members pass away and she often was referencing. News items were videos that were very quickly censored within China so it became a way to access what people felt like was more accurate portrayal of what was happening in Wuhan without the state narrative imposed on top. These posts began to be censored as well and loyal fans with screen. Shot these entries as fun. Posted them online? You would get forwarded quotes from them on social media. You would see pictures of them before they can be taken down so it became the very interactive sounding board for people as well to talk about their own experiences now. A translator Michael Berry is taken all of those collected all sixty entries and translated them into English so that we can also experience what phone went through during the Wuhan Lockdown You know the. Us government has criticised China for a lack of transparency about the outbreak. What is the Chinese government's reaction to this new book coming out in English? There hasn't been so much government backlash against this book. But there's been this groundswell of online backlash there's a suspicion about whether that backlashes were Ganic Or whether it somehow state sponsored. But what is apparent? Is that phone song? The writer behind one diary has been subject to an enormous amount of hate mail. Death threats and criticism that she is somehow airing China's dirty laundry about how it handled the corona virus and shortcomings. It may have had to an international audience. She's been accused of betraying China of somehow aiding and abetting Western governments and criticizing China. And so she's really become the symbol of growing nationalism within China an inability to tolerate moderate or liberal voices. That's NPR's. Emily Fangs. Speaking with us from Beijing Emily as always thank you so much thank Tanya the UN is urging leaders to address mental health as the pandemic is adding to psychological distress around the world. This comes after a recent poll by the Kaiser Family Foundation found more than four in ten Americans say stress from the pandemic has negatively impacted their mental health joining us. Now is Ken Duckworth. Who serves as the chief medical officer of the National Alliance on mental illness or Nami? Dr Duckworth Welcome. Thank you Jeremy when there was already a mental health crisis in this country before the corona virus appended. Everything we know. What would you say is the state of our collective mental health right now? Well it really depends per individual but you know we had a record number of suicides in two thousand and eighteen and between overdose deaths and suicide. The American Life Span had actually been getting shorter in the last several years. So that gives you the pre picture. Now you take on the added stress of a we call physical distancing because you have to say stocial -cially connected physical distancing the threat of unemployment. And just the all around anxiety that you or someone you love will get sick and I think many people you know are experiencing you know. More mental health concerns than ever before. Obviously this has made things more difficult for people who were already living with a mental health condition. But are you seeing a lot of people who didn't show any signs of depression or anxiety beforehand? Now saying this is a real problem for me is like a bell curve. Imagine you know. The twenty percent of Americans who live with a mental health condition and the bell curve has gotten pushed to the right so more people are having anxiety panic. That didn't have it before. More people are having a Gora Phobia when you reinforced to stay at home. You can get scared to leave. Your home and more people are reporting depression so you know addiction is another vulnerability. We don't really have data on that yet but a n a smart recovery and all kinds of services are available online but that's an additional risk for people who've been living in recovery from substance use disorder. So I think people are feeling the stress but perhaps one the silver lining Jeremy. I think people who haven't had a mental health condition before may have increased empathy and sensitivity for what it's like to live with a mental health condition going forward and I have heard that comment from more than one person. I know what this is like now in a way that I didn't before because I'm now having panic. Attacks is the economic picture as devastating as the anxiety about the health problems associated with corona virus in other words. Do you see mental health challenges rising as much because people are losing their jobs and their livelihoods as because they're afraid of what could come from the corona virus. Well I think you know. There's now multiple streams of stress so some people have secure jobs but have mental health vulnerability. Some people are experiencing a lot of turbulence in their economic life and are developing mental health problems. That didn't have them before. So I think you know what you find is that every person is individual but this is really one of a kind if I like to say to people when they ask me. This is my first pandemic as it is for you Jeremy. Right and so. The stress of loss of economic distress of what we call physical distancing the uncertainties and unknown qualities of. What's coming like we actually don't know when this is going to end. And you don't know an Idaho now if somebody I love is going to develop this. So the chronic unsettling is a reality and for millions of American unemployment is a risk and there is some data that unemployment and economic distress correlates with mental health owner abilities clinical depression and the potential for an increased rate of suicide. Do you think it's going to be difficult to convince lawmakers in Washington that this is a major issue? That's probably going to develop very quickly if it hasn't already in this country as we make our way collectively through the corona virus pandemic and all the effects of it the lawmakers have been pretty open to the idea that tele therapy should be covered that some people don't have a computer so you should be able to use your flip phone. These are things that the Center for Medicare and Medicaid services had not really considered before what we're going to need is for them to show creativity as this becomes more chronic phenomena that we just have to learn to live with because mental health is going to have a long tail. Every time I look at one of those virus charts Jeremy I think about the mental health post traumatic impact of people who are losing loved ones of healthcare workers who are getting psychologically traumatized first responders who are exposed to a lot of bad outcomes. So I think the mental health piece is going to be with us for a long time and I think that creative work will be needed on the policy side to think about best ways to deliver care to people. What is the cost? If we do not adequately address the nation's mental health right now it's pretty well established that untreated mental health conditions lead to not just suicide which is of course a huge problem overdose. Which of course are two things that you would think would be part of it but it's bad for your heart to have an untreated depression. Your diabetes is more poorly controlled if you have untreated depression. If you have panic attacks your ability to sustain your care and get chemotherapy for a cancer that might be treatable is limited. So I think there's a hidden cost that people will find in terms of their medical care and then of course untreated mental health conditions. Make it harder to parent harder to be in relationships harder to contribute to your community so I think that you know it's really important for us to take this moment where so many of us are feeling stress and mental health or poorly sleeping or having panic attacks and realized that you know this is a common condition that many people live with mental health problems that we need to treat them the same and we need to eliminate the shame. I WanNa ask you one more thing. I saw one of your ads on TV and everybody in it was saying. It's okay to not be. Okay tell me a little bit about what that means exactly. It's okay to not be okay. Our society were socialized to say. We're doing okay. We're we've got this. We've got this covered your experience. Whatever it is is okay. So if you're an introvert and you're secretly enjoying some aspects of this. That's okay but if you're a person who has having trouble accessing care for a recurrence of bipolar disorder. And you need help. That's okay seek help. I find that messaging to be very loving and welcoming to the complexity of the human condition under stress. You know it's okay not to be okay. Never worry alone reach out for help and you will find somebody that is can duckworth. Who is the chief medical officer of the National Alliance on mental illness or Nami Duckworth? Thank you for joining us. Thank you Jeremy. And thank you for taking up this important question. Last month. Alaska's biggest rule airline carrier. Raven AIR GROUP DECLARED BANKRUPTCY. Passenger demand fell this place. Tens of thousands of Rural Alaskans in jeopardy. Should they need transportation to bigger cities for help? The airlines blames its demise on travel restrictions that many villages have put in place to protect themselves from the Corona Virus Christie Shellenberger of Alaska's energy desk reports Christina McDonald is a law student in New York. Right now but she think keeping up with the news from her home state of Alaska McDonnell is to be one of the Alaska native people that live in southwest. Alaska she grew up in the village of Perryville and she remembers breaking her arm as a kid and I had to wait several days for the airplane to come to take me to the nearest hog which was dealing hand and a you know a broken arm is nothing compared to the Monja. She's worried the state isn't prepared for virus outbreak in Rural Alaska. Reliable medical transport is one of her biggest concerns. Raven group served more than a hundred predominantly Alaska native villages without much warning. The rural airline declared bankruptcy in April and abruptly left villages without mail delivery or passenger transportation. That left a lot of questions for rural health care providers who depend on those airlines to fly patients in for medical care. Heidi Hedberg directs the Division of Public Health at the Alaska Department of Health and social services. We are hoping and waiting to see. The private industry stepped into that vacuum and meet the needs of the villages that have had reduced flight services into their community but Alaskan native communities still remember the nineteen eighteen Spanish flu pandemic wiping out entire communities soon. Nearly all the villages in southwest Alaska put strict policies in place prohibiting. Anyone from outside the village from coming in in order to protect themselves against the virus had Burg says. The state emergency center is working with the rural airlines that are left to properly transport rural patients who test positive for corona virus. Need urgent care. The airline refuse or is unavailable. That's when the National Guard or the Coast Guard is able to be used to transport that positive case. But that's not the case. With Non Corona virus patients with no regular air service the Yukon. Huskies Health Corporation. One of the few rural health providers in southwest Alaska has had to turn to charter flights to get non corona virus patience to Bethel a small town that serves as one of the region's hubs. That's expensive says Mitchell. Forbes of the Yukon Cusco Health Corporation costing them one thousand dollars per flight. We've continued to tell the state that if solution is not found there. I'm it is not financially feasible for us to continue to carry that cost but Forbes says they will make sure they won't leave anyone behind in a village that needs medical help for here and now I'm Christie shellenberger. The number of Americans filing jobless claims last week grew to just shy of three million bringing the total since the pandemic began to nearly thirty seven million for more. Let's bring Allie vel she. Msnbc ANCHOR IN ECONOMICS correspondent alley. We should note. This is the six week in a row that these jobless claims have come down after peaking March twenty eighth but that said we're still talking about twenty percent of the American workforce filing for unemployment. Are you alarmed or optimistic about today's numbers? Look I think they are. You know the first headline is that their cause for alarm these are. These are huge numbers and they're abating very slowly. The two pieces good news are that some of it will be temporary right. Some of it is a result of shutdowns. And we don't know when those shutdowns and that's a political discussion. But when they do. Some proportion of these people will go back to work. The other thing to be optimistic about is at the Federal Reserve Chair has said this is really really serious and more needs to be done now. That does stand in contrast with what the President What Mitch. Mcconnell are saying. They're not sure that we need another round of stimulus at the moment. The Democrats are looking for another three trillion dollar deal but the fact is people who know about these things are saying. This isn't going to get better on. Its own the government's going to have to continue to think about creative new ways to fix it so I'm both pessimistic and optimistic at the same time when you talk about the Democrats three trillion dollar relief package plan and again. It doesn't have a bipartisan support. At least not yet. This one would put a lot more aid into state and local governments. Right yeah because think about this. With all of these people unemployed they're not paying taxes in many cases they're not earning and paying taxes to the state and local governments state and local governments. Unlike the federal government can't generally speaking go into deficit They can't go into debt They can raise bonds if they're building a dam or bridge or something like that but they generally speaking can't spend more money than they have. So then you start seeing services cut on a local level including policing ambulances health centers. Things like that. So these states have long said they haven't received enough money probably a third of what they need. Generally speaking And and small businesses haven't received enough money so only the federal government has the Haft and the power to create a stimulus plan. That's big enough to to affect everybody. So that conversation doesn't have bipartisan. Support is being had. Well when you hear. Republicans talk about it and we just talked today with Senator Lankford Republican of Oklahoma who is concerned about how much money is being spent on this. And we hear about trillion dollar deficits multi trillion dollar deficits. Is there good reason to be concerned about that. Yeah I think there is. I think that we often don't spend enough time talking about debt and deficit. I would say this isn't exactly the moment To make this the priority right there are reasons to get into debt from federal government perspective and this would be one of them so I think we have to think of debt more holistically. I think Senator Lankford is right. I think a lot of people who are concerned about debt are right that it's a conversation. We should have more frequently whether it comes to government debt corporate debt or household debt but emergencies are generally not the ideal time to be deciding to. To tighten about argument would be that. It's going to be a lot cheaper to spend the money now than it will. After millions and millions more jobs are lost and some may be permanently correct. Msnbc ANCHOR IN ECONOMICS correspondent. Thank you my pleasure from the killing of a MoD armory and Georgia received little attention in February later. After a video circulated it became big news. Fueling protests across the nation. Here's Atlanta Mayor Kisha Lance bottoms earlier. This week speaking about the case. It's heartbreaking. It's it's twenty twenty and this was a luncheon of an African American man to white men are now charged with murder and social justice. Activists are now assessing how to mobilize while adhering to the constraints imposed during this pandemic. Opel to MEDI IS CO founder of black lives matter and she's been thinking a lot about this and the role of blm seven years after its inception joins. Us now welcome. Thanks so much for having me well Opel you know Ahmad Aubrey's death in the minds of many is of course reminiscent of Trayvon Martin's death and so many other cases over the years I can imagine it's the same for you. Yeah it is extremely saddening to see that even in this moment where so many of us are grappling with the pen demonic. We are still seeing these types of horrify cases where unarmed black people are being targeted and killed and sadly MoD on the story. Here is just too familiar to us. Yeah you launched the initial social media and website for black lives matter back in two thousand thirteen in some ways. It was re imagining digital activism. Because it was so new back then and was really one of the major ways this movement got going in the years sense. People have have been questioning whether this online activism translates to change. I'm just wondering from us. Seven years later and now with covert nineteen changing. How really activists can gather physically. What do you see as the role of black lives matter in? It was so important for us to start utilizing social media because we knew that we needed spaces that we could be unapologetic about who we are. About what our concerns were and so true to previous social movements the civil rights movement and beyond we are making use of whatever. The tools are at our disposal for the given time. And so. It's not too dissimilar. From what may be Dr Martin. Luther King would have done with the newspaper or television and beyond. So we're just using the means that we have for our time to make similar concerns to those of our ancestors known but building upon that you know along with those digital spaces which have become even more important during the time. A covert nineteen The ground mobilization that took place particularly after Ferguson and the death of Michael Brown back in twenty fourteen that in-person protest was super powerful. You know we have no idea what the future holds for us. But have you been thinking about what the future of in-person protest might look like now with Cova nineteen in this post pandemic world we expect to see and also knowing that we've actually seen protests happening throughout the country where people are still gathering because they understand the power of being in person with each other but they're taking all of those safety measures that health officials are telling us to do nothing will ever replace human beings gathering together and so much of what we did even on the creation of black lives matter was using those new media tools to share with each other to connect with each other but it was so that we could mobilize in person one of the things that I found. So heartening in this time was Despite the fact that we're in the midst of this condemn ick we saw this amazing Movement for Justice for a Mon- emerge where people were running from. What they were doing. All that they could elevate his name. We're also seeing similarly with The case of three on a Taylor the EMT who was killed in her home people are beginning to say her name and uplift this really tragic and recent case that was only just a month ago and people are saying enough is enough. Despite the pandemic we won't be distracted. Yes people are social distancing. They're wearing their masks. They're being very safe as they do it. And I think that's important. I think that's going to be some of what we see here in the future. And we'RE NOT GONNA stop gathering and demanding change one of the major issues. That really is the issue of this moment. is the disproportionate amount of black lives That have suffered and people who have died from covert nineteen. Is this something that black lives matter? The movement is addressing the systemic inequalities that are the reasons that we may be saying this disproportionate amount of black death. Yeah well I'm seeing. Come out from this. Large Racial Justice Movement is that there are many different groups highlighting the fact that this isn't just happenstance her Because we're negligence or doing something wrong but we do have systemic issues in this society that allows for black people to be impacted in this very acute way. And it's it's really disturbing. I know people who have passed away as a result of this virus. And it's something that I think. We could have predicted but to see it firsthand. It's it's been very very difficult but yes our movements are definitely speaking about this or doing all that we can From mobilizing online to getting together on person to organizing mutual aid and just being very creative about how we show up for one. Another something that I've always wondered about you know that ago. The black lives matter movement was listed as a terrorist organization. And this kind of labelling is not new in our nation's history How have you navigated this? It's been so disturbing to see how black organizers and people who have the right and we know we have the right to speak out and to name justice in our community and assert our dignity that we're being mislabeled that our message is being manipulated and misconstrued on purpose for an agenda that is rooted in white supremacy and and racism. And we know that this happened to many human rights leaders before us from you. You Have Martin Luther King. You have your Rosa Parks. You have various leaders over the years who their actions have been maligned right and they weren't necessarily the most popular people in their generation but history proves them right and they knew that they were right and they had the moral high ground. And it's been disturbing to see that you know. Even decades later. The Lessons of those times haven't really been applied and haven't really been learned and we're seeing the same type of melon man of our movements as well and it puts us in danger when we are the ones who are trying to make peace. They target US trollers They tried to put our private information online. And we have to take our own precautions to ensure our safety in this time and and beyond. What's next for you and black lives matter and the role that it's currently playing. What are activists asking for as we deal with several major issues in our country? What I see as what's next for our social movements is that we continue to grow that. They continue to feel safe Joining Organizations. It doesn't even have to be the formal a network that we have but there are many different groups across the country that are doing such phenomenal work and we think it's important that the local level people get involved. We have an opportunity right now to transform the way things are done. And we've seen some wins over the years and we need to see a fundamental transformation of our of our democracy and so there are three hundred fifty one people who've been fatally shot by police just this year and that's despite this pandemic and it's not just about the police brutality and I think that's what people also are getting their understand that issues of racism cut across all the spheres of our lives including the healthcare sector as we're saying and so I'm encouraging people to continue to pay attention and to make sure that their voices and their concerns are known and I think even as the elections are are coming up we have an opportunity to mobilize encourage folks to get out the vote and we're going to need us. We need all of us to show up and transform our our nation that's able to Medi. She's a CO founder of black lives matter Opel. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you so much for having me. It would be almost time for summer camp for many kids but camp directors around the country are wondering if it's safe enough to welcome visitors this year. Which brings us to New Hampshire. Some historians believe the first summer camp actually started in the state back in eighteen eighty as for this year. Well here's New Hampshire public radio's Lauren. Children Adriana Ben says she grew up faster than most fifteen year olds. She says it's because she lives in Manhattan. Her mom calls it a fast life Adrian. His friends I'll have credit cards. They take Uber's too fancy Sushi restaurants at fifteen. I feel like living in New York apt to keep up with everyone now. Only like everyone's so much they act like they're like in their twenties like a Frat party or something but when she was ten years old she found a place where she could escape all that pressure in innocent place she calls. It were the only thing she stressed about is. Who is going to win? Color Wars. It's Camp Bernadette and Wolf Borough New Hampshire at Camp. It's like chill. Everyone going at their own pace living their own life. And I don't need to like be worried or anything. It's really fun but for weeks now instead of counting the days until our trip up north. She's been trying to mentally. Prepare yourself for the possibility that camp could be cancelled because the thing she loves most could now be considered dangerous like bunking with girls from all over the world. You get to like experience how they live in like trade snacks with them. But that's definitely worrisome. Because you don't know anyone can be carrying the virus so like it's kind of scary New Hampshire camp directors. No there are a lot of kids who feel just like this. They don't want Cam to cancel either. But how did they pull it off safely in this environment? You're shooting basketball. We can't both touch the same. Basketball Ryan holder is program director at adventure. Lauren Danville their summer. Camp programs are adventure based but they also offer counseling. They often serve kids with depression anxiety. Adhd doing archery. It's like okay. We're shooting at the same target. Okay you go grab your arrows. Only touch yours and then I'll go and only touch mine and they'll sanitized and when we're all done this is how you have to do it right now but imagine running summer camp like a big summer camp for like two hundred fifty kids like that. A few camps in New Hampshire have already made the tough call that no. They can't imagine that there's no one-size-fits-all solution here. There are around one hundred sixty license summer camps in New Hampshire and no two of them are the same and this doesn't include town wreck programs are sports camps. These are overnight camps day camps summer for kids with special needs summer run by national organizations others are independent and so each camp has to make its own decision and to do that. They're all waiting on local and national guidelines. If if everybody's gotTa wear masks then we're not gonNA run camp. This is Garrett Cogan Snyder. He's the owner and director of camp. Hawkeye and Molton borough you youngest seven you know. Most of the basic nasty have aren't designed to run around with and get sweaty you know they're not designed to go into the water. We don't want to give a false sense of safety. But until those guidelines come down camps who haven't closed yet exist in this weird space where they have to act in prepare like campus still happening until it isn't Cogan. Snyder says this has been the hardest thing. It's a lot of work. You're essentially running a small village. Staff needs to be trained. Ropes courses need to be inspected and meanwhile camp staff are trying not to over promise but still keep hope alive reminding kids that their special place will always be there for them. Even if it's not this year I think it's about holding onto a hoop of normalcy. John Kelly is executive director of Ymca Camp Coniston in Grantham which just announced that. They won't be opening this summer but they're one of many camps who've tried to connect with their kids by putting beloved traditions online there now digital campfires zoom. Sing alongs now. The irony of this is not lost on tilly. Campus intentionally a very no screens environment. The TILLES says they've been streaming vespers. Every Thursday night. A Pre dinner tradition where staff tell inspirational stories and campers have loved it. It's absolutely magnificent. How many people feel the need to join back into these rituals that ground them and tie them to sort of each other and we need connections now more than we ever did before once camps. Decide if they're on the next big decision will fall to camp families back on the Upper East side. Adriane his mom. Layla says she keeps thinking back. To the beginning of the pandemic the sounds of sirens and helicopters every night she really wants to get Adriana city. I'm worried I just have to have spent many many months in a tiny apartment Jackson seen any friends in months. Like it's so I feel like we might risk it. Says it feels like she's choosing between Adrianus physical health and mental health. And she says it's a horrible gamble to take for here now. I'm Lauren Schoulgin. Well every time I look at the weather forecast and see that. It's going to be cold and rainy I think. Or maybe it's just a bad forecast and maybe I'm right. Meteorologists are reporting a shortfall in weather data normally gathered by commercial aircraft with more than two-thirds of the world's passenger jets grounded during the corona virus pandemic weather forecasting agencies are missing out on measurements of wind. Speed air pressure and temperature typically collected by sensors mounted on the noses of many commercial planes last week the United Nations warned that the decline of meteorological measurements from airplanes was as high as eighty percent and up to ninety percent in the tropics in the Southern Hemisphere. Not just making it harder to count on your local forecast. It could also complicate predictions for the Atlantic hurricane season. Which starts June first in the meantime when I see that there's a chance of rain for five of the next seven days. I'll just assume it's a data error for the best here now is a production of NPR in WBZ and associated with the BBC World Service. I'm Jeremy Hobson. Im Tanya Moseley. This is here now.

Jeremy Hobson Alaska China United States federal government Oklahoma Wuhan Tanya Moseley NPR senator New Hampshire Emily Fangs Democrats Senator Lankford Beijing president Washington depression Opel
Genetically Modified Mosquitoes; Las Vegas Workers Want 'Right To Return'

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Genetically Modified Mosquitoes; Las Vegas Workers Want 'Right To Return'

"From NPR in Wbz I'm Tanya Moseley I'm Jeremy Hobson. It's here. Now we are following a lot of big news today from the Republican National Convention where President Trump will speak tonight to developments in Kenosha Wisconsin to of course Hurricane Laura the National Hurricane Center. Says Hurricane. Laura has weakened to a category two storm since making landfall as the strongest storm to hit the state in. More than a century law came ashore at Cameron Louisiana near the border with Texas. Early, this morning as a category, four storm with sustained winds of one hundred and fifty miles per hour. The Hurricane Center warned unsurvivable storm surges of fifteen feet or more could overwhelm parts of the Gulf coast. NPR's John Burnett joins us on the phone now and John Describe what you're seeing for us Actually, on a on a remote road way down here in the marsh land almost in the Gulf, deepen the wetlands few miles from where Laura hit last night conditions are getting worse and worse. A lot of lines are down big oak trees have lost their limbs these beautiful houses on the marshawn still some of them have lost to some of their roofs and. you know outbuildings. I'm trying to get the Holly Beach. So we'll see how that that goes but It's been remarkable. How just a few a difference a few miles make I was over in Beaumont last night. which received almost no damage and no. Water whatsoever, and yet you come over here to Louisiana and you can see that it was a monster storm. And you're trying to get to Holly Beach because you've heard that there's been a lot of damage there. Yeah. It's not far from Cameron, which was where the I cross. The damage. I. It's very hard to get into Jarl's unless you reporter who wrote the hurricane out there last night which I didn't We've certainly seen pictures of a lot of structural damage, a lot of buildings and residences that lost their roofs that. Were blown out just you know hotels pulverized by this hundred and twenty miles per hour wind. It was really a breathtaking hurricane. What are the evacuation efforts looking like in light of Covid? Well I've covered a lot of these Tanya and this is unusual because rather than open up these big crowded shelters with communal eating and cots all next to each other. The they're doing that as a last resort of these communities are really urging people to get to. Cities where they were hotel rooms like Austin and San Antonio in Dallas in Shreveport and Baton Rouge and You know hunker down in social distancing They don't. You know it's bad enough that you ever hurricane raking across the state much less. You know spreading corona virus. What are also some of the other biggest concerns right now Well these this is a huge complex of petro chemical plants and Refineries Tanya and they've all gone down and so you know the United States depends on consistent flow of gasoline and so if they stay down there much longer, it's going to disrupt that flow and and We'll see the results in gas stations and maybe in prices. So all these giant refineries are going to have to take stock and see when they can reopen. And then I tennis closed as well as interstate is the major trucking corridor between East and west United States, and it's closed down for dozens and dozens of miles because of high water morning. That's NPR's John. Burnett John Thank you so much for this update and please stay safe. Tonight President Trump will headline the final night of the Republican National Convention last night law and order was a central theme. Shootings murders, looting and rioting occur unabated and reason months we've seen weak spineless politicians seek control of our great American cities to violent mobs. Democrat. Run cities across the country are being overrun by violent mobs. The violence is rampant. The hard truth is. You won't be safe in Joe Biden's America. That was Michael Mikhail President of the National Association of Police Organizations the President's daughter in Law Laura Trump South Dakota governor Christie nome and Vice President Mike Pence speaking last night. Let's bring in Republican Strategist John Bray Bender whose firm is working with the trump campaign John Welcome back. Thank you for having me as always. Well, I have to say watching the programming last night with the convention. You wouldn't even realize that we're still in the midst of a pandemic I I know the trump campaign would like to focus on other things but is it a mistake? For Republicans, not to acknowledge in a bigger way the pain that people are feeling as a result of this virus Well I think I think in fairness the vice president did an incredible job in talking about the pain he talked about how families don't grieve we grieve as a nation every person that we've we've lost the to terrible pandemic that that came on our shores leaker came every place else in the world I think he talked about he gave a certain amount of hope certainly in saying that in this incredible race for the vaccine and the resources America's putting behind this that it now looks promising that we'll have a vaccine by the end of the year. Would have noticed, I think is a distinction between the Republican. Convention in the Democrat is Republicans are also saying, but where do we also go from here I think Americans WanNa know both of those I want. To know that the government is doing everything possible in fighting this terrible pandemic. But at the same time, what is the long-term plan economically for forgetting his back to where we were and but in terms of the government doing everything possible to deal with the pandemic I mean many people would point to the fact that it took president trump a long time to get around to the idea that marrying wearing masks was really useful in controlling this pandemic or stop embracing hydroxy chloroquine after. said, that wasn't the right way to go. But okay I i. take some of your points on that I I want to ask you about what was talked about a lot last night, which was this message of an order. This is vice president pence speaking last night the violence must stop whether in Minneapolis Portland or Kenosha too many heroes have died defending our freedom to see American strike each other down we will have law and order on the streets of this country for every American of every race and creed and color Pencil also said you will not be safe in Joe Biden's America is this going to be the central message of the campaign for the next couple of months look. We're an unprecedented times where we have a pandemic, we have the economy with a racer considerations were still having ongoing conflicts at least economically with people like China. So we're never going to have a central theme for here to Election Day. There's too many brad things. I think there's a couple of things though relative to law and order that was very, very important that the vice president said first of all, he said that he and president trump will always support the peaceful protest of people having their right to go out, express their beliefs and be protected being able to do that and I think most Americans would agree with with that right I. also think most Americans agree agree though that. Burn down businesses that that you know Shooting people hurting people. Starting fires, violence making terroristic threats. Those are not something that we should accept as a as a country and and I think again with the vice president said is we're not going to allow that we are saying that if you have to have tents I mean president trump is in office right now when you say we're not going to allow that I, if if things actually happening. His responsibility. Yeah. I think Wisconsin is probably a good example where they're now asking for support to come in to help that, and again you got to remember in many of these cases, the governors who have to take responsibilities and so you know the vice president also played a video the two nights ago where he interviewed on an African American woman from Pennsylvania, where they talked about the other thing we have to do though is sit down and as communities talk through and and listen to everybody. This doesn't have to be always violence. This can be a dialogue and this administration has shown a commitment to willing to do that I mean. Look this administration can stand on his say look look at our our commitment financially that we made to African American colleges and universities around this country. Look at what we actually did on criminal justice reform while before anybody else was successful in doing this, it was this president but we haven't heard anything during this convention about how to deal with the systemic racism that exists in law enforcement That is the root of some of these protests around the country. Well. But let's contrast that what is the Democrats Lucien let's demand dismantle the police I mean Joe Biden has sat there and said he agreed with the defunding the police. He doesn't defunding the police. He's he specifically said John that he doesn't agree to defend the police, but but but he has listened time time again to the the sort of Democrats socialists the most Liberal left-leaning part of the P-? The the Party and that's where the weakness of Joe Biden comes in. I. Think that that we don't have to find it paradoxical to that we're going to help and want to help the African American community in whatever way we can. At the same time, saying what we're not going to allow is the destruction and the violence that's happening at the same time. That is Republican strategist John Bray Bender, whose firm is working with the trump campaign president trump will speak tonight John. Thank you. Thank you. Always a pleasure to be. Most schools in America are starting school your remotely Leander Independent School district in. Texas did but starting on September eighth, the district will bring some students back into the classroom for in-person learning Dr. Bruce caring is the district superintendent and joins us now welcome Hi Jeremy Thank you for having me today. Well, tell us about your plan. How is this going to work for students who wish to return to school in person? So we'll be starting out with about twenty five percent of our student population coming back on September eighth, and we will keep that level of population for the first two weeks, and we will start to bring more students back off to that, and how do you decide which students get to come back in that first rounder is it up to them and their parents? Actually, we do have criteria that we've put into place we are invited our highest special. NEEDS students to come back as well as our youngest learners, and so I'll pre K. and kindergarten and first grade students will be invited back in that first round at the middle school level will be bringing back off sixth-graders and at the high school level ninth graders. In that first round, we will also be including our stuff children so that they have a place to be ballooning as our stock comeback to help with all of the in person instruction. Our teachers, all the teachers are they going to have to be back in the classroom as well? So we are requiring all of that stuff to return on September eighth with the exception of a few who have. Applied for accommodations throughout humans department. And how will they both teach the students who were there in person and the ones who are learning from home So we have two different models that we're working with at the elementary level, we will have teachers who are teaching only in-person students and other teachers who are only teaching students at the middle and high school level. All of our teachers will be teaching both in person and virtual students. So the in students will be receiving the same online instruction as virtual students. The synchronous part of that is the first forty, five minutes where the teacher will be. In all of her students virtually including the students or in person in her classroom and then in the second forty, five minutes on the students in the classroom will be interacting with each other and interact with the teacher in person while the students saw still at home and virtual will be in breakout rooms and interacting with each other or working independently, and they may also consult with the teacher of virtually if they need. The other piece of this of course is that you're going to have to make sure that there's not an outbreak of covid nineteen in the school. In order to do that many places are doing a lot of testing. Do you have plans to do a lot of cove nineteen tests regular tests for the people who will be in the building? we are not going to be doing any additional testing apart from what is already happening in our county, and we of course, a focusing on the three main things which are mosques social distance in and handwashing to try to ensure that all of staff and students remain safe. What kind of reaction are you getting from parents and students to this plan? So, of course, we have a mixed reaction. There are a number of parents who really want kids in person in school and asking us to do that. As soon as possible we have some who do not want children back in school they of course, have the choice to keep their students one hundred percent virtual. It's a little more challenging for US stuff. They really don't have as much choice as students in our parents have and that has been challenging for us to to manage. If there is a spike in cases, will you change course and go back to all online learning? Just like when we have bad weather reconsult meteorologists. So in this global pandemic, we're working very closely with the health departments and especially epidemiologists. So we will be watching the numbers very carefully. We will be monitoring our situation in each classroom and making those decisions as necessary. To your consulting with the experts. But how does it feel to you as a superintendent to be responsible for all of this at this moment something obviously that nobody's really been able to prepare for at the level of Superintendent of a school district. Absolutely you know I am a math teacher by trade and I never dreamed that one day I'd be building school buildings and managing this many students. and this is a new situation and that requires us to be highly flexible and adaptable, and we're GONNA make decisions in the best interests of staff and students, and we're GonNa do the very best that we can in very challenging circumstances. Are you moving in this direction though because an in-person class is better in terms of quality than an online class or because there is economic pressure to get the kids back into the classroom so that the parents can go back to work some combination. I think it is a combination of both of those things we know that we're human capacity organization and we do our best work when we have personal human connections and relationships between students and teachers and students and students. But we also know that we don't understand everybody's personal circumstances at their house and we want to provide those opportunities if it'll possible safely in order. To mitigate what could be you know dire consequences for families that that may really need kids to be back in school for some reason That's why we're trying to operate under a as much choice as possible of course that requires us to have both in person and virtual opportunities for them which requires that we operate under a full staff as soon as possible. That is Dr Bruce Gearing who is the superintendent of the Leander Independent School district in Leander Texas, which is currently. Teaching Online, but we'll soon on September the eighth give students the option to attend school in-person. Thank you so much for joining us and good luck with this. Thank you very much for having. Professional sports teams from several leaks have taken a dramatic step to raise awareness about racial injustice in an unprecedented move. The Milwaukee Bucks decided not to play game five of their first round of the playoffs series three other NBA Games were also called off and teams from the WNBA Major League Baseball and major league soccer followed suit. Let's bring in Howard Bryant senior writer for ESPN and Howard. You've been covering sports for a while. How would you characterize the small met? Well, I think is a remarkable moment I think that especially. In the case of the NBA, it just takes a tiny bit of a of a history lesson. Let's not forget that six years ago when the NBA had the Donald Sterling affair with the the owner of the Los Angeles Clippers. The players threatened to boycott the playoffs if he was not removed as an owner and it took some diplomacy from the new commissioner, Adam silver and the players went up to the line, but they did not cross it and they ended up playing the Games resume and then Colin Kavak took A. Knee the basketball still went on and you get to George Floyd and there were many players before the restart. That thought that maybe what was happening in the country was more important than resuming in the basketball felt irrelevant and yet the players still played what happened. Yesterday was different yesterday seemed to be the breaking point for these athletes who had decided in unison that they weren't going to play, and in addition you had other sports follow Naomi Osaka. The Great tennis player she withdrew from the Western and southern open and. Baseball of all sports so that it's only seven point seven percent black baseball players decided that they weren't GonNa play the dodgers, the Mariners, the Cincinnati, reds, Milwaukee Brewers, all they didn't they didn't play. But I, think what I'm hearing from you is that it's sort of a culmination. We can't look at all of these incidences separate. They're kind of building on each other. This really gets to what you've been writing about. You said, the player voice was heard. So powerfully that for the first time in sports history, it toppled an owner. Explain, what you mean by that, the players have always been treated. As Chattel in so many ways even though they are paid in their paid enormous sums of money. Sports is an incredibly paternalistic place and when the players begin to exercise their voices normally there shouted down by the public ignored by ownership, and in this case when we're talking about things from the Social Justice area, we've seen what has happened to Tommy Smith and John Carlos, and we saw what happened to Muhammed Ali years ago we saw what happened to Colin Kaepernick, and in the case of the Clippers in two, thousand, fourteen, they threatened and management listened and this year. We've seen players make demands. We've seen players make their voices heard and instead of being shouted down by the powers that be they've. Had to listen the players are also saying something else to the public. They're saying that these issues are important enough for you to pay attention to without being distracted by me. I'm not willing to contribute to the distraction. Yeah that is that is really interesting. You know something else there's a lot of debate on the language used to describe these actions by the players. Is it a strike? Is it a boycott? Is it is a distraction VINCA is it neither? Well, I think that language is extremely important right? Is it a strike? No, it's not necessarily a strike because the players aren't demanding labor concessions. Is it a boycott? Not really because normally when you boycott something you're boycotting an outside entity, you're boycotting something that you're not a part of so it's sort of in between I. Think what the way that I tried to couch. It was simply to say that the players decided not to play as a form of protest. NBA Commissioner Adam Silver is really an interesting position right now, how do you think he'll proceed? It's an interesting position. In some ways it's a completely uncomplicated. It's interesting because the history of the sport and history of all professional sports in America has been to always keep labor in its place. Especially, if this were the NFL, you would see a much more draconian approach, but on the other hand, it's Not Very, complicated because ever since George Floyd was killed in in May, all of these sports have and all of these corporations have said that black lives matter they've said that they're in support they've said that things have to change well, I can't think of a more appropriate time to back that up than right now there was a movement before this and I think that conversation is now being revived. Powered Bryant is a senior writer for ESPN. Thank you so much howie now my. Nearly forty percent of colleges and universities are holding some form of in person learning this semester and schools that are inviting students back have put together rules in place to prevent corona virus outbreaks. Students are expected to police themselves when they aren't in class but as we've seen that doesn't always happen corona virus spikes blamed on partying college students his forced some schools to move from in person to online only classes as Kerry young with member station, W. B.. U. R. in Boston reports stopping the spread relies on everyone doing the right thing. That reliance on the honor system is making a lot of people nervous right now, I just don't trust the student population as a whole to be responsible. Miranda Rhodesia is a fourth year student at Northeastern University. She says seeing a spike in corona virus in her home state of Texas over the summer sealed the deal for her to stay home and learn remotely and with most social events canceled the cost of housing just wasn't worth it. I just thought there is no point but even students who have decided to come back. Say they're worried I honestly. AMMO bids scared like I. I don't know if should really like trust everybody Elliott. Saumarez is also from Texas and also a fourth year student at northeastern. He had a hard time keeping up academically living with his family. So the health risk of coming back to campus was worth it for him. Still Morass says there's a lot of uncertainty about the new school year. We're just GonNa Kinda just take it one step at a time students just cannot make the most of it really for business owners who have long relied on students being around the start of in person classes is a welcomed event to be honest we're. Excited to have the students back, Billy Moran is the general manager of Cornwall's pub a popular bar near Boston University. He says, the coronavirus pandemic has been devastating. For business, Moran is hoping that with the students back, the family can make up at least some of their losses. It is a little bit scary because we have people coming back from all over the world but be has spent the summer preparing testing facilities and contact tracing abilities so that they are able to track and trace anything that flares up they'll be able to isolate very quickly. Northeastern is doing the same thing. Still School leaders acknowledged there will be. Things that are outside of their control like student activity in off campus housing. Here's what northeastern Kathy Spiegelman told Boston city councillors. Recently, we are trying to create a community of caring where people understand what it means to come back and what it means for us all to share this space in this time given everything even in a typical college year, there are tensions between students living off campus and their neighbors, and that's why some Boston residents are especially nervous this year. If you're acknowledging a whole piece of this, then you're asking for an outbreak again in the fall, Patricia clarity lives in the Mission Hill Neighborhood Near. Northeastern. University she says colleges should take more time to develop better plans for policing behavior off campus and is that an acceptable risk I don't know I don't want to be one of the acceptable risk numbers but other nearby residents like Pamela lanes who also runs a small barber shop in the neighborhood remain cautiously optimistic. You'd have to make a conscious decision that if you are going to come back like quarantine do everything that you need to do to ensure that you're not the one that's going to spread anything she says she hopes students can hold themselves accountable just like she is for here and now I'm Kerry on. We're learning more about two people at the center of events in Kenosha. Wisconsin. Police say rust in chess. sqi Is the officer who shot Jacob. Blake in the back on Sunday igniting protests officials have also identified the seventeen year old from Illinois who allegedly shot and killed two protesters in Kenosha l'etoile Dennis is with Milwaukee Public Radio W. w. m., and the toilet I want to start with kyle rittenhouse the seventeen year old suspect on social media he supported president trump and the blue lives matter movement. What are we learning about why he was there? Yeah you know he basically has said that he was there to help protect businesses than. From social media video that is circulating that was taken before the shooting. He said that you know it was his job to be there as though you know he was he was helping the police and he felt that that was here where he belonged we know that growing up he was part of a police cadet program and that you know he really Loved police officers appreciated the job that they do in communities. We mentioned the officer who shot Jacob Blake Rust in chess ski who has not been charged. We didn't even know his identity until yesterday. What else do we know about the circumstances of the shooting and what repercussions he's likely to face? Yes. So at this point when it comes to best in chess game, as you said, his name was finally released yesterday with consonant torney general he had been on the Kenosha Police Department for seven years and when it comes to what led up to that shooting, it said that Jacob. Blake was at home where his girlfriend lived. He wasn't supposed to be there. It sounds like. There was some sort of restraining order and the police were called a shaky was one of the officers who showed up at some point. I'm not sure what happened but officers used a Taser on lake that didn't work for whatever reason. That's when we see him walking round vehicle he opens the door, and then we see the officer grabbed his shirt in fire seven rounds into Blake's back. at this point, we know that the Kenosha district attorney has also asked for a federal civil rights investigation into the shooting right now as the Wisconsin. Department of Justice also investigating the shooting. What do we know about the condition of Jacob Blake at this point So, at this point, blake is paralyzed from the waist down. That's according to his attorney, a been crop that's Wallace, his family he he was shot and he has injuries to not only his spinal cord but his vertebrae. He's had a portion of his colon removed He was shot in our he has kidney and liver damage is well from the shooting. It's unclear as to whether the paralysis is pregnant although they're thinking, it might be at this point. And what about the demonstrations They continue I gather in the White House has said as many as two thousand, National Guard troops are available for Kenosha. What is the situation with that? Yeah. The right. Now, there's there are lots of police than National Guard members in Kenosha. There are federal agents already there and there are more on the way. I'm governor evolves yesterday agreed to accept president trump help when it comes to that, and basically there's a curfew in place from seven PM until seven am that it's expected to to remain through Sunday and protests are continuing last night It's been said that they were quite peaceful. There were no people walking around with guns helping to protect businesses, and the protesters largely stayed away from the courthouse which had been the center of a lot of this in previous nights. La Dentists with Milwaukee Public Radio W. W.. M.. Latorre. Thank you. Officials in the Florida keys have approved a controversial plan to manage mosquito borne diseases by poisoning bugs, Gene Pool members of the Florida keys mosquito control district voted last week to approve the release of does that have been genetically modified. So the only viable offspring they produce are males only female mosquitoes, bite humans. So supporters say it is a way of controlling the spread of diseases like Dang, Gay Zeka and yellow fever without using pesticides for more we're joined by Phil Goodman Commissioner and Chairman of the Board of the Florida keys mosquito control district, he's in Cudjoe key commissioner. This is scheduled to start next year. What's your goal? Well what we would like to do would be to eradicate the mosquito borne diseases brought by the eighty s agip time mosquito, which is our public enemy number one here, which is the Zeka. The dinghy fever, the yellow fever diseases you mentioned we would we would love to be able to eradicate them. That's our goal in order to do that, you need to eliminate at least ninety percent of those mosquitoes to prevent local transmission and that that's our goal to be able to do that. So we're really excited about having this opportunity. Are you worried about unintended consequences of doing that releasing these Genetically Modified Mosquitos into the population? And? No. We have been studying this for ten years here within the mosquito control. I'm scientists We have a big team of scientists within our mosquito control district here in in the Florida keys, we have gone through all types of regulatory evaluations, all of the people who are against this. They raised a lot of questions. They presented those to the regulators specifically the EPA THEY EPA looked at everything and put in writing entered every objection and without exception they found that none of these objections really held water and that you know there was no impact negative impact on health human life. Wildlife including endangered species or the Environment here in the Florida keys? So one of the critics in this plan does have many critics. One of them is J. D. Hanson of the Center for Food Safety Who Call Jurassic Park experiment we remember in the movie Jurassic Park, they bred all the dinosaurs to be female and Jeff Globe. Bloom's character has the famous line. He says, you know life will find a way you can't stop it. What about that? What's your response to that? Well you know we heard a lot of Jurassic Park type fearmongering basically in my opinion I think some people are just in some organizations are just against any type of genetically modified organisms. No matter what it is. So they're automatically against it in my opinion, it's it's a rather small, but very vocal minority that or against this and But by going through the regulatory process, we've been able to mitigate these objections and we feel like this is a very safe process. Well. Just to give our listeners some context though more than two hundred and thirty, five, thousand people have signed a petition online opposing this plan they say the company that developed this genetically modified mosquito tech wants to treat people like human experiments d you expect lawsuits. To come. There could be and most of the people that signed the petition. You know this was a written petition that had all kinds of erroneous information on it and very few people from the from Florida and the Florida keys actually participated in this. So there may be lawsuits but you know we have all the approvals from everybody in my opinion that really matters but you know we we have to do something. The biggest fear here is ding fever and all these diseases that this mosquito carries not the blacks genet-. Genetically Modified Mosquito. Well, what does it feel like to be fighting against diseases like gay fever and Zeka in this way in the middle of the coronavirus pandemic? We have to be able to do you know we didn't ask for this second Virus to be here. But since it is, we have to address it and we're addressing it every day but you know we're very prone in the Florida keys. We're the undisputed hotspot of the mosquito borne diseases in this country, and you know there are no vaccines there no therapeutic treatments. The only thing that you can do to control these diseases is to eliminate. This mosquito and like I said, you know the the biggest fear here's a favor and the fact that this board may not have acted but we did act and so we're ready to defend ourselves and we think we did the right thing for the people of the Florida keys and you think that this is a safer option than just spraying pesticides all over the place. But that that's correct you know mosquitoes killing mosquitoes. This is what got my attention in the beginning. You know what a novel idea I'm a chemist I spent my entire career in the chemical industry and the chemicals that we use for mosquito control are no longer effective against this mosquito. We're not going to be able to spray our way out of these. Diseases with traditional technologies. So we have to find new tools and right now you know the sterile insect technique, which is this one really the only thing this out there there are no new chemicals on the horizon that will help us solve these problems. Thankfully, their companies like tech willing to invest in new technologies to to give us hope for the future. That is Phil Goodman who is commissioner of the Florida keys. Mosquito. Control district joining us from Cudgel key in Florida for Goodman. Thank you. Thank you very much. Another one million people applied for unemployment benefits last week, and in Las Vegas unemployment skyrocketed after hotels and casinos down back in March. One of those out of work is Benjamin Hernandez. He had been a restaurant Buzzer for Park, MGM, for twenty four years before being laid off. Of really miss the interaction with the Gorkhas with the gas you know casinos are slowly reopening but former workers like Hernandez are now pushing city to pass an ordinance called the right to return, which would require businesses to hire back laid off staff as the sole provider of his family Benjamin Hernandez and I started our conversation by talking about how the last few months have been since he was laid off. Has Been Difficult the. Dude the. Month that we had the stimulus health was okay by right after is dot you notice concerning because I'm going through star taking money from my life saving, pay my mortgage, my deleted bills and so on and so on. It's Kinda concerning yes you you're referencing the stimulus package money that extra six, hundred dollars You're no longer getting that in. So now you're thinking about going into your savings, tell me a little bit about your family for have four kids but three year they're leaving on their own, just the youngest one living with me he's seventeen in my wife and she's working. Just, a part time job now. I'm a survivor you know I deal medical treatment in observation to have health insurance S-O-F-I. Yes. But you will be effective on the lock Dover over three. I. OF DIES we don't know what's going to happen as I mentioned you are part of the save our jobs union coalition for the right to return, which would require employers to hire back former employees like you before offering those jobs to another person. More about what's at stake here? Will you know Is. Very. Important. For us to go back you know be Good Assa We have been working with the company for show long you know. we have. Invested great part of our lives, the company it we've been getting good You know benefit glued wages and everything but bright now I'm not saying it's going to happen but some companies might try to use this. Opportunities to get rid of some of the guys that. Being with the company for the longest time because you've been there for twenty four years. Yeah. Yeah. If I I don't know if that going to happen but that could be a good opportunity. Concerning you know in in that's why we asking for the companies to call everybody back at you know we understand that things are not going to get better right away but you know. The business go back to normal. Procedures People Boggle. They were they wear. What do you miss about work? We've been doing this for so long that we we enjoyed that atmosphere this. You Know Vegas is such a unique place to to be at work in any awesome the amidst all of the me sold the well the people you know what will you do though if you can't go back to park mgm I, know that you're going into your savings and that will last you for a little bit of time. But have you thought about the possible reality if this ordinance is not passed, I thought about the you know in. Definitely have a plan B our I've been thinking about. Reinventing Myself saw been thinking about maybe switching fields in may be going to auto mechanic I was thinking about enrolling myself glass in. You or nearing retirement but you're not there yet. That's the point is that you still have many years left working years left is the city really looks at this idea of the right to return or nets what do you want city officials to consider? Well they need to consider the we are be contributors to the developer. CD We. We big of this and it's a lot of light socks taken out of families that depend solely in this on this job. So now that we're going through all of these things in the nation I think this important you know legislator pass on blow something to protect us workers you want them to acknowledge that you and so many others have been a part of building up. What we now know is Las Vegas dot is correct. That is the thing you know because we always We have the kind of workers that always. Bach Station doing the little thing that makes the thing look good. So now is the time for the companies to really show they. They appreciate you know because we are told all the time that we have the best acid they have in everything. So the time to show that low us. That's Benjamin Hernandez. A former Buzzer at park mgm in Las Vegas. Nevada, Benjamin my very best to you and thank you so much for taking the time to talk with us. Thank you very much for. And workers are asking the Clark County Commission to consider this ordinance on September first here now is a production of NPR in WB. You are in association with the BBC World Service I'm Tanya Moseley I'm Jeremy Hobson, it's here now.

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41:29 min | 11 months ago

'80s Music Made For Quarantine; Housing Market Stalls

"From NPR and WB YOU are. I'm Tanya Moseley. I'm Jeremy Hobson. It's here and now. There's news from the Labor Department today. That another three million. Americans filing for unemployment last week bringing the total number of jobless claims to more than thirty six million since the pandemic started and this morning top government vaccine expert and whistle blower Dr Rick Bright warned a congressional committee that the US faces a grim future. If the trump administration doesn't ramp up its response to cove nineteen. Our window of opportunity is closing if we fail to improve our response now. Based on science I fear the pandemic will get worse and be prolonged. There will be likely a resurgence of Kobe. Nineteen this fall. It'll be greatly compounded by the challenges of seasonal influenza without better planning twenty twenty could be the darkest winter in modern history. Joining us to talk about this is Susan Davis NPR. Congressional correspondent and sue remind us of WHO Rick Bright is and what he's blowing the whistle on. Dr Bright Ran an organization. The government called the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority known as Barda and he was essentially the nation's top vaccine vaccine expert and he alleges that he was removed from that job because he was unwilling to go along with insistence from the White House from the president directly touting the use of an anti-malaria drug to treat Cova nineteen and he said it was not based on science and he wouldn't do it an alleged. He was removed from his job for that in a complaint that he filed he also says he raised all kinds of alarms inside the government about the government's readiness that he says Early Warning signs were ignored and he says without a national strategy going forward that the pandemic will not be contained. And in fact could get much worse. Here's subcommittee chairwoman and a Democrat questioning. Bright when you look at the first four months of this year would you describe the governments And the administration's response as a successor failure. I believe we could have done better. I believe they're in critical steps that we did not take time and bright says lives were were lost because of this response. What did we learn from bright today? Well much of what he is. Alleged is already out in the public domain and this is really a chance for Congress to question him and the allegations. He makes one of the things that he points. You not just about the use of the drug that he has gotten a lot of attention but also the mass supply. He says that one of the Early Warning Signs is that he was getting information from American mask. Makers the end ninety five masses that are used for frontline workers especially in the healthcare industry saying that the American supply was short that they didn't have what they need it and he says that he raised alarms about that that he tried to get messages to the White House directly saying that we were unprepared and it was an early warning sign in that when those warnings went unheeded. He said he knew that that was when things. Were going to get. Really Bad I would say that. Republicans however have pushed back on some of his allegations and also noted that the president didn't necessarily mandate use the drugs that doctors often use off prescription drugs to treat conditions when no other options are out there so defending that the president was sort of looking for all options to try to help the country that it wasn't some kind of nefarious act and also suggesting that Dr Brian may have been a disgruntled or angry employees. That people didn't agree with his assessment that it was just one man's assessment. Okay so parsing out. Some of what? Republicans said today to ranking Republicans said bright's accusations are serious and deserve to be investigated we also heard from Texas Republican. Michael Burgess who's also a doctor. He was pressing bright on anecdotes. He's hearing from other doctors about this drug hydroxy chloroquine which president trump has touted as being an effective treatment. Here's bright's response. I've heard those anecdotal stories. As well and they were not conducted in the context of a randomized controlled. Clinical study is very difficult to understand the data from those types of observational studies or anecdotal stories. So the drug might have some benefit and some populations. But we won't know that until we have that information from a truly randomized controlled clinical study and an. Yeah go ahead go ahead. And his point was more that the science didn't back up the use of the drug and I think the counterpoint to that is that You know you don't always necessarily need random clinical trials to get a drug out there if there is anecdotal evidence that it could help patients with no other alternatives in that essentially that there was nothing nefarious with what the White House was urging but break point is it just didn't have the science to back it up that Sue Davis she's NPR's congressional correspondent. Thank you so much sue. You're welcome we'll a fourth. Usda food inspector has died of the corona virus that comes as the meat packing plants. They inspect have become hot. Spots for outbreaks. At least ten thousand meatpacking workers across the country have been infected. Likely far more and at least thirty died Kim Cordova President of the U- FCW local seven union which represents workers in Colorado and Wyoming including meatpackers. She joins us now. Welcome thank you for having me. Well let's start with the workers that you represent several thousand workers for the food processing giant J B S. What has happened to them? Since this pandemic began. How many of gotten sick so we have had seven deaths in the Greeley Facility so I believe we have the largest death toll for the entire country Total for our plant we have Three hundred sixteen positive cases but we have not had testing for all of the workers so they did not until this week. Even offer testing for a symptomatic workers so the plant was closed back in April after the third death at the plant so they are back in Operating again yes. We've had several deaths since the plant was reopened. And what are the conditions like this point in the plant is the facility save? How close together are the workers kind of protections? Do they have so while the plant was closed? The company did make some improvements to the plant. Like in the lunchroom's break rooms. Put plexiglas dividers up on the fabrication side of the floor. They did put metal dividers up. They have markings on the floor to identify six foot of social distancing their staggering breaks Also they do not have the highest level of personal protective equipment respirators but without daily testing and they opened up that plant without testing all of the workers. We've seen the numbers start to move up again. You know. The plant was about one hundred and twenty somewhere around there Positive cases those were workers. That were Had symptoms and that were tested. Yesterday's numbers we have three hundred sixteen in they just started offering Voluntary testing but out of site. That's not on the plant fits you know on the plant site you have to draw is to a community college and get tested and they also have the testing during work hours so they are going have to do something about the personal protective equipment and areas in the plant. Where you just can't social distance will what do workers are? They glad to be going back into work or are they afraid you know. A lot of workers are scared. They need to be able to pay their rent and provide you know living for their families A lot of workers are still grieving. The death of their coworkers and as well as their family members that died so We still have Workers that are on ventilators. You know we know of one family that soon have to make you know the most horrible decision to take their family member there it's a jv she's a. Gps worker off the ventilator or You know she will be on the ventilator for the rest of her life In a coma. So it's it's a really bad situation for the Workers Kim. Let me ask you this question. Because there are a lot of listeners. Probably hearing you talk about this and wondering whether they ought to just stop buying meat for the moment because they don't want to contribute to the situation what would you say to Americans who are hearing this and they're worried about being part of the problem. There is a way that you can run this plant and keep the food supply chain going We need to run it safely. So when the president of the United States states invoked his executive order you know he failed to provide any type of safety mechanisms or invoke. Strong safety laws enforceable laws. That would be number one so you can run the food supply chain if we had safety controls in place so there needs to be some real change in these industries and you can continue to continue the flow of the food chain but we need to have it safe for the workforce. Let me finally ask you You represent another group of workers. The krogers grocery store workers and Kroger's has announced that it is ending hero. Pay For workers this weekend. That was an additional two dollars an hour that it was giving to workers during this crisis. What are your workers saying about that? Well they're really upset because we're not out of the woods yet. You know with the States opening up these workers are going to be put you know. They're still at risk. They have to often work. You know address customers face to face while they're helping assisting them and for the company to take the Bonus away workers. Don't understand that because the companies have profited the most Kroger has they've had record sales But they're taking the pay away from these frontline workers and so we're hoping that Kroger wreath rethinks their decision and provide that additional two dollars for these workers that have really risked everything There sit their health and safety as well as their family members. That is Kim Cordova. Who is president of UFC W. local seven union in Colorado and Wyoming? She represents meat-packing employees grocery store workers and more. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you Jeremy. Have a wonderful have a wonderful day. Spring is usually a busy time of year for the housing market the corona virus however. His up ended plans for buyers and sellers across the country for some. It's brought back still fresh memories from two thousand nine when the housing crisis tipped the US economy into a tailspin here announced Peter. O'dowd reports Barbara Vam Fund listed. Her home in rural wanted back on February twelfth. Remember those days beheaded House that week. I had reasonable amount of people coming and walking through and then Interest in her ten acre property dried up. Timing was definitely As bad as you could think of phone is seventy four years old. She can't risk people gathering inside her home. Her realtor did let one serious buyer inside but he had to wear a mask and keep his hands his pockets. One set of people ask if they could look into windows and I felt that was perfectly safe so They did. They came and looked into windows. This is no way to sell a house. A buyer needs to walk the hallways touch the countertops. They need to feel at home. Oh it definitely has ended my plan. Luckily von Thun isn't in a hurry. She'll have to wait to sell just like Oliver. Hoare who was also a victim of bad timing three or four days of being in the market when the shot down really starts to happen. He's selling his home in Kirkland Washington for just under a million bucks so this is about three miles away from where Bill Gates lives just by on the water. It's one of the most czar towns in the US Kirkland's also one of the first places. The virus broke out in the. Us remember tore through a Nursing Home. Killed Thirty seven people with that backdrop. It's no surprise. A good offer on Horace House fell through find Senate and notified the next morning. Actually buy a houses okay with the price but wants to stop looking for in house. Because I'm worried about the security your by Gut Scoot be. I worked for shovel. Company Uber's laid off. Thousands of people. Tripadvisor has client has expedia. The list goes on and on as of today more than thirty. Six million Americans have filed for unemployment and the pandemic has plunged the American housing market into uncertainty almost overnight this month the real estate firms zillow predicted home. Sales will drop up to sixty percent before recovering in twenty twenty one. The demand side of housing will disappear. We started seeing that fear disappear among people. Vivek Shaw is director of the Lead Institute of Real Estate Studies at the University of Nevada. Las Vegas a city that was crushed by the foreclosure crisis in the last recession. But if twenty twenty feels like deja Vu Shaw says there are key differences between two thousand nine and today I the lending environment much more robust. He says the days of making risky loans to unqualified buyers are pretty much over second. The supply has been very restricted. Shaw says home. Builders are facing headwinds. They didn't see a decade ago. The cost of labor is up. Land is more expensive and before the pandemic the number of homes for sale was already at historic lows. That tight supply is keeping prices up for now. I mean one thing that people forget is we had the market for appearance program right now mortgage. Forbearance is part of the corona virus. Relief Package Congress passed in March. People who lose their jobs can defer mortgage payments for at least three months. But it's not going to be forever. Which means that what happens after you know July August. Nobody's talking about the upcoming distress asset. That looks lead. The market which we saw was the financial crisis in other words. If the economy doesn't bounce back soon prices will fall along with a new wave of foreclosures. Not everyone is panicking yet in Houston. Sales fell twenty two percent in April though realtor. Eric Rodriguez says the market is coming back to life now. That people are venturing outside abandoned. Houses sold Here in the seventy. Hey so you definitely know that. Things are still moving. And how's this for confidence outside? Phoenix Robert Gifford. Made an offer on a three hundred and nine thousand dollar house and then got some terrifying news. After we got the offer on the House accepted you have the thirty days in about day? Sixteen actually got furloughed Advertising Job was gone. It was very nerve racking in times where even after we felt like we decided we so look at each other like we sure about this but he and his wife went ahead with the purchase trusting. They'd budgeted well enough to live on one salary for a while. Get back on track. We're totally fine. But if this whole pandemic goes on for another year like a lot more than just needed releasing out as if buying a house in the best of times wasn't scary enough for here and now I'm Peter out now that's buying and selling a home but with more than a third of people in the United States living in rental housing and millions unable to pay rent. The rental market is also experiencing a shakeup for more. We're joined now by Chris. Salvi Housing Economist for apartment list. We're hearing early reports that some housing markets like Seattle. We're seeing a small increase in rental prices. But your most recent study that looked at rent prices nationwide shows that they're actually starting to plateau what's happening right now in April and now may yeah that's exactly right so our most recent rent estimates so this is looking at our month over month changes from March to April things. Rents were pretty much flat and now that that. That's kind of notable because this is a time of year where we would normally expect seasonality to be causing that growth to increase at this time of year so the late spring is sort of when a lot of apartment search activity really ramps up ahead of the summer which is the peak moving season so in contrast to what we would normally see. We've really seen rents kind of level off. Are there any places where you're saying? Prices actually go down. Yes so that's another really interesting thing that we are seeing here so the biggest one was in Henderson. Nevada which is just outside of Las Vegas. Henderson is the city. Where a lot of folks that work in Las Vegas? We live in Henderson. And there we saw rents declined by a full percentage point month over month in similarly Orlando Rents. Were down zero point seven percent month over month while in Miami. They were down zero point five percent month over month and so. I think what we're seeing here is that these are all local economies. I really heavily dependent on tourism and I think what we're seeing. The rental market is responding most quickly in the places that are getting impacted most economically not necessarily the places where the public health impact is worse so in terms of you know dollar values here. These aren't necessarily that. Rents are dropping in a really stark away but we are starting to see the market respond. Yeah You keep referencing it in the context of what we used to see. So I'd love for you to take a little bit of a step back. What was the rental market looking like before this pandemic as far as growth sure? That's a great question. So before the pandemic rent price growth had actually been cooling a little bit as year two. We've actually seen rank wrote that was In kind of you know wants to percentage point year over year rate and and that was trailing consistently both behind overall inflation as well as average wage growth. So that was that was kind of a pretty stable market and A lot of that kind of price. Cooling was really driven by a pretty robust level of new construction. That was happening in a lot of places but I think an important nuance there. Is that a lot of that new inventory which really targeting the luxury end of the market and so the overall price growth was you know really kind of cooling off in many places it was still the case that the affordable housing market was still pretty tight. And I think that's something that if anything will be kind of exacerbated by what we're experiencing right now yeah say more about that because I'm thinking about millions of people are unemployed right now What do you anticipate will happen as we're talking about this luxury market now being pretty much unstable and we're kind of seeing this flow down to this rental market for lower income people right? So what we're seeing right now is record. Numbers of folks losing their jobs and really facing unprecedented levels of financial hardship. And so you know throw it all of this shelter in place period. Moving activity is really been put on pause for the most part But once once that sort of pick stack up and things began to return to some level of normalcy and folks are able to look for apartments and move again. What we might actually see. Is that a lot of folks may be looking to make downgrade move so people that are facing a new financial hardship that maybe looking to move into more portable housing than what they currently occupy. And so that can really create this effect where you're seeing sort of a a bifurcation of the market where the affordable housing segment is. Seeing kind of heightened demand in that could actually lead to accelerate growth for affordable units whereas the luxury end of the market. Those vacancies may get harder and harder to fill. And you could actually see prices coming down a bit for the luxury of the market. So that's really creating a pretty. I would say undesirables situation where you know. The market is tighter for the folks who are facing the most financial hardship moving forward. What are trends? You are looking out for that that you believe will impact both landlords and and really this country's renters one one really important factor of what's happening right now for the housing market is that shelter in place for folks who are able to work from home or lucky enough to kind of to have that ability. this is really kind. A large scale remote work experiments and so if it ends up being the case that companies started rethinking in the long run. Well you know. Do we really need to be spending money on on expensive office? Space and workers sort of rethink. Do I need to be spending all this money on expensive housing just to be close to the office while a Mecca could actually have really significant impact for the housing market so many unknown so much to consider. That's Chris solve the ATI housing economist. Apartment list thank you so much Chris very ever really nice talking with you. Governors of Arizona and Florida say professional sports teams can escape corona virus restrictions in their home states and practice or play in. There's Florida governor. Rhonda's Santa's had already said professional wrestling counted as an essential service and wwe world wrestling. Entertainment is staging matches in Florida. Including this one between Finn Ballard and Cameron Grimes. Drunk tick by power. You said it. There were no fans around the ring. It was televised last night on the USA network. Mike PESCA is here now. Sports analysts he host the daily podcast. The Gist it's late. Dot Com and joins us now Mike? We can leave aside. The debate over whether wrestling is an essential service or whether it's just being deemed one because of president trump's relationship with Vince and Linda McMahon who owned wwe. But how are they making? It happen safely right now in Florida Right. So if the question is how does a drop kick comport with social distancing regulations? Obviously it doesn't and the wrestlers have to come into contact with each other but what they say is employees are tested. Their temperature is taken before they go to their performance center which they own. They're essentially empty Reno and In the in the locker rooms the wrestlers spa are a little further apart from each other than they usually are and employees are encouraged to wear masks. Is the official proclamation. Now I do have to say that. Roman reigns a big wrestler a popular wrestler. He pulled out of their main event because he is a Cues former cancer patient. He had leukemia. He's immuno-compromised and he said he's not going to be participating and as a result. Wwe which has no unionized employees. They've basically written him out of existence. They took him off some posters. There was a little bit of an outcry. Reinserted him into ads but Yes there is there is ill will between the governing organization or at least a wwe and some of their most prominent wrestlers. There's also report that a an employee an onscreen employees which is to say we think a wrestler did test positive for corona virus but. Wwe explains it wasn't during One of their performances it was. He came in contact with someone who is a medical responder. I guess they're doing it. The best they can is the answer but it certainly doesn't comport with say. Cdc guidelines will but it does bring up. The question of what are the plans to restart any other sports baseball basketball hockey? Yeah well NASCAR is going ahead. There're racing in North Carolina and South Carolina and for instance the pit crews which are normally around twenty or now sixteen no fans fans in the area. And they're doing it. As one day event so a big NASCAR race is usually a multiday event. This way the cruise the whole teams can get in and out not stay over in a hotel. That's one answer the NBA's answer is right now. They're surveying players to see if the players even want to try to do it and they'll see where they could do it. Major League baseball is far along because you know we should be a couple of months into the season and a plan is in the laps of the players. They have to figure out compensation. But there's this whole plant have pretty much half. The season eighty two games and then make the playoffs much bigger. It will be. It'll be interesting in terms of not the baseball we're used to and not to set up where used to. We just have to see if the players agree to the compensation because it's far different from you. Get a salary. We get paid the salary. We've negotiated. Let's go home. Well there are a lot of workers who are wondering if they're going to get extra compensation for doing Hardship assignments right now. Mike pesca thank you. You're welcome. Well let's take a break from the news now for a special edition of the here now. Dj Sessions John and Heidi small or a husband and wife duo from Sioux Falls South Dakota. They run their own. All eighties radio station called Sunny Radio and are with us from their living room today and by the way we should remind people. Yes you are the. Dj's that came on and then later like months and months later by accident. Instead of the emergency alert system going out across the country. They replayed our session. I don't know what happened. It was so crazy and there's a youtube video somewhere floating around with the audio of that but it was like in the middle of the nationwide emergency alert tests. They played the here and now interview with us so It was kind of fun. Well Okay let's see if we can live up to that Today and I wanted you to come on a for a DJ session to talk about some feel good songs from the eighties. Give us a little bit of eighties optimism but your selections are actually perfect for the pandemic. So let's get to the music one. That was kind of a Heidi playlist right there by the way. Well it's perfect Let's listen here. Don't stand so close to me by the police chief subject the shooter warm so bad watch mall and she's so now am i. Right sting wrote this song about his previous career of being a high school teacher and the fantasy that can sometimes develop between young teachers and students. That sounds like a perfect story to me. That's a whole new meaning now. It feels like you should play this at the supermarket absolutely. We made the playlist just off of our current situations and this one. We actually been playing quite a bit on the radio station just because it does kind of make you smile based on everything that is going on right now with the little arrows and the dots on the floor when you go to the store and you know if you do happen to get too close to somebody when you're grabbing something you get these dirty looks and it's it was just pretty fitting all right. Well the next one you brought us is dancing with myself by billy idol on the only bare mention dance with ABC ELSE. Crowd dancing with now. Billy idol says he wrote this song after being in Japan and seeing Japanese. Teenagers Dancing by themselves disco-club covered in. Mirrors. So they could see themselves. I guess maybe that's how clubs will work in the pandemic once they opened up and let's hope not well. We chose this kind of for two different reasons. First of all we. We saw billy idol in Las Vegas about a year and a half ago. We loved it. It was so great and one of the things that has been keeping us going through this pandemic that. We're going to see him again in October. He's going to be at an event in in Mexico that we're going to so we have to get all of this stuff taken care of so. We can be there for the eighties in the sand event in Mexico. I don't want to be the bearer of bad news but you really think you're going to be able to do that in October. I really hope that we can. I think we will. It's all on schedule. It's all on schedule so far two. Don't don't ruin my outlook on this. Okay I I'm not making any decisions about it. Fingers crossed about that one. The next you brought us also has a solitary theme this is. I think we're alone now by. Tiffany your so now. Tiffany IS TIFFANY. Darwish who was sixteen when the song went to number one in one thousand nine hundred eight. She was huge and she was a big deal. She was on a tour of malls all over America and she was performing that and the cool thing is I think people are now able to get back into malls for the first time in a while. So maybe she needs to go on another mall tour. What happened to her? Where did tiffany go? Oh we just saw her again last year and I got to introduce her at a concert in this area and I admitted on stage before a introduced her that I had a crush on her when I was a kid and when I was leaving the stage. She gave me a hug good. We'll be careful. I don't know what what what could happen there. There was no social distancing that night. Okay all right well. Let's get to the next one. This is I remember when this song came out this is. You can't touch this by. Mc Hammer J. K. Touch this touch this touch this well my own amendment so going back to the grocery store Guys I guess you could say you can't touch this or if you do touch this immediately wash your hands and then every Yeah this was the first hip hop song ever by the way to reach number one billboard hot one hundred in one thousand nine hundred and the thing that's fun we just saw. Mc Hammer performed this song in Los Angeles in February right before the presidential valentines weekend So it was one of the last things we did before. We had to stay home for the last few months. Wow you guys really get around. You've seen almost all these people. Have you seen everybody in this session? What we've we've not seen the police and this last band we're going to get to we haven't seen but we've seen billy idol And tiffany at MC Hammer. Sound all right. Well the last one you're talking about is owned. Go Boy Ingo. This is called home again soon. Nine now I'm going to say this knowing that people are going to write in and say what? How could you say that? I've never heard the song before ever. Oh really soundtracks. It's in the movie home alone. Three home alone three. But it's it's a great song and I love wind. Go boy not seeing them in concert but I would love to someday hopefully see them and we chose this song from them. There's there's another song they have called Dead Man's party and that would have been a terrible song. We didn't want to do that but they've got a lot of really fun. Peppy Fund just. Yeah they have such different stuff to love and respect because they're just not like everybody else. They didn't conform. And that's kind of what I loved about them. So what do you think we can take away from the the sort of optimism of the eighties up? Be Stuff that that was being produced back then that might help us get through. This corona virus pandemic. I think one of the things we can do is turn our music. Just have some fun and I know this is probably the wrong place to say maybe. Listen to the news last but I'm saying a sometimes when people get stressed out about the news. Maybe that is when you say okay. I'm going to put on some music and just jam up and roll the windows down and just enjoy your life because life's too short and there's nothing you can do to change it anyway. So be as happy as you can while you're here at a safe distance of course distance of course safe distance and I will say I think news is very important of course and I pay a lot of attention to the news but when I take my dog walks in the morning it's usually with music because it does put you in a good mood. John and Heidi small their own eighties. Radio Station called Sunny Radio. In Sioux Falls. South Dakota great to talk to you both. Stay great to talk to you. Thanks so much always a pleasure. Thanks again and you can find all of our. Dj Session picks on our spotify playlist. It's NPR here. And now we're also on apple music at it here now. For nearly every state has begun a phased reopening plan with some exceptions including California and New York. Which are still heavily locked down. One of those states however reopening is Kansas. Which is in its first phase and officials say they'll announced tonight or tomorrow whether face to start next week face to let restaurants bars and nightclubs open at fifty percent capacity and allow gatherings of up to thirty people. There have been some seventy five hundred positive tests and Kansas but infection hospitalization and death rates are dropping and most parts of the State Kansas Department of Health and Environment Secretary Lean. Norman joins US now and Dr. Norman what is your governor Lower Kelly weighing as she decides whether or not it's time to open into the new phase. Yes that's a great question. Essentially we have three epidemiological markers were doing. One is the hospitalization rate per capita. One is the death rate per capita and the third one is disease spread. The first two are quite easy to measure and are going the right direction. The disease spread. We'll take a little bit of art and a little bit of science to figure that one out the reason being and I'm sure you're aware that as you increase the amount of testing you pick up a lot more a symptom cases and what we're finding is that there's counties that are just great and there's counties that are problems and it's confirming what we had the trends we've seen and I'm assuming that's also by density as well when you're talking about those different areas in curiously Sort of we have four counties that are What we would consider to be rural but they have the same commonality that packing plants for Yes and those four counties are for the problem counties and then the other four are urban counties with more density as you point out. I WanNa ask you a little bit more about those areas with meat packing plants. What kind of power does the state have to protect those workers In those areas specifically an are you guys mandating in terms of P. P. E. testing reporting in those types of things. Yes ultimately we could shut the plants down. We have that statutory authority in the state of Kansas. That can be done by a local health officer in that county and we could override the local health officer and shut down the production in these packing plants. We had that has not been necessary to do. Fortunately we have had really great cooperation by the company's my the local health departments. We've augmented terrifically for testing. We've tested essentially everybody in those plants. And then we still face of course. In each of those counties the meatpackers live in their homes in their communities. So it's not just a workplace problems community problems. Well I WANNA go back to that face to that allows gatherings of up to thirty people all the things that you have to consider weighing. But I'm picturing this reopening in practice. Maybe a bar hosting a small concert or an event like renting space for birthday parties and stuff like that. I mean you've been In public health for a long time do these kinds of images make you nervous knowing how easily this virus spreads in restaurants and Choir Practices? And and things like that. We've seen that over and over again across the country. Yeah not only across the country but globally as well and especially with that one index case in South Korea the young man that went to five bars and then infected orange people in their off to the races again so it does concern me We have not made the decision to move into phase two of the reopening plan But you're absolutely right the gathering Places are where the problems have mostly been in Kansas. We've had but we define as eighty-eight outbreaks and the largest number of those have been in Places of business worship more Correctional Facility. So it's where people congregate before I let you go In many ways the corona virus has become politicized. There are questions about The politicization of the national stockpile a now you have figures on the right saying don't wear masks. The president himself has refused to wear a mask. And you are the secretary of Health and estate that has democratic governor and a Republican controlled legislature. And and they don't always agree. Have you found That there is a polarization on these issues on a national or state level. And does that make your job harder? Yes I absolutely agree with you. That the political polarization that has occurred does make it different. It's a whole separate minefield to navigate on the one hand. There's if I look at something from a purely public health perspective then. We can lockdown for the next year which is not practical on the other side of it which is free markets. This is America after all. Everybody needs to get infected and and let the strong survive herd immunity will catch up and be at four million people dead well. That's not a very appealing thing. Either so I look at it practically and say what is. We can't mitigate risk two zero but we can try to mitigate risk to lowest amount possible and I think that Both sides have to give a little bit meet at some Risk Mitigated Position. We can live with and then we have to be able to respond because whenever we move onto the next phase and the next phase and the next phase after that it won't be set in stone because we are looking to the fall of mentor for a resurgence and it could come sooner if people aren't attentive to the principles that we're trying to help people practice that's Kansas Department of Health and Environment Secretary Lee. Norman Lee. Thank you so much. Thank you very much done. You have a good day. Here is a production of NPR WB. You are in association with the BBC World Service. I'm Tanya Moseley. I'm Jeremy Hobson. It's here now.

United States president Las Vegas NPR Jeremy Hobson President billy idol Kansas Mike PESCA Tanya Moseley Chris Congress White House Republicans Dr Rick Bright Kim Cordova Wwe
Hairstylist On The Future Of Salons; Pandemic Impact On Rural Health Care

Here & Now

43:28 min | 1 year ago

Hairstylist On The Future Of Salons; Pandemic Impact On Rural Health Care

"From NPR and WBZ. I'm Robin Young. I'm Tanya Moseley. It's here now. An epidemiologist at the University of Washington have revised their project of Corona virus death toll upwards to just over seventy four thousand seventy three people by August. That news comes more states move. Cautiously towards lifting social distancing restrictions and president trump suggest. Some schools could reopen soon and this morning. President Trump tweeted. We are doing far more and better testing than any other country. That's only true in number of tests per person the. Us has testing less than two percent of the population experts. Say That's not enough and yesterday. The president unveiled a new testing strategy in a Rose Garden news conference. That took the place of yesterday's schedule. Daily Corona virus briefing so. Let's get some context here from recline. Abc Political Director and Ricca. Yesterday the President had pharmacy and lab company officials talking about testing. But what are we witnessing here? You know this wasn't a task force briefing but it had Dr Burks from the Task Force. Wh what are we seeing? Well I you're seeing the closest we've had so far to a national testing strategy although we still don't have that we have federal government working as a testing facility or testing warehouse last resort. If you will but still the states mostly out for themselves and you also see a White House that's beginning to turn the focus of these these regular updates as regular as they're going to be a from immediate reaction and mitigation into trying to spin forward to over opening strategy and and I think The the optimism that president trump is brought early in the in. This crisis is now reflected in these briefings just about every day of beyond just the statistics and beyond the inflated sense of where we are as a country where the states are you starting to see more details that are aimed at trying to convey that we have turned a corner when the reality is very much in the middle of this crisis. Well are we also seeing the president acknowledging what we've been seeing all along? Which is that. He has sort of taken over. You know what what was supposed to be a task. Force briefing Anthony Fauci wasn't in the Rose Garden yesterday On Saturday he said the US needed to double its testing over the next several weeks. Dr Deborah burks was there but many are saying that she's not calling out the president when he is wrong. Boston Globe columnist Giovanetti Her column was headlined. Dr burks drape yourself in Science. Not In trump pleasing scarf of denial. So what other kind of shift are we seeing here? Well I don't know that you can look at strategy or find strategy and what the president is doing today because it changes so what frankly but I do think that a lot of the real work of this task forces not happening in front of the cameras. President trump by all accounts is not even attending a lot of the a lot of the actual meetings the public end of it. The president has taken over and he's taken over for more than a month. Now and off to the consternation of the health officials and if you ask these health officials about it look they recognize that the president goes out on on on tangents that wild that are. Ill informed irresponsible. Even they feel like their role though is to try to rein in as much as they can behind closed. Doors recognizing this president is going to do what he wants like or loathe their strategy. That has been how they have crafted their response. Whether it's Dr Bursts or Dasa how so? Many of the full surround president trump or have been trying to manage president trump. A little bit of sound from yesterday with maybe that in mind We had the president's tweet yesterday. Posing the question of why American tax payer should bail out states and cities which he said were in all cases Democrat run and managed seeing the pandemic and blue and red states and then one reporter. Livia nutsy from a New York. Magazine asked President Trump yesterday. What his reelection chances should be given the death toll president loses more Americans over the course of six weeks and died in the entirety of a Vietnam. War deserve be reelected. So Yeah we've lost a lot of people but if you look at what original projections were two point two million. We're probably heading to sixty thousand seventy thousand far too. Many one person is too many for this your thoughts in his response. Rick measured. I thought it was measured and also revealing. I mean he could've flipped off at the reporter. Really lost it on and I think maybe other presidents might have said. Look that's inappropriate. He didn't he. Didn't say what a lot of presidents would say. Which is this is not the time to think about politics. He made clear. He is thinking about politics thinking about this in terms of his own re-election he's tried to try to put the numbers out there that portray his response in a positive light notwithstanding other things that he has settled for a long period of time that would cut in another direction. Politics has been front and center and first and foremost in his mind from the beginning and the president has been honest about that actually throughout even as he's been dishonest about so many characterizations because we just have about a half minute. What do you make of the news today? The House will not be coming back to Washington week as they announced they would yesterday because of Corona Virus Concerns. Some lawmakers are sleep in their offices. Used that House Jim People wonder how that might work. Just a half a minute here yeah. Politics is normal as politics in person. Who's going to have to wait? And I think this is just the bowing to the realities of how things are right here in the District of Columbia where I am. We are not back to normal. We're not ready for that. And the idea of putting lawmakers and the huge infrastructure around them endanger took to hold votes. It's just not gonNA happen yet. It climbed political ABC. We always get it all in Rick. Thank you thank you. We've been talking a lot about the use of technology to track and stop. The spread of the corona virus and apple and Google are now releasing more information about their plans to help public health agencies in this effort instead of contact tracing. They're now calling it exposure notification and to explain more about how this will work. We have Sarah Morrison with us. She covers personal data and privacy for. Vox and Sarah tell us more. What data could your phone be sharing with public? Health officials. Sure So to put it very simply Your phone if you opted into this program your phone would send out and receive like Bluetooth signals to and from any other phones that also opted in that were within a certain distance to you and so basically keeping a record of all the devices. You've come in contact with over a certain amount of time. The assumption there is that those devices are carried by people and if one of those people test positive for corona virus. All the devices that they came into contact with would be alerted that they may have been exposed. The current virus so Unless you test positive your phone is actually. Sending data to the public health officials And then the Bluetooth Signals keys which I think is really the only data that's kept on your phone. Those are anonymous so it actually makes it really very difficult to identify somebody through just that Bluetooth Signal. Okay interesting so you mentioned the opting in as a as a feature. When will people start to see this on their phones? Well it really depends on if you download the APP so the apple and Google are making this technology available to public health authorities only and the ideas that those thirties will develop their own apps. And this would be a part of it. It won't just like appear on your phone. You would go and download that APP and then opt in obviously and then then that would work on your phone. They're not ruling this out until I think mid may so that would be the soonest but it would also depend on. I guess if your local public health authorities participating in it and when they develop an APP that's out there okay but you know though at first Google and apple we're calling this contact. Tracing now they refer to it as exposure notification. Some have really interpreted this change as a response to privacy concerns that many Americans have about the use of technology in this way. Can you talk more about these concerns? And and maybe what Google and apple or doing to mitigate them. Yeah I mean I think people are always concerned about people finding things about their health where they've been. Google Apple said from the beginning that they had to make this tools privacy centric as possible while also still trying to figure out a way to sort of track who people came in contact with because this is always been opt in you know it has to be a thing that people are gonNA use so the way that they've done. This is the signal that your phone sends out is changed the identified from your phone. It's changed every ten twenty minutes. It makes it pretty difficult to connect that back to a specific person. It doesn't take your location data. The data again stays on your phone. It's not sent the public health authorities if you don't trust them with that kind of data only public health. Authorities have access to the technology to make the APP and they're saying the tools going to just end the pandemic does so it couldn't be all sort of used for different things You know the even still the. Uk's National Health Service has said they'll develop their own tool to do this as well as Health agencies in France. We know there's been a contentious relationship between the UK and these tech companies in the past over privacy issues Do you have any more insights as to why There's an apprehension there to use these tech companies In this way and their efforts to help track this virus so think the funny thing is that like you. Said Europe's generally been debtor about tech and privacy than actually America is in this particular issue. I think the problem is. They think that this tool is a little bit to privacy centric interesting. Yeah I think both the United Kingdom and France wanted the data to go to a centralized server as a not on the phone because they don't get any data I think they're public health agencies on like where the viruses are coming in contact with. It's basically just the people using it to get that kind of notification you can see why the agency would want to know that stuff so Dave gone with their own to try to sort of keep using this bluetooth exchanging technology and find a way around the limitations of that particular tool that Sarah Morrison. She covers personal data and privacy for. Vox Sarah Thank you so much. Thank you it's here. And now and the corona virus outbreak has put a strain on cash-strapped hospitals many of them in rural areas of the country. Mark homes has been tracking this impact. He's the director of the C. Sold G SHEPS Center for Health Services Research at the University of North Carolina. Welcome happy to be here thanks. What has this crisis meant for hospitals in rural areas Have they been inundated off but these covert nineteen patients? What rural hospitals have had financial challenges for years? We've been tracking closures for example for since roughly two thousand five and two thousand nineteen was the highest rate of rural hospital closures since we've been tracking them Roughly half of rural hospitals lose money in any given year and so some of them three months ago. Were looking at questions of can we make payroll on Friday? And so as you cut revenue you know. Some emergency departments are talking about fifty percent cuts in revenue and some of the elective procedures. That hospitals have been turning away for the last month or so. Those are the highest margin services. So they've started off from a tricky situation and they're seeing the revenue fall in. It's going to be tough for many of them. Hold on What parts of the country? do you think we are seeing the biggest impact to hospitals from this crisis so the south has always been one of the more The region's that's face the tough finances from a rural hospital standpoint but the nature of this particular crisis is that goes on all across the country. And we've been seeing closures in the Mid West now for example and if you look at the maps and see the flare ups of Cova cases in rural America you can find one in Indiana in one in South West Georgia of course Louisiana and in the mountains in so these pop ups are occurring throughout the country and that makes every region susceptible. Your Center found that since twenty ten so the last ten years are so one hundred twenty eight rural hospitals of closed around the country what was happening to rural hospitals before this crisis. I mean as far back as twenty ten. You can really break the causes of the Rural Hospital closure crisis into four main buckets. One would be population. We've seen changes in demographic and population decline. We know rural areas in particular. Have seen hustled income fall and that makes it harder to make deductibles and copayments There's a policy A category that include certainly the a. c. a. and the choice of Medicaid expansion but sequestration back during the last great recession when we asked hospitals for a one percent Give back in terms of Medicare revenue. Sometimes that meant the difference between being black and being in the red payment changes in terms of how healthcare is paid for and structured and delivered have particularly affected rural hospitals because of their volume. There's more susceptible given their small numbers and the way that medical practices delivered The movement away from inpatient care the concentration of services away from rural hospitals into urban often larger facilities before those combined to exacerbate the crisis that they've been facing you mentioned The push for patients in more urban areas is that the alternative for folks who live in rural areas. And then how is that way of doing things compounded by what we're seeing now with covert nineteen so sometimes? This is driven by a decline in services. So as hospitals closed their operating room or their maternity ward That's going to mean that instead of getting delivering your baby or getting your Appendectomy at the local hospital. That means you're going elsewhere. But sometimes this is driven by patient choice and desire to go to the larger silly which may be seen as being a off. Sorta right might not always be the case in terms of CO vid. It's really hard to tell because whereas there's some question as to you know my local hospital will be less likely to have cova cases there may be some incentive to staying local on the other hand people may respond by going to the larger area they think can handle a wide variety of cases. And I think we're still waiting and seeing how that's playing out you some stories that we've been hearing Though is that many of these rural hospitals as you mentioned. They're understaffed but also the ability for them to receive some of The state of the art technology but then also just some of those basic tools p. p. e. face masks in those types of things. What have you been hearing so certainly? There's a question of a volume purchases and so if I'm a small rural hospital and I have a one twentieth of the order of a large urban facility. I may have tougher challenges getting that. Ppa delivered. But I think the other thing to think about too is if a hospital has one respiratory therapists for example if that Therapists gets ill or has a family member who on these cared for now. The hospital has zero. And so there's much less room for error in many of these rural facilities. You know the President and Congress approved this thirty billion dollar. A measure to help rural hospitals. Is that expected to help? I think anytime that you have stopgap funding coming in at. That's well come in and will be really valuable. The question remains how long this crisis continues many indications are that this is a long haul and That may be a challenge for some of these hospitals to go months under the current scenario. Even with this infusion of resources mark homes is director of the cease G SHEPS Center for Health Services Research at the University of North Carolina Mark. Thank you so much for joining us. Happy to be here. Thank you well. Let's check in now with a small town where the local hospital has come face to face with an outbreak of corona virus. The Mountain West News bureaus nate. Heggie has the story. The town of Shelby sits on the high plains of North Central Montana. It's home to a lot of wheat and barley fields Pretty Good High School football team and an Amtrak train the passage through town twice a day. The people here are are fantastic There's a huge sense of community. That's William Keefer. He leads the only hospital in all of Tooele County that offers twenty four seven emergency services. He says shelby is a town. Where most everyone knows everyone? So when folks here started getting sick and even dying from Cova Nineteen. It hit hard. I mean I think that everyone's reaction is is one of despair. The virus ripped through the hospitals assisted living facility in late March infecting more than a dozen staff and residents. As of April twenty-seventh. It had killed six people in the county and because tool county has such a small population that meant it. Now has one of the highest per capita death rates from cove in nineteen in the entire west former shelby. Mayor Larry Bond Rude says he knows everyone who passed away. We all had major health problems all been sick before and now the town just like the rest of the State of Montana has been under a strict stay at home directive for the past month a lot of the mainstream businesses are closed and You know the restaurants are all kind of doing take out and so everybody's adapted to it. Nobody likes it. Montana's governor plans to slowly lift the stay at home directive in phases beginning this week but bond rude was against it in the first place. He doesn't think it works. Christine Porter disagrees. She teaches public. Health at the University of Wyoming and says staying at home is one of the only ways that rural towns like shelby can protect themselves from the virus left. It's devices it will spread like wildfire. Something we're familiar with. Rural towns are acutely vulnerable because folks living there are often older and because these towns often have limited medical capacities for instance shelby only has twenty one hospital beds into ventilators but some of the West small towns aren't taking the threat seriously enough because unlike show the aren't seeing many confirmed cases in their counties yet porter says this is a frustrating yet. Common Public Health Dilemma. She explains it using a parable babies in the river. Let's say you're standing by you. Know the the river having a nice picnic and then you see a baby floating by drowning. What do you do well? You jump in the water and you save it but then you see another baby floating in the river and another and another and then there's a thousand babies in the river. That are all drowning. What do you do? You cannot save all the babies she says this is how some rural communities are treating the threat of Cova nineteen when there are no babies drowning in their river. They don't see a need to change their behavior so drastically until we see the suffering. We don't believe it and don't think it's worth the cost of of the public health measures even though once you start seeing the effects in your community it is. It's not too late to still save some lives but it's too late to prevent the the slam porter is especially concerned about the handful of conservative states. That resisted enacting. Stay at home orders. Those order she says are demonstrably helping to flatten the curve back in Shelby Hospital. Ceo William Keefer says Montana's stay at home directive helped his town rest control over the outbreak. There we believe that everyone staying in their homes and doing the falling the guidance of the CDC is incredibly important. And that it's to this point being been very successful until county and there's something else that shelby did that officials should take note of for all future pandemics. Keefer says the hospital planned ahead before the virus even reach the. Us have a group of dedicated people here that the while if it does hit the United States were very rule frontier facility and we should do everything in our power now all the way back in January. The hospital began purchasing and storing personal protective equipment. That's because even though Shelby Montana isn't a ski resort or a bustling city. There's that Amtrak train the comes through twice a day between Seattle and Chicago and the trucks. That role passed along the main highway. The families getting back from vacation. Although we're small we're not isolated. People do move around quite a bit and in this pandemic is that movement that can kill for here now. I Made Heggie and if you live in a rural part of the United States let us know how you're doing. Are you worried about whether your hospitals are prepared for an outbreak? Are you staying home? Instead of seeking care or travelling long distances for care. Let us know at here now. Dot Org Taiwan is a model for how to handle the pandemic the island province of twenty. Four million people has just four hundred and twenty-nine cases. Only six people have died. Let's bring the BBC's Cindy Sue on skype from Taipei and Cindy when the outbreak started in China late last year. Taiwan responded quickly. What did the government do? It did everything that it felt that it had to do you given the lessons learned back in two thousand three during the SARS outbreak it. I closed the border so it stopped flights from China And it also put in travel restrictions for its own people travelling to mainland China. At the same time they started looking for cases that could be nineteen cases and they did that by learning all the doctors in the hospitals in Taiwan and asking them to test for Virus in anybody who has symptoms of flu symptoms of pneumonia so the very quickly found some cases that way people flying including Taiwanese people returning from overseas. They were immediately check for the temperature so that helped authorities catch people who who may have the disease. Well what about testing? It's of course. Large twenty four million but in many ways that's relatively small so has everyone been tested. No it actually took a very different approach from countries such as South Korea which did mass testing. Taiwan has not done that the fact that they caught the cases so early on and they isolated the confirmed cases as well as Corentin all the people that they had contact with. So even now we. We have not had community-wide transmissions most of the cases here are actually imported cases. So they haven't had to do mass testing because they've been very good at contact tracing so they will find the person that has the illness. Quarantine them but also go back on that person's path and find everyone that they may have contacted. There's never been a lock down. The baseball now has started in Taiwan But people are practicing social distancing wearing masks. Yeah when life here you know looks and fused quite normal except for the fact that we all have to wear masks in when we go into like our buildings elevators or sometimes In school some schools require that the kids wear masks throughout the day. Our temperatures checked several times a day. If you go into several buildings checked every time you walk in it from the sports centers to the office buildings and sometimes the post offices as well So you know. It's a very strict sort of system here. And you're there are also a lot of vigilance. These people in for instance in the community. I live in people in my building compound within. Remind you to wear a mask When you walk into the elevator Reminded disinfect your hands as house. You Cindy how do people feel about that? You know being policed by other citizens well it can be annoying. I mean but I heard that it happens everywhere. My sister in California says their mouths Gestapo out running around. I mean you don't really need to police. The People here that are very very compliant. They know the risk involved as I mentioned a went through SARS. They don't want to to impact economy in the same way. It's ready impacted Tourism industry has been badly affected so the government has Put out these stimulus packages in rescue packages to try to help the businesses and workers but on the whole you know we've been quite lucky here societies functioning economies more or less functioning and in a way we may be looking at our future. You know temperatures taken before you go into stadiums and things it's quite something the BBC's Cindy Sue from Taipei Taiwan. Cindy thank you so much. Thank you The city streets and San Francisco are mostly empty these days residents sheltering at home many as in other cities living through their second public health crisis in one group is trying to use lessons learned from the AIDS epidemic to help people stay connected today for member station K. Q. E. D. Michelle pitcher reports. It was one thousand nine hundred five in San Francisco. Richard Goldman was working as a physician's assistant. He moved to the city about ten years earlier and had met people through his job. Who ARE LIVING WITH HIV AIDS. Then he got his own diagnosis he was HIV positive. Expected to actually live this long today. Goldman is seventy one years old. He lives alone in the middle of the city. He says sheltering in place is incredibly isolating and on top of that. He can't help but revisit. The fear he felt decades ago was terrifying for many many years during the early AIDS years. And I think those of us who went through it either as survivors or caregivers or family and friends have a fair amount of Steve. From those years. And a lot of that has resurfaced during this code pandemic HIV attacks the immune system so does covert nineteen and people with HIV or AIDS are some of the most at risk during the pandemic. They're forced to cut all interactions with the outside world and all this isolation can have an effect on their physical health when golden was diagnosed with full-blown AIDS in nineteen ninety. He knew he didn't want to be alone. He reached out to the Shanti Project. A San Francisco nonprofit that Peres chronically. Ill patients with companions. The goal is to make sure that no one is socially isolated during a difficult time so during those weeks I was supported one hundred percent on the telephone by one of the volunteer staff. I know how powerful phone call can be in how important it is to to receive them and also to make them. We know that more people are living by themselves than at any other point in American history. Cushy Croix is the executive director of the Shawnee project the group raises funds through government contracts and donations. And use that money to keep. It's more than one thousand. Hiv positive clients from being truly alone for so many of Shaun. T's clients their social network. If you will. Our nurses and social workers and doctors basically people who are just telling them what to do and oftentimes shanty as a volunteer or a staff. Member is the one person who shows up just to be invalidate and recognize that person's humanity beyond their disease or illness chips. Panic is almost sixty years old. He's a compromised immune system and a pulmonary issue. He's one of shontae clients. He's also living alone. I'm a social person my home. It's always been a sanctuary. Become a prison chip. Says he lost a lot of friends to AIDS. He says the current situation gives him a funny feeling in his stomach. The fear the stigma the prejudice. It all reminds them of a different time. Something like well. We need to take care of another subpoena. Jr. Says the most important thing is to stick together especially in a time when we're all forced apart for here and now I'm Michelle pitcher in San Francisco while under the Federal Cova nineteen relief. Packages the self-employed Canal. Collect unemployment. Usually they're not eligible. Let's see how that's working in Michigan. Those in the personal care industry like Stylus barbers. Makeup artists are among those who could benefit from this change. Kristen Snyder is a hairstylist. In Ann Arbor. She started a change. Dot Org petition to raise awareness and funds for people in our industry and Kristen. It's not as simple as it may sound for people like you to get on employment. What's been your experience applying in Michigan? Well we were actually not able to even begin filing for unemployment until last week so you can imagine. It's been well into a month with no ability to file for unemployment. Well let's explain why a Michigan wasn't up and running in many states are up and running with this new aspect of unemployment you previously hadn't been eligible and Kinda don't know how to do it right now. That is correct and this unprecedented thing so I think the whole world is a little left behind in scrambling to come up with what to do next. Ya know kidding and yet we're seeing states like Georgia opening up hair salons. What do you think about that? I mean yeah. Obviously you've taken real Gut Punch but would you open tomorrow and have people come in well. So here's the funny part. As soon as the states mandate that we can open. We lose our eligibility for unemployment so for us. It's a matter of. Can we survive choosing to stay on employed when our state's open and for many of the stylists that I've been talking to George? They are forced to go back to work because if they don't they lose their benefit and they are all very uncomfortable being there a lot of them because the requirements and recommendations that the state has given out to stylists to open up their businesses and start working is similar to what nurses are wearing in doctors are wearing in hospitals to take care of Kobe. Nineteen patients the amount of P P. That's required and recommended by the state for US. To working is a little bit a little bit strange to work in a and to find and source and pay for all on our own which is I have very strong opinions about because the healthcare system needs it more than we do. What a catch. Twenty two seem to be so many of them. So you're saying if the state does mandate that you open you you would in jeopardize your unemployment. You would go back not really sure of how you could keep things safe because you don't have the equipment right now the PPI. And I can't even imagine you feeling safe even with people work so closely with people and by the way would people come in. I think that there are a handful that I could say absolutely. If I were to open tomorrow they would be there with bells on. I think that there would be a very big struggle however to maintain paying things like my salon rent and supplies to do that. Because I do think that more people would stay home than not at this point. In the meantime do you worry that after all this over will be in a different world? It will be a slightly different world for a while. I know we're all really used to bustling salons on Saturday morning and I think for the foreseeable future. It's GonNa look much different. It's GonNa be much more of a one on one experience waiting in your car for your appointment and potentially washing your own hair depending on the service you're having because that's so far. What some of the guidelines if it looked like for US potentially to reopen well. Well you know. We're on a lighter note. We are hearing about you know hairstylists again. A very close relationships with clients dropping off packets of hair color. And here's how you do it. But what tips do you have? Because we're also hearing about women saying you know what across the board I'm GonNa. I'm letting the gray go I'm letting the hair grow I'm The heck with my nails. I'm nat women are not just not doing things like this to have tips for women. Who maybe you know would like a little like to do something themselves for me. For instance there are a few people. I have that go blonde from pretty dark and I would never million years want them to try and do their own hair. That would be a disaster. So the best thing to do is to reach out to your stylist to see what things you could do comfortably other than that. It's a lot of ponytails that we suggest I know it's hard what will and compared to the big picture. It's really not that it's not a big deal and I just want to say that I would recommend if you haven't tried a haircut before. Try It. I did a couple. It's very very close with someone like you know. I may or may not have walked my best friend and her teenage daughter through cutting twelve inches off of their hair that was through zoom meeting kitchen scissors all kissing sharp enough and by the way I would just say if you're cutting a guy's hair and I was if you're cutting up around the year just pull the top of the down your learning so many things less room for ears on the floor. That's pretty much how that works. Let's Chris Snyder. A hairstylist in Ann Arbor Michigan Kristen. Thank you so much for filling in thank you and best of luck to you. Thank you so much. Your hair stories lead met here now dot org every year. In April hundreds of thousands of people visit Skagit Valley Washington for the annual Tulip Festival. That thirty day event brings an estimated sixty five million dollars in revenue for the region except for this year festival was cancelled because of the corona virus outbreak. And for more on what this means for farmers in the valley we have with us. Andrew Miller he's the CEO of the family owned Farm Tulip Town Andrew. Welcome thank you Andrew. I hear the birds chirping out there in the valley. It's a beautiful place. I know this festival started Back in one thousand nine hundred eighty four but variations have been happening really dating back to the early nineteen hundreds. Your Business was projected to make one million dollars in April from the festival. It took a lot of time to prepare. How are you guys doing well? We we had a really quickly and we said Hey. There's we've got some markers that we need to hit to be able to even do this again next year. How can we give it to to create some revenue to be able to do this again? that put some energy into what otherwise could have been a really really dark time. Yeah you and your family brought this farm from a Dutch couple just in the last year so this was going to be your big splash. The first year a really experiencing the Tulip Festival. What are some of the ways that you've adapted since this cancellation? We had very early. Pivoted to really focusing on Technology comes on social media as well as moving the flowers that we had in the field to people in different ways. Usually we sell Bouquets to talk to people that come here so let's see if we can figure out how to ship them and then we also how's that working for you guys. It's we're learning a lot. We're overwhelmed by the response from people. We've always wanted to make tulips approachable and so we sat for a long time and said really cost this much to ship flowers because we looked and said seventy five dollars for twenty flowers for someone. There's gotta be a better way and so we said okay. Well let's let's use the Postal Service. Let's use ups so we just continue to test data rate until we found you know a solution that we really love exporting the beauty in the hope and the joy of spring here in Skagit valley around the country. Yeah I can imagine you know. This is prime buying season with mother's Day coming up. I also know that. Raising Tulips is is a year long crop. They bloom in April. This is why this is a big month for Skagit Valley. I've been to the festival many times. It's amazing to see so many colors of tulips that run for miles. So what happens to all of the tulips that you don't sell or you can't ship out now so what we what we've done is so we will top the tulips. I'm so what we'll do is This week really restarted topping in earnest. And so we have about thirty percent of our field right now. There's just in color and so we take the tops off the plant then. We'll focus on strengthening the bulb for harvest here in the next Three to four weeks. We'll move into the serving. And then so those pictures where we see where the tulips have been topped off. It seems heartbreaking. Because you're thinking their top that actually helps the individual flower. Does we call it a life saving surgery? Because if we didn't do that they would die. we we would so what happens is because we plant so thick again the the leaves would fall down into the foliage or the pedals rather would fall down in the foliage and then they could invite disease which would get down into the bulb which would actually destroy the destroy the flowers so we top it to separate the parts of the flower. That are good for the flower. But I I will admit there's some of my favorite flowers out there that I just can't watch when they're chopping them I can imagine how has this changed or strengthened your relationship with other farmers because you kind of all come together for this wonderful festival and work together You know I know that you are shipping out flowers as you mentioned but that can't really make up for the revenue of folks who are coming to visit. No it doesn't we. We say people ask us if we're a bulb farm or if we're a flower farm and ultimately were a smile farm. We are about connecting and we have a lot of phenomenal farmers. But there are only two Bolt farms in other to commercial growers of of Tulips left in the valley. And so we do have to rally around what it means for our community. You know it's been great. People come up to the FARM STAND. And we've sold you know Tulips to our neighbors and people made. That might have stayed away Before and so. It's just it's really has been a different part of our business model To to connect and we've always relied upon our community. We we purchased Tulip town because tulips are are so iconic. You have this campaign now. Color for courage. What exactly is that? And what are you asking people to do? You Bet so. Colored for courage is an opportunity for anyone really around the world to purchase a bouquet and so we use a lot of the relationships that we have to To take these tulips and take two hundred. Tulips Bouquets Tulips into a hospital and Madigan Army Medical Center or into a nursing here in our community where people just love tulips. Do you think the Tulip Industry and Skagit valley will survive. Will there be a next year. There will be a next year. How that comes about. We'll we'll still have to see. We're not entirely sure on on on how that will shake out where we know here at. Tulip town that Growing Tulips here to obtain next year. That's Andrew Miller. He is the CEO of Tulip town. Thank you so much Andrew. Thank you for helping us tell her story and to see more images of these spectacular tulips go to here and now dot org here now is a production of NPR and WB you are in association with the BBC World Service. I'm Tanya Moseley. I'm Robin Young. This is here now.

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Blue Apron CEO; Republican Suburban Women Share Thoughts On Trump

Here & Now

41:57 min | 8 months ago

Blue Apron CEO; Republican Suburban Women Share Thoughts On Trump

"From NPR and Wbz I'm Tanya Moseley. I'm Jeremy Hobson. It's here and now Vice President Mike Pence speaks at the Republican. National. Convention tonight. Last night. First Lady Melania trump broke with other speakers and acknowledged the racial strife in the country as well as deaths from the coronavirus. I want to acknowledge the fact that since March. Lives have changed drastically. Visible enemy covid nineteen. Swept across. Our beautiful country. And impacted all of us. My deepest sympathy goes out to everyone. WHO has lost a loved one. And my prayers of those who are ill or suffering. Joining us now is NPR White House correspondent Hammer Keith ten the first lady spoke from the White House Rose Garden, which is unusual and president trump's staged a naturalization ceremony in the White House. Last night for this convention he also gave a surprise pardon to convicted bank robber who's turned his life around. Tell us about the unprecedented use of the White House and presidential power in a very political convention. A complete and total blurring of the official and the political. You had the White House at the White House the President conducting this naturalization ceremony yesterday as we understand it during the day than the White House posted the video to the White House Youtube page that video was then picked up and aired as part of the RNC convention it. It is unusual. It is unheard of there is a law called the Hatch Act that is meant to prevent the blurring of these lines and prevent public officials from doing. Electoral politics on on government time and and using government resources the the White House is trying to skirt around these rules. We should just say that. President trump and his staff have have been accused of violating the hatch. Act many times before during his administration and and they've largely just brushed it off. And on that note, by the way, there was another speech last night that's raising some Red Flags Democrats in Congress. Say They will investigate Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, forgiving a political speech to the convention from an official diplomatic mission overseas listen I'm speaking to you from beautiful Jerusalem looking over the Old City. I have a big job. At Susan's husband Nick's Dad. Susan and Nick are more safe and their freedoms more secure because president trump has put his America first vision into action. May Not have made in popular in every foreign capital but it's worked. TIMRA secretaries of state don't speak at political conventions. A purposely avoid it. They sometimes go to other parts of the world to be nowhere near the convention of course, Secretary of State Pompeo was in Jerusalem, and the State Department has said that no official resources were used for that video and as you heard there, he said my job is to be Susan's Husband in Nick's Dad Wink wink nod nod. To say, no, I'm not here as the Secretary of state I'm just here is a guy. You know this is just yet another example of the blurring of these lines and you know there's a reason why secretaries of state have have avoided this, which is that you know politics is supposed to stop at the water's edge there you know the the the the State Department. Frequently, tells other countries that they shouldn't have this sort of use of the apparatus of government for politics and yet here it was happening. What does Mike Pence the vice president to do tonight he of course, has led the coronavirus task force in more than one hundred and seventy eight thousand Americans have died from the disease so far. Yeah and he'll be speaking from Fort McHenry in Baltimore, which is the site of the battle that inspired Francis Scott key to write the star spangled banner. He is. Vice President and people generally know him the thought is that he may. Try to show a little more teeth or or a little more criticism of of former vice president biden and his running mate we will. We will see what that speech actually contains. But You know a Mike Pence is not traditionally known as as the attack dog of the administration. Traditionally, president trump has just taken that on his own with relish. We'll, and we'll probably hear from president trump again as we have the last couple of nights keith. Surprise. That's right. It will be a surprise. Tamra. Thank you. You're welcome. Let's go now to Kenosha Wisconsin where two people were killed and a third injured last night at a protest Jacob Lake, a black man who was shot by police as he was reaching into his car where his three young children were waiting for him. Blake alive. But partially paralyzed in the city of Kenosha is in the midst of unrest and for more let's bring in Alderman Anthony Kennedy who represents the tenth district of Kenosha Alderman thank you for being here. Thank you for the opportunity. And last night as as I mentioned, we saw another night of protests two people were shot and killed and a third injured hearing There were protests earlier in the day a peaceful march and a protest near the courthouse, and then later in the night, another more chaotic scene after that eight PM curfew tell us what you know. I was able to witness a good deal of that second incident in the evening my friends, Ray, Roberts, and my friend county board supervisor Andy Bird set up A. facebook live feed where they were discussing issues and bringing up different feeds that see what was going on in the city of Kenosha and one of the feeds they brought up showed the situation just about twenty to thirty seconds before the shooting happened, there was a confrontation in that confrontation. See People coalescing around that. You hear the shots fired and see. that. That little crowd disperse and the shooter walks. Past the person who is filming and. Close to a up the street, he trips falls the crowds that was near them starts to converge on Him. The person started shooting from the ground and I saw this as it was happening because of the feed that my friend Ray Roberts Andy were broadcasting, there were no Kenosha police officers in the vicinity they're line that they had set up was about four five blocks to the north of where this was happening So any narrative that talks about the Kenosha police were involved in this or complacent or allowed to happen. That is a weaponization of information that is literally GonNa Destroy My neighborhood. You said that you're heartbroken over what is happening there in Kenosha Blake sister his has said. This is nothing new though she's not sad she's actually angry and protesters have said this to. You've been in. One of the tenth district since two, thousand eight, where is the breakdown between police and communities there that protesters are contending and and do you feel a sense of responsibility in this at all as an Alderman? As a city Alderman, I absolutely feel a sense of responsibility I am part of the system it would be A. Falsehood for me to try to divorce myself from this watching the video of Mr Blake and his engagement with my police department was absolutely heartbreaking. There is no way you have any kind of humanity. And not be affected by that shock. Disbelief disbelief because the Police Department that is being pictured on that. Video Is a disconnect foam, the men and women that I have worked with WHO I have asked to help improve quality of life of my constituents for the last twelve years the people who It was almost as if I'm watching a fiction and. That was not an indication of what I thought I might police department was about. Alderman. There has been though a contentious relationship between Kenosha police and residents. There was another death that rocked Kenosha sixteen years ago the death of Michael Junior. He was a twenty one year old white man who was also shot by police and because of that incident Michael Bell's father pushed for reforms that now. Where the state to investigate cases involving Kenosha police. Do you have faith in that process. I have respect for what Mr Bell. Done. Taken a tragedy that I, I cannot imagine any father. WHO's their son? And he's taken that tragedy and he has made some reforms happened in the state of Wisconsin and I thank Mr Belfer that effort because we I think we are in a better place because of it. In a better place but the call from protesters is more they want more to happen. This is this is a small city with one hundred, thousand people I can hear in your voice that you feel a tremendous amount of sadness about what's happening to your community. But what conversations or actions do you see coming out of what's happening now? What do you want to see happen? One. And this might be Pollyanna Pie in the sky but. I have been accused by the people I have engaged in the in the neighborhood in the community that I'm a liar that I am the puppet for the system. I work at a certain level I don't have the luxury of just being angry I have to be angry an productive and I'm GONNA ask my constituents to please join me in that. That was Anthony Kennedy Alderman for the Tenth District in Kenosha Wisconsin where people were killed and a third injured last night at a protest over the shooting of Jacob Lake. At last night's Republican National Convention, Culturally Conservative women were, front and center with strong opinions against abortion bathroom bills for transgender students and a general appeal by first lady Melania trump to the mothers of this country. To mothers and parents everywhere your warriors. In my husband, you have a president who will not stop fighting for you and your families. But polls show a significant portion of women have deserted trump a recent NPR PBS Newshour Mayor's poll released in June shows sixty, six percent of women disapprove of the president. I connected with two longtime supporters of the president who believe despite the polls that trump actually does have a second chance Susan, Sherman of Lake Mary Florida, just outside of Orlando and Sonia mcmasters of round rock. Texas a suburb just outside of Austin I started by asking Susan, what issues are top of mind for her and her neighbors. Well, many issues for myself in those in the central Florida A lot of their issues is the country may be turning towards socialism concern defending the police. Rioting, happening. So there's there's different topics that have truly have come up since covid. Never really heard anyone really talk about these three until after covert really started. Do you see those talking points is really showing the reality the truth of where this country is headed and really the conversations that are being had about defunding police organizations your against defunding the police. But president trump has also had in his twenty nineteen budget plan. The trump administration was proposing a nearly fifty percent cut to the COPS hiring program, which hires local police officers. We hear that in his twenty twenty, one budget plan there also plans for cuts. What do you say to that? He has to do it budget just like anyone else. So if he has to. Reduce that budget and move it to other areas then. It's just like running a business with that being said, then has to go back to your state your county in your city to do their budgeting Sonia do you want to weigh in here city of Austin defended our police department in the city of Austin already in their budget? We've had major riots in Austin and then they get matt because they want protection while they're doing this. But you mentioned Austin City Council cut the police department budget by one third they did not defined the entire police department and so in thinking about that I mean, I'm thinking about how polarized we are as Americans. And the conversations that we're having seemed to be we're we're we're not talking to each other even though we're talking about the same things I, mean, this is one example of this. Do you see what I'm saying here? It I I can see your point on that, but at the same time. They want money taken away from the police department they really don't WanNa Police Department 'cause they WANNA do whatever they want. They want to go back to the olden days of the Wild Wild West that is my opinion on it. May Not be everybody else's opinion but I respect my police department. Sonia some are calling this election a referendum on how President trump has handled the pandemic in the US There are more than five million cases now, more than one, hundred, seventy, five, thousand people have died. And the president has gone back and forth on mask-wearing as a means of protection. Are you happy with trump's response to this health crisis? Oh. Yes I'm very happy because. You gotta remember we survived the swine flu. We survived the Spanish flu we have survived. Other flus that have surpassed in here and we've never had to treat it the way me tweeting this one Yeah it's good to be careful. But at the same time we gotta move on and we gotTA survive out of it So what you're saying there though I mean the swine flu, some would argue it was the the measures that the Obama administration took to stop that from becoming a pandemic. What are your thoughts on this? China is already up and running in with walking around with no masks and stuff. So. I know in the future it's GonNa. Come. For us. Susan I heard you agreeing with Sonia on this point. That we have been in this position somewhat before and that we are able to survive it. But to what Sonia, saying though about other places, the differences is that leaders in those countries took swift action. Are You satisfied with the way that the president has handled this pandemic to be quite honest we still don't know the numbers every day they come out different if it's a false positive if it's positive. So my concern is, what are the numbers of how many are truly new testing being done I think we're doing the right things that we need to but yes, I think the administration is doing right with the numbers in with the information that they ever receiving. Susan you're the president of the suburban Republicans. Women's Club does trump's assertions that we need to defend the suburbs an idea that was reiterated on the first night of the RNC by the mccloskey's resonate with you and if so why what does suburban living mean to you? So how I would put it for the State of Florida in particular is. We have a thousand people moving to Florida a day. So when you have a thousand people moving into Florida Day, it is concerned because now we're going to need more housing. We're going to need more apartments are more single family homes. The individuals or families that are moving from the bigger cities are moving from New York New Jersey California. So they're moving from democratic states into the state of Florida, and so with that comes different different views of what that would look like somewhat say this definition though and what you're trying to protect is the idea of an all white suburb I mean is racial diversity. What you're protecting the suburbs from. I don't I don't view it as race I view it as the ideology wouldn't when others are coming from other states what their views are and how it will affect our our state or county in our cities doesn't matter. Mace, it's more of how we will change our school districts. We have great school district's here here in some county. So when you bring that ideology and it's going to stir it up and that's the change that they're afraid of Sony. I think I heard you try to pipe in their former yes. What what were you saying? Yeah, I highly agree with what her response on this because I'm GonNa Tell You I. Am a Hispanic Latina woman. We are in the state of Texas. Still seen a lot of people moving from California State of Washington Illinois. A lot of people of those states are moving to Texas and they are going to need housing and not tell you from experience I said I sit on the Housing Authority board in town that I live in and I see how hard it is for us to try to. Help the needy and at the same time. When you have a little town, the doesn't have no more boundaries to grow on how are these people are going to find places to live Sonya I wanna ask you more about that because the suburb you live in is just outside of Austin you grew up by the border. What's your opinion about the trump immigration policy and calls to make a wall I mean, what do you want to see him do? I want that wall to completely protect the United States it's not for reasonings of. Trying to separate two countries from each other I wanted to separate the criminals from coming into our country. The thing that hurts me the most is that. The media surpasses this to become a crazy wild thing when it not it's not what you mean by that people are willing to comply I mean I've seen pictures and videos of people that are waiting in Arizona waiting in new. Mexico, waiting in the borders cities. Texas where they're waiting for their documents, they're filling out their documents to get permission to come across instead of doing it illegally. Susan I. Hear you agreeing in part to what Sonia has said I want to also ask you more about. Trump's statements. So we've heard from some GOP voters who are turned off by President Trump's twitter specifically, the company itself has had to flag many of his statements as inflammatory or misleading. How do you feel about? His twitter. Account. I do hear that all the time. I actually even have a lot of voters to say they don't want to vote for him just because the twitter. And, I, and I always tell everyone when when you vote you, Oh should have three issues of whoever you're choosing because you're never gonNA, have a perfect candidate and that's only one issue. Twitter in my opinion, he uses because he gets so frustrated with the other side trying to make. Laws passed make deals work whatever it happens to, and he gets so frustrated. They don't work that he uses twitter and it's Kinda like here. Let me throw something out there that you can talk about this via get something done. Is there any part of you? That thinks that what he says on twitter is representative of his ability to lead. I think any I mean he's a human being just like all of us and we can say we to say. He can use twitter just as much as you and I can use twitter. Do I think. He should maybe back off little. Yes. Does need to be using it every day should responding to everything no. But using it cutting him off completely I would say now for both of you, you know in the end when Americans cast their ballots, this November they're voting for for what they want the future to be. So for both of you, what is the America you want to see and I'll start with you Sonya I want everybody to stop aiding each other when they don't need to hate. Each Other Susan I agree with that that we still have our free speech we still have our second amendment and everyone that lives here can live their dreams. They have the ability, no matter, their background, their race, their culture, any of that does not matter. Everyone should have the right to provide for their families to give their children whatever they desire but Susan Sherman of Lake Mary Florida. And Sonia mcmasters of Round Rock Texas. Thank you both for taking the time with us today. Thank you Tanya. Thank you Tanya we. that. Idaho lawmakers are back at the Capitol today after police, they're wheeled anti-government activists, Ammon Bundy out of the complex yesterday in an office chair he's been charged with trespassing and resisting and obstructing officers all amid protests over the state's special legislative session related to the coronavirus pandemic NPR's Kirk. siegler is in Boise Kirk people remember 'em, and Bundy for his armed occupation of that wildlife refuge in. Oregon in two thousand and sixteen reminders of who he is and how he's connected to these recent protests. Well, right Bundy. was acquitted for his role in leading that forty one day armed siege that you mentioned of Federal Bird Sanctuary not far from here over in Oregon and also a separate but related case over an armed standoff near his family's ranch in Nevada collapsed and mistrial so. Jeremy, he's free and you might say emboldened and the pandemic has really brought new life into his so-called Patriot movement that he is a leader of you know they're always looking for something that's perceived as government overreach. So bundy who lives in Idaho now has been leading all kinds of controversial protests lately since the lockdowns hit disrupting a public meeting in defiance of mask orders trying to get the governor here recalled over a statewide stay at home order implemented and when the. Legislature met in special session. As you mentioned this week here was Bundy saying his people and their voices were being shut out well and his arrest or his his being wheeled out. I suppose his being wheeled out of xactly of the complex yesterday was after things got out of hand earlier this week on Monday protesters who were not wearing masks for covid nineteen pushed through police to get into the legislative chamber glass door was broken and it was caught on video listen to this. This is our house. What were these people protesting? Well right and Bundy was front and center there. It's sometimes an open question and never black and white to be honest with Bundy But there were a lot of anti sers, conspiracy theorists of which there are many in Idaho remember the state is famous for far-right extremism and there are plenty of far-right elected officials here who would sympathize with Bundy to sum it up the main. The main thing they seem to have wanted is the state to not be able to enforce corona virus restrictions. And did the police just stand by and let this happen earlier this week initially sort of, but you keep mentioning the wheeling you know it was a chaos and disorder and there was pressure to do something by yesterday even a lot of the Republican leaders here seemed pretty furious. So at one point, the House Speaker ordered a hearing room to be cleared and most of those protesters you heard there in civil disobedience they left but there was Bundy and two others they refused to leave. He was sitting at a table that was ordinarily reserved for press and it's Truly bizarre scene he was on this swivel office chair and the state police came over handcuffed him to the chair, moved them out to an elevator, wheeled him down to the first floor and literally right out onto the street and into a squad car that was waiting for them, and so then he was transferred, of course booked into the local county jail. So just a few seconds left here but what is the legislature trying to do this week and is this putting pressure on them to not do it or to do do it more? Puzzling me because some of the bills that are going to consider you might expect the far-right with like including one that would strip authority away from local health districts to enforce things like mass restrictions and other things and give that back to local school boards, and the governor has for the most part. A lot of the restrictions have been lifted. That is NPR's Kirk Siegler in Boise. Kirk. Thank you. There are some companies that have actually done better during the pandemic than before think. For example or the meal Kit Delivery Company. Blue Apron has so many more people are cooking at home. It reported ten percent profit growth in the second quarter this year compared to the same period last year blue apron president, and CEO Linda Finley Kozlowski joins us on skype is part of view from the top our series of conversations with leaders Linda welcome and for people who have never used a meal kit delivery service tell US briefly how blue apron works It's interesting because I think a lot of people giving kids are still so new are quite clear exactly what they're four or they they they wonder is it just really about convenience or not going to the store and the reality is the reason people find meal kits attractive actually sorta falls into three buckets. One is is meal planning. It's actually the primary reason that people. Find our kids to be very attractive. Is Because that stress over four PM? What are we going to have for dinner tonight families argue about the time feeling like they're in a right so it's really just helping with that planning and removing that stress with with really great recipes that provide a lot of variety for your family or your loved ones that you're cooking with. Number two is actually about Canadian said having some of the best ingredients delivered straight to your door. We have very very high sourcing standards and were directly with producers to make sure that you're getting quality food, and then the final piece is actually lack of food waste your a lot of complaints from people that in their homes, they bought too many carrots for her recipe and they don't know what to do with the rest of them. They wind up throwing out too much food that feels really stressful of the reality is there's a lot of food waste in the industry. In general. So we've really focused on reducing the food weights spoke in our supply chain, and then also in people's homes. So you're getting great meals but you're not feeling like you're having to buy a giant jar of sauce for something where you only might need a small amount or or buying too much produce that goes bad to quickly at the same time you you say you're reducing food waste. There's also the issue of packaging though and I know that this is something that's come up over the years with blue. Apron, how much of your packaging at this point is recyclable? More than eighty percent of our packaging is recyclable and reusable, and we continued to optimize that and try to make more and more of it. Recyclable but the interesting part about it is the University of Michigan study that actually found that even with the packaging were still a third lower carbon footprint than a going to the grocery store because of not just food waste, but the packaging in the supply chain as well of traditional grocery. So even though we continue to strive to make the packaging better and we are participating in the how to recycle grandma, I, get to do that. We are actually seeing benefits already from the fact that we have narrowed down our who'd waste and our packaging quite a bit. What about the fact that China for example is not taking a are recycling anymore after that two thousand, eighteen banner you confident that the packaging that that you give people that is recyclable doesn't just up in a landfill somewhere our hope is to make sure that. Are Really doing everything they can to continue recycling programs and we big advocates for making sure that we're keeping all recycling channels been not just frankly for blue apron materials. But for materials in general, you know as people are buying more at home from the pandemic, we are seeing more packaging out there. There's another part to recycling though that's really important education about how to recycle, which is why we've participated in this program because many people don't even know. That things that say they're compostable aren't always compostable based on different city and county regulations in different programs. So we WANNA make sure that people know how to make sure that their materials get to recycling effectively Okay and then you mentioned the carbon footprint let me just press you on that for a second because obviously the things that are being delivered to your customers have to be moved from from one place to another year saying that even given that. There's still a lower carbon footprint from blue apron products than if you went to the grocery store, right. So that's again the the independent study that was done by the University of Michigan last year that that actually traced including the transportation aspect of it. Because again, think about the food that comes into the grocery supply chain does need to be transported as well. But food waste really is the biggest culprit and a big part of what we do is because we use technology to understand exactly what people are ordering. We can source exactly what's needed for the. Same customers exactly what they need. If there is any overage, we offer that first employees through a farmer's market program, and then the rest goes to donations city harvest to make sure that it's feeding people directly. How has your supply chain been affected by the pandemic? So because we have such a very tight supply chain. have people ways that we can be flexible if we need to based on availability and freshness of ingredients because of the fact that we are using fresh ingredients in our realities, we wanna make sure that if something isn't the best quality that we can adapt the recipe and switch to a different ingredient that flexibility has worked well for us during the pandemic because we're able to manage to work with our suppliers to make sure. That we have minimal disruption in our supply chain. What we're particularly proud of is because of the quality of ingredients that we source, we have long standing relationships with suppliers and also audit them for the same safety and sanitation standards that we have in our facilities, which is extremely high, and so we're very confident that we're able to manage through that the fluctuations in supply chain without impacting the quality what we send that the customers. So we mentioned that you've seen a revenue growth this year especially as more people have been cooking at home during the pandemic. Do you think that your growth will sustain after life returns to normal which I assume at some point it will. Let's hope that it does return to listen as possible. What we're hearing from our customers what we're also seeing that third party research out there is that habits are changing. And what people have been doing during pandemic. I, cooking at home more etc. At least a third of people planned to continue to cook at home even more so than they did during the pandemic, even after things start to open up again, they started to see value in the connection with family and the the cost savings that comes from cooking at home, and so all the research points to the fact that people will continue to cook at home more after the pandemic even they did during the pandemic beforehand. So the meal Kit Industry is getting a busier as you know, you've got hellofresh played Sun Basket Purple Carrots just to name a few what do you have to do at Blue Apron to stand apart from the competition? So we feel very confident that one of our best assets is our culinary authority. So the reality is we constantly create new recipes. We have an in house team of culinary experts that really know how to layer flavor. We're able to include more unique ingredients in our kits that you might find it more specialty stores if you were actually shopping for them and more unique ingredients than than what we necessarily see from our competitors, you can layers of flavor in your recipes, really high quality proteins. That meet high animal welfare standards great quality produce the kids beyond that. We try to give people a lot of choice when it comes to flexibility around what their health needs are. We offer different sort of low carb options of we're partnered with the American Diabetes Association ww. We also offer Mediterranean options that people can use to mix and match choose their own path when it comes to health and enjoyment. So even if you're being healthy, you don't feel like you're sacrificing anything in the process. So I have I have a question just out of curiosity and I'm sure that you have the answer although maybe not at your fingertips but I'll try anyway, what is the most popular recipe what are Americans into these days when it comes to Blue Apron. That's actually a very interesting question. So we are known for our burgers. the combination of the quality of the meat that we use as well as the the rest of these techniques were were big believers in not just giving you what you need in order to make something teaching you how to make it better and we definitely have some really great potato bonds that we. Back in as well, I will say it is interesting during the pandemic you're seeing a mix of people wanting to look at some comfort foods that you are seeing a lot of pastas, noodles, and that sort of thing. Then also a lot of people during the summer are very focused on health and so are fish dishes are some of the best dishes out there in it's one of those dishes where people feel really confident cooking fish. After using our box. So we're seeing an interesting split in our customers where. The comfort food side of the menu and the health side of the menu are getting a lot of love. In the process and what's the thing that probably will have to come off the menu because nobody wants it. Well, we try not to have too many of those things because we do collect quite a bit of data and we really focused on our customer reviews. We continue to adapt our recipes based on that but honestly, there's not many things on the menu that have to come off at this point because we're were pretty good about managing that based on customer reviews are our customers love our product and they also tell us when they don't like a recipe as much. That is Linda. Findlay Kozlovsky, the president and CEO of blue. Apron. Thank you so much for joining. US. Thank you. I thought she was going to say something involving Brussels sprouts although Brussels sprouts are hot now. So people like. A. At, least five states have rolled out APPs to help people alert their contacts, they've contracted covert nineteen. Twenty states and territories plan to release their own APPS covering forty five percent of the US population that's according to Google which helped develop this technology. The I called covert. Made a debut in Virginia earlier this month and let's bring in Jeffrey Fowler Technology columnist for The Washington Post with more high Jeffrey. Hi there. So you and your team of staffers at the Washington Post have been testing this APP covert wise and how is it supposed to work? Does it seem like it does what it's promising to do? Well, the idea is that if you run this APP in the background on your phone. It just is running all the time and it's keeping track of other people that you come in contact with within at least six feet for fifteen minutes, and if one of them later gets a positive krona virus diagnosis, the system will anonymously send an alert and you'll get to know on your phone that maybe you should get a coronavirus test as well. That is the honest. It's like the world's most stressful. Kind of alert, you could possibly get from your phone says you may have been exposed. The big question is, of course, does it work and the truth is we still don't really know. Thirty five Washington Post. Staffers and this data Virginia that were. Helping me test this APP. And over two week period. None of them got any alerts now that could just mean that. Washington Post efforts. We're doing a very good job of remaining socially distant that could also mean. That just not enough people out there have been using the APP yet for people to be exposed to to folks who might. Get a positive coronavirus. Diagnosis so we just don't know. Yeah. These apps used technology from apple and Google but they were developed for public health agencies. Where is the data going? Are you confident that tech companies are keeping their word about not using this technology to track users for ads and those sorts of things? Yeah that is kind of the core question. Here I think the real stumbling block to people in the United States in particular brawl around the world to trusting these sorts of APPs is that we don't really trust either. The government to track. US. And with good reason, right I mean we learned from Edward Snowden that the government tracks the lives of citizens in lots of ways people might not like and we've all learned from using facebook and watching Mark Zuckerberg in front of Congress that tech companies aren't to be trusted either I'm someone as a columnist for the post to recommends being very wary about installing apps and browsers might track you. But in this case, I was very pleasantly surprised we looked beneath the the code on. These APPS and they're actually not collecting any information about your location at all. Instead, they're using this really kind of sophisticated trick of using the Bluetooth signals on your phone to keep track of who you you might come nearby and then deleting that record after fourteen days. Okay. So then I mean on the other hand, you also right that the focus on privacy also means health officials get almost no useful data from these APP. So can they be used for contact tracing in this way? Yeah, that's been one of the most controversial elements of these APPs among public health officials say, okay at best this is an individual alert system might let you know as individual you should go get tested, but it doesn't really help public health officials as a whole figure out where hot spots are and also do what's called contact tracing right where they go and they find the exact individual people who might have been exposed. These APPs can't let them do any of that in fact when you get an alert. Through one of these exposure notification APPs you won't it won't tell you when exactly it happened or where exactly it happened or who you might have been exposed to. It just lets you know that that you should go get a test. Okay. You mentioned how you and your colleagues have used this APP. These APPS are supposed to encourage people who might have been exposed to someone with the virus to go get tested. Is there any evidence that they're pushing people to get tested who wouldn't otherwise have done so? So far the state of Virginia hasn't reported. How many cases that they think where people who? Got Notified through the APP, they've said that about ten percent of the state of Virginia of the adults in the state now have the APP running and some scientists estimated would actually take up to sixty percent of the population for to really be effective. So that's part of the. We just don't know part of this equation and it raises for some folks a what I think is an important question like if this technology is unproven. Why are we all installing it on our phones? Why do we believe that phones can actually help us combat the coronavirus and look I? Think those are important questions to ask but the truth is we're now at a point where a half dozen states have invested in this technology, they've made these apps through their state health departments and so you know my advice to folks is if it's available, let's give it a try and let's find out because at this point, the money has been spent and we might learn something and you know if you or just a couple of people do get these notifications I'm sure you'll be glad you got it. That's Jeffrey Fowler Technology columnist for The Washington Post. Thank you so much thing. And here now is a production of NPR, in, WB you are in association with the BBC World Service I'm Tanya Moseley I'm Jeremy Hobson this is here and now.

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Women Voters In Philadelphia Suburbs; COVID-19 Long-Hauler Family

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Women Voters In Philadelphia Suburbs; COVID-19 Long-Hauler Family

"From NPR and WB you are I'm down I'm Tanya Moseley? It's here now as the clock runs down on the presidential race Donald, trump and Joe, biden are both campaigning today in the key states of Minnesota and Wisconsin, and here's some interesting facts. MINNESOTA. Hasn't voted for a Republican since nineteen, seventy two. But the last election there Hillary, Clinton's victory was razor thin. She won by just forty four thousand votes and in the neighbouring Wisconsin President Trump won by only twenty three thousand votes. And look what's going on in Texas. The state has already collected more votes this year than I did in twenty sixteen and with a flood of ballots coming in the question in some key states is they all be counted just last night a federal appeals court ruled that any late arriving absentee ballots in Minnesota. Out. In case another court rules they can be counted they can't be counted after election day, nearly four, hundred, thousand requested ballots in Minnesota haven't been turned in yet. Let's bring in our political roundtable. Jesse Holland is a hosted C. Span's Washington. Journal. And Beth fouhy is senior politics editor at NBC News both are on a skype line and welcome to you both. Thank you channing us. And Dueling events in Florida yesterday trump in Biden criticized each other's handling of the coronavirus trump said, biden. Would shut down the country again, there will be no school. Graduations no wet snow Thanksgiving's. Christmas? No. Fourth of July's there will be nothing. They will allow you nothing other than that. He's doing a wonderful job. Biden said this. I'm not going to shut down economy. I'm not gonNA shut down the country, but I'm going to shut down the virus. Beth what's your take on how both men are approaching the final days of the campaign? Well President Trump is on the wrong side of public opinion on this one poll after poll after poll shows that this is the number one issue for most voters voters are very worried about getting sick they're worried about their friends or family getting sick they feel the president trump has not been a responsible steward of this crisis and that's what's weighing him down quite frankly peter had he taken a responsible. Approach to this last February march when it was first coming to this country and stepped forward and said, he was a wartime president that he would manage this a war. He would marshal the resources of the federal government to fight this virus. If he put on a mask if he encouraged people to wear a mask, he would probably be cruising to reelection right now in fact, he took the opposite approach and that is why polling across the country is showing him struggling. We'll Jesse what do you think about that? Because the worst coronavirus outbreak in the country right now is right there in the upper midwest where both men really need to win. One of the things that we're seeing here is a completely two different opposite ways of trying to win the presidency president trump is trying to win the presidency by actually campaigning against his own time as president he saying he's still saying he's going to make America great he still saying that if Joe Biden is elected, America will continue the way it is right now during its presidency with people work with people getting sick from the coronavirus Joe Biden is trying to win the presidency by saying he is going to do the exact opposite of what President trump is doing. He's GonNa work with the sci he's going to work against the virus. He's not going to go out on on his own to make the American people feel better by just saying things are better. He's actually going to do things. So we see one candidate trying to run against the things that happened while he was in office and another candidate running to change things that happened while his opponent was in office. The question is as always with these elections who turns out on election day, who's voting before the election day and how How and whether those votes will be counted. I'm hearing what both of you all are saying Jesse in Beth I want WanNa ask you though I want to parse out more the ground game both of these candidates along with the things that they're saying. So the Atlantic has an article today about how president trump could actually wind minnesota because he has a door knocking campaign there despite the pandemic, as well as micro targeting Latino voters in key states and politico reports, how some Democrats in Florida, for instance have been. Tearing their hair out trying to get Biden folks to actually door not there which he hasn't done in part because of the pandemic Beth will will this be what we'll be talking about on Wednesday if trump wins, for instance. So the Biden campaign made a strategic calculation early on that in these days of of Corona, virus and people staying in their homes and not venturing out much. The last thing they want is a stranger knocking on their door to talk to them about politics. Now, that approach changed a little bit in the last, let's say five six weeks There has been a little bit more sort of traditional door-to-door canvassing by the Biden team, but they are really abiding by largely abiding by the that first principle that this is just not a year where people want strangers showing. Up at the door and yes, we'll see whether this was the right calculation on the Biden parts campaign. I mean obviously president trump wants to downplay the virus has said it's going away that it's not that serious if if you get it, you're going to recover so you know it's very much in keeping with that message that the campaign is deploying all these door knockers You know we're in a we're in uncharted territory here traditionally, a good ground game does make can make up a point or two in a closely fought race and we will see what happens this time Jessie I WANNA talk to you for second about. This targeting and micro targeting. So the pandemic as we know has disproportionately hit black. Americans. The recession has disproportionately hit working women their social unrest that president trump is exploiting and biden has this inconsistent history with both groups where are black voters and women in the final days of course, knowing they're not a monolith. Here's the thing that we a lot of us who follow politics are not taking into account as we come to the last days worth a large population of the voting. America's out there have already voted. So if you were waiting for the last two days and the last five days of the election to start your micro targeting campaign, you'll miss more than what fifty sixty million voters already people who've already gone to do pilots and we've seen that target targeting. We've seen the attorney aimed toward African. Americans, a lot of African. Americans. Have already voted if people are waiting to. To do their dirty tricks on the day of the election, they're going to miss the population that's normally targeted for those dirty tricks because the African American voters allow them have already voted in Georgia in Texas in Mississippi all around the south populations including in the big urban centers they've been standing in line for days to get their vote out before they get targeted by the by those dirty tricks in the elections. So I don't know how much these last-second. Appeals by even Joe Biden or president trump is gonNA make a difference in those populations. Of them have already voted. Jesse you say dirty tricks. It makes me wonder if you see security issues at polling places affecting the vote at all. Well. One of the things that we've seen and I actually had a caller talk about this at. On C. Span on a couple of weeks ago that when he got ready to vote, they were insisting that he had to take it. They had to take his temperature before he voted. So some of the things that might seem reasonable in a pandemic also could be ways to tamp down the voting the voting population. So we know that a lot of voters are being targeted on social media. We know that in some states there. They have people talking about they're going to be there with guns on voting data to monitor the population. So we've seen conversations about a lot of this, but we've also seen a lot of voting population show up and vote early. So they won't even be affected by these things and I think that's GonNa be a wave of the future where people don't wait for election day and that will make it harder for their vote to be suppressed. Beth I mentioned at the top that some votes that come in a little bit late May not end up even being counted There's an ongoing fight over absentee ballots in Minnesota also in Pennsylvania, of course, what kind of conflict ahead do you see there after November third? Yeah. The Supreme Court has weighed in on number. A number of states rolls around this, and they've you know on the one hand let sort of mail in voting, continue after or counting of mail in ballots continue after November third and some states in others they've they've seemed to put the brakes on It really depends on how close this is I mean we could face a scenario where the vote is so close that we are waiting for mail in balloting in battleground states across the country and that definitely pretends a very close race in those mail in ballots are gonNA matter a lot but there is. A chance as Jesse said because of this enormous early turnout and what we're expecting to be a very large turnout on election day as well that these male and ballots will not be determinative of the winner of the election. But if things look close on Tuesday states like Pennsylvania North, Carolina, though their Mellon ballots really could make a difference. Yeah and delve into that a little bit I mean people are thinking. Okay. So what states should I be watching on election night that it could take quite a while before we actually get the results what are some key states that you will really be focused on including the ones you just mentioned So the number one st to be focused on Florida, they they're they're polling places, close apparently early, and they also have a very long history of dealing with mail in ballots they count them very quickly. So we will get a sense of how the direction Florida has gone fairly early in the evening and Florida will tell us a lot. It would be very hard for president trump to win if he loses Florida Joe Biden can continue on and there's other paths to two seventy for him. Should he lose Florida but if President trump loses Florida it's gonNA. Be a hard hard march for him. That's Beth fouhy senior politics editor at NBC and Jesse Holland is a host at C. Span's Washington Journal. Thank you so much for this. Like you. Thank you. And Schools across the country are back in session with some reporting outbreaks of Covid nineteen that have forced them to temporarily shut down we to teachers to tell us about their experiences in the classroom during a pandemic starting with Sydney Jensen a ninth grade English teacher at Lincoln High School in Lincoln Nebraska Sidney. Welcome. Thank you so much for having me. Sure, you're also at the two, thousand, nine, hundred and teacher of the in Nebraska. Yes that's true. Okay so we have an all star. Congratulations. Thank you. Sure and then we've also got Dan Cranford no slouch special education teacher at the eastern North Carolina. School for the deaf in Wilson North Carolina. Dan. Welcome to you. Thanks for being here. Thank you. Thank you. It's my pleasure. Peter. In Austin to congratulations on teacher the year. Thank you so much. I appreciate that. Well I want to give you each a chance to tell me how you're doing because this school year is one like no other. How's it going Sydney? START WITH YOU To be. Honest. Not Awesome this is definitely been the hardest year of teaching that I've ever experienced This. Is I think you're eight for me in the profession I've always really loved getting up and going to work every morning. and this year is the first year that I find myself really experiencing that teacher burn out that people talk about. I. Ask myself a lot of days. How much longer I can do this And that is not something I'm used to. Tell me why I mean I know it's just a just a wild time right now what's making it so hard? So. We're doing sort of a hybrid instruction model at Lincoln High. So teachers are in person every single day. And then we have our students divided into multiple groups and so a lot of it is workload. That's really you know tripled in most respects. I'm also twenty seven weeks pregnant, and so that has added some added challenges and stress just worrying like I'm I'm very nervous about getting the virus and what does that mean for pregnancy it's exhausting to feel that level of anxiety all day every day will hold that thought Sydney. Because it does sound absolutely exhausting but I want Dan to come in here and you know tell me how you're doing Dan is what you're hearing aside from the pregnancy part of it I mean is what you're hearing from Sydney something you can relate with. Well Massachusetts I met a residential school. So our students come in on Sunday evenings and stay with us. Through the week and they leave on Friday afternoons, the staff come back and forth though we test our students when before they get transportation, we test them then come into the building, we test them in the mornings. And test them again in the evenings, the staff is tested when we come in in the mornings. And that's one way we're dealing with. As far as being in classroom runner plan. B. which we do six feet apart. Of course, we had moved half my desk out of the room if you're asking me how I'm doing with it. If we're following the protocols we seem to be. Having a pretty successful year so far and of course, I'm with students. So they naturally be around each other and they have to keep their mask on and that stay six feet apart. It Dan are you feeling the same kind of burnout is Sydney? I'm feeling extra heavy. Workload. Yes. Is Harder and half my student still teaching online. So. I'll have a classroom where I have kids on display there at home, but also have students in the classroom. And so I'm trying to to navigate both at the same time. It was you all both well, know many teachers have retired or quit because they didn't want to go back into the classroom. I wonder if either of you other had a moment of reflecting on what you wanted from your future and maybe digging in your heels and say no way I can't go back I love what I, what I do everyday and I really consider it a privilege that I get to to work with the kids that I do every single day I, teach the best kids in the world and so that's never really been a question there certainly been have been fears of you know are we making the right decisions as a district Had A it's to our plan and our protocol and. The effectiveness is sort of still in question and I think with what we've done. You know we also have kids were trying to space out as best we can. But with class sizes six feet apart isn't really feasible and even with the like fifty percent in person each day were really kids are about four feet apart at best we bleach the desks between every period we you know have to give out hand sanitizer at the start of each class students staff, all wear masks every day all day but even with that, you know our most recent. Numbers that the district released in our district, we've had over two hundred students positives. We've had almost one, hundred, fifty staff positives. Of the virus we just had what they're saying is the first real confirmed case of school spread. So Do you feel safe? No. Sydney if you don't feel safe, why are you going to work? Because I. Love My kids. and. I think that teachers and a lot of ways we really sign up for a certain level of risk when we agree to do the job, of course, I care about their learning and their ability to like grow into these awesome citizens that they are and that they continue to become after they leave Lincoln High and I, I love being a part of that growth in that journey for them. I can't see myself doing anything else and I'm also hopeful that this will end that there will be a light at the end of the tunnel. Aren't we all Dan I want to ask you how the kids are doing how is there learning going like I was wondering with my own kids because in the spring no one really knew what was happening with his pandemic no-one had figured out how to do online learning all that well, and now we're in the fall and things are still not great and I just wonder like how much ground kids might have lost in that time. Have you seen any of that in in the kids at your school I'm sure sitting has an I have noticed this regression from not physically being into the skull in a students learn best when the physically into school especially younger students. I, I deal with middle school and high school students. And there was a Lotta aggression we went out in March and we didn't come back until August and I'm worried about a lost. Year for a lot of our kids. You're doing a lot of rebuilding. WILL INDIANA? No. You've said that you're seeing anxiety and depression in your students tell me about that. I see students who are fearful. Because I teach death kids a lot of music kids like tuning forks. They can sense then when things are. Aren't right. What I'm sensing is there deal with return to learn at the same time dealing with emotional issues as. Making four difficult learning experience for them difficult teaching experience for for Sydney and I. I can imagine. So Sydney I, WanNa, leave this last question with you. What do you need from parents from your students from administrators it would make your life easier classroom safer. That's a great question and I don't know if I have a perfect answer for it. I think that the biggest thing that everyone needs right now is grace. I think everybody's having a hard time teachers. Our parents are they're trying to adjust to you know childcare needs on these days when their students are remote, our students are highly stressed out sort of like what Dan said I think that there's an emotional toll that's being taken by not being able to smile at their classmates i. You know one thing I've noticed is in you know years past teachers are always fighting the like cross talk. You know kids giggling with the student next to them and now I crave it I wish that kids were were cross dockings. And having those like funny moments together that interrupt my teaching I I sort of miss that and you know I think that the biggest thing to remember is that everybody's struggling and everybody's doing the best that they can. We're all under significant pressure were all still trying to build the plane while we fly it and figure out ways to reach our students remotely That are going to be effective and engaging ways to build connections with our students who are in front of us when we can't share a smile with them, and even though were you know seven months into this pandemic pandemic it's GonNa be a long haul to figure out how to make school and relationships and connections continue to thrive in function at a high level. I agree with Cindy Peter and Cindy, but also WANNA say that I'm optimistic at heart and I feel that if you're going to have optimism, it's got to be a teacher I. Mean we we got a positive optimistic face every day these kids let them know you. This is the problem, but we're going to get over it. We're going to get together and we can't. We can't just crawl under a whole deep. We've got a taste through art examples of optimism and how to move forward in a in an appropriate in smart way. Well I'm glad Dan that somebody can be an optimist in this time Dan Cranford special education teacher at the eastern North Carolina School for the deaf in Sydney. Ninth Grade English teacher at Lincoln High School in Lincoln Nebraska. I'm so thankful for what both of you do every single day. Hanging there. Thank you. Thank you Peter in. Thank you seen eulex. Thank you much. It's great to talk to you. More than three, hundred, thousand people are still without power in Louisiana as of this morning after hurricane, Zada ripped across the Gulf coast on Wednesday and left six people. Dead Emergency crews are busy today trying to assess the damage and restore power. The storm has weakened, but it's also dumped heavy rain as far away as New Jersey joining us on skype is times. Picayune reporter Britain's stole bring. Thanks for coming on. Appreciate it. No. Thank you for having. Sure. In the barrier island community of Grand Isle, the Levy System Broken three places in this storm governor John, Bel Edwards called the damage catastrophic damage look like from where you are. So, here in New Orleans, we've got a lot of tree limbs down all over the place. Some some basic damaged structures a couple of buildings collapsed nothing too terrible Some citing was ripped off of my house and have a little bit of a leak in my ruth but the biggest thing is that there's massive power outages grand dial got hit particularly hard as they've. This is about I? Think the fifth hurricane to hit Louisiana this hurricane season and they had some massive version to those levees in earlier storms. So this one was just sort of the Cherry on top for them. And as you say, three hundred thousand people still without power in Louisiana, the storm hit Wednesday. So it's been a while. Now what are the barriers to get those lights back on? Well the the blackouts stretch from here in Louisiana, all the way in Georgia. So it is I mean, it's a, it's a massive project to try to get those backup several main transmission lines. Were knocked down your trees tearing down power lines or the power poles themselves just getting snap. So there's I think about almost five thousand linemen from all over the country in Louisiana working to get power back up but it's a pretty complicated process and it's pretty expensive and it's difficult work. So you got to clear those trees out you have to reestablish the transmission lines and then he the try to repair the distribution network and so this still about I, think about half the people in our in the New Orleans Metro area still don't have power. Will we we see that it could take up to ten days for some people to get power back, which means they won't have power on election day a big election up what kind of damage has there been to election infrastructure polling places that sort of thing. They are still assessing that the The that was one of the big concerns is obviously within the ten days. We'll be election day the before the storm hit the the state shared with the power company is a list of all the balloon places in the area to try to prioritize restoring power to those places alongside other critical infrastructure like hospitals, water, infrastructure, fire stations, that kind of thing whether that happens I think the power companies are pretty optimistic that they can pull that off but if they can't, there's a bunch of contingencies. Being, kicked around including using the the NBA Arena where the Pelicans play here in New Orleans is super precincts to move election day voting getting generators out to all the precincts all over the city to try to make it work. Obviously, it gets a little complicated because you have to communicate those changes to people. So that's that's one of the things that people are worried about. If powers not restored in time whether people whether there might be mass confusion on election day about where people are supposed to be casting ballots. Well not only that all of this is happening in the middle of a pandemic. As you've said, this has been a long hurricane season for Louisiana people must be exhausted there. Yourself included times-picayune reporter Brin stole. Thank you very much for your time. I appreciate it. Thanks very interesting I appreciate it. Survivors of covid nineteen in their families are gathering outside of the South Carolina State House in Columbia today to grieve those who have died during the pandemic summer Barrios of South Carolina is part of that remembrance her husband Robert is fully alive, but he is still navigating long term health complications after testing positive for covert in July and Robert, is home now after eighty-one days in the hospital and a rehab stay in his journey has been hard on the family's overall health as well as their finances summer. Welcome to here now. I. Appreciate Y'all have me on. Your husband Robert is forty six years old and we understand he's having trouble talking after this Kobe nineteen diagnosis. How is he doing? He had A. in. So he has some scarring in the throat and He's still on supplemental oxygen here at home. So he gets you know he's struggling still, but we're just grateful to have him home. His lungs are only operating at about fifty percent capacity right now he he could have lung disease brought on by. Damage from covert, nineteen. Your husband was a a warehouse manager doing shipping and receiving when he got sick can you take us back to that time? How did you find out? it was the last Monday of June beginning of July. Would just hanging out around the house and everything and then Monday he got up early to go to work. Few hours later calls me incredibly sick. We're lucky. He made it home because if you were to anybody wants to talk to him now he would tell you that he really doesn't remember any part of July including that day. His illness just literally came out of nowhere and It was definitely a long eighty one days. What was his experience like in the hospital? He was on a ventilator four times the last one being a trait. he experienced. ICU. Delirium had a collapsed lung. aspirated multiple Thomas, which also caused bacterial pneumonia. One morning he I think it was the winced Tuesday or Wednesday of the first week. He was there. He called me really early in the morning. Crying. Sees me it's Kinda hard to. Relive this crying saying that he was going to be ventilated. That was the first of four times. Oh summer this is so hard. I'm so sorry. Well. You know we're just blessed to. To have him home. Unlike so many other people that have lost someone. You know our hearts. Go out to them. How long have you all been married? Actually, October sixteenth was our tenure wedding anniversary. So he was actually out. In time for that. which we were very blessed to have a chapel here in the Clemson area. To let us do a vowel renewal. I, went from. Before he got sick to. Just as being you know happy and cautious and doing what the medical professionals suggested. To have to think about his funeral. And then when he finally came out. The vowel new was definitely not the first thing on my mind it was protecting him in protecting our immune compromise daughter. You know. So we were blessed that people stepped up to help us make to happen. and. In light of all of this though I mean, it's also been financially hard. This has not been an easy road for you and for many of the other families, you're a one income household Robert was your sole provider how'd getting by? Well you know at the beginning when he first went in, you know we kept in touch with his employer and stuff and his boss and. He had forty hours. What's called Kobe pay and that was basically just A week worth the pay. and. Then after that, we were lucky enough to find out that he had short-term disability through his work. And that is three hundred dollars a week. Runs out basically at the end of December. which is really hard. You know. For just about anybody to live on, let alone somebody that has now to medically complex people at home. Still. Of course, have bills coming in including medical now In a like you know his lung function was at. Right around fifty percent in in middle of December, which supposed to he's supposed to go back to do another one to see if there's any progress if any. Were possibly looking at the diagnosis of restrictive lung disease brought on by the Kobe damage in the double pneumonia. Your twelve year old daughter Jessica. Is there with you? Can I say, hello yes. Sure. Allow. By. Jessica this is Tanya how you doing. Doing good. How are you? I am doing okay I'm happy to talk to you. How How ben how have things been like for you life? Well, it's been. Much easier since you know he came home and. It was hard for all of us. You know just thinking you know he's sick. Pun. Villere ventilator four times you know. What's Your Dad like? What's your relationship like with your dad? Well, unpremeditated daddy daughter girl with him. We have. You know we have a really good relationship so In time, he could always make you laugh you know. What would you say to other kids out there who they know about covert nineteen but maybe maybe they don't think it's a big deal or they're just not directly impacted like you have been impacted. What's kind of the message you like to say to them? I would say you know. is good to wear masks. Can you know social distance because one day? This could be you know you never know when your life could be perfect. One Minute in. Crazy the next basically. Yeah. Jessica is true. Your your twelfth birthday was also the same day as your parents wedding anniversary. Yeah, it was So happy for him to come home before my birthday. Yeah. How did you guys celebrate? We went for low dinner than. Birthday cake present stuff like that. Yeah. I know it probably felt so good to be able to have him there even though he's pretty sick still. The main part I really liked him being home in La. Strong enough to be there with us. Jessica. Thank you for talking to me. I really appreciate. It can have your mom back. Thank you for having me on. Thank you Jessica. Okay I'm back. You know hearing her speak about this thinking about everything that that you're going through. How is this all influencing how you're feeling about? Who should be leading this country through covert nineteen? Of course that's on the minds of all of us right now, we were just a few days out from the election. While? No, both my husband and my. Opinion on that has changed especially after Kobe hitting so hard at home. My husband was a you know a trump supporter. Prior to him getting sick but when he came out. And was watching the news when trump came out and said that he had Kobe did and you know he did the little walk through and everything. Both of our opinions on who we were going to vote for definitely went to the democratic side. We just hope whoever wins whether it be trumper. Biden that people start listening to the medical professionals that are in power. and not to the political because we like my daughter said, we know how fast? Kobe can destroy a life. We hope that both Congress as well as whoever has the presidency. Really starts listening. And realizing that you know the once frontline workers are now the ones that are fighting covid and are like my husband you know just forgotten by the administration. You're part of a group called Kovic survivors for change. So I wonder what exactly do you want to see changed when it comes to how our country is managing this pandemic? Abdu believe that this should be a bipartisan. Issue where everybody comes together for the sake of this country. To honor the ones that a pass needlessly from this virus. Summer I really appreciate you taking this time with all that going through and with your family to to share your story with us. I appreciate you having a song. That was summer. Barrios. Talking to us about her husband Robert's long-haul journey with covert nineteen and how it's impacting their families health and finances we also heard from their twelve year old daughter. Jessica. Pennsylvania is one of the most important of the contested states in this election but with one key demographic, the race doesn't appear to be very close a new ABC News Washington Post poll finds that fifty nine percent of women. Pennsylvania's suburbs said, they support Democratic candidate Joe Biden forty, one percent say they support trump and it was in Pennsylvania just a few weeks ago when President Trump said this Suburban women you should love me. You know because somebody said, I'm not doing that well with suburban women I said why I last August two thousand, sixteen trump narrowly won the state but Hillary Clinton took Bucks County home to some of Philadelphia's suburbs and political experts say bucks. County may lean blue again this year. Thanks to women here now she go reports You can't help fall in love with Bucks County's beautiful. Wendy, roads some shaded with massive trees that arch over showing their fall foliage, and there are rural areas to with long front yards, rolling hills, and in the neighborhoods you can't help but notice the diversity of political science. It's pretty hard to tell how this part of the state leans. doylestown is the seat of bucks. County it was the last of a pro-trump parade that clashed with Biden supporters demonstrating a women's March a few weeks ago. The political parody here is pretty clear. Just had to state street that's where you'll find Shannon Leli I met her outside of her shop called Planet smoothie. I am voting for trump lally is a republican mom of four, and this will be her second time voting for trump she plans to do so in person on election day and Lily says, she didn't know trump was even calling on women like her to support him and while she admits that trump's behavior and rhetoric have always been exemplary she says he's better than the alternative Biden is completely fake and I can't even stand it when he was like. Oh people of America. I'm like. So I'd rather somebody who's just real than fake because you don't know what's going on behind the facade, but she says, it's really trump's policies that have her. It doesn't matter what trump says like as much as the whole. Party of what they stand for as a Christian Leli says, she's antiabortion and pleased with the confirmation of Justice Amy Coney. Barrett to the US Supreme Court. Barrett is expected to chip away at Roe. Versus. Wade. And as a small business owner lally says, she's benefited from trump's tax policy. Karen Stone says, she's also benefited from trump's economic policies. She's a Democrat voting for Joe Biden and works at a boutique nearby. Cozy modern shop with sleek hardwood floors. But stone says despite trump's economic policies. That's not a reason. Vote for him. Stone says she's voted for candidates outside of her party before and considered giving trump the opportunity to change her mind until recently the way he handled himself during the first debate I mean just. I wanted to give him a chance thought maybe things could change. For the better but that hasn't happened. Exceed suburban Philadelphia become increasingly democratic after a century plus of being Republican that's Christopher. Bork. He's the director of the Muhlenberg College Institute of Public Opinion. He's bucks. County has deep Republican roots, but it's overwhelmingly white. It's also more educated and wealthier, which is why it's become more politically competitive and board says, suburban women are a cohort of voters that are capable of moving the needle. We've seen that group of move increasingly during the trump years to to democratic positions they've shown that in their vote. During. Midterm elections. State elections the showed it in polls, and it's a group that the the President and Republicans can't afford to lose much more grounded and I think you've seen them. A ground relatively to where they were in two thousand sixteen, and thus you see the efforts to rhetorically reach out to try to find policy areas, including law and order. As an in to this group in that message law and order has resonated with Shannon Lally, the owner of the smoothie shop in Doylestown I I know there is absolutely still racism in this country like I do not deny that. But. When cops are coming into my store scared for their life now. That's not okay. Makes a when you disrespect and you have no respect for authority. We are going to crumble especially youth like you have no respect for authority anymore, and this whole thing is just fueling that and when there's no respect for authority, there's no respect for private property businesses being smashed in like who pays for that. But Lilies in the minority here a recent Reuters Ipsos poll found only eleven percent of white people in suburbs across the country consider civil unrest and trump's tough on crime stance to be a major issue. We'll have to wait and see if president trump continues to make his plead a suburban women. He's expected back in Bucks County. Tomorrow looking to secure enough votes to make a difference in this crucial swing state. For here now I'm she go thirty. Nine is a production of NPR WR in association with the BBC World Service I'm Peter o'dowd. I'm tiny Moseley. This is here now. The candidates make their final pitches before Tuesday's election with record early voting amid the covid nineteen pandemic will have the latest next time on here now.

President Trump Joe Biden president trump Dan Cranford Florida Sydney Jesse Holland America Cindy Peter Minnesota Kobe C. Span Louisiana Tanya Moseley Robert President
State Marijuana Laws And Coronavirus; Kids' Books To Read In Isolation

Here & Now

43:09 min | 1 year ago

State Marijuana Laws And Coronavirus; Kids' Books To Read In Isolation

"From NPR and WBZ. I'm Jeremy Hobson. Im Tanya Moseley. It's here now and there are a number of protests. Plan today against stay at home orders. After demonstrations in a number of states over the weekend president trump was asked about the protests yesterday. He said that some governors have gone too far in their restrictions on economic activity and he is called to liberate a number of states on twitter. Joining us now is Dr Michael Oester home. Who's director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and policy at the University of Minnesota? Welcome thank you very much. When we mentioned the protests there were some in your state on Friday. What would you say to people who feel that these stay at home restrictions have gone too far well first of all they have to understand that this is really about life and death and that this virus which has so far infected probably no more than five percent of the US population over the course of the next twelve to eighteen months will likely infect more than fifty or sixty percent of the population? And with that we're going to see a substantial increase number serious illnesses doubts and we're all trying to work out. How do we thread the rope through the needle so we don't shut down our economy in a way that had happened but at the same time? We don't let this virus run Willy. Nilly in our communities and 'cause what would be many many thousands of deaths and serious illnesses and so I think it's truly should be about US versus the virus not about some political economic issues that are are surely valid very valid. I don't want to minimize them. But at the same time we've gotTA figure out how to get through this just merely opening up doesn't answer the question of how do we get through it at the same time? We just can't keep doing what we've been doing and So this is where we really need right now for this kind of creative solutions that say this is the best we can do given this horrible situation. We've been handed. Well is the creative solution that you're talking about or at least part of it just a lot more testing. There's a new study from Harvard estimates that we need to triple the amount of testing that is being done before safely reopening the economy. Right now the. Us is doing one hundred fifty thousand tests. -Oday there've been fewer than four million tests in total despite president. Trump's promise that twenty seven million will be done by the end of March. What is taking so long and what needs to happen on the testing front. Well first of all let me just say that The whole testing issue I think has been poorly understood by a lot of people including those making national recommendations. Saying that you're going to test out of the situation right now is just not possible and the reason for that. Is that win? This entire outbreak situation first emerged in China. The need for testing was surely they're in China and Asia and the demand for what we call reagents or the chemicals to make these tests could be met there but once this virus spread around the world the whole world became a code fire. We now to test literally billions of people into resources for making these reagents chemicals. Run the test is just not there. That's a situation where you have to build new facilities to make these reagents. That doesn't happen overnight. Frankly it hasn't been a coordinated effort to make it happen at all. I predicted weeks ago that we'd be in this situation with what we know for the testing for the virus itself this PCR test and we're going to be there soon with the testing reagents for the serology antibody so in the short term. We have to come up with other ways. That testing itself is not going to be the key. We do need testing. We need to know for seeing case numbers increasing our communities. But this idea of doing all this extra testing is just not a reality. So what are the other ways than that? You're talking about but at this point then what we have to do is we have to look at things like syndrome surveillance that type of work that we do in Public Health. All the time looking for other comparable illnesses like influenza like illness. We have to be monitoring very closely. Who is going into doctor's offices who's been hospitalized and we have a sense of the case is picking up in the first instance then we have to basically hit the accelerator to slow it down on the other hand. We also if we're seeing that transmission has been limited in a community then we can ease off and let people get back in. We need to look at. What's our healthcare capacity if were in our communities in a hospital setting where it's full right now. We don't have more capacity that has to weigh in but to do what you're talking about where you would identify hotspots basically and slow things down where you see them. Wouldn't that require the United States to basically stop domestic travel and not allow people to move from one place to another? You know all of us has to be on the table. I think what we're looking at right. Now is kind of a solution for the next few weeks and that is important. But we've got to look at a solution for the next twelve to eighteen months. A solution in part would be releasing some back into the workforce who are younger who are healthy. Who Won't have nearly the same risk not forcing and we go back in. But if they want to. They should likely have the opportunity. We need creative solutions. Like this where we take the best of what we can do in public health reduce serious illness and at the same time maintain society as we know it. Let me ask you one more question because one solution that many people have been looking to is about these antibody test that which could show people if they've had it if they've built up some immunity to it. Do you think that that's promising? As a way to get some people to feel that they can go back into the workforce because they've already had the virus in an ideal world. The antibody test would be a great thing. But let's hit again. The reality button number one is is that The challenges of having enough antibody test to the same. We're seeing with the Virus detection test the PR. We have reagents today but within three to four weeks. Globally little exhaust through agents. We need for serology. Number two is many of the tests that are currently on the market are nothing short of junk that was exactly how the FDA described him. We've had virtually no oversight of these test methods number three when you test using these kind of test. And what we call a low prevalence community like five percent that I mentioned before might be infected with a few understood that half of all the positives you find will actually false positives. Meaning THAT HALF. Will Him Act have antibody but half? Won't we're going to tell them they do. And if you're now trying to be protected you're trying to get back into society and feel like I'm okay. Would you accept the fact that one every two people that you test positive role positive so again? This is not an easy answer. An easy solution. I understand why people are basically grabbing for these kinds of solutions. We just have to face reality that antibody testing as we now have. It is not going to be a magic bullet that Dr Michael Oester home. Who's director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and policy at the University of Minnesota? Dr Oester home. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you this week. Boeing is reopening its factories in Washington state where an early containment strategy is credited with slowing down the number of corona virus cases there Carolyn Adolf reporter at K. U. O. W. joins US and caroline start with the numbers for US Washington state as we know once had one of the highest case loads in the country today. It's not even in the top ten states for infections. Are you continuing to see that? Slow down we are seeing that slowdown. Washington is indeed flattening the curve on new cases as well as hospitalizations even deaths per day are in decline now. But I have to say that. They're not back down yet to the levels that we were seeing when the social distancing measures started up in mid March so we still have work to here. Yeah let's talk about this decision by Boeing aircraft. Giant brought a few thousand workers back last week. And it's bringing back twenty seven thousand by the end of this week. That number sound significant. It is significant. You know this is the first major industrial reopening and it was not at all expected. This company could very well be writing the playbook about how other workplaces come back however the governor here Jay Inslee says Washington state will be going slow and we'll be led by the kind of extensive testing that frankly we can't do yet but whenever more businesses start to come back which is going to be likely around may eighteenth. It's GonNa be a light switch of for more like a Diale-. He's talking about very cautiously restarting sectors. Like maybe just starting to finish building houses that are already almost finished and then assessing the impact. Yeah let's talk a little. Bit More about Boeing. Though for a moment I mean it's significant because Boeing is a major employer there. What does this opening mean for the regional economy? This is the biggest employer in the state. This is going to have an invigorating effect on hundreds of supplier companies. Their families their communities and it also means that. Twenty seven thousand Boeing workers are not going to be entering our overloaded employment security system. Yeah I think another big question folks have though is we learned. That one hundred Boeing workers were infected one Boeing employees in Washington state died from the corona virus. How has the company said? It's going to prevent that from happening. This time you're right. The company did not succeed last time and getting that the corona virus out or keeping it out this time. It says masks will be mandatory and temperature checks. It's a huge shop floor up in Everett but work inside the planes as in very close quarters so they need more than masks temperature. Checks are going to need personal protective gear when workers are inside the planes. You mentioned a governor Jay Ensley And his response Friday also accused president trump of inciting a rebellion with his liberate various states language. And we actually saw over the weekend. Hundreds of people gathered in the state capital of Olympia to protest the stay at home order. They called for the governor to liberate the state. Give us the latest on that. It's interesting because many of those demonstrators were not wearing masks. And you know frankly just by the fact of their gathering. They were violating. The governor's order against large gatherings. This said even on the day that this was happening governor Jay Inslee was pointing out that. Actually there's a high degree of social cohesion. Washington state overall. They are finding that people are really trying to be respectful of social distancing. That's Caroline eight off with K. U. O. W. in Seattle Caroline. Thank you so much for this update. Oh thank you Tom. This message comes from here and now sponsor indeed when it comes to hiring. You don't have time to waste. You need help getting to your shortlist of qualified candidates fast. That's why you need indeed dot Com post. A job in minutes set up screener questions then zero in on qualified candidates using an intuitive online dashboard. And when you need to hire fast accelerate your results with sponsored jobs new users can try it for free at indeed dot com slash here now terms conditions and quality standards apply offer valid through March. Thirty first twenty twenty. Today Is April Twentieth also known as four twenty a day on which many celebrate the use of marijuana thirty three states across the nation now allow for some form of sale and consumption of weed and of those more than twenty states have designated the cannabis industry as essential during the corona virus outbreak. Npr's BRAXTON BOOKER REPORTS. He didn't want to supply to run out. So Sean Carnell of Brockton Massachusetts scooped up more than thousand dollars worth of marijuana products to make sure. He had enough to last through his states. Stay at home order. How went around and went to some of the best people that grow? Flower have juices candies. Have this and have that so if anything happens in the next couple of weeks I'm good. Cornell is a forty year old retired marine. He says he's been approved for state medical cannabis card. It hasn't come in the mail yet though Massachusetts Republican Governor Charlie Baker last month shutdown recreational shops but kept medical dispensaries. Open leaving Carnell with few options. I couldn't even go to the dispensary if I wanted to. I couldn't either. Nothing in Colorado Democratic Governor Jared Police also designated marijuana. A critical industry is order allows for medical marijuana purchases to be made in pot shops and recreational weed to be picked up curbside. But after the governor's March announcement the Denver Mayor mandated that city dispensaries would close the following day that led to panic buying and a record day of sales according to Lisa G. I said to a couple of my colleagues. I'm not sure whether to send the Mayor Cookies Vertigo. Tps House G. is an executive with light shade labs which operates roughly a dozen Denver area dispensaries hours after ordering pot shops closed the mayor reversed course allowing dispensaries to stay open so long as extreme. Physical distancing is practiced. I think the biggest upside is that we've seen that. The state has now recognized dust as a critical part of the economy for the state of Colorado. That does help forward the conversation about getting the things that we need to run our businesses just like every other retailer in the state. Debbie guy is with Americans for safe access this epidemic and the way that cannabis businesses are being run really highlights the need for federal oversight because once again every state is doing it a different way twenty four states including Florida Pennsylvania and New Mexico. Mccade curbside pickup Ohio in Minnesota now allow new patients to get a medical marijuana prescription through a telehealth appointment with physician Nevada which to delivery only for all medical and recreational pot sales enclosed. All Marijuana Storefronts Jon. Hagey attracts cannabis sales and consumer trends and new frontier data. I think one of the major takeaways from the past six weeks is the number of states and by now it is. The majority of states where cannabis is legal that have deemed canvas businesses as essential to give estimates roughly forty three million Americans consume cannabis regularly and spin some seventy billion dollars a year on both the legal and black markets that black market remains the biggest competition for legal marijuana. And that says Colonel Kief of the marijuana policy project shoot. Put lawmakers on alert in Humpbacks of this crisis also more of a risk as people selling marijuana legally are following all of a sudden to distancing requirements Santa Requirements O'Keefe ads. Those fears should prompt states to further expand access to legitimate businesses during the outbreak. Otherwise she says that leaves the legal industry and public health vulnerable if more people turn to unregulated sources for the cannabis Braxton Booker. Npr News. Well if you've been following the political news the last few days you've probably seen stories about how blaming China for the virus is seen as winning strategy for Republicans heading into the November election while president trump initially praised. China's response and it's transparency. He has changed his tune. And it's called the corona virus the Chinese virus and the Wuhan virus the side effect of placing blame on. China is that there has been a surge in hate acts against Asians and asian-americans Americans the Asian Pacific Policy and Planning Council and its partners have documented more than fifteen hundred cases of anti Asian. Hate acts since mid-march Dr Chen Fu is hospitalised at Nyu langone medical center. He says he's been a victim of xenophobia and racism himself Dr Welcome. Thank you so much for joining us all. Thank you for having me Jimmy. Well first of all. What are things like right now for you So right now. Things are a little bit better. The cove awards have died down a touch. All Across. The city were sort of reconverting. Some covert wards over to bear original intents and purposes granted patients are still coming in and patients are still sick but for the most part. We've we've seen a light at the end of the tunnel where starting to be hopeful. Do you have all the supplies you need? Because that's obviously been a big problem for doctors not just in New York but around the country throughout this crisis. Initially it was a little bit difficult. I must admit. Initially it was quite a challenge. But our communities have rallied together. Incredibly people from across the country have been sending US protective equipment of all sorts and kinds. I know. Initially in certain parts of the city people rationed to one mask a week in some nurses even took to wearing trash bags as as as gowns to enter patient rooms but currently we at at Nyu at least are doing right. What has been the hardest thing for you personally about this entire situation? The hardest thing personally has probably been the sense of powerlessness around this entire situation. A big part of my job is taking care of patients in the final moments of their lives. One of these experiences that I'll never forget is listening to patients as they had their final conversations with their loved ones over the phone just because visitation abilities were limited due to the infectious risk and a lot of the time. They just sort of lay there and struggled to breathe. While they're family recounted memories of happiness and oftentimes they just sit there repeating over and over again. I love you and care for you Just the knowledge of the disease into the as a whole has made it difficult talking with patients in normal times before krona virus. I felt that knowledge was a big comfort when it when it was brought to patients but in these times it just accentuates this feeling of powerlessness. Not Too long ago. I had a pregnant patient. Come up I still remember the first time I went to go see her. She was sitting there in her bed clearly terrified clutching her belly and I just reviewed all of her labs or imaging her data all of which pointed towards a progressive disease. Course and the first thing she asked me was. Am I going to be okay? And I really didn't know how to respond at powerlessness is not something. I'm used to feeling on top of what you're going through in terms of just caring for patients and having to have conversations like that You've also written about what it's like to be an Asian American doctor right now during this crisis especially when some people have blamed China for this disease. Yes it's it's it's been an interesting dichotomy. It's pretty challenging being in the situation where you have this conflicting responsibility and fear over over how you're going to be perceived as you walk around the streets and as you as you go about your day to day. I walking through the subway a couple of weeks ago and a gentleman came up to me and just started yelling racial slurs most of them directed towards my my Chinese Mississippi. But beyond that I've been I've been hearing stories from all over my mom included. My mother had her car broken. Nothing was taken but my mom does tend to hang little Chinese knickknacks in her windshield. And when she brought this incident up to her friends or friends all sort of echoed the same very similar experiences. One of one of her friends had car completely keyed all over and it seems to be something. That's increasingly pervasive in society. These days has it made it any harder for you to do your job. I personally don't try to let it affect me too much at work. Granted it is something that's in the back of my mind as I go about. But the overall goodness of people has been overwhelming the overall kindness and humility and grace that. I see overwhelms that sensation of any fear that I might have. What would be your message to our listeners. Some of whom may be surprised to hear that. There's this kind of thing going on in the middle of a crisis especially hearing from a doctor who is trying to help people get through The terrible effects of Corona virus. What would be your message to our listeners. About how to combat this kind of thing I think my overall message would actually probably be a quote from Fred Rogers who once said that in the midst of crisis you should look towards the helpers from our restaurant workers who even though their businesses are hurting provide free food and coffee to US daily to the mini physicians and Nurses. People like that. Really give me stream that is Dr Chen Fu who is hospitalised at Nyu langone medical center. Dr Thank you so much for joining us and thank you for what you're doing and I'm so sorry that you've had to deal with This kind of xenophobia During this crisis thank you so much. I appreciate it The US continues to lead the world with the most corona virus cases and Dr Deborah Bursts. The White House cove in Nineteen Response. Coordinator says the Federal Government is approaching the pandemic right now as a series of small epidemics. Here she is. Cbs Face the nation. We're still very much focused on Boston. And across Massachusetts and we're watching very closely Chicago and then we every single outbreak that occurs in different states around the United States including the most recent one in Ohio. Joining us now is Jason Bobi. Npr Global Health and development correspondent. Jason as we hear about those places. Let's look around the US right now. Where are things getting better at the moment? And why so? You've got to give credit to the New York. Area cases are down for several days in a row of governor Andrew. Cuomo just this morning said they had four hundred seventy eight people who died in New York yesterday. That obviously sounds bad for seventy eight but that is actually the first times the single the single day death toll has been less than five hundred since April second so this is significant and the entire region their New Jersey Connecticut New York. They're all seeing the death toll. Come down and was forty five percent of the cases in the United States in that General New York area. This is good news. Same time governor. Cuomo saying that you cannot like party yet. They're still urging caution. They've canceled big events all the way through June but they are saying. It looks like they've gotten past the peak there and what about where things are getting worse in the United States so obviously there were some of the places that Dr burks mentioned. But it's also interesting. You're seeing upticks in four of the five places that do not have stay at home orders. You're seeing some significant upticks Iowa Nebraska. North Dakota and South Dakota Dakota. Arkansas is the exception there. They have a they do not have a statewide stay at home order and they only had four new cases yesterday so things seem like they're working their butt. Iowa a big jump over the weekend driven by outbreaks in some meat packing plants of similar in Nebraska again some of the cases around some some meat packing factories that have stayed open one huge outbreak and hall county which is a fairly small county. But they're the rates. There are similar to what you're seeing Louisiana. Obviously the stuff in North Dakota and South Dakota. Isn't that big? But the trend is in in the wrong direction near seeing rising cases there and what about globally. We've been hearing about some European countries that are starting to ease lockdown restrictions. Are Things really getting better in those countries? Yeah if you look overall at the trend in Europe. Things are looking a lot better. Spain Italy they both had roughly half the number of new cases that they had at their peak Germany. Two thousand five hundred new cases a day at the moment. That's down from a peak about six thousand France. The numbers seem to be going in the right direction so yes there definitely has been some improvement there the UK on the other hand. Things are not going so well but yes. You are seeing some significant improvement in in Europe and just briefly. Where as you look around the world are things going in the wrong direction? There's great concern about Russia and then also in South America Peru Brazil Chile. Numbers are seem to be starting to rise there as well that is NPR global health and development correspondent Jason Bobi and looking around the world for us as we follow how the corona viruses affecting various countries and in this country. Various States Jason. Thanks you're welcome here Perhaps like many parents. You're hoping that your kids might use this time to do some reading or they've been assigned free reading time for school and you're not sure what to select here to help with a few selections is Anita Giles. She writes a children's book column for NPR. And she's the founder and director of the Virginia Children's Book Festival Juanita. Welcome thank you Tanya pleasure to be here so you've been thinking a lot about a book that's been read and loved by many children over the past century or so it was near and dear to my heart when I was a kid. And that's Laura Ingalls wilders. The long winter why while really any sense of isolation brings that book straight back to me. The story of Lauren. Her family being together all the time every minute of the day struggling with survival and distance from everyone that they knew it really resounded with me in this particular instance. We all wonder if we're going to run out of something and they ran out of everything so I couldn't help but go to that book immediately but they're also some parts of the book that you want to caution folks that may not have aged well but parents in talking with their children might want to kind of explore a little bit more. Yes I do that with my own children. We do read the Little House books together and I am of native American heritage myself so I've cautioned my children that you know ideas about native Americans when they took place in eighteen seventies or vastly different from what they are today but they are quite reflective of the attitude at that time but we can certainly use those as the teachable moments absolutely. Let's take a look at some of the other book selections on Your List and just the title of this first. One makes me think that we should whole read it. It's called the. Don't worry book by Todd. Par and it's for kids three to six years old. Tell us about it while you could read Todd Parr at any moment of your life. There's hardly stands children better than todd. Far We'd love Todd. Parsa much the. Don't worry book it's it takes different situations in which a child might be worried whether it's at school or in the dark or when you're alone or with other people there's so many different ways for kids to worry and todd really. He's so comforting. His books are such a comforting presence and at the end of every book. He writes a little note and he says at the end. You know worrying doesn't help you. If you're worried talked to someone you love about it and you'll feel better the end love todd and it just feels like such a big hug and kids are worried these days and they may not even know what they're worried about. Some parents share all the information with their children. And some don't but even if your kids are feeling a little unnerved even it could be that. Don't be unnerved book. You have a number of books for older readers as well including the witches by role doll. He's the author of many kids favorites including Charlie and the chocolate factory But you know what his books can also be kind of scary at times And this one is about a world where which is really exist and they hate children. Yes and so right now actually. My husband is reading that to my seven year old and my six year old daughter. He'd read it to my son a couple of years ago and they actually are not afraid. The thing about that book is that role doll actually sets it up so the children who are hearing the story. You're reading the story sort of gas. What's happening next? He never really leaves a huge cliffhanger for the children to be scared of. It's almost humorous. The way they guess what happens. And it's his. Descriptions are so funny that there's so much humor in there that it's hard to spend the whole time being scared and it's a really good way. This is something I wanted to say. Is that this is a wonderful time for parents to share their favorite books with their kids and to bring some quality time and at the end of the day. That's something that I have found with my children being home and teaching them. We think that we're giving them so much time. And we are physically giving them so much time but it's not the same quality of time that the children want from us so at the end of the day the children want to be connected in a different way than they've been connected during school time or anything like that and to see my husband reading this with my two girls. They're just so involved and so excited and it's just wonderful to see them like that at the end of the day. That's a really good distinction to make because all of us now are playing teacher in the mornings. Jim Coach in the afternoons the Wrangler for Dinnertime at night. And then it's off to bed but if you have that moment where it's really the one on one time where you're enjoying a book together. That could be a wonderful way to do that. There's also a classic on your list Sterling North Rascal which was published back in nineteen sixty three. He wrote about his Childhood in Wisconsin. How do you think today's kids can relate to that actually? I think this is sort of the perfect time for them to relate to it I had tried to read it to my son a couple of years ago and he wasn't incredibly interested but now that he is at home all the time sterling. North's character in the book is at home alone with his father and that's the important part of his life and so he makes a friend of this baby raccoon that he rescues. And it's really about what you do when you are sort of alone. You know his his older brother's off at war and it's just him and his father so there's a bit of isolation there and I will say it's given my son the idea to build a canoe in our living room which I'm not sure I'm ready for that to happen. But I'll say that right now if you WANNA share classic with Your Children. This is really a wonderful time. And he's really taking it a very different way than he did a couple of years ago. let's talk about another memoir. Jacqueline Woodson's Brown girl dreaming which was a National Book Award Winner. Back in two thousand fourteen. She uses poetry to tell the story of growing up as a black American. And the nineteen sixties and Seventies. Do you think kids who might automatically say I don't really read poetry. WanNa read this book. I think they will find that. The poetry adds to the music of the story. That's what's really so beautiful. Brown girl dreaming besides the fact that as an adult somehow Jacqueline Woodson is able to bring us back to the uncertainty of childhood. And I feel like that's really important right now as well. Reading that book with your children can help you identify with them. In a different way you know describing her own childhood and feeling out place. Not Knowing we're home was all of those worries that she had when she was young. She brings those forward in such a beautiful way. And I don't think especially if it might be nice to read it after a little Shel Silverstein because that's poetry too because it just the the meter the music of it it's not an impediment whatsoever And we have one more memoir to talk about this. One is a graphic novel by Robin. Ha called almost American girl. What about this book appeals to you? Well one of the things that appeals to me about this graphic novels specifically is that I find it very difficult to read most graphic novels allowed and my children always asked me to. And I'm just I stumble. I don't really know how to make it through a graphic novel reading it aloud But this particular graphic novel is very rich and text and it can read like a a a regular novel and what appeals to me. Also about this is. It's also the struggle of you know a girl a teenage girl as she founders through her identity and has to leave friends behind in discover herself and a lot of those things also are things I think kids may be feeling but not able to say I imagine being a middle school or high schooler and being away from my friends who helped give me that identity. That's it must be a very difficult time for that age group and so I feel like this book will really bring them a sense of comfort and familiarity with what they're going through themselves and it is it's very readable and you know what. I'm thinking about what you're talking about and saying that we should be reading together as family members. The parents along with children and that goes for older children too so a young teenager or between. Who's reading almost American girl? Perhaps it's a way to talk about feelings and emotions about this time. If we're all reading it together absolutely in the parent doesn't necessarily have to be the one reading It's really important to let these kids pick the books that they would want to read to you and want you to know about. I know that my children do that all the time. They have things that are important to them that they want to read to me and it's as important to be the listener as it is to the reader but we can do it together and it really will open up some doors for us to talk about things that maybe we don't know how to express and when we're home together all the time we we really need to learn how to express those things or who knows what could end at the truth. I know that's Juanita Giles. Founder and Executive Director of the Virginia Children's Book Festival will have the entire list of her book suggestions here and now dot. Org Juanita thank you so much. Thank you so much for the opportunity. You have a good day. Congress could reach a deal as soon as today on a second round of funding for an Emergency Small Business Administration program formed in light of the corona virus. Many small businesses are still hoping to get a loan from the federal paycheck protection program to stay afloat despite those stay at home orders but the three hundred and forty nine billion dollar program ran out of money last week. Let's hear how one financial institution has been handling this joining us now is gene pelham president and CEO of Rogue Credit Union in Medford Oregon Gene. Welcome thanks Jeremy. Thanks for having me today. Look forward to the opportunity to speak with you and tell us how things have been for you as a credit union dealing with all of these small businesses. Who are in need of help. You know we've got a lot of folks coming to us right now for help whether it's on their mortgage loan or their auto loan and even more so with their paycheck protection loan program that was introduced in our team Basically stood up overnight and worked really hard to to get connected with the SBA and and just recently we had we had finally got connection and so on Monday the thirteenth. We got our first alone. Guaranteed and then the system froze on us so we use that time to train our staff a little bit more but on Tuesday we did one hundred and two guarantees and on Wednesday. We did one hundred and twenty-two guarantees so we were able to pump about two hundred and twenty-five and just a few short days but we still had sixty six that we weren't able to help before the funds ran out. What kind of businesses have been applying for help it? This is the cool part. We've got several folks helping out and and I was talking to one of our staff members and their as they're entering the applications. They're going well. That's the place where I buy pastries or that's the place where I go to get my hair done. And I've got lists of place like True Cell Solar in Ashland Oregon or they're keeping their team's working with this program to install sustainable energy panels. We've got barking moon farms the fieldstone stop growing during this time. And so they're keeping their folks working prepping for the harvest season and we were able to on those two hundred and twenty five loans. We're able to put twelve million dollars into the local economy in southern Oregon. What kind of questions are small businesses asking you right now? I know that people that I know who own small businesses have been extremely frustrated with the fact that they're not able to get through on the website it keeps crashing. They they don't know how or whether they can get the help that they need right. Now what are they asking you? Yeah it's the same thing is how can I be assured of getting the funds? You know what can I do to make sure that I'm first in line? Do you understand need to pay my payroll next week and I think you know with anything. We're we're all kind of writing new playbook right now as to how we respond to this. This is if we look at how we reacted in the financial crisis. Even though it was very bad we had a little bit of time to build up to it but here we loaded the bus before we had tires on it. And we're changing the tires on it while we're trying to get it to go one hundred miles an hour and so. I think that's been the biggest challenge so far is kind of figuring it out as as we went the SBA I saw release from them recently as they did. Fourteen years of commitments in fourteen days. That's that's a huge huge raising up a program from nothing and and it was the same thing for us we we had not really worked through the SBA lending process. We had problems getting connected to the system but they worked with us through the whole thing they were they were out there. They were trying to help us figure it out and then when we finally got it turned on. Our team just went to town it was. It was great watching them work. They stayed late. They were doing everything they could. The Best I could do was bring in pizza and salads to keep them going so they could work longer in the evening to get more of these applications book before the funds ran out gene Pelham. I just want to ask you one more question because I'm sort of imagining you as you tell me what this has been like for you with your phone ringing off the hook and emails coming in from businesses in your community. That need help in order to stay afloat right now. Have you been tempted to bend the rules in all of this as anybody? You please just give me another month to to do this or or something like that. Yeah you know. It's it's I in a highly regulated business and so even the thoughts about bending the rules don't end well for anybody but one of the early things that are regulators allowed us to do is our annual meetings. Which is the meeting of the member owners of credit? And what's unique about a credit union? Is that everybody that does business with us? Owns it and so annually. They have the opportunity to meet and elect their board of directors. That's always been required to be physical meeting in a physical location or rapidly. Regulators gave us the opportunity to hold that meeting virtually and believe it or not. We actually had one of the best attendances that we've had in several years so those are some of the things that are happening right now is that we're not bending the rules. We're them BEND THEM FOR US. House that you know virtual meetings right now do get a lot of attendance because nobody has anything else too. That was gene. Pelham president and CEO of Credit Union in Medford Oregon. It is true that a lot of people are doing zooms these days and it's almost hard to figure out how to end them. If you need to end them you just say I have another zoom. Let me know at Jeremy. Hobson on twitter here now is a production of NPR and W. B. U. R. in association with the BBC World Service. I'm Jeremy Hobson. Im Tanya Moseley. This is here now sir.

US NPR China Boeing Jeremy Hobson president trump Tanya Moseley director marijuana Todd Parr New York Dr Michael Oester twitter president and CEO SBA Credit Union Jason Bobi
'Imagine: Reflections On Peace' Book; Amazon Destruction

Here & Now

42:32 min | 4 months ago

'Imagine: Reflections On Peace' Book; Amazon Destruction

"The i'm tanya moseley. And i wanna thank you for listening to the here and now podcast. I also want to ask you to do something. Support your npr station with a donation right now at donate dot npr dot org slash. Now your contribution supports the reporting you hear every day. The latest from washington where a new administration is preparing to take over and reporting from across the country on the surge of covid nineteen cases your donation ensures that you're hearing a range of voices the experts and also the everyday people were experiencing all of this right now like we all are also helping to make possible those unforgettable interviews with authors big thinkers and creatives in the fine arts and popular culture those moments that make you want to listen every day so make a donation to your npr station. Now your contribution is more important than ever just go to donate dot. Npr dot org slash. Now we're building. Npr in its member stations. Thanks to you now. Let's get to the news from npr. Wb you are. I'm lisa mullins. And i'm tanya moseley. It's here and now. Congress is expected to work into the weekend to try to hammer out a deal to help people. Struggling financially during this pandemic and republicans and democrats seem to agree on a couple of things limited extension of unemployment benefits some help for small businesses and direct payments of at least six hundred dollars for most americans on the senate floor. Today missouri republican josh hawley called for doubling that to twelve hundred dollars with these americans asked for is not for government to solve all their problems. It's not for government to give them a handout. It's a chance to get back on their feet. One major sticking point has been federal assistance to state and local governments facing budget shortfalls because of this pandemic and joining us now to talk more about. This is the mayor of louisville kentucky. Greg fisher. He's also the president of the us conference of mayors. And he's a democrat mayor fisher. Welcome back to here and now thank you mayor. It looks like they'll be no direct money to cities and states in this deal make the case. What is the need in your city right now well. It's immense here in louisville in cities all over the country right now all along this response to the pandemic was supposed to be fairly supported in state mandated and then locally executed so here we are where we see vaccine insight and we're coming up short with no funds to locally execute that so what that means is our budgets at the city level. All across the country have been ravaged by this in about two thirds of normal city. Budget consists of public safety personnel so to balanced budgets without any type of relief. We're getting in right now. Means that we're going to have to impact the very public safety officials that we were we. We rely on more than ever right now. So it's just a travesty. And we're encouraging congress to stay at the table find the will to involve local governments with this response and direct fiscal stimulus. It so badly needed right now. are you looking at. Layoffs are cutting social services that is going to be very real ramifications for cities around the country right now so when you think about the Emt's ems workers. Police workers that make up most of the budgets They are in very real threat right now And the social services the amount of food insecurity that we have right now the people that were helping with fiction relief none of that's gonna stop on december the thirtieth so it's critically important at this relief is included in congress's response that they're working on at this very moment encourage everybody to call their. Us senators encourage them. Keep cities in this stimulus. Bill some states are doing better than others. California has a one time tax windfall because it has higher property taxes on the wealthy That were hurt less during this. Pandemic texas is hurting because of falling oil revenue Senate majority leader mitch. Mcconnell says he doesn't want what he describes as a blue state bailout here. He is last friday on the senate floor after more. Important than supply the governor of california with a special slush fund that help restaurant workers in california. Keep their jobs. Oh and by the way these demands for state and local government giveaways or blocking urgent aid for struggling families at a time when many states tax revenues have largely gone up. Mayor is this a matter of blue versus red states. this is not a blue state. Red state issue boosted. He read city issue. You can see what this is a time to put all kind of partisanship aside over one point. Three million state and local workers have already lost their jobs and what we learned in the great recession. Was that because of the non funding of local and state governments. It took us two years longer to come out of the recession than what should have so. We need not only to keep these jobs at the local and state government level. We got to think about the services that are being provided in terms of public safety public health. Work that's what we're talking about when we're talking about direct relief for state and local governments. I hear what you're saying about this. Not being partisan issue. I'm just twelve of the fifty largest cities are led by republicans. Though your city louisville ranks twenty ninth what are you hearing from. republican mayors. Are they in line with republican members of congress and opposing direct aid to their cities. No mayors have rallied around the need for aid because mayors are in the reality business so we see the pain in our cities. there's unanimity in terms of mayors. That we have to have the support that we can. So that we can locally execute The solution here to the corona virus and the irony. of course we're closer than ever before with the vaccine now being administered around the country so now is not the time to hold back. It's the time to invest to make sure that we can get the vaccines in the right place at the right time. Get our country out of this nightmare. That's been covert nineteen may. You've voiced concern about another idea that's been floated. It's this one month extension of federal moratorium. That expires at the end of the month. Isn't a one month extension better than no extension. If you want to help people who are struggling at this moment. Pay their rent and stay in their homes. I think you wanna ask him. What's the role of government is to provide a platform for human potential to flourish. And certainly well one month. Extension of fiction is better than no month. You gotta be thinking further ahead than that because the economy's not going to be recovered one month from now. I just implore congress defined the skill and the will to get this done right now. The time is critical. Greg fischer is mayor of louisville kentucky and president of the us conference of mayors mayor. Thank you so much for speaking with us. Locate thank you. The navajo nation began distributing the covid nineteen vaccine this week in the midst of a second deadly surge in a strict lockdown order. The vaccine represents a glimmer of hope for navajo healthcare workers. It's been a feat to make sure it's distributed and stored properly even in the most remote areas the navajo nation is the biggest reservation in the us an area larger than west. Virginia it stretches across utah arizona and new mexico. The person in charge of the vaccine program areas. Dr loretta christianson. She is chief medical officer of indian health services navajo area. Dr christianson welcome. Thank you as we mentioned. The navajo nation is an enormous area. How difficult is it to get the vaccine to the people and tell us how many people there are in the region and And what is what. The challenges are in getting there. We had an excellent distribution team. We did a lot of logistics and planning and our -mergency management incident commander created a plan with four distribution teams. So that we could get the vaccine in a timely fashion to each one of our health care facilities the furthest one being almost four hours away we had the escort of the navajo police department to make sure we were able to make our way through in a timely fashion and we got it done. We know our area very well many of us are from the navajo nation or the border towns and we travel along these roads all the time. It is quite challenging because there aren't many ways to get to each of these facilities. There's one main route that we have to take but we certainly did a lot of pre-planning and it worked out extremely well. We were able to get everybody vaccine on monday or tuesday. So we're very very pleased that means how many people have received it. We are over a thousand of the doses have been given and we anticipate the remainder will be done by sunday afternoon We of course have to catch the different shifts of healthcare workers and we have been very efficient with this process. So i have to say. I'm very grateful to everyone on the vaccine teams at every facility for being so well prepared. There has been a historic mistrust between the federal government and native communities. And i wonder if you're hearing from frontline workers how and whether they're having to deal with that mistrust And whether people are comfortable getting vaccinated. Well it's unfortunate that there is that historical trauma that we're dealing with. But we've been extremely proactive. And i feel one of the issues. Overtime has been adequate and impactful communication. So we have really taken the time to get the word out to the public to have forums where the public could ask us questions. We've been very transparent about this process all along that we're watching the vaccines we feel. They're safe while they're going to help us. We don't want you to get cove. Where all messaging berry positively and this includes all leadership from president nasr to head of ihs to the upstanding members of the communities and now the who that are speaking up our medicine men are speaking of. They're saying we need you to get this. We need you to protect yourself your family your friends in our community so we're message in a way that this is going to be very helpful for us. This will help. Stop this surge that we're in right now and we don't want to lose any more of our people we've had tremendous loss and we're still grieving over all those losses so we want to move forward with a very positive attitude that this vaccine is here to help us. He just created an interesting image their medicine men encouraging people to take this cutting edge vaccine. Yes we're very fortunate that we have some very strong traditional practitioners that succeeded with our healthcare facilities in hospitals. So they work side by side by our workers every day and i think there is a very trusting respectful relationship established to where they understand what covert has done to our navajo people. So they're very passionate about healing. They're very passionate about their communities. So one of the first people on navajos that got the vaccination was it traditional practitioner from one of our hospitals and he spoke very eloquently to the public that he believes. This is here to help us that we how us what were given dr loretta christianson chief medical officer of the indian health services navajos area. Thank you so much thank you. How does a country that suffered searing conflict survive. How do the people of rwanda cambodia northern ireland and lebanon. Pull the pieces together. And even thrive as the inspiration behind a new multimedia project called imagine reflections on peace gary night is one of the editors of the project. He is an acclaimed photographer and co founder of the seven foundation which produced the book. That's part of the project. Gary welcome thank you. They said great to be here. We're also joined by robin writes. She's a longtime foreign correspondent and writes for the new yorker wrote about the wars in lebanon and life there now for this project. Hi robin radio gary. Let's start off with you. What were the threads that you felt the need to pull together for this project working so much in war zones during the late nineteen eighties. Through to the mid-2000s i realize that although piece was the was the main objective in any war that i covet when i look back at all these stories that i covered piece seemed to be somewhat disappointing and peace hadn't in fact delivered what the populations of the countries i've been working in had expected so your idea when we started the project really wants to just go out there and examining why and and and understand how could make peace. How one can make a better piece in you. Say that process largely goes on documented. So how did you go about documenting at talk and talk about the reporters who covered then an and you sent back out again now. Do we send people back to cambodia to rwanda lebanon bosnia northern ireland And team columbia. Which when we started the project was was still a very fresh peace process. It was very important for us to assign photographers and writers who had decades of experience not owning covering the wars but covering the optima one of those reporters and writers that you sent out was robin wright and robin i wonder if you can tell us you had lived in lebanon for fifteen years there. We can't even call it a war in lebanon. It was actually a combination of wars. And you went back to talk to the people after the bloodshed and assad jeff. Tari i think it is. He fought for lebanese forces christian militia. And he told you you met him at a starbucks and talked about his time as One of the top intelligence officers. He said my task was to decide the fate of those who were rounded up at checkpoints. He's talking about in the muslim quarters of beirut and decide whether someone should be spared or exchanged or killed a human being was little more than a product to me. This is a man who you say has a christian education. He goes to church. Goes to confession now and find some minor little thing to confess and says nothing about the killings. How did you make sense. How does he make sense of his history and what he was telling you well he used to go to confession not talk about those who kill but he'd gone through on a pigmy partly because of his wife who introduced him to a group of wives who were trying to bring their husbands together to get them to think about what they were doing and he was one of those rare rare people who was not only aware finally of the wrong he had done but wanted to do something and said he could never do enough to change or alter the evilness that he engaged in he started a group called fighters for peace and they would go to high school because the war was not taught in lebanon and you go to high schools and talked to groups about how they used to try to kill each other and they actually he actually pulled together people he knew he was trying to kill and howard destroyed their lives their families their country their communities and how it had to be put to a stop but the lesson of lebanon out to be that it is the individuals who are trying to create a different alternative rather than the state itself not do which was not doing very much and that was true in south africa as well and you saw desmond tutu who who fostered the truth and reconciliation committee to try to bring peace but that's very rare in war zones countries coming out of conflict. Don't have the resources. The know how the tolerance the courage to do those kinds of things gary night. Could you talk to us about what happened in rwanda. This is nineteen ninety-four four the genocide in rwanda and the issues at hand and there are so many different issues sectarian issues to territorial issues that can cause war. What happened to rwanda than and this is. I think one of the most positive after war stories that you have in the book yes was. Was the rod still pretty serious political problems. I think in in rwanda sunny has been. I would argue. The greatest success perhaps along with northern ireland of the countries. That we've noted and i think as everybody knows that was a very violent genocide perpetrated by hutus against to. It's it's in rwanda. Country was completely broke and at the time and then talking to colleagues. I was covering the war in bosnia at the time and If any of his which which of the two countries ause neo rwanda would've been the most successful now two decades later. I don't think any of us would have thought the rwanda would have been but it has and there are some key reasons. Why the process of reconciliation. You know truth and reconciliation coach. Of course that would borrowed from south. Africa have been instrumental in allowing people to move. Forward and moving forward is critical in the generation. That's lives through the war. If it doesn't process the war move forward It's very difficult for subsequent generations to do so and the active personal forgiveness absolutely critical. And i think an issue that robin touched on that when she was talking about the wives of warlords bringing that husbands together the role of women in post conflict societies is absolutely critical and has a major impact on the success of pace. There's a there's a quote from the book research shows that we're women have access to power. War is less likely to break out in the first place. When when you talked about the reconciliation there are in. We should say this is a massive project. You embarked on here that includes videos and in one of the videos from rwanda There is a Photographer jack picone. Who had in nineteen ninety-four forty legally crossed the border to document the rwandan genocide. He twenty five years later returned wondering if the the country could find light out of such horrific darkness that he had documented and he spoke with a pastor who is there in nineteen ninety four. Let's listen to this tape. I think most of those who survived most of is to simply meet the because we were thrown into the building process involved into consideration. But unless you hundred properly come on chill you so you implented cool. So what comes through here is that there is peace in the in schools. For instance kids. Who used to have to say in the same classroom. A hutu tutsi. They're not asked that anymore. Does that mean that. There are no differences. Does that mean that that They're able to live peaceably together. And we should say that. Who's intuit sees. Who were the twinsies. Victims of some of the who slaughter are indeed living together side by side. What kind of a piece is that. Yes if you go to rwanda now you ask people about their ethnicity. They won't answer the question But doesn't mean that differences don't stood exist. I think what's happened. Though in rwanda is that people have understood how to patch over those differences how to forgive and how to move forward. And i think that's that's really really critical to understand and that's why rwanda has been massively successful so just to summarize and there's so much more to talk about and will include Much more on the website. I wonder if maybe robin you can tell us. If what what the lessons are that you drew from your time there and going back now and talking to the people now about the nature of war and peace a huge question but particularly how people in how countries survive the human spirit is obviously we are a species that struggles to survive wants to survive and were set up to make every effort to do so but we also have other instincts and sometimes we are not educated or knowledgeable enough to understand people who are different from us and that leads to in most wars. You know some flash point that was not intended to start a war but in back does and there was a shooting incident in nineteen. Seventy five started lebanon's war and as we were putting this book together. United states starting fa- facing its own racial challenges and tensions and i have thought that a relevant this project is not just to wars and other countries but really to our own situation and that peace is the best in the human spirit spirit but it is much harder than war which involves some of the kind of primordial instincts so the the book was fascinating bows and understanding our times and the world and warfare but it was also kind of a reflection of human history and the challenges. We we've faced in every country not just in other places very good to talk to you new yorker rhetoric robin wright photographer and editor gary night talking about the book. Imagine reflections on peace. You can see some of the photos from this multimedia project at here not dot org. Thank you both. Thank you support for this. Podcast comes from the boston foundation for more than a century a resilient city and region have relied on the boston foundation to bring people together to solve our most serious problems. The foundation's work has been strengthened by hundreds of people who've left legacies to support our community leaving a charitable legacy at the boston foundation is a great way to have an impact now and in the future. Learn more at t be f dot org slash partner. It's a monumental day on wall street. Tesla's is poised to join the s. and p. five hundred traders are scrambling to sell eighty five billion dollars worth of tesla stock by the close of the markets. Today before the electric car maker conjoined the stock index migrants here to talk about it. He is senior editor at bloomberg news. Help us understand. First off mike. This process of a new company becoming part of the snp and all stocks having to be sold in one fell swoop. So lease the most important thing to understand. Is how immensely popular. What's called passive has become and that's when a mutual funder or another type of investment vehicle simply buys every stock in the s. and p. five hundred rather than picking and choosing among them. There's something like four point. Trill four point six trillion dollars invested that way including i would guess a lot of our listeners. 401k plans so these funds are actually obligated to purchase shares of tusla wants. It's added to the index as opposed to an actively managed fund where the manager could pick and choose and decide whether or not to buy tesla. What's weird is that sucks are added and removed to the snp fairly frequently. But what makes tesla so unusual. Is that the stock. Price had soared so much that it turned this company into the six biggest company in the index wants its added. And that's because it didn't meet the indexes eligibility requirements until this year mainly the one where it had to be profitable over the previous year. So that makes tesla actually the biggest stock by market value ever added to the index. And that's why it's such a big deal so when it joins the s&p five hundred has to knock somebody else out. It's going to replace apartment. Investment and management company. Real estate investment. Trust that makes up just a small fraction of what tesla's worth what's the impact on the snp of the entrance of a behemoth. Like tesla so about tusla. The very volatile stock the price swings quite a bit and it's valuation compared to its earnings is very high. It's a very very richly valued stock but the appeal of investing in the entire index. At once is that you get that instant diversification among those five hundred stocks. So tesla's only gonna be about between one and two percent of the index so it will have an effect on the the the volatility in the index but not a huge huge effect. I think one of the main concerns today is that for these funds to buy all that tesla's stock they have to sell an equal amount of everything else in the index so there is some concern about selling pressure for some of the other stocks in the index briefly. Tesla's meteoric rise comes as tech stocks. Have just one of the few winners this year amid the pandemic how is it. The company seemed to be rolling in cash when so many americans are unemployed. Well ethically so one thing with the stock market. This year is the federal reserve has kept interest rates at rock-bottom to sort of spur the economy and that's made the return returns on offering the bond market very unappealing to investors. And at the same time if you're lucky enough to keep your job this year you didn't have a lot of places to spend your income. So there's a big savings glut. That i think is going into the stock market as well. Those two things really popping off the stock market. Thanks a lot. Mike regan senior editor for bloomberg news. Thank you mike thank you. States are receiving fewer doses of the corona virus vaccine than they were initially promised. And they're now calling on the centers for disease control and prevention to explain. Why washington state governor. Jay inslee says the state's second shipment of pfizer's corona virus vaccine will be cut by forty percent for more. Let's bring in anna boyko. I rock a reporter with k. U. o. w. in seattle in seattle and anna visor says no vaccine shipments to states across the us are on hold or delayed in millions of doses are actually waiting to be sent out. So what's going on. Yeah i to know that too actually. So the state of washington hasn't been given a clear explanation on this and yesterday. Washington state governor jay inslee said. He's hoping it's just a communication issue. Which will be fixed soon. Inslee was speculating that the different federal agencies involved in vaccine distribution are not talking with each other very well. In essentially there was some mix upper miscommunication somewhere along the line Visors vaccine requires two doses per patient and states are in the process of now giving out those first shots. So how are these. Shortages expected to impact. The rollout of of those first doses. There well some hospitals were just starting to get word of what. Their allotment was for next week At least one is putting its vaccination plans on hold for the moment overlake medical center in bellevue. Which was one of the first places to treat covid patients in the area back when seattle was the episode They were going to get nine hundred seventy five doses and start. Vaccinations monday or tuesday. But now that's on hold and they don't know when they're going to get doses or how many the washington state hospital association says they're hopeful. Vaccine shipments aren't delayed beyond next week And how is the deployment of vaccines wash in washington state More broadly going so far. Well they started out really slowly early this week. So you had just a handful of health care workers Just hospitals could run through everything sort of do a test run and then within days. The hospitals started vaccinating hundreds of people including this morning so Earlier this week. Seventeen hospitals received doses. And we know that at least a thousand people have been vaccinated in the state so far but it's probably a lot more than that because the data likes behind a few days So far hospitals haven't gotten enough doses to cover all their frontline workers but a wide variety of care workers and first responders are getting vaccinated. And it's really quite remarkable to see. Actually this week. i saw seattle. Firefighter get injected with the vaccine. He does testing for covid at the city's free test sites. You have workers who are handling biological waste from cove patients. They're cleaning up hospital rooms after covid patients and these workers are now getting vaccinated One guy who fits that category. I saw him get injected pumped his fist in the air After the dose went in healthcare providers in the er who have to live with the uncertainty of this new patient who just showed up do they have food poisoning or do they have covid. And this week. I saw them get vaccinated and they said this is a relief from that uncertainty. Thank you so much. This update that's k. u. o. w. reporter anna boyko y rock in seattle again. Thank you thank you. The destruction of the world's largest rainforest continues with profound impacts on the world's climate satellite imagery shows more than four thousand square. Miles of the amazon has disappeared since last year and roughly an area. Roughly the size of jamaica organizations like amazon watcher shining a spotlight on the role banks and other financial institutions play in funding deforestation with a particular focus on us asset manager blackrock and for more. Let's bring on more roberge. She's a climate and finance director with a nonprofit amazon. Watch welcome laura. Thank you so much for having me maura. This is the most logging amazon has seen in twelve years. What is driving this increase. That's right there's a massive increase in deforestation this year and largely what's driving. It is the rollback of environmental indigenous rights protections being led by the country's president jail bolsonaro at the behest of or at the very least for the benefit of the agribusiness industry primarily. And we've reported before on how meatpackers. Jbs play a significant part in this but your organization has been increasingly focused on the role us banks and other firms play in financing this destruction. Can you explain what your organization found big. Us banks and asset managers like blackrock j. p. morgan chase like citi group and others are major bankrollers of the industry in the brazilian amazon. While a lot of the companies that operate there the jbs is the mar frakes nervous brazilian a significant portion of the funding that they get to actually carry out those operations comes from us financial firms. You mentioned black rock Black rock the largest asset manager in the world has been a big focus of yours in two thousand eighteen amazon. Watch accused black rock being the greatest causer of climate chaos. That is a bold charge. It is a bold charge but we stand by it. Not just to amazon watch. But allie organizations like friends of the earth like near communities for change many others have done research into the finances of blackrock and wear the investment dollars manages goes and we've found that it is the biggest investor and fossil fuels and the biggest investor in deforestation risk commodities. And those are the two industries that are most responsible for climate change and so we think that block has a huge responsibility here particularly as it in. The last year has really tried to position itself as a good climate actor. Yeah i mean. Is there anything that comes from from this last year. Your investigation was in two thousand eighteen. Ceo larry fink has been applauded for his commitment earlier. This year to divest from coal. Do you think that think is genuine about moving the company in the right direction. Well i think we have seen some important changes You mentioned the movement of coal in certain of its funds and other small steps. So i think there is something to be applauded. But there's much more to be done. We really think that it's among other things absolutely necessary. That blackrock isn't claiming to be a great actor. Climate change but still marketing and creating and pushing funds to its clients that our chock full of force destroying and climate destroying companies. So right now you go to black rock. You say i'm a new client. I wanna invest my money. Where should i put it. And a primary menu of funds that gives you are climate unsafe and we think it should be the opposite. We think that unless you are going to block saying. I wanna pour money into everything. Destroys the climate that you should actually get options at aren't between the climate that our climate safe black rock's position is that the majority of its investments in the amazon or passive exchange traded funds or. Etf that it claims it doesn't directly control. What do you say to that. Well that's exactly what i was just referring to in the sense that there are a lot of decisions that black rock and other asset managers are making even when they're putting clans money in index funds. I actually don't like using the word passive one. Because i think it's a misnomer right. Because black is picking which which indices to create funds to track. It is in some cases creating its own indices for boutique type is deciding which funds to before clients when they show up in the front door. And so i think there actually are a lot of decisions. That are that are being made and so i think pacifism misnomer to former senior. Black rock executives have been nominated for appointments to president-elect administration. Brian dece former head of a sustainable investing to lead the national economic council. And wally mall a former interim chief of staff to larry fink to serve as deputy secretary of the treasury. What's your feeling about this. Should they be confirmed. Do you see any opportunities for engagement with these appointments. Well i think that it. As a general rule we should be wary of appointees and nominees. Who are coming directly from wall street. I definitely have some concerns that either these folks will be Willing to maybe go head to head with some of their former colleagues and friends at black rock and other financial firms. And i haven't had direct interaction with mr jahmil. But i have had with mr deeds and i must say that It doesn't leave me very optimistic. Because really found him to be dismissive of the concerns of people from amazon and of the impacts of black rocks policies on impacted communities. And that's a real concern when we're talking about someone who's supposed to be a public servant serving the american people all of us. The few more reverse is climate and finance director for the nonprofit amazon. Watch thank you so much for this conversation. Thank you so much even without a pandemic keeping you inside. Odds are you'd be catching up on a lot of tv and movies over the holidays. There's never been more to watch or more streaming platforms to subscribe to but believe it or not. There's going to be so much more next year. Giant companies such as disney and warner brothers are adding to their arsenal and smaller contenders like discovery plus joining the fray. Npr tv critic. Eric joins us now to talk about. What's next in the so-called streaming wars as twenty twenty draws to a close. Hello eric hi are these companies expanding so much because the pandemic has created such a demand or would they have done so anyhow. Yeah i think they would have done so anyhow We knew a long time ago. That apple and disney and warnermedia an nbc universal were all going to be creating streaming platforms. So that they could take these shows that they owned away from net flicks but once the pandemic hit. It just made it. Even more this that they had to funnel more their resources towards streaming and funnel more their projects were streaming and different companies have handled that In different ways. So let's look at how disney's handling it at announced it would spend up to sixteen billion with a b. dollars on new projects for its streaming services with a bit of a trailer for of them. Now it's a new show centered around a fan. Favourite super villain. Loki taking me to kill me. Take you someplace to talk lighter talk but you do like to lie which you just did because we both know you hopped talk donkey. Disney isn't the only one with big plans Warner brothers is going to be doing all. It's twenty twenty one movies on. Hbo max at the same time. They released movie theaters. How much are these. moves game. Changers while the warner brothers announcement was a huge Deal i think that's going to create an expectation amongst the audience that they will have quicker access to movies that are in theaters australia services. And i think that's why one reason why so many people in the movie industry are angry at warner for that move because they didn't really consult with them before they made this decision. And now it could be a seismic change and the window between a movie being at a theater and a movie being available on a streaming service. Well it seems like everybody's keeping an eye on netflix and disney is streaming original material. It has in the works star. Wars tv show mandalorian an immensely popular show disney announced many new star wars projects including the upcoming film rogue squadron and they teased it in this promotional trailer. With director patty jenkins. I grew up the daughter of a great fighter pilot and every day i would wake up and go outside. And look see my father and his squadron taking off in there of course so when he lost his life in service to this country i ignited desire in me to turn all of that tragedy and thrill into one day making the greatest fighter pilot movie of all time and the clip. You could hear the velcro there. It ends with jenkins donning a space pilot and walking toward wing the iconic star wars ship. Do you think that disney can replicate the success of the mandalorian with projects. Like this one. Well it's interesting so disney actually announced. I think something like Nine different star wars projects that would be streaming into movies including the one that patty jenkins's on it seems like they developed a process with the mandalorian. That could be a template that they could use to develop these other star. Wars series certainly seems like that streaming version of star. Wars is much more creatively exciting than some of the theatrical films that we saw disney's leaning into that and they're creating more projects and we'll have to see how. How does does this leave any room. For smaller streamers Discovery plus compete with the guys so If you're looking at these lesser known streaming services like discovery plus. Amc is starting has started one called amc plus they will have to offer material that you can't get somewhere else. I think it's a situation where the consumer is actually going to have a lot of great material. You just can't let yourself be intimidated by all the choices you have out there and you have to figure out a strategy that makes sense for sampling at all. Yeah i mean it is intimidating there. There are so many to choose from. And if you don't feel like turning out more money for yet another one even if it's just a mo subscription what are you to do what you suggest. Well i did a story a longtime ago year ago now about how to put together a strategy. It's on mpr dot org so if you did a search on my name dagens and then streaming strategy and then npr. You probably find the link. And i think my recommendation now is the recommendation i made back. Then which is you know you generally have to find a couple of streaming services that might be your base camp and then pick and choose. The things That makes sense to add to your little collection of streaming services. And if you find you're not watching something you know with click of a button. You can stop this subscription and you're not paying for it anymore. Npr tv critic. Eric thank you always a pleasure here. Now is the production of npr in wer in association with the bbc world service. I'm lisa mullins. Im tanya moseley. this is here.

rwanda lebanon tanya moseley Tesla louisville congress lisa mullins us senate josh hawley boston foundation Greg fisher robin npr Greg fischer Dr loretta christianson Dr christianson amazon
Kirk Franklin's Message Of Hope; EU Official Promises Summer Travel Season

Here & Now

41:12 min | 11 months ago

Kirk Franklin's Message Of Hope; EU Official Promises Summer Travel Season

"From NPR and WBZ. I'm Jeremy Hobson. Im Tanya Moseley. It's here now. The House of Representatives voting today on a three trillion dollar economic relief package that so far does not have Republican support and this morning White House Economic Adviser Peter. Navarro dismissed testimony by whistleblower. Rick Bright. Who said there isn't a national strategy to respond to the pandemic? It was the height of irony that the day that bright was up there. Doing the circus thing president. Donald J trump was out in the beautiful Lehigh Valley essentially announcing a key part of that plant strategic national stockpile to point. Now it's in President Trump's images smarter bigger and more resilient what do I mean by in case you missed it by the way here is some of what Dr Bright said. Yesterday on Capitol Hill. Initially our nation was not as prepared as we should have been as we could have been. Some scientists raised early warning signals that were overlooked and pages from our pandemic playbook worked hard by some leadership. There will be plenty of time to look back to assess what has happened so we can improve but right now we need to focus on getting things right going forward. Let's bring in Blue Ola Rooney Pie White House reporter for the Washington Post Tiller. Let's start with Rick. Bright he was removed from his position as a top government vaccine expert. He says because he raised alarms about the pandemic response from the administration. How is his testimony resonating in Washington? Today well his testimony is largely a bombshell for those who have been in critics of the administration who've been wondering why the American response to the Krona virus has been so haphazard and delayed Dr Bright provided not only details but also evidence that he and a number of other scientists and government experts. Were trying to warn the government where we're trying to get the red flags to begin to to to flare about how much of a major issue this was back. In January and February and those warnings were not heeded so he has been able to provide some of that evidence that a lot of people have been looking for in terms of trying to find out why this was not handled in a more responsible way. And why the White House and the political figures seem to have made played a much more significant role than the scientists in the experts. And that's part of the reason why you're seeing people trying to defend president trump like Peter Navarro In part because there is the fear that This narrative is starting to build that president trump and his political allies. We're not listening to the experts. And that's part of the reason why we are where we are now. Well some of what is happening. Now is out outside of the White House's control President trump praised the Wisconsin supreme court's ruling this week that overruled. The Democratic governor stay at home order Republican lawmakers wanted the restrictions lifted in Wisconsin. And they won now. People are packing into bars and restaurants in some cases is president trump by praising that ruling. Now saying that all stayed home orders across the country should be lifted. Well that has been his message if you look at social media accounts that his public comments. He's really pining for this grand reopening even though a lot of these states have not met the guidelines listed by the White House in terms of what they need to do before they start to relax restrictions. President trump has kind of moved on beyond that. He's speaking out in favor of reopening saying that all of the states that have not yet reopened are doing it for political reasons and essentially saying that all states should begin to relax restrictions. He has said it should be done in a gradual way but a lot of that nuance gets lost when he starts speaking publicly and attacking Democrats who have been resistant to reopening their economies. He has praised Wisconsin for opening. He's re tweeted messages. That say you know. Don't worry about wearing a mask or staying home. You should feel free. Go out to restaurants and bars without wearing masks. And it's clear that his own personal views are at odds with the views of even members of the White House. Corona virus taskforce. Who have said that. We need to be very cautious about reopening. Because we don't want to have a second wave of the virus the president had said instead that this is all gonna go away by itself and there's no need to take precautions and that's part of the reason why there's so much Uncertainty about what the federal government responses. Because there doesn't seem to be a clearing consistent message coming from the White House. Well there's no question that there is severe economic devastation. That is being caused by everything That is happening right now. House Democrats are voting today on more cash payments to families additional help for states and businesses and expanded unemployment benefits. What are the sticking points? Why aren't Republicans willing to go along with this at this point well a number of Republicans say that this is too much too fast? They want to take a little bit more time to see how the first multi trillion dollar packages that have been passed. How they work. How effective they are. And sort of stemming the economic damage and they also believe that Democrats were willing to put in a lot of their pet projects into this major massive bill. Things like you know vote by mail in all fifty states and You know diversity Studies for different industries things that Republicans generally have not been in favor of. They say that this has been a grab bag and for that reason. They're not going to support this but there are some things that they do support in the bill so this is sort of an opening bid which will lead to more compromised things like funding for states and localities is likely to be part of whatever. Bipartisan package comes out of this but this was just an effort by Democrats to be able to sort of provide a messaging platform about. What they their priorities are so that then we could go into full negotiation on a bipartisan. Basis and Republicans and Democrats will eventually have to come up with a broad package that will be able to help the country because the the packages that have been passed so far have stemmed the damage but there still is a lot of economic hardship out there just a few seconds here too but should we be paying attention to what. President trump is calling Obama gate or is it just noise? It's mostly noise if you look at the actual details of what he's alleging this idea of unmasking. That's very common. It's been done in the past. It's been done under the trump administration but it isn't effort by trump to try to cause a sense of distraction in the middle of pan-demic To White House reporter for the Washington Post. Thanks as always thank you. Oil and gas companies could benefit from a change to a Federal Reserve Stimulus program aimed at helping businesses during the corona virus pandemic. But some are calling. These changes a stealth bailout for the industry and questioned whether they make sense from an environmental economic standpoint. Read Frazier of the allegheny front and state impact. Pennsylvania reports when it first rolled out its mainstream lending program the Federal Reserve prohibited companies from using the loans to pay off debts. The loans were intended to help small and mid sized companies from going under during the pandemic but oil and gas companies and their advocates asked the central bank to loosen up those guidelines. They wanted to use the money to be able to pay off debt to the feds rule change announced in late. April allowed just that in a video. Us Senator. Kevin Kramer of North Dakota said the changes will help American oil companies. He says they've been hurt by corona virus an oversupply of oil from Saudi Russian Price War. It's created a belly and we need a bridge to the other side of that Valley for these highly leveraged companies and. This will be one of those tools. I think it will help build that bridge. Oil Drillers cremers home state and other states like Texas stand to benefit the most from changes to the six hundred dollar loan program which was part of the cares act the two trillion dollar corona virus relief. Bill PASSED BY CONGRESS IN MARCH. But some have criticized. The feds changes environmentalists question whether the government should be throwing a lifeline to the fossil fuel industry. One of the country's biggest sources of greenhouse gases Graham Steel of the Stanford Graduate School of business and a former Democratic congressional staffer says the changes could help companies that were doing poorly well before the pandemic and he says that's not what the cares act is for. This is an oil belt for a specific set of companies the Federal Reserve said in an e. Mail that changes. The program weren't made with the oil and gas industry in mind and that other industries could benefit business groups like the US Chamber of Commerce also lobbied for the changes but steele says the big winner is oil and gas is really the program in a way so as not to lose tax payers money and now members of Congress industry lobbied them and under that pressure they have buckled David Livingston with Eurasia Group Risk Management Firm says allowing companies to use the loans to essentially refinance higher. Interstates will help oil and gas companies. He says they've had to borrow. Because revenues from oil and gas alone have not been enough for them to cover their costs. They were sort of running on a treadmill and the entire shale Enterprise was increasing. Its production month over month. Year-over-year in large part thanks to the continued provision of relatively low cost capital to the sector. The idea was that prices would eventually rise and they'd cash in but the opposite has happened at least for oil. The crash in oil prices is actually increased. The price of natural gas since oil wells also produced natural gas when oil production slows. Less natural. Gas comes onto the market and the price for natural gas goes up. That's been good for shale gas companies in Appalachia and other places across the US but bill Holland who covers the natural gas industry for SNP Global Market Intelligence says. Some of these companies are still paying off debts. They accumulated leasing millions of acres of land. During the fracking. Boom companies. Spent big the least big big tracts of land in western Pennsylvania West Virginia Ohio in the UTICA Marcellus Shales that grab that land. The land grab we called it and that debt still on their books. One company that could benefit from the Fed's new loan program Holland says would be Chesapeake Energy. Which has a big loan payment coming due this year. But it's unclear whether Chesapeake could qualify for the loan in a recent regulatory filing the company announced its considering filing for bankruptcy for here and now. I'm Reid Frazier at home. Right gave them move at home. Does he moving in your role big house shoes Russia Tapu? That's go home award. Winning Gospel Singer and songwriter. Kirk Franklin has been pretty busy during quarantine you just heard part of one of his at home concerts which he shared on his Youtube Channel Easter weekend. And while Franklin's larger than life presence has always been on stage these days he's taking to social media to reach people and he joins us to talk more about it Kirk. Welcome to here now. Thank you so much for having me so you know. Every time I look around there you are. You gave this mother's Day message just a few days ago. It wasn't even just a message. It was like a full orchestra playing in your yard. You do these youtube concerts. You did this especially moving video about the latest on a MoD armory You're working nonstop. It seems and you're building connection virtually these days. What drives you? I think. I'm just driven by life. I am a student of good and bad and always been inquisitive. You know is I never want to be the the Noel Room? I want to be in the room of those that are thinkers in people that are compassionate and people that have driving ambition. A M- always driven by that of tried to apply that even in my Christian faith or or even in my cultural experiences or my my social anxieties as a black man. my fears father in my heart beats for my wife and my kids and so yes things. Drive me. You brought up your wife and your kids and really the first thing I think when I think about you. In addition to your expansive music career is family. The importance of it. It's something we're all thinking about right now. we're either with them in quarantine or we're away from them or we're on those we've lost you talking about wanting to be in the room with people who make you better. You're there with your family right now. But you're also providing an experience where you're connecting with US online. Talk to me a little bit about that. It's very interesting you know. I am just always trying to pay attention to how to communicate things. That may not always be the hot topic issues in ways they can be entertaining and engaging that that that's what I think has always been my passion you know even if it comes to the tap of music that I do and you know but with family a lot of the stuff really is organic like you know like even the mother state thing like I hadn't thought of that weeks ago you know they didn't know what they were going to be doing. Had them do their parts in their phone? I just had them do it on. Diskette like a voice. Ticks and send it to you went into the studio and can put it all together. So we're going to have it on our website so folks can see what I'm talking about but you know I think anyone who has watched g performed knows that there really is no sitting down with your hands in your lap. These performances are experience. I mean they are high energy. It's it's praise music. I mean I'm even standing up right now talking to you because you you obviously don't have an audience right now where you're doing these concerts in front of them. But do you miss the energy of the audience to be honest with you? I don't feel emotionally a difference just because it is still very easy for me to just deal. Be that guy like like. I'm not having to be another guy you know what you do. It's your gift. Yeah Yeah and that's not anything to try to puff myself up or to try to you know boasting anything. I'm just sharing with you. What moves the heart and this would moves my heart. Yeah speaking of some of your collaborations when we're talking about some of those. I G concerts and Youtube concerts. You collaborated with several artists including Kelly price and Fantasia for a rendition of your song smile. Let's listen to some of it. Bookings spat song much there. So you know what? I was thinking about Kirk when you hit the scene back in the nineties I was in high school and I remember. It was such a huge deal because it felt like you were bringing contemporary sounds to Gospel Music when we listen to that now. It is very current. It's very now. But you kind of brought this to the forefront away that opened it up for people who may not have been either in the Church or listened heavily to Gospel Music. When when you think about that. Just your legacy. In that way does it still feel brand new to you or do you feel like we've come so far in this time. Now that we've just evolved with the music is still new to me just because there's always a new mountain you know. There's always a new bridge to cross and there's always a new experience that has to be communicated like like my heart really is about making sure that the conversation of Jesus Christ is something that can be a relevant conversation regardless of where culture finds itself like I wanted to have a fabric that they can bob and weave out of politics which are can raise which can social injustice we. We're talking pandemics. Whatever it is. We're talking about that. I want to be able to bring light into whatever area of darkness that may exist that will cause people then or atheists agnostic. People that are that are cynical can be able to hear the hope in the subtitles. In so what you know what that was. Kinda good. I liked it. They can hear the hope in the subtitles. Yeah I hear the sermon coming on that one you know is is. I wanted to be a conversation you you know. I don't WanNA preach to people. I just WanNa love people and you gotTa tell us if this is true. I read somewhere that you received your first record contract offer at seven years old. Is that an urban legend. No no well. There was a like a boys choir like a band or something that wanted me to perform the and they were going to take me on the road and my mom said No. You must have been pretty dynamic for that offer to happen. What were you doing? Where are you performing publicly ahead of play uncle performed and clubs and so he will let me come sometimes and I would do songs with him like bad bad. Leroy Brown you know and I know all type. A little things. They would kind of go into so I would perform do music with him. That's amazing and since then. Your career has spanned decades. Your first album Kirk Franklin and family was back in ninety three sold a million copies. It was like an explosion since then you have won many many awards released about a dozen other albums to ask you about your activism. We talked a little bit about a Marbury. You took to instagram with that. Very intimate video. You framed it in a way that said. Hey we're all dealing with this devastating disease covert nineteen and this message is not to discount that but our country needs to grapple with this other disease that we've had for hundreds of years and that's racism. Can you say more of you know the problem is that you can't legislate morality that you can't pass policies that that are going to turn the hearts of people that then prejudice has to do with deeper areas of wiring that we as humans have to address in and that's why? I believe that when it comes to the hearts of men and women that the only thing that can get past the core of prejudices is love and it can be the love that we say to. Each Other. Didn't Valentine's Day is got to be a supernatural love that is bigger than the cosmos. And so. I'm just trying to do my part as a flawed human to try to bring context to it. Can we anticipate more at home? Concerts from you is almost like the first few weeks is everybody was excited about it. You know but I'm quite sure that by the time you got to your fiftieth zoom call. There was laying all right all right. I'm ready to go outside to the to the River in to the lake. But I think that our country or the world right now we are at the most vulnerable moment that we've ever been because I think that people can whole his and combine for minute and then after that there's echo of anger and rage and I don't know if the COMBI now come stat and so I'm praying and hoping that whatever my voice needs to be. You know the guy will give me the wisdom on how to do that to be able to speak to the second stage of this lock down because we are stronger together Kirk Franklin. Thank you so much for joining us. This was a pleasure. Great honor great honor. Thank you for having me one try. I've come kill know okay. Beaches in New Jersey will open on Memorial Day according to state officials with some limits on the number of sunbathers and social distancing in place. This move is expected to boost. The state's tourist economy main also relies on summer visitors many from states where the virus is still rampant which is making business owners worried that summer may be over before it even started. Main public. Radio's Fred bevere reports in old orchard. Beach it's spruce up time for the fresh shacks and Pizza Parlors. The rollercoaster the tilted world and the towns many low rise hotels at the waves. Oceanfront resort workers like Raksmei me Ye and owner can lafayette also have something else to worry about the corona virus forgiven some of the polls closed not open at all. Because the ball of the safest thing I mean look at all those chemicals. There is no way any about the social distancing on the pool deck was in all that you can't sit on the deck and always win in and out. It's one of many new Kovic. Nineteen Eric concepts that means tourism leaders have to contend with in March. Lafayette bought a new property based on its long history of repeat customers from Canada but now president trump's sealed the border indefinitely. Lafayette says he's lost bookings worth at least a half million dollars so I almost feel like a failure. My brother will tell me. It's not my fault. My wife tells me it's not my fault but all the all the optics engages that I use it's just demoralizing and not just for him but also the eighty plus seasonal workers. He planned for his job. Prospects are now uncertain. Tourists spend more than six billion dollars a year here supporting about one in seven jobs. We're looking at the right down. The gun barrel like a lot of people are susie. Hawk Myers Northern Outdoors River. Adventure resort should be ramping up for the season now but the rafts are still in storage. And she's trying to figure out how to maintain social distancing through Oliver Operations abode is sixteen feet long. And it has four different thwarts. So if you kept people in the same household in the first few thwarts you probably get almost about a six foot distance between the Guide and the people up Front As possible we have to put a mask on the guide if th- even get the chance. Commercial Lodging in Maine is mostly shutdown. That changes next month but visitors from out of state will have to quarantine in place for two weeks before doing anything else. The hospitality industry says that's just causing problems and leaders are begging state governments modify lift that restriction and there is hope that more prevalent corona virus. Testing can help much. Depends on the pandemics progress in hard hit Massachusetts which is the single because contributor to means Torres population meantime tourist towns like old orchard are testing ways to meet the needs of the day closing streets. Restaurants can stretch out a bit coordinating beach openings creating new cleaning regimes for all important public restrooms that while this great respect and Rocco ferriol whereas a mask because he's shapes pizza rounds in his store. He's worried about making the rents but he had some hope. I think that if everybody's writing mass the gloves these undock everybody everywhere and every south another restaurant owner says it's time to think outside of the box anymore. It's time for a whole new box for NPR news. I'm fred beverage in old orchard. Beach Norway's prime minister said today the travel restrictions to that country will stay in place until late August even though a number of other European countries are easing similar restrictions. An e you officials said this week that there will be a summer tourist season joining us now on skype from Berlin is the BBC's Damien McGuinness Damian. How easy is it to travel in Europe right now? How much are trains and planes operating? It really very much. Depends Jeremy where you're going to and where you're coming from. So since the corona virus polemic has hit Europe what most European countries have done. Have they put up board restrictions? That's changed trouble overnight. In in Europe on the most people that has meant you could not go to different European countries. Unless you had a very specific reason. That isn't a process right now. Changing so in a period of flux. So what's happening right now? In many European countries people and various governments is starting to those restrictions so for example Germany has now announced that there will be no border controls anymore to Luxembourg there will also be fewer border controls simply spot checks raw. The natural border controls between France and Germany the bolts states for example. Latvia Lithuania Estonia. They've now just announced they're going to have their own mini. Free Travel Legion. Where the board in each country going to be completely free so reed British and where you're from to where you're going from. I think what we're going to see now is more and more of these fictions being lifted depending on the development ours so you have these little travel bubbles. What about Americans will? They be welcomed in Europe this summer. I think certainly American tourists would be welcomes. The difficulty is each country is going to have its own particular rules because each countries that are slightly different phase of the pandemic so for example. The situation in Germany is looking relatively positive Gemini has just now scrapped rules calling for a European citizens you come into Germany to go into two week. Quarantine paid when they arrive. In Germany for trump is coming from outside of Europe that could also be scrapped at some point in the future so contrite Germany Australia where the virus infection rates are relatively low and so far the pandemic seems to be relatively under control. Trump might find it easy to go to those sorts of countries other countries like Spain. Even Spanish people called travel within Spain for example so Spain would probably not very welcoming to tourists. Even if American tourists can get into Spain. They wouldn't be able to travel within the country and they might find as well that hotels on even open. There's lots of factors going on which I think American travelers will have to take into account you know as you talk about all these countries in Europe. There's one country that the whole world is kind of watching which is Sweden which has done things very differently. And they've had a lot less restriction in terms of movement and terms of businesses. Being allowed to open. What are the thoughts on Sweden within Europe right now yet? It's it's difficult to say really. Because Sweden is also in a period of flux at the beginning of the crisis Sweden very much relied on people voluntarily engaging in restrictive Matt measures and safety measures that changed over the past month or two so they've become more restrictive but still they have a more liberal approach. You could put says than some other European countries. It really depends which figures you look at because according to some figures the death rate per capita is actually relatively high and certainly much higher than other. Scandinavian and Nordic countries on that neighbors so some people would say the Swedish purchased not working Sweden. Docu I've actually is a long-term approach said Swedish government says that if you lock down too harshly you can't keep those measures in place long term and then as soon as you lease the measures then the virus spots up again but I think the jury is still out as to which approaches crack because every country is doing. The best in every country has slightly different development and no one really has the crackdown so far just yet that the BBC's Damien McGuinness speaking with us from Berlin Damian. Thank you thank you Jeremy. What was the pleasure or one of the many things getting more use because of widespread? Stay at home. Orders are home. Wastewater systems septic tanks in fact the number of homes with onsite sewage treatment in this country has been rising. Raising concerns from some environmentalists joining us. Now for more. Is Sarah Hager? She's an engineer researcher and instructor in the Onsite Sewage Treatment Program in the Water Resources Center at the University of Minnesota Welcome. Thanks for having me well. First of all how many people in the country have septic tanks and is that number going up across the US. It does really vary from state to state but If you look at across the US that number is about twenty five percent and that number according to the home builder's is actually increasing. We don't have fabulous data about this because last time this question was really address. Nationwide was in the nineteen ninety census. They are planning to currently at that question back. So we will in the future probably have better. Data homebuilders have been collecting data and they have been reporting that that number has been increasing. It is that just basically because more people are moving out further away from cities into rural areas and even deeper into suburbs and they just don't have the infrastructure there to have a town sewage system yet generally that is the reason that extending sewers also. Rural areas is very expensive. And if you think about where. A lot of people live around metropolitan areas. It's in you know that. Give her take our range of downtown city and you really can't. In many instances affordably extend a wastewater treatment plant that far. I'm also we've really developed a lot of the easy land that was easy to play with a wastewater treatment plant connection so a lot of the areas that we are now. Developing are far beyond that extent very often. It's a less costly option. Chew treat your wastewater closer to where you're collecting it so again. People basically have little wastewater treatment plants in their backyards. That typical treatment we're going to see from noses is again. That's something now that the property owner is responsible to both pay for and manage and there are some pretty big environmental concerns about the rise of septic taste. Tell us about those. What are the disadvantages? When it comes to the environment I would say the largest disadvantages is that many of the septic systems that were put in the past. Sometimes people call. These legacy systems aren't up to today's standards so the most common impact we see across the US is to our surface waters so in areas that have freshwater like in the Midwest where I live the risks. There is phosphorus reaching our lakes rivers and streams if you live more in a coastal area that concern is nitrogen and cause improper treatment of nitrogen can cause toxic. Algal blooms but varying municipalities and states have kind of different tracking of those systems and management requirements. And so that's still a nine. Universal application is like how our systems actually being managed across the US now you mentioned the Algal Blooms and in fact the big ones that we saw in Lake Erie and in the Gulf of Mexico in recent years septic tanks were actually one of the contributors to that. They're not the only cause of that. But what about the issue of sea level rise especially with septic tanks that are close to the coast? What are the concerns when it comes water levels rising and then there's this thing underground That that may be a problem. Yes a septic systems to work effectively do need a separation from the bottom of the septic system and keep in mind that a septic system is at a minimum a tank fouled by some sort of drain field system that drain field is a soil component. That helps treat the wastewater so we designed those soil components to be above the water table and keep in mind. There's kind of two water tables in many parts of the US sometimes. There's like a a very shallow groundwater and then there's the deep brown or where we're pulling like our drinking water from but we are designing our systems to be about even that shallow groundwater so if sea level rises impacts where groundwater is that could negatively impact septic systems are there parts of this country that have no wastewater treatment at all. No sewer and no septic systems there are pockets. I wouldn't say there's any state or any given area but there are areas that are underserved when it comes to wastewater treatment so there's been an area identified in the southern part of the US even in the state. I live that has pretty progressive environmental regulations. We still have communities and even individual homeowners. They don't have appropriate wastewater treatment. It's a very large public health issue. It's not just an environmental one. Its sewage spreads sickness improperly treated sewage. So that is. That's definitely a priority. That's gotten some more recent attention that is Sarah Hager. Who is a researcher at the University of Minnesota there in the onsite sewage treatment program the Water Resources Center? Sarah thank you so much for joining us. Thanks for having me house. Lawmakers are voting today on a three trillion dollar relief. Bill from the Democrats it would send a trillion dollars to state and local governments and another twelve hundred dollar check to individuals already. Senate majority leader. Mitch McConnell has said Republicans will not consider the bill unless it includes liability protection for businesses for more. Let's bring in Neil Bradley. He's chief policy officer for the US Chamber of Commerce. Neil thanks for joining us. We'll thanks for having me. Yes well of course. We are in unprecedented times. And this is such a complex issue. But they're valid points on both sides on one hand you have businesses saying. There's no way I'm going to reopen. If every single employee who comes down with covert nineteen is able to sue me but on the other hand you have people calling for the opening of businesses for the sake of the economy What are you hearing on the business side? Well you know what we're hearing is not just from businesses it's from universities and nonprofits and you know really employers kind of across the spectrum is that I they wanna do the right thing and reopened safely. But in the course of reopening what businesses and nonprofits and universities WANNA make sure of. Is that if we follow the appropriate public health guidance issued by the best minds at the. Cdc In Ota our in our state. Then we don't WanNa be second guessed a year from now when someone brings a lawsuit suggesting that we should have known that we should have done even more. We've been hearing stories of hairdressers in Georgia. Trying to essentially deal with this on their own. Making customer sign waivers on. It's not really clear how enforceable those are but what are you seeing in terms of litigation you know Senate Majority Leader Mitch. Mcconnell has warned. This is coming major litigation or is this idea. Theoretical right now what's not theoretical. We're already beginning to track hundreds of cases of litigation that have been filed. We also know that there are some people unfortunately who are looking to profit off of these kind of lawsuits so amazingly in some parts of the country now. There are advertisements on television Soliciting individuals to become a plaintiff's and litigation is really disappointed when we should be focusing on fighting the pandemic. Getting people back to work in a safe manner that people want to go out and spend money to try to figure out how to recruit Plana so that they can do businesses and nonprofits so of course we know that businesses want to do the right thing But there are some industries we know that have records of workplace abuse even before their worker started getting sick and dying in this current crisis. How do you make sure a few bad actors like these? Don't take advantage of any sort of new system that we're talking about what we have to be careful about how we write that system to avoid that very outcome and so what at the US chamber what we're recommending what we think is likely to be considered on. Capitol Hill is a very narrow targeted temporary safe harbor so it's not immunity. It's not some of the things that you may have heard what what we believe is appropriate. Here is a safe harbor that says if you follow the guidance issued by public health officials then you have a safe harbor being sued if however you don't do that if you are grossly negligent if you engage in willful misconduct. Then there's no safe harbor for you and you can be sued as you appropriately should be sued for being a bad actor. Well one federal agency that that really has the potential to make a big difference in all of this. Here's the Occupational Safety and Health Administration House Democrat road. Khanna California actually said he'd be open to giving a liability shield to companies if Osha requires them to develop strong worksite specific plans on how they're going to protect their workers but so far Osha hasn't done that. They've more so issue. These broad guidelines with that be an acceptable tradeoff In thinking about the commerce and in all of this will the devil of course would be in the details when ocean normally when people usually refer to strong regulations from Osha. It is literally the two hundred page rule book for example that applies to a medical facility for example that is developed over years and implemented over time. And it's only applicable to certain kinds of facilities here. We're talking about trying to adopt public health and safety measures across nearly eight million businesses establishments plus nonprofits plus schools across the entire country. And so I think it would be difficult to have a strict regulatory approach We at the. Us Chamber will be supportive of of better guidance. We think we we will learn more every day about this virus and how we can help stop it and so the guidance ought to evolve and not to be improved we learn more but that's a far different cry than kind of a strict regulatory approach. Which frankly wouldn't be practical in terms of protecting public health. That's Neil Bradley. He is Chief Policy Officer for the Chamber of Commerce. Neil thank you so much thanks for having me and here now is a production of NPR IN WB you are in association with the BBC World. Service I'm Tanya Moseley. I'm Jeremy Hobson. This is your now.

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WHO Warns Coronavirus 'May Never Go Away;' How Much Salt Is Too Much?

Here & Now

41:17 min | 11 months ago

WHO Warns Coronavirus 'May Never Go Away;' How Much Salt Is Too Much?

"From NPR and WBZ. Im Tanya Moseley. I'm Jeremy Hobson is here and now. Wisconsin no longer has any statewide corona virus restrictions in place after a closely divided. Wisconsin Supreme Court struck down the governor. Stay at home order yesterday with the Republican controlled legislature against Democratic governor. Tony Ears Everts told. Msnbc that it's now quote the wild west in his state at this point in time there is no no no orders. There's nothing that's compelling people do anything other than having chaos here. We'll have more on Wisconsin in a moment. But first and Michigan people with weapons gathered outside of the state capital in the reign to protest the state. Stay at home orders and for more. We're joined by M L ELRICK INVESTIGATIVE REPORTER WITH THE DETROIT FREE PRESS and l. The state legislature actually cancelled Thursday's session because of the protests. They ended early and said they won't meet again until next week. This actually feels like a big deal. Well there was a quite a bit of controversy. The last time this protest group came to lansing where armed men and perhaps some armed women win inside the State House and we're just outside the legislative chambers shouting at lawmakers and In Michigan we are an open carry state so people felt intimidated. Lawmakers some said they get bulletproof vests on and the last time there was a or I should say a recent session will lawmakers came to work with her own armed escort since then the Capitol Commission which is sort of a non public body or not elected officials that oversee the grounds of the capital said. They were going to reconsider whether or not weapons could be brought into the State House leaving some Republican. Lawmakers are very pro second amendment have been making some sounds like this is a policy. We might want to reconsider. I say yeah What did these protesters tell you? They're very upset that the governor has basically continued to keep small businesses and some larger ones closed. Some people were upset that Barbara Awa- so who had defied the order in a Septuagenarian Barber had his license revoked. So they thought that was Tyrannical others think that other states have plans to reopen. The state and that Michigan does not. So they're upset about that. In fact Michigan does have a plan. It's a six stage plan but that doesn't satisfy folks who are protesting and a lot of people just came out. I think because they wanted to see like minded people because they wanted to get something off their chest. We saw antiabortion. Protesters we saw anti vaccine is out there and there were of course a lot of supporters of president trump and some people who just think anything the government does is rigged and they're willing to stand out in the rain to tell us about it m L. Can you take a step back for us to look at Michigan? We know that the state has this. Six phase plan for reopening a lot of that of course is contingent on being able to assess the spread of this disease about fifty thousand confirmed cases and Michigan. Tell us what's happening in Detroit. In the state of testing their the city has been at the forefront of testing the state still says they need more test kits but in the in the city of Detroit where the mayor has been pretty resourceful and getting test kits and using these these Abbott quick testing machines more than ten thousand cases of covert nineteen have been identified. And we've had over twelve hundred deaths. The city has tested somewhere between twenty five and thirty thousand people but the The mayor says he believes that one in twelve detroiters have the virus whether they know it or not and by far the greatest category. That's been decimated by this in Detroit. Population is nursing home residents where the infection rate was somewhere around twenty five percent. You mentioned those testing efforts so Detroit had of this massive dry through testing effort at the fairgrounds. The Abbott Test. It's a fifteen minute test. We're just learning that the FDA is now investigating the of those tests. It's a real concern that they might be falsely reassuring people that they don't have the virus has the city spoken or responded at all to the FDA's investigation on the accuracy of these tests. So we still need to ask the mayor about the FDA weighing in on this but previous reports that have questioned the accuracy of the the Abbott tests. He is said that he has full confidence in them. Detroit was the first city to get some of these machines and start doing testing. They have been a key part to returning. The city workforce because of some of the concerns about the accuracy. The city performed its own not exactly a double blind test but they basically took fifty people and tested them with the Abbot machine. And then with a swab sent to the state laboratories and they say that in almost every case the results are identical so whatever other people are finding about these. The Mayor of Detroit has staked the safety of city workers a lot of other people on their accuracy and he seems to be entirely confident in their results. And what he has said is the problem. These other cases that the test samples were not treated as they're supposed to be they were not preserved or tested quickly enough and in Detroit. They say we're following the rules and that we're getting accurate results that's m. l. elrick investigative reporter with the Detroit Free Press and host of soul of Detroit. Podcast thank you so much. It's been a pleasure. Well not a Wisconsin. Where photos of bars reopening have been making the rounds on social media let's bring Femi- okay hosted the stream on Al Jazeera English for our social media. Roundup High Femi- well for those who haven't seen some of the images of the bars open Wisconsin. They could be quite shocking. During the pandemic they appear to show dozens of people crammed shoulder to shoulder with no face. Masks. What are you seeing? A one of the most infamous post came from Knicks bar and at the moment almost ten thousand likes knicks by you see picture of customers very cozy sitting together. You cannot see a mask and the tweet from Nick. Sponsors Forty five minutes after the bars opener. Wisconsin people went crazy when they saw that. For instance in Minivan Hell those who unfairly suffer people who continue to stay at home and end up getting exposed at the grocery store and trying to get some daily food or because they happen to walk down. An our by drunk debra just had to run to the bar mmediately when opened so I looked governor. Iverson twitter feed to see what he was saying. Even though the stay home executive order has been overturned. And he's still advising people he state stay at home stay safe. Sumi Jo tweeted on Thursday. Nope I had a wonderful sit down breakfast and local restaurant this morning. I will continue to act as free as my constitutional rights provide me. So that's just a little viewpoint of what? Socialists is picking up from Wisconsin and the Baas being able to open and serve customers again another Hashtag. That is getting a lot of attention. This week is Hashtag Obama Gate. A president trump has tweeted about it but has not said what it is exactly. It was actually trending last weekend. What is behind it? It was such a huge trend last week and I thought it was an event that was happening. I shot a Bama Gay. Run about two million tweets. And I'm thinking what am I missing out on? What's going on here? So what? Obama Gate is is basically rebranded from spy gate. So it's the idea that the FBI were allegedly spying on the trump trump campaign. That was back in two thousand sixteen and that that when trump won they ch- made to discredit trump by connecting his win to Russian interference. So that is not show up Ama- gate and it's being rebranded. Formerly known as spy gate at twitter itself has been accused of trying to downplay interest in Obama Gate. What else are people saying about it on social media? Let me give you a little snippet from Ben. Look Ben tweeted to is trying to push down a Bama Gate to number seven trending and I seen one point. Nineteen billion tweets. He's absolutely right. The number of tweets for Obama Gate were really high so I looked into how twitter determines hell trends are made and how they number them and they use an algorithm and its tailored to who you follow your interest topics. Maybe what else is trending on your feet? So it's the algorithm rather than maybe Jack Dorsey the CEO of twitter that may will impact. How your Hashtag following or you're with goes in terms of twitter trending so may be inaugural from that bias. And that's a whole different conversation. But it wasn't Jack Dorsey trying to stop Obama Gate them trending at number one okay. Well on a lighter note Femi- many people on social have been taking up in one of the cutest ones you've seen is the fruit snack challenge where parents put a snack in front of their little. Kids ask them to wait and Phil what happens next. Let's listen to one that you shared a toddler patiently waiting to eat a bowl of fruit snacks. You can't eat it now. One second. I'll be right back okay. Okay oh I love this. One from Shifra Mussa moths. And I'm going to have our postal of these. Connect them with here Nelson. You can watch them later on twitter. So the LAD found. The secret camera was filming him to see if he could resist tasty snacks and he completely forgot about the snacks and dance routine in front of the secret camera. Instead and then to really see the agony one little miss was posted on a who culture twitter feed and she can see the fruit loop. She touches them. She twirls the plate. How FACES IN AGONY? And She just about makes it. This is very craw is very funny and I get the feeling that this is what happens when parents left at home at kids under lockdown but it really is sweet and wholesome challenge look out for it Hashtag. Fruit SNACK CHALLENGE OUR OUR post of my favorites online for the okay host to the stream on Al Jazeera English. Thank you have a great weekend? Thank you jabbing tycoon. The Corona via may never go away. That's from Dr Mike Ryan Director of the World Health Organization's Emergencies Program. Dr Ryan says the world has to manage and come to terms with the virus like it has with HIV. But there is no guarantee it will ever be completely eradicated for more. We're joined by Lawrence Boston professor of law at Georgetown University and Director of the Institute for National and Global Health Law and professor. Explain what Dr Ryan was talking about. Why wouldn't a successful vaccine mean the end of covert nineteen? Well you know. The truth is is that we've actually only eradicated one disease in all of human history. Which is smallpox one major disease? We've eliminated which is a different term. It's regional term where you reduce the number. We've eliminated certain diseases like childhood. Diseases like measles chicken pox mumps which were common at one time. But they're less common NABET. You still have outbreaks. We going to probably have to live with this virus for the long term even if we do get a vaccine what about the notion of herd immunity that wants a certain percentage of the population has been exposed to this disease and presumably developed. Antibodies against it. You've effectively stopped the virus from being able to spread. Is there a way to safely get to that point? We'll probably hit period where we can do that but think about this. There are always going to be new people. Being born and coming in without immunity immunity is likely not to be forever It'll probably be waning as it is with other corona viruses and so over time you'll lose your immunity and importantly the vaccine probably is not going to be one hundred percent effective remember. You know the current influenza vaccine even when we have a good match is only about forty fifty percent effective. You know all of us really have never experienced anything like this in our lifetime so I think although we understand the history of other diseases. It's hard to wrap our heads around this idea. The only thing we can get close to is like you said influenza and understanding how we respond to the flu every year so does controlling this diseases spread in the future. Then start to look like responding to the flu. Can you talk a little bit more about that? Can you know you so right? Tanya that corona virus may or may not be seasonal like the flu. The good news is that corona viruses don't seem to be as genetically adaptable as flu viruses. Flu Viruses are they're constantly swapping genes adapting and so every year the vaccine kind of has to make an educated guess about what the circulating strain is going to be. We may be in a better position with corona virus if we had you know thinking about the most hopeful scenario. I'm so we may be seeing something anywhere from measles through to influenza through to even something worse never conquered HIV aids. And of course we don't have a vaccine for that at all. We're learning about two people who took a serology tests in Washington state and it showed Their blood positive for antibodies to covert nineteen. Maybe as early as late December which really throws off the original timeline of when a health officials I at the virus might have been here and the United States. What does that tell us? And why why does this information madder matters a lot and and frankly it doesn't surprise me at all. I suspect that although it wasn't until December thirtieth China reported the first case of Corona virus to the World Health Organization. Many of us think that it had been circulating for a month. Maybe two months or even more and so it doesn't surprise me but what it means is that we most likely have been having reasonably widespread silent community transmission in the United States so far longer than we imagined which is why it's so very difficult to to get a handle on this epidemic now in the United States and why we become the epicenter so I really. This brings up though when you talk about behaviors and how we respond to it. We were talking this week. About quarantine fatigue. I think we're at a point where many people are getting frustrated with the state of things and also Lockdowns opening up cities. When we're going to do these things what would you say to people who hear something like this and say well if we have to live with this virus forever? Why should I even bother with social distancing? Now you know because it's really our only hope Until we get a vaccine we are going to be in a better position when we get a vaccine in. We get an effective treatment. You know think of it like this. You're in a battle and the enemy is really strong. And you don't have any weapons. And that's where we are now. So the only thing we have is classic public health measures social distancing personal hygiene testing screening contact tracing isolation and quarantine. Those things they can work you know. They've worked for so many diseases in the past and we know that work with corona virus. Because we've seen it happen in places like Israel South Korea and other countries and Germany even Close to home so we can do this. You know the public just needs to stick it out but I'm really worried. I'm writing Major Medical Journal article now about you know the so-called we've talked about this dark fall and winter because we're GonNa have circulating influenza virus circulating a corona virus with probably a major second and third wave and so we do absolutely have to be vigilant. Whatever the politicians are telling you the public health and scientific community pretty consistent in pretty clear which is that. We have to stay the course. That's Lawrence Boston professor of law at Georgetown University and Director of the O'Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law. Thank you so much. It's a pleasure. Thanks for having me telling you now by now. Many of you have already received that federal relief payment either directly in your bank accounts or as a check in the mail most eligible individuals should get twelve hundred dollars the internal revenue service but hundreds of thousands of households across the country. Could miss out on this money. Not because they earn too much but because of the way they filed their taxes from member station W. B. You are Shannon Dueling Explains Henry always dreamt of becoming a US citizen to officially belong to what he calls the land of the free and not long ago he did. I was happy to become a naturalized US citizen on February twelfth but then I will surprise the first impression I get of the government is that I'm being discriminated against discriminated against. He says for being one of the millions of immigrants living in what's known as a mixed immigration status households. Henry is originally from Kenya. He lives in Taunton Massachusetts with his three children who are also. Us citizens. His wife still lives in Kenya. We agreed to use only. Henry's first name because he worries speaking with us could jeopardize his wife's green card application in fact it's that Green Card application which led Henry and his wife to file taxes jointly he with a social security number and his wife with an individual tax identification number. Or I T I n when we filed together. It strengthens our case in the immigration process. Because it shows that we are has been legally married in that we do financial things including paying taxes together but when it comes to getting stimulus check Henry. His wife and hundreds of thousands of other families in similar positions could find their penalized for these tax rules. If one member of the family has a social security number and the other one has an it. I N and they file jointly. If an unfortunate situation they won't benefit even Milona heads up the Massachusetts immigrant and refugee advocacy coalition. She estimates hundreds of thousands of households in the US file taxes with an individual tax. Id most frequently used by undocumented. Workers had Henry filed taxes individually using only his social security number. He'd be looking at close to three thousand dollars in stimulus funds for himself and his three children but because he and his wife filed jointly under the current legislation. He's not eligible for any of that and it's really really in this very difficult time making it impossible for them to survive. There are thousands of families in Massachusetts who are in desperate need Massachusetts and California have established emergency funds for people who aren't eligible for unemployment benefits and who in cases like Henry's miss out on the federal stimulus funds as well. Meanwhile a class action suit filed on behalf of US citizen children of undocumented immigrants challenges the cares act claiming denying stimulus payments to millions of young people amounts to treating them like second class citizens. We reached out to the Republican Senator. From Kentucky Mitch. Mcconnell who was instrumental in drafting the stimulus legislation that includes these tax stipulations. His office never responded. The IRS confirms a tax payer and everyone listed on their return must have a social security number in order to be eligible for stimulus payments. So even my specific Kiss My. Us citizen I phrase my taxes. Are you to not to get any of the stimulus checks? That were issued. I get zero. Henry says he would have used that money to buy food and help pay mortgage. He hopes Congress will amend the next stimulus package so households like his can benefit for here. And now I'm Shannon Dueling. New Retail numbers are out today from the Census Bureau and the situation facing stores. Bars and restaurants is worse than what economists thought. Total retail sales dropped more than sixteen percent in April. That's almost double the drop in March making it the worst two-month drop on record for more. Let's bring in Mike Regan senior editor at Bloomberg News and Mike. Not even at the height of the great recession. Did retail sales drop even five percent. Were now more than three times that. How concerning are these figures today? Well they're obviously concerning as you pointed out they were a little bit worse than what the sort of consensus of communists was but clearly. It's not that surprising given this shutdown to so many parts of the economy. And there's kind of a general sense that this is as bad it will get because even this month parts of the economy are reopening and that should hopefully continue in June. But obviously there's a real concern about even though if we do rebound from these awful numbers this month. How quickly it'll take before we're back to normal with sales actually increasing compared to the year earlier period. And that's a big open question for economists simply can't answer at the moment and when you dive into these numbers and you look. The industry's spending on clothing. Accessories was down almost ninety percent compared to last April for restaurants and bars. Spending was down about forty nine percent. How much of this drop is because brick and mortar locations are closed? And how much is it? Because consumers are pulling back trying to save more so both issues are definitely a play and it's tough to sort of suss out and quantify exactly which one is the bigger issue for numbers like this. I will say that will are economists at Bloomberg did interpret this report as a sign. That consumers did get very thrifty last month. I obviously either. Because they lost their job or their own businesses or struggling or simply because they're worried about the future and that may explain why they were a little bit worse than even economists expected. People are certainly in savings mode now rather than spending mode when we've already heard that some major retailers J. crew and Neiman. Marcus have filed for bankruptcy. Now everybody's waiting on JC Penney which could be the next one to do so. And I guess there's a question of whether these stores might ever be able to reopen important to point out that just declaring bankruptcy doesn't necessarily mean that a retailer like this wound up closing their stores. It's just a legal process that they go through when their debt load is so great that they can't keep up with their interest payments on it so Jc Penney for example will likely try to restructure its debt so the investors who loaned money will take some losses but the chain would hopefully survive the process and the stores remain open. The other option obviously is liquidation where. He basically sell off the company's assets to repay investors something from that process. So what though see how each of these bankruptcy proceedings proceeds to see which happens to what company I will say? There was one alarming stat out from the website open table. They're predicting that one in four restaurants in the country will simply go out of business because of this so pretty scary thought. Yeah and by the way on the bright side there are some places that are doing well. Apparently game stop which sells video game sales explode more than a thousand percent April in Lululemon known for its leggings saw sales go up two hundred percent so people are buying something. Mike Regan senior editor at Bloomberg News. Thank you thank you. Jeremy of US have been cooking a lot more than usual which could give us more control over the amount of salt in our food. Americans have long been consuming on average more sodium than is recommended joining us. Now is Dr Dr Moza Faren. Who's a cardiologist professor of medicine at Tufts and the dean of the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy? Dr Welcome. Thank you so much. Jeremy Let's start with what people should do. What is the right amount of sodium that we should be consuming every day? You know this has been an area that twenty years ago everyone thought was quite settled and then some research started coming out made this a little bit more controversial the last five or ten years and so Congress asked the National Academy of Medicine to review all the evidence and they did over a couple of years and just last year came out with their recommendations which we're very clear that for optimal health too especially reduce risk of heart attacks and stroke. All adults should be eating less than about two thousand three hundred milligrams per day of sodium. But we're probably all eating more than that. Yeah there's actually very few Americans that are at that level of about twenty-three hundred milligrams the average intake in the US is probably more around thirty. Five hundred milligrams and globally. Were kind of right right. About average. There are some countries that are actually around twenty two twenty three hundred milligrams a day on average where they should be Mostly countries in Africa But there are also countries that are much higher than than we are. We're around thirty five hundred. There's countries that are around fifty five hundred especially in Asia and China where there's a huge amounts of soy sauce. Now why is it that we're consuming so much salt in this country? I know that now that we have some of this nutritional information available especially when you go out to eat. You can see that you know a Burrito bowl at chipotle is GONNA go way above. Probably even what you should have an entire day let alone one meal but there are a lot of foods that we consume that you wouldn't even think Have so much salt. But do you know that's really one of the most surprising things? I think to most people. Is that the foods that we think of a salty. Don't actually have a lot of salt. Things like salted nuts. Potato chips. Sure they have some salt but really what salt is used for in the US food supply. It's for preservation so bread there's enormous amounts of salt in most breads for for canned foods and some frozen foods. There's enormous amounts of salt restaurant foods. And also if you actually take food. That's in a package and then you microwave it or heated up weeks after it was cooked it normally would have a very artificial and kind of harsh taste of salt hides that flavor so as just one example You know serving of potato chips might have eighty one hundred milligrams of sodium on average a single slice of bread just one slice kind of three hundred milligrams of sodium bread. Shouldn't last for weeks in the grocery store on yourself without going bad but it does much of that is the high sodium. So what are the health effects of eating too much sodium? Well the the most clearly established as effects on blood pressure sodium gets into our bloodstream in it expands the volume the amount of fluid in your bloodstream. And it makes the kidneys work harder to pump it out and it makes the heart work harder to pump that extra fluid and so it raises blood pressure and that increased blood pressure increases risk of stroke in the brain and heart attacks and long-term over many years. It's pretty clear. From animal experiments and also some human studies that that long-term effect of also causes scarring scarring of of the blood vessels scarring of the heart scarring of the of the kidneys which leads to kidney failure and other other problems like heart failure even above and beyond the effect on the blood pressure. Are there positives of having a lot of salt in your diet? There really aren't any clear. Beneficial effects of having too much sodium. There are very traditional populations indigenous populations living in jungles and other places who have six hundred seven hundred eight hundred milligrams of sodium per day much much less than the United States and they are very healthy and live a long time. Obviously they'd have lots of other ways. Their their lives are different. So we can't say that they're healthy just because of that but there's no noticeable adverse effects of eating very low but what what's incredible is the human tongue has different taste receptors. The taste receptor for salt is very adaptable. And so within a few weeks. If you changed your salt intake and increased or decreased dramatically the tongue receptors. Adjust so the food tastes the same again. And so you know what I what I say is in these countries where people are on average consuming two thousand three hundred two thousand four hundred milligrams much much less than the United States. Kids aren't telling their parents. Hey my food doesn't taste salty enough and in these countries where people are consuming five thousand five thousand five hundred milligrams way more than the United States. Nobody's complaining about salty food. You get used to it very quickly. And so that means if as a population as a whole we slowly reduce salt in this country. Over a few years nobody would notice. All of our times would adapt and we'd be healthier. That is what the individual can do. What about restaurants and the makers of packaged foods? There's something that they ought to be. Doing on a grander scale to bring down the amount of salt. That's used to preserve things. Well it has to be system wide. I if just one set of restaurants or just one set of companies does it by themselves than Americans are used to a certain level of salt in their food. And they'll think those foods don't have flavor and those products will lose sales business and I won't work and so the solution has to be everybody doing it together. Other countries like for example Britain and Turkey have have done. This government has gone and partnered with industry and together come up with voluntary sodium targets. Where everybody together? We're going to get to this goal by ten years and levels the playing field in the United States in two thousand sixteen the US Food and Drug Administration propose. This came out with two year. Tenure voluntary sodium targets and much of the industry actually embraced this and said Yeah. We're we're happy with this. Let's do this together. But some parts of the industry didn't and they pressured Congress and Congress block the FDA from partnering with Industry for even these voluntary targets for listeners. You should be telling your elected officials in the federal government that it's time for the FDA to re initiate this discussion and wooded have do you think the same kind of impact on public health that reducing the amount of sugar that were taking in would have well sugar and salt. The two major harmful additives. And of course reducing. Those alone won't give a purely healthy diet. We also need to increase the good. You know we need to have more fruits and vegetables and nuts and fish and beans and other healthy foods from our research from research of others. There's actually more harm from from too much salt than from too much sugar. So if you wanted to get bang for your Buck S- salt is an excellent place to start. And as I mentioned reducing salts can be done without really changing tastes. It's really more about changing. How we preserve and packaged foods long-term And New York actually has created a national sugar and salt reduction initiative and they're trying to work with state governments and other big cities and and some companies to try to get there. But this really has to be done you know with the help of the federal government. Dr Moza Faren D. Think that well so much of the country Is working from home staying at home? This might actually be a good opportunity for people to try out a diet that they can control a little bit more with less salt. Well there's so much going on with Kovic nineteen and I think that nutrition is as important as ever. I mean we've known in medicine for years that if you know you're generally malnourished you're less able to resist infection and so people need to keep up their their nutrition as well as their sleep and exercise and that's that's hard but also with schools closing and if people losing their jobs especially hourly workers you know people don't have enough money to buy food so food is a huge priority. I think for those that are able to do it. Restaurants being closed. This is a great time to to learn how to how to cook and get reacquainted with cooking. That's the simplest way to lower salt About eighty percent of salt in the. Us Food supplies from packaged and processed foods. And so if you just cook at home you're going to cut out a lot of salt but we also need to remember that you know. There's many millions of Americans who kids and families that are not going to have enough food during this crisis and so they're salts is not the concern is just getting them enough. Food so food is just so central to health. We can't forget it while we're focusing on this incredible crisis of Corona virus. That is doctor. Dr Uche Motza Zafar Ian who is a cardiologist and professor of medicine at Tufts University and the dean of the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and policy. Dr Moza Foreign. Thank you so much for joining us. You're very welcome. And by the way I mentioned that you put lay Burrito Bowl it can be twenty six hundred milligrams of sodium compared to the daily recommended. Twenty-three hundred but it's not just to Poli a Turkey Bacon. Guacamole Sandwich at subway is twenty two hundred. Milligrams the network showtime debuts today the Documentary Basketball County in the water. It's the latest in a run of sports documentaries to keep fans occupied since most live. Sports competitions are on hold. Npr TV critic. Eric Duggan's joins us to discuss upcoming sports documentaries. And the era without sports. Hey Eric Okay so I joked that for the last few weeks my husband has had. Espn on all the time. Just in case a miracle happens sports POPs up on up on the streets hockey game. Breaks out somewhere. I quit but these documentaries have certainly helped. So let's talk a little bit about this newest one basketball county. It's about Prince George's County Maryland. Just outside of DC. Let's listen deadly fighting to hold your spot being able to stand quote a bunch of grown men and everybody will say live so that was NBA player Jeff Green who who grew up in pg county an NBA star. Kevin Durant is also from there. He's the executive producer on. This film. Does this doc. Make a compelling case for Prince George's county. I never knew this as a basketball Mecca. I know something like thirty. Nba players have come from this county and numerous wnba players. And what the sense that you get from watching. This documentary is there has to be a system that kind of arises to help. Groom these athletes that they can excel. This documentary shows that the first black man to teach physical education in the nation helped establish a basketball program. In Prince George's county really. Yeah and so. He landed on this idea of encouraging young black males to learn basketball and to use the sport as a way to find discipline in their lives and also using sport as a way to have new opportunities in society and one of the things they talk about. Is that If you're a young person from that area and you sort of get involved with playing basketball in the courts in that county you very quickly find yourself having to compete against people who are much older and more experienced than you and it forces you to get good really quickly. It's an interesting doc. I think you kind of have to be interested in basketball to really watch it but it does sort of explain how a local community can sort of without really trying like develop this whole system that produces these amazing players and encourages them and gives them opportunities to become professionals in the sport. Yeah interesting it sounds like something. I might want to watch for sure well. Espn aired the DOCU series. The last dance about Michael Jordan and the Chicago Bulls but ESPN has more documentaries in this style coming up what's next so espn realized that the last dance was such a ratings hit and that its audience was sort of start for stories about sports so they decided to take three documentaries that they developed for their thirty thirty documentary series and air them after the last dance in the same Sunday. Timeslot and the first one is lance and it's a documentary about biking Champ Lance Armstrong. Who of course people will remember was accused of doping sort of resisted for years that people were unfairly accusing him of using performance enhancing substances and eventually had to admit that he was doing that? So we have a quote where he's talking to the person who's interviewing him for this documentary and trying to to talk about how he's going to talk about his life. Let's just listen to this clip. I'm not GonNa let him ring and I'm not saying that they will but I'm GonNa tell you might truth in and my truth is he's not my version. My truth is the way I remember it. Yeah and so part of what's interesting to me about. This documentary is that Lance Armstrong seems to either not want to understand or not. Want to publicly acknowledge. Once you admit are lie that big you know. How can you possibly expect the public to trust you about anything? And I think the only way he's going to get to the point where people aren't sort of cursing out in public because he talks about that in the dot the only way he's going to get to that point is if he figures out some way sort of publicly show people that he recognizes. Those lies hurt hurt. A lot of people. Yeah well. I mean these documentaries of of course. Don't make up for our loss of sports at this moment in time but they do seem to provide like this bit of narrative back story kind of thirty for thirty exactly as they are. That's what they are for people to kind of keep them a little bit entertained at least folks like me. What do you think? Yeah I mean you know in talking about thirty for thirty one other thing. I wanted to mention that. They have often been criticized for the lack of documentaries that they do about female athletes. And I do think it's important that if the sports media world is going to turn towards documentary until you know professional sports start to ramp up again. They're going to have to make an effort to be more equitable in the sports. That they're portraying they're going to have to make an effort to take a look at female competitor. Absolutely that's the one thing that kind of bugs me about where we are right now on. This is that we're seeing a bunch of these documentaries calm in too many of them seem centered on males that's NPR TV critic. Eric Duggan's Eric is always thank you so much. Thanks for having me and here now is a production of NPR IN WB you are in association with the BBC World Service. I'm Tanya Moseley. I'm Jeremy Hobson. This is here now.

United States Detroit Wisconsin Tanya Moseley Henry Michigan basketball Congress FDA DETROIT FREE PRESS Espn twitter Director Jeremy Hobson Abbott Test NPR president Dr Ryan
Lessons About Racism from 'Cops' and 'Gone With The Wind'

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

34:44 min | 10 months ago

Lessons About Racism from 'Cops' and 'Gone With The Wind'

"Hello Hello how are you? Say what's up. You know I'm just like it feels like. We're living in three movies at once. That's a good way to put it. A Satire Anna Horror Movie Spike, Lee Joint. GonNa I was Gonna say it feels like a Mike judge movie. It feels like a spike Lee movie and it feels like a Michael. Bay movie like. Hey y'all. Daddy. You're listening to its benefit from NPR right. Hey. Al Sam Sanders here this week on the show I wanNA talk about what happens after that first wave of protests, particularly what Corporate America is doing? We're going to walk through some of the most absurd corporate statements given in response to this current moment, but first I want to dig into what the heck is going on in Hollywood just this week. Gone With the wind was taken offline cops was canceled. All in response to the black lives matter movement to make sense of that and a whole lot more. Let's bring in my distinguished panelists. This is really a Dream Team. Tonya Moseley host of NPR's here now Eric Dagens NPR TV critic. So have you both here. Welcome happy to be here and always happy to talk with you and Eric. Glad to be here and I'm I'm here as a reformed cops man. No me to. Those that into the right up front full disclosure I I WANNA. Ask y'all how long this week has felt. How long this year has felt. We were talking just before we began taping about how it feels like at least for me that I'm living in three movies at once. What about Y'all? How are we doing right now? I mean well the days. Days just I don't know what day is what I'm like crawling through. Friday, but then does even matter. Time has no meaning for me right now. Oh, yeah, it's a mess well, hopefully our discussion on this show today we'll give our listeners at least a little bit of comfort and understanding, if not a few laughs. That's the goal. That's the goal. So with that. Let's get started. We gotTA. Talk about cops. Took you never know what's going to happen. When the nation's attention is focused so clearly on one thing as it has been these last two weeks with black lives, matter and these protests against police brutality. I did not expect all that focus to. Have ended up with COPS, a reality show all about real cops on their beats that has been on the air since nineteen, eighty-nine, being canceled. How surprising was the you? Well first of all. Can I say something that might be embarrassing I'm surprised, but cops is still on I. had no idea that it was still a thing. It was such another lifetime when I watched it I. Mean. You! Say Eighty nine. Yeah, the last time I watched. It probably was like ninety five. Maybe really so what's interesting is it was on TV for a long time, but there was another petition to take it off the air back in twenty thirteen from color of change, and so Fox took it off a their air, but then it came back a little while later on Spike, TV. Now paramount network in this week paramount said we are taking the show off the air. Their statement was quote. COPS is not on the paramount network, and we don't have any current or future plans for it to return Eric. Disappears you. It surprised me a little bit. Just because cops is one of those shows where it has, a has a brand name, it has a fan base, and it is cheap to produce now. My sense is that paramount network had a bunch of sort of political internal political reasons for getting rid of it. They were shifting away from unscripted programming and I think they're trying to create like A. A more high brow version of television that appeals to a traditional TV viewers so I think you know the last thing they wanted was to have a show on their air. That is getting on this criticism from civil rights groups anyway given that they're trying to make this turn into higher quality fair, so I think it might have been an easier call for them to cancel that rather than. Live, PD, which is other cops like show that was on. That was their most watched show, and was one of the most watched shows on cable, and that got canceled, too, so This is the thing that I really was intrigued by once I began to read into cops There's been study and reporting on how that show for a long time has disproportionately shown people of Color as perpetrators of serious crime. Glorified controversial and sometimes extreme police practices. There's the two thousand and four paper from the Western Journal of Communication, but they're also a big podcast about this last year, and once you peel back that top layer, a lot of folks say that producers of cops would manipulate the video and the content to make people of color lures, and to make the cops look justified in being really extreme, and how the tweeted people. It's really interesting what you're saying about. About the study, too because I will say when I became a reporter in the late nineties early two thousands. I was a police beat reporter and I. Do want to say hey. Shows like cops probably did alter my thoughts on what police officers did. It wasn't until I started doing the ride alongs and I realized just how boring it was Georgie of the time, so it is interesting about how much their doctor, but then how much it? Changes the perceptions. The public has about police well I mean I been thinking all week about you know police, officer, TV, and movie content that I love, and it seems like the through line is convincing Americans that. If police officers hearts in the right place. They can do what they need to do to get. What needs to get done done I'm thinking about the latest bad boys movie which I love, because I love bad boys and Love Will Smith those are two cops who were black, whose hearts in the right place, but they are breaking every kind of law to get what they want in. The movie is telling me that it's okay, and I'm like. Yes, it is okay and I think. People are asking questions right now. They say Oh, can I tell you what I said after? I left a screening of bad boys before it open. Said I said that was the stupidest movie I've ever seen this year. This is what I. See here's the thing I love will Smith so much. It doesn't matter what he does. I love that man I do. Me I'm, but it's me. I like the performance, but man come on now. ZAC. But you're right. You're very right. Like one of the big problems with a lot of cop shows fictional or quote, unquote reality TV. Is that they? They're centered on this idea that to overcome the problems with policing all you need. Is that righteous cop? But those shows are unwilling to admit that the system itself is so stacked against some defendants the system itself so flawed. Yeah, all I know, is they better, not mess with law and order because people will revolt right right? No, no nobody say nothing bad about one order. At all really. You know you don't want me to don't do it Eric, do it? I get quick, which is that when law and order I started. was very much trying to get at the systemic stuff and you rich people who were guilty of crimes. Get Away with it all the time and I. Think what they realized was that people don't want to see a show that robs them of their confidence in the criminal justice system, as so they began to change it, and and now it's much more show where it's the righteous people trying to make a difference and the good guys usually went well. We're going to move away from that before you besmirch the name of law and order anymore. Now. We gotta talk about Eric, Tanya. What in the heck is going on with gone with the wind this week? Hbo Max announced that is pulling gone with the wind from its air, which I made me. Pause and say Oh, Hbo Max that is a thing I had forgotten. It was just the latest removal of programming in response to these protests, sweeping the nation and the world over police brutality I gotta say. This one made no sense to make any sense to you. Can I. Say something before Eric Takes this because I Take it. I have never seen gone with the wind same. Intentional I've heard too many bad things about it i. don't WanNa see that. Yeah, I mean I know. Kinda but see the thing. Is You already know like some of the lines because it's just part of you know pop culture I think it's really interesting that they said that it may actually come back, but with with a disclaimer, yeah, with the disclaimer about this was a moment in time, but from my understanding, it has always been problematic. It's just really interesting that this is the moment in time we've decided that. Hey, maybe this is not appropriate to have on our air for people to watch exactly Eric I. Want your thoughts on this, but I I want to. To read some of the backstory about this so hbo Max made a statement of Variety magazine, and they said quote John with. The wind is a product of its time, and to pick some of the ethnic and racial prejudices that have unfortunately been commonplace in American society. These depictions were wrong then and a wrong today, and we felt at to keep his title up without an explanation and announcement of those depictions would be irresponsible, so basically they said were taken off temporarily. We're GONNA add something some conversation. Some disclaimer that gives context and then we'll put it back. That's what really puzzles me Eric like. That's going to make this movie okay now. While no, it doesn't. It doesn't puzzle me I. One thing to understand is that this has been a low key controversy in the streaming. Wars a really have yeah, when you have these streaming outlets bringing all of these libraries. Making them available to people. You're going to be making a available some stuff. That's really old and in some places really racist so Disney. Disney Disney plus for example you know. They had a bunch of cartoons that were problematic, and they came up with a sort of boilerplate disclaimer that they put on certain cartoons in certain. Films now what I don't like about that is that Disney didn't explain how they chose. Which shows or films got the disclaimer. The disclaimer wasn't detail, so people didn't had to guess what the material was inside the film that might be problematic or do a google, search or something I. Guess and It didn't proper larger discussion of how do you reevaluate? Films that people may cherish from their childhood, but then now we realize had very troubling you know racial and ethnic language it will also what's important to note is that you can't get rid of this stuff on? It's out there even after HBO. Masks pulled gone with the wind this week right after that it jumped to the top of the Amazon TV and movie charts, and also went back into the top ten on I tunes I. Love America One can put these things back in a box, so my question to both of you is. Watch it! Could. Eliminate, I, mean. Maybe it's not gonNA. Stop people from watching, but maybe it will illuminate the issues in the first place you know now. We're having these conversations about it. People are interested. Obviously, they're probably lots of people who have never seen it. And now that HBO, Max's off. They want to see what the big deal is I think there's some value in that. Last question for both of you on this topic, what I find to be the bigger problem in terms of corporate response to moments like these period. is at the symbolic acts seemed like a way to distract from and avoid the real tangible change that corporations can implement internally like how many of these companies are also talking about what they're doing to hire and retain more people of Color to produce more stories by people of Color to really look inside of themselves and see how their work as an organization is supporting these goals as well well. That's the big criticism and I. Think it's making many companies actually have to take a deeper look at their business practices. I, mean Amazon was under fire after they announced that you know they were behind. Black lives matter now. They'd be given a donation now. The folks who? Who Work there are calling for them to take a look at the board I mean they're all of these concerns and issues and I can imagine if you're a person of color working for some of these organizations, and you see that they've made these statements, and you probably feel okay. I'm working inside of this institution, and I know the realities that maybe it will be a call to action internally. Yeah, you know I. Almost hate to use this cliche, but yeah, we can walk and Chew Gum at the same time you know we can. We can hold these companies accountable and also hold them accountable for the media that they're presenting for us to consume yeah. Well, I tell you what leave. Bad boys alone y'all just bad. Bad Bad boys to let me have Martin Lawrence and will Smith please boys anyway time for a break coming up. We're going to stick on this theme of what in the world corporations are doing in response to these protests when we come back. We'll talk about which corporations have had the worst or most hilariously bad statements in response to all this stuff. It's Kinda hard to pick one answer because there are just so many, so we'll sift through that long list and find comedic gold all right you're listening to. It's been a minute from NPR will be right back. So production requested yes. To Slip The law and order coaching in there anywhere. I just think that would be so cool man. This message comes from NPR sponsor, better help gutter help offers licensed professional counselors who specialize in issues such as `isolation, depression, stress, anxiety, and more connect with your professional counselor in a safe and private online environment. When you need professional help, get help at your time and your own pace schedule, secure video or phone sessions plus chat and text with your therapist. visit better help, dot com slash minute to learn more and get ten percent off your first month. Support for NPR comes from Newman's own foundation, working to nourish the common good by donating all profits from Newman's own food products to charitable organizations that seek to make the world a better place. More information is available at Newman's own foundation dot org. Protests over racial injustice are spreading across the country. Mullah pandemic continues to take its toll. The next weeks and months are leading to consequential election this November and every day. The NPR politics podcast is here to discuss how it could reshape your world. We are back. You're listening to. It's been a minute from NPR I'm Sam Sanders joined by Tanya, Moseley host NPR's here and now Eric Dagens. NPR TV critic, a Dream Team of a panel. Thank you both for being here, thanks. Thanks for having us. Thank you, of course of course of course You know we've been talking this episode. All about how corporate America is responding to these protests and I WANNA. Talk now a bit about all those strange, weird, offensive, hilarious corporate statements at a bunch of companies have been releasing in the last week or two because I need a laugh, and you need to laugh, and we're gonNA, Laugh and roses companies right now by playing my favorite game. WHO said that? Okay now in my head is playing a version of what's up with that the theme. Be Even more by. Where's Keenan Thompson? We need him. So I have gathered a handful of the strangest most absurd and most hilarious corporate responses to the protests, sweeping the nation and I'm GonNa read these quotes and have y'all guests. What company said that so earn? Some of them are so earnest. Them Tanya. Before, we start I got to give a big shout out to my play cousin. Jean Debbie over at coats, which he has been doing the Lord's work and housing the list of these for the last two weeks. Thank you gene. We borrowed from his list of liberally. He's the man. Okay Ready. All right I'll say the quote. You tell me what company or corporate entity. MADE THAT DUMB statement I. When we defy hate, we defy gravity. said. Some sort of airlines, some sort of American airline. No, you're it. Know. This is an iconic Broadway musical which one of the ICONIC LYRICS WANNA be comic songs is defying gravity. Let it flow oh frozen. This is it involves a witch O B you. Wicked wicked. Wicked, one of the best songs from wicked which I love and have seen on Broadway more than once. in my opinion, the best song is defying gravity where they just seeing and bouts defying gravity. This week in response to the protests. The musical photo of a green, which is hand locked in embrace with a white hand, stomach APPs and was when we defy hate. We defy gravity. Wow! The. Way Tanya was with cops like I was amazing. I don't know who got that point doesn't matter. Okay. But I'm coming for you next quote. We're working with fruit by the foot on creating space to amplify that we see you. We stand with you. Working for fruit by the foot, working with fruit by the foot on. Sharon Gosh. This has been my obsession for the last several days. Gushers, this is the. Very sugary tart. Candy for kids with like a juicy fluid fruit center, they have really been staunchly in support of black lives. Since this is popped off and they tweeted something this last week where they said and I quote. There would be no gushers without the black community. And I don't know why that just sent me. This really sit me. What you know what tart lives matter. Long. Time. How do you feel about this? Because I love I do love gushers. The thing about the messaging gushers I think that was like the second. tweet but I feel like the first one. There wasn't much thought about it. It really was like. Hey, we're going to say something and I'm going to tweet something. Their social media person I don't think there was unlike the wicket where they actually had graphics involved like they actually did set someone working on that I will say so funny enough. I actually heard from someone who used to work at Gushers, and they explained the thread and the tweets, and they said a lot of the folks follow us on social right now are like actually teens and tweens and we talk. A lot and they actually get this stuff. And she basically said the message was for them, and not for older folks. By All right next quote. Keep fighting. We got your back side. Back Side Stop I'm scared. What kind of company deals with your backside? I don't even want gene kind of want. Get it like geniuses my job with. You, no it includes water. They work with water in your behind. What's a day? Staff. Day Toshiba Day tweeted this week and support of the protest. We got your back side with side in parentheses, and as you can guess they were dragged for it, but then they responded, and said actually a woman of color runs this account. She wrote it and she stands by it. I don't know what to think anymore. No, see I'm. By it that would actually turn me off from the company because it's too. It's too on the nose. It's too ridiculous and. It's. Can I tell you what else they wrote. Go ahead, go ahead. They said quote. We stand in solidarity with the brave pooping. Humans protested avenue and. Let's get to the next one. Who won this game I? Don't know corporate America did. Okay Tonya congratulates. We. WHO said that? Who say? Thank you both for plan. Who said that all the corporations listening? We appreciate it, but do better on that note. Thanks to my guest, Tanya Moseley host of NPR's here now and Eric Dagens NPR's TV critic. Thank you both for being here. Please come back again soon. Yes, and thank you. This was the best laugh I've had in a long time. We needed it. We needed it. We sure did our listeners while we have you here. If you listen to this show, and like what you're hearing or even, don't like it. Rate and review us at Apple podcast. It helps us in the algorithm formula thing or whatever people see us more. If you do that, so do it, thanks. Support for this podcast and the following message come from the Walton Family Foundation where opportunity takes root more information is available at Walton Family Foundation Dot Org. With civil unrest, the pandemic and the economic crisis. You want to know what's happening right when you wake up and that's why there is up I the news. You need in about ten minutes from NPR news. Listen every day. We are back. You're listening to. It's been a minute from NPR. I'm Sam Sanders gotTA shift gears a bit right now. This year has been really hard for a lot of us with the protest and the pandemic and the uncertainty everything. And usually when stuff gets pretty hard for me I. Look my faith for Solace and for answers, but in two thousand twenty. Even that has been hard, and it is making me reassess my faith, and how it works for me in moments of prices like this and I know our audience is full of people from all different backgrounds and beliefs and faith traditions, atheist agnostics, wiccans, everybody, it is a big tent, and I like it that way. But I was hoping to find something spiritual issues. That would just you know, provide some comfort and also energize you wherever you coming from. And I really do believe that my next two guests can do just that I'm Jacky. Lewis and I'm the Senior Minister Middle Collegiate Church in Manhattan Okay I'm Reverend. Angel Williams I am increased by training and a teacher on top of being faith leaders Jackie, Angel or activists. They've been fighting for issues like healthcare and racial equality for very long time so on top of giving me a little pep talk for twenty twenty. They I discussed this moment of activism. Jackie runs a multiethnic church. In New York City Black folks and the Tino folks and white folks all go there, and she says right now the message she gives them on how to get involved and how to just stay sane through. All of this is not the same for everyone. White People Nice white people. Nice white people. What are you going to do? You see a neon neck and you're like Oh my God. I can't believe it's still happening and black people like we know it's still happening is just on tape. But the work is multiple layered right some times black people right now. The work might be divorcing to the black audience like just stop. It's okay to cry. It's okay to grief, right? It's okay to be still. It's okay to own your trauma. It's okay to sit down and drink some tea or have a Gloucestershire name or take a bath and rest and let somebody else run the race. That could be black work right now, right? And White? Work is getting the game and turn to white people and stop pretending like you don't know America's racist. It is and will you disrupt that? Yeah. Revenue Angel, are you speaking to different folks that you. Work with differently based on their backgrounds right now. Oh, absolutely, you know. People are rising up because people are tired of this and people are saying enough is enough and the best thing about that sense that it's people that are rising up is not just black people that are rising which you know, quiet as kept. These states were not ready for they were not ready for White folks putting their bodies on the line and what I said to black folks. Can You let them do that? You let them move that. When Bite, folks show up and put their bodies because we've been trying to train them for a long time to not be allies, but to put their bodies on the line to take some action, and that the works black socks do is go ahead and step behind Tony you in in thinking about. How the two of you! Help folks in this moment, you congregants. People coming to you for wisdom for guidance. Have there been questions you don't have answers for. And what are they? And how do you feel when that happens? Event? Jackie if you have answered I I've one I'm listening girl. You've no. Here here, cus- cus- what's good about that kind of guy. Yeah go ahead! I'm going to say God I worship. The God I worship is not a genie. Is Not Magic. CanNot be rubbed with my prayers or my ties to give me the my wishlist. The God I. Worship is a partner. And is presence and so when I'm able to say to. My Congress is a big strong I don't know, and I say it like with freedom and joy like I don't know we're on an adventure together in this life called human and what we get in this life called human is good friends to be colleagues with and people to love and people to say what if with and dream with and one of those partners is God. God is love so today I had six phone calls with confidence just. How you doing I it sucked. Yes, it does. I'm in pain me, too. Same Question Revenue Angel. Yeah I! Very core of not just a this sort of tradition at large become the stream. That I came through in Mealy in my post posting. Expression is not knowing and creating the conditions for myself. In preparing people to be able to sit with the complexity, the discomfort of not knowing you know, and in order to get to that place, we have to unpack myths and part of unpacking. Those MIS was innings that we do have to sit with the complexity of the American dream that we've been. We've been sold right and the nightmare that it is so many I'm with you there. I'm so with that. Yeah. I you know it's. For me, what's been so hard right now? I know that a lot of the work is sitting still and looking for whatever answer might be within myself. But if I'm being honest. I don't want to. I'm so tired and I'm so angry. In, especially for black people right now. Kind of what I want to say. Every day is. I'm not doing any more work I shouldn't have to. Why y'All do it. And I think there is this moment in which. A lot of people who were tired. Have to be encouraged. To continue to accept these notions in in this comfort with uncertainty and yet. What do you say to them? I say, You get to stop having faith. you get to shut down today? If there is a god, she's not going anywhere. She doesn't require your attention. For her to be existing. You can turn away. You can sit down. You could cry can fold your arms. You can stomp your feet. You can shake your fist and while Lord and please do. Because if there is a god, if there is a loving other, if there is something out there, that's bigger than we are. It learn from us to. It is dynamic and. The, right? There's a transformation so you'd be real and the the holy other Israel back. I say sit down, Sam and don't do anything and be angry. Yes, Ma'am! Yeah! Thank, you that's. It yeah, thank you, and if and if God kit cat. Then I would make him him. Back. She's working really well see. Let's fire him. You know I don't know. Yeah Well, I think I've asked all the questions I have. This has been so good for me. Personally and I know our listeners will enjoy it. I love you both and thank you for what you do. and that's so sweet. Thanks again to reverend. Jackie. Lewis and Reverend and coach Williams for that sermon I liked it a lot. Now it's time to end the show as we always do every week. Listeners share the best thing that happened to them all week. We encourage folks to Brag and they do. Let's hear a few of those emissions missions. Hi, this is Helen from Washington DC and the best part of my week was bringing home, my new adopted daughter. She's home with us now as of Wednesday and We're really looking forward to being the parents of teenager. Who Sam this Gordon from New Haven Connecticut I'm calling you from the Nick you with our newborn son. Arlo. I'm hanging out with him today. And I figured I'd give you Quick recording, you know we're doing all right even with all this terrible stuff going on the world, Hey Sam. This is Andrew from Evansville Indiana and the best part of my week has been all of the social justice activism that Ivan it'll be a part of. And in. All of my friends that are taking stands right now haven't taken stands before. They're drawing a line and they're saying black lives matter hi Sam! The CYA, calling from the bay area. And the best part of this very hard week. Was that I convinced my dad, who is a conservative white guy to go to a black lives matter protest with me. What I started talking to him about systemic racism and police brutality seven years ago, he thought that all forms of protests were bad. I never thought that he would go to a protest with me. We have to keep putting in these conversations. We have to keep having these difficult interactions with our loved ones. People's minds can change and maybe one day your dad will also go with you to a protest to hand out water bottles and Granola bars. So Sam thank you so much for the show and I'm sending a big hug to on Betty. Thanks for everything. Thanks for all that you do. Many. Thanks to all those Listeners Cya Andrew Gordon and Helen don't forget all of you can be a part of the segment. Just record the sound of your voice onto your phone, showing the best part of your week and email that to me. Sam Sanders at NPR dot Org Sam Sanders at NPR DOT Org. Now. I WANNA. Give a shout out to the people who are consistently some of the best parts of my week team. That makes this show it's been a minute was produced this week by DNA West Unduly Sassari Andrey eras and helps the Fatima. We engineering help from Patrick Murray and Sean. Phillips are fearless editor issued in a hopman. Our director of programming is Steve Now. Our big bosses NPR senior VP of programming on your grandmother, and as we clothe, they're going to pause really quick to say, thank you, thank you. Thank you to our first ever and best ever. In most as an intern puffs Fathi mark. This is our last week and y'all. She was so good we to extend the internship. House. It's really hard to overstate how much you've meant to this team. And how much you've helped us grow during your time here I love your sense of humor. I love your work ethic and I. Forgive You for your bad taste and cereal Please stay in touch and keep shooting for the stars. You're prayed all right till next time listeners. Thank you for listening I'm Sam Sanders. We'll talk soon.

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