17 Burst results for "Tanya Moseley"

"tanya moseley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:32 min | 6 months ago

"tanya moseley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Biden. You could listen on both 93.9 FM or a 20. You can also ask your smart speaker to play W n my C Tomorrow. Things considered just ahead tonight Patchy fog. Cloudy skies Low 63 degrees with more fog in the morning tomorrow Partly sunny through the day near 70 for rain is possible late tomorrow night. More fog. More clouds to love about 61 degrees. You're listening to W n my C. It's 7 20. Support for NPR comes from member stations and from total wine and more where in store teams can recommend a bottle of wine, spirit or beer. For any occasion, shoppers can explore more than 8000 wines, 2500 beers and 3000 spirits. More at total wine dot com and see three C three Done. Ai Ai software enables organizations to use artificial intelligence at enterprise scale solving previously unsolvable business problems. Learn more at sea three dot From NPR news. This's all things considered. I'm Tanya Moseley and I'm Ari Shapiro. Record breaking wildfires in the West have destroyed more than 10,000 homes and buildings this year. Many people there have little idea of the risk they face and as an NPR investigation has found few states require that risk to be disclosed. NPR's Lauren Summer reports. In a year like this one, it's easy to get frustrated with being home all the time. That's a feeling that Jennifer Montano misses. You realize quickly. It wasn't that bad being stuck at home because now.

NPR Jennifer Montano Tanya Moseley Ari Shapiro Biden. Lauren Summer
"tanya moseley" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"tanya moseley" Discussed on Here & Now

"Remote Alaska a man who survived for about three weeks in sub-zero cold is now talking. Alaska state troopers found thirty Tyson Steele late last week next to a makeshift shelter. An a big SOS signs stamped in the snow. He told Katie. UTV In anchorage. He woke up to find his cabinet on fire. He got out. His dog did not horrible to watch. The fire destroyed his home. Most of supplies. I just I sat down on on the on the ground for a while. Like just was cold. I didn't have any socks in my boots and I was just wearing Pajamas at that point and a t-shirt not hearing from steel friends and family asked a police check on him. He'd been living alone in the wilderness about fifty miles southwest of Denali since September. He says he will rebuild some resilience to end the hour here now is a production of NPR WR in association with the BBC World Service. I'm Robin Young. I'm Tanya Moseley this here and now exploring secular spirituality gonNA turn to literature. What themes should we include the things that help us live life with more meaning with more purpose? And if I had a secular Bible it would be this one. which book is that? We'll tell you and give you a list of others that inspire and instruct next time here.

Alaska Tyson Steele UTV Tanya Moseley Robin Young anchorage BBC World Service Katie NPR
"tanya moseley" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"tanya moseley" Discussed on Here & Now

"Remote Alaska a man who survived for about three weeks in sub-zero cold is now talking. Alaska state troopers found thirty Tyson Steele late last week next to a makeshift shelter. An a big SOS signs stamped in the snow. He told Katie. UTV In anchorage. He woke up to find his cabinet on fire. He got out. His dog did not horrible to watch. The fire destroyed his home. Most of supplies. I just I sat down on on the on the ground for a while. Like just was cold. I didn't have any socks in my boots and I was just wearing Pajamas at that point and a t-shirt not hearing from steel friends and family asked a police check on him. He'd been living alone in the wilderness about fifty miles southwest of Denali since September. He says he will rebuild some resilience to end the hour here now is a production of NPR WR in association with the BBC World Service. I'm Robin Young. I'm Tanya Moseley this here and now exploring secular spirituality gonNA turn to literature. What themes should we include the things that help us live life with more meaning with more purpose? And if I had a secular Bible it would be this one. which book is that? We'll tell you and give you a list of others that inspire and instruct next time here.

Alaska Tyson Steele UTV Tanya Moseley Robin Young anchorage BBC World Service Katie NPR
"tanya moseley" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"tanya moseley" Discussed on Here & Now

"Remote Alaska a man who survived for about three weeks in sub-zero cold is now talking. Alaska state troopers found thirty Tyson Steele late last week next to a makeshift shelter. An a big SOS signs stamped in the snow. He told Katie. UTV In anchorage. He woke up to find his cabinet on fire. He got out. His dog did not horrible to watch. The fire destroyed his home. Most of supplies. I just I sat down on on the on the ground for a while. Like just was cold. I didn't have any socks in my boots and I was just wearing Pajamas at that point and a t-shirt not hearing from steel friends and family asked a police check on him. He'd been living alone in the wilderness about fifty miles southwest of Denali since September. He says he will rebuild some resilience to end the hour here now is a production of NPR WR in association with the BBC World Service. I'm Robin Young. I'm Tanya Moseley this here and now exploring secular spirituality gonNA turn to literature. What themes should we include the things that help us live life with more meaning with more purpose? And if I had a secular Bible it would be this one. which book is that? We'll tell you and give you a list of others that inspire and instruct next time here.

Alaska Tyson Steele UTV Tanya Moseley Robin Young anchorage BBC World Service Katie NPR
"tanya moseley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:50 min | 2 years ago

"tanya moseley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A storefront black charity. And you came in and somebody for the church like oh, are you driving? Armor on whether you think like I get fresh with you on church Sunday. It's just that jarring moment of whoa. My expectations or sumptious are totally wrong. But they also realize there was no indication that what they're seeing couldn't be true. And I think if people were to see more diverse representations of interracial couples specifically to people of color together, then that would open their horizons to who they date, so at, you know, a couple of months ago like last year before people got to know you always talk about you, and they like all my gosh. You guys like sounded amazing and your boyfriend. Sounds amazing. And then some of them like when they saw on Instagram or person that you're Asian. They were like, oh my gosh, I didn't know he was Asian. But then, as soon as I said that they would say out loud themselves, but I don't know why I wouldn't have thought that, like you know what I mean, they're like, actually, like, there's nothing to make me assume he wouldn't be. And so we, we have people questions their preconceived notions of. Who can be with who and why they think that you know what I love about this is that they've clearly gotten very comfortable with this and all the ramifications of it. But they're still this sound of surprise that this is the relationship that they've wound up in and it's working so. Well, yeah. And it also is a show that when you are in an interracial relationship, having discussions around race is something that is an evolving discussion that you might have for the rest of your lives because you sit in a very unique place in this world in both of you have different experiences that you'll be reconciled with each other. I also love them because I think about this moment in time and the push for representation, but other day I saw the trailer for the movie, the sun is the star. And the character is a plaque woman. Asian man falling in love. It's around calm, and I thought you know, this is beautiful. This is what folks are yearning for, you know, I had a new kids on the block on my wall. And I still love them, by the way, my daughter has BTS. On the wall on the wall Korean void. Van these are things that we're seeing volving over time representation that I think is truly enlightening and really cool to see now kick. U E, DS Tanya Moseley, host of truth be told the new episode on colonized desire. That's what you wanna call it drops today. Thank you, thank you. You're listening to morning edition on D. I'm Brian watt. And stay tuned. More news NPR news ahead for you. Here's Joe with another traffic.

Brian watt Tanya Moseley NPR Joe Van
"tanya moseley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:34 min | 2 years ago

"tanya moseley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Oakland, seventy two San Francisco, sixty eight Hayward, seventy-five, San Jose. Seventy six degrees forecast for tomorrow overnight tonight, mostly clear and mild with lows in the mid to upper fifties. It's ten thirty one back to foreign. Welcome back to forum. I'm Tanya Moseley information. A Kim we're talking with Scott dickers-, founder of the onion dot com and authored editor of welcome to the future, which is mined by not Alon musk. And he's taking selfies as we're sitting here in the studio. Such a twenty year old you're such twenty year old. Yes, you are before the break. We were talking a little bit about putting the call out to folks about their favourite onion article or headline. But I also asked you the question have there ever been an article or headline that you would go back and change or not publish it? All yes. So back. Let's go back a little ways to the creation of the internet when our tech people introduced us to triple editing, which was incredible. Because once you put a story out online. It wasn't over you could go back in and we got kind of obsessed with that. Because you're always trying to perfect things. Get better find a new joke for this part. All this is a much better joke. Let's get that in there. And I actually had to put a moratorium on that and take the password away from people 'cause they were too obsessively going back and changing things. So the short answer is. Yes. Oh god. Yes. We did want to go back. And change a lot. Yeah. Those even a story that we did once where we went back and completely change the headline in the idea the story was. Mcdonald's to open up inside area. Mcdonald's and a few years went by unannounced gotta change. Starbucks opens up inside Starbucks. That's funnier. So, but yeah, going way back when the print days when you couldn't do that. There were some stories that we ran. So in the early years, we were trying to figure out how to do satire and a lot of what we did was mostly kind of sophomoric and pretty amateurish and shocking because your college kids, you're trying to like shock the system and be funny. And that's one of the few tools that you turn to shock humor. And so we went after some targets that probably weren't deserving. I remember a story. We did once the goddess into so much trouble that I would go back and change or cut. If I could that was. Gulf war syndrome caused by idiots who join army that was the head of the ass. What I'm saying? Like, you you make mistakes like that. And you learn, but like veterans groups wrote us, angry, letters and one particular guy hounded us for years after that. And you know, at some point in many of them, sometimes they don't stand the test of time either so back then like there would be headlines that probably be so funny. And then today, we look at it like a little yeah. Yeah. Absolutely. Because times change things like gay rights has changed so much in the popular perception in just the last thirty years, so but thankfully, everybody at the onion is pretty woke. So all of our jokes Figo back. Our our heads are mostly in the right place. But yeah, occasionally, we did we did slip up, and it would be great to erase those from memory. All right. Let's take some calls. We asked listeners what their favorites were. And let's see. Take a Vlade high Bod from San Francisco. Hi there. Hey, thanks for having me on. I got a couple of favorite headlines and just a comment. One is there's two people. It's like an image of people sitting opposite each other and says sides are you on the right one? For a long time. And then the other one I had an appeaser instead drugs win drug war and were burning men for many years. It was a huge hit. And that's great. Can I just respond to those two sides? Are you on the right one? That's a great one. I think that was just one of the headlines of images that we talked about. I don't know that that was a full article and drugs article, I just saw that image and drugs win drug war. That was a headline from our first original book, which was called Artem century. Which is a look back at the twentieth century through pages of the onion, you know, fake front pages. Super proud of that book because we cover everything, you know, from the Titanic to the. The Christian, right? Ascending into heaven on January one two thousand and drugs. Win drug war was. A headline in the ninety s and these two stone owners were like taking the podium as drug czar. Barry McCaffrey was ceding power. So I'm delighted you've got use out of that shirt. Thank you so much. Yeah. It kind of both funny and sad to see that hashtag, not the onion has evolved. Now, you have to like put that in front of articles where it seems like it'd be written by the onion. But it's actually just true. Thank you so much for that. Yeah. It's true. People. Don't know. What's true? What's not see kind of that is popular as Dan? I don't know if it's because the world is more absurd now because the world has always been pretty absurd, and there's always been plenty of awful terrible people to make fun of and whatever. Or I don't know if it's just that. There's so much information now that people's attention spans are so much shorter that when they see something or anything they're not even gonna do two seconds of research or critical thinking to determine whether it's true. So they might immediately see something and not be sure. And also, I think part of the issue is sometimes the onion does get a little too subtle. And I'm not a big fan of when we're too subtle. I like when we sort of hit people on top of the head and make it kind of obvious and funny, we have a comment from Krista. She writes, the headline no way to prevent this says only nation where this regularly happens. This one always gets to me it. I see it posted after every shooting, and it so indicative of how we refuse to learn or change. It's a great satirical headline. And I didn't think of it. I don't know who did it came out of the writing pool. I'm sure I'm sure somebody knows who wrote it, but for a long time whenever there was a mass shooting the onion had to come up with a. Funny headline to put out in response to it. Which was painful because they kept happening. And it's like, oh my God. How can we be funny, and we're not Craig Ferguson. So we can't go out there and tell the audience look something terrible happened today. I can't be funny. The onions not gonna break character like that it has to do something. So that headline was so ingenious because it's something that. Is funny. It's a good ironic medical humor joke, but it works even better because it repeats like she said, the the satirical point the subtexts really comes through powerfully even more powerful each time. So not only is it. Great satire, but it saves the onion writers a ton of grief from having to come up with a new joke. Every time something horrible happens. A lot of folks bring up the publication after nine eleven as well. You all did then. Yeah. So I wasn't at the onion then. But all I had just left. So all the people were like, my people I had hired them. And I was so proud of them. It was a great issue. And also, I know that I'm pretty sure that the first print issue distributed in San Francisco was the nine eleven issue. I think we started here in two thousand one and people in San Francisco are always talking to me about that issue. And how they fell in love with the onion as soon as they saw that issue, which is so cool. It broke my heart when we had to stop the printed edition here. And what year was that the eels not? I don't remember when print stopped in San Francisco. Yeah. Yeah. Let's take another call. Cindy. And Santa Rosa. Hi, cindy. Hi. Hey, what's your question or comment or favourite article as the one of my favorites was probably about ten years ago where it was like you could outsource your job? And then like, you know, do it have paid somebody a lot less for it. And you would just sit in the office and just kind of collect your paycheck. That was hilarious. Thank you. Cindy, you're smart. I also wondered I wondered how many people actually thought about doing that? Because I know it kind of like, oh, I wonder if that would work, right? I wonder if overseas slavery will work for. One of my favorites is the let's see if I could get it. Right. But it was about podcasting. And it was something like twenty three million podcast. Producers are looking for folks to interview other show or something like that. But it was hilarious. And it was like in twenty twelve or something. I don't remember that podcasting was I did a podcast in two thousand four. Yeah. Yeah. Podcasting has been around for a while. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Let's take another caller. We have rob from San Francisco. Hi, rob. Hi, thanks for having me on God. I love I've always loved San tiring, and and that kind of humor from shows like the office, but I think nowadays with things being so serious and getting downright depressing. I think websites like the onion or the Borowitz report and satire is actually keeping us all saying because we have to be able to laugh at ourselves. And if we can't do that your life is just too serious. Yeah. No. I appreciate you saying that. And I think about that a lot Andy Borowitz, a friend of mine, I just saw him the other day, and we were talking about that. When terrible things are happening in our lives. We kind of revert to lizard brain. And we're in flight or fight response. And that's when humor kind of feels inappropriate and a lot of people. Now, they're starting to talk about. Yeah. Boy satire is this really the, you know, the right time or place shouldn't we be doing something shouldn't be activists or whatever. But it's true that humor is a great coping mechanism for times of tragedy. And we do need it to remember that we're humans and not lizards even though terrible things are happening. And so you know, it's what I do. So I don't know how effective of an activist. I would be, but I know how to write a funny book. So I'll keep doing that. And. Yeah. Hopefully, people do still find some refuge in it. Yeah. Laugh to keep from crying against. Exactly. Yeah. We've got max max from San Francisco. Hi, max. Hi, thanks for having me. One of my very favorite laugh out. Loud headlines is during the Bush administration. It's Bush vows to eliminate US dependence on oil by forty nine twenty. There's a quote in there. That says we must free ourselves from dependence on fossil fuels with an eighty five generation, right? It's just so great because we keep winning this problem off and one no better now than we were thirteen years ago. So thank you very much. Thank you max. Yeah. The onions coverage on global warming. I think has been really good, but George W Bush those were those were fun times..

San Francisco cindy Tanya Moseley Starbucks George W Bush Mcdonald San Jose Alon musk Barry McCaffrey Kim Andy Borowitz Craig Ferguson Scott dickers Hayward Oakland founder editor San tiring
"tanya moseley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"tanya moseley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"That they're looking for a. Bart spokeswoman said the agency cannot. Comment on pending litigation Facebook is well known for how some of its ads are targeted. Towards certain groups of people but now a formal. Complaint filed today by, the US department of housing, and urban development or HUD says when it comes. To housing listings the tech giant's advertising platform violates the fair. Housing act here's HUD spokesman Brian Sullivan and under. Dorm circumstances if we're talking about, clothing, or, shampoo or anything like that that might be just fine but this is housing. And the fair housing act, simply says you can't do that the complaint says. Facebook allows real estate advertisers to select, which users can see their listings based on race religion sex national origin and other discriminatory options he acuity senior Silicon Valley editor Tanya Moseley has been following this and Tanya, these allegations against Facebook are not new but what is this complaint alleging. Will you're right propublica, broke the story back in two thousand Sixteen but this. Newest claim from Hyde says that Facebook allowed advertisers to control which users received housing related ads. Based on all of the categories you mentioned but a couple of examples include adds to women versus men, or parsing out whether or not, person is interested in an assistance dog or mobility scooter. Or not showing, ads to, users that Facebook categorizes. As those interested in childcare or parenting and all of these, according to HUD effectively limits. Housing options under what's billed as targeted advertising so is that, how it violates the. Fair housing act, will yes HUD says it's all unlawful because you cannot exclude people based on race religion, sex, or, disability and, the fair housing act. Also prohibits discrimination in housing transactions, in print and online advertising on the basis, of the categories I mentioned so in, a statement Facebook said it does not tolerate discrimination? On its site and that it would respond To hut in court, and Tanya this, case has already been in court in another state just last month the company signed an agreement with Washington state that says they will not allow housing. Advertisers to exclude users based on race and this comes after the attorney general they are filed a lawsuit after an investigation found that Facebook was micro targeting allowing advertisers to do things like of way targeting adds to certain people so at, the time Facebook denied wrongdoing but it said it was refining its advertising model so now Facebook. Has this formal complaint against them from HUD what comes next? That's. A great question is requesting that Facebook respond to this complaint and from, there, they're really pushing. For there to be changes in the protocol for advertising we could see a lot of litigation also come from this okay. Thank you. Tanya thank you that, was senior, Silicon Valley editor Tanya Moseley and I'm Tiffany Cam high cake you eating Who's. Next up on all things considered an interview with the Pennsylvania Roman Catholic clergy abuse survivor also in the next segment talk. About Tesla's stock and Tesla's CEO Elon. Musk those interviews just ahead. Here on public radio I'm Michael stay ahead on KiKi we'd newsroom one o'clock panelist will discuss the weekend politics and what. A week it's been also to film, buffs will talk about the new romantic comedy crazy. Rich Asians which you've no doubt heard above heard about I. Should say also? You'll hear from the vice president of read it Melissa Tidwell she'll join newsroom to talk about her ideas about moderating hate speech identifying phony accounts in closing. Silicon valley's diversity gap that's this morning at one eighty newsroom. Here, on public, radio, and then. More politics of course on Washington, week with, Robert Costa at one thirty Paul. Manafort verdict Watch on the program the White House. Revokes in director security clearance and is President Trump disrupting the GOP's mid term strategy, hear those, stories on Washington week at one thirty here on, kqed.org public radio Coming up on the next Commonwealth club, program go.

Facebook HUD Tanya Moseley US department of housing Silicon valley Bart editor Washington Tesla Brian Sullivan Hyde White House Robert Costa Musk President Trump Pennsylvania Roman Catholic
"tanya moseley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"tanya moseley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This update metaphor to set to go on, trial later this month on tax fraud Bank fraud and other charges brought by special. Counsel Robert Muller manafort's lawyers had asked for the trial to. Be moved away from Alexandria Virginia just outside. The nation's capital they argued that because. Of the media attention it would be impossible. For Manafort to get an impartial jury in the DC area but judge T S Ellis, disagrees and has denied their request the trial is, scheduled to open July, twenty, fifth Manafort also, faces a separate trial this fall in Washington DC on similar charges. The cases are part of Muller's investigation into Russian interference in the two thousand sixteen election although the charges against Manafort stem from lobbying work he did in Ukraine, Ryan Lucas NPR news Washington on stock markets in Asia shares are, mixed lower in Shanghai Following gains on Wall Street this is NPR news from k. q. e. news I'm Tiffany Cam high contra Costa county is set to. Have one of its first cannabis oil manufacturing laboratories in Pittsburgh that's after this city, council, approved a permit yesterday for. Canyon laboratories to use cannabis oil in their, medical and non medical products Richard Fischler is the CEO of canyon for us to. Be kind of the leader in the space benefits in Pittsburgh. I need it really showcases Pittsburgh as having. One of the premier manufacturers of these. Types of products within its city limits Fischler. Says the move could potentially bring in tens of thousands of dollars of revenue for the, city a US House Judiciary committee hearing on social, media content moderation quickly, turned, into partisan bickering, senior Silicon Valley editor Tanya Moseley has more at the start Maryland Democratic Representative Jamie Raskin. Called the accusations that conservatives are being silenced on. Social media as pure fantasy but Facebook's Monica bicker did apologize to right-wing personalities diamond and silk for deeming them as. Dangerous the bigger issue says San Jose congresswoman Zoe Lofgren is that algorithms are playing into what users want to see the net. Result is that Americans have been isolated into bubbles that is allowed the American public to be exploited by our enemies. Critics argue the hearings are a waste of time and that the decisions by social media companies on content is fundamentally a. First amendment protected right I'm Tanya Moseley k..

Robert Muller manafort Pittsburgh cannabis Tanya Moseley Richard Fischler Washington fraud Alexandria Virginia Canyon laboratories Zoe Lofgren NPR Ryan Lucas US House Judiciary Jamie Raskin San Jose
"tanya moseley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:35 min | 3 years ago

"tanya moseley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And participate in providing on the ground legal work whether that means preparing coordinated efforts here in california she says they've gotten calls from dozens of barry lawyers who want to help and freddie that jeb romeo k q e d news and in a few minutes we'll get reaction from bay area religious leaders on the separation of families at the border for about ten years security guards in volunteer ears in palo alto kept close watch of the city's cal train crossings a response to the surge in teen suicides that once gripped the area but this summer the city is trying something new replacing guards with cameras kick senior silicon valley editor tanya moseley looks back at the original idea of watching over the tracks and why the city thinks technology will be better caroline cami didn't really have a plan the night she decided to grab a lawn chair and sit along the cal train tracks near her home it was up tober twentieth two thousand nine and all she knew was that teenagers were killing themselves and she had to do something at that point my head assign coming into third grade and a son coming into fifth grade and i started to think what was going to happen what was i doing or why was here what was i doing here watching the trains barrel down the tracks that first night was disorienting because it's very loud and it's very bright and it calms very fast and it takes a long time being out there to get used to the speed at which it calms cami noticed right away that it was hard to see beyond a few feet but she believed her presence would be a deterrent maybe what's really needed somebody to sit in a chair outside when it's cold and just either other moms and dads joined her and at the height of the track watch program one hundred and fifty volunteers rotating shifts kept watch over those tracks this is a spreadsheet people with simply sign on cami did this for three years even after the city added paid security guards and the number of suicides at palo altos four train stops dropped by twenty twelve volunteers began to teeter out and the security guards took over full time and his candies children got older they needed her around more she began to think about the effectiveness of having people out there watching today i was outside and i drove by and i noticed a guard looking at his phone so it is very difficult to be out there for hour after hour and all kinds of weather and after a while when you sit out there and nothing happens time after time and day after day people to begin to lose focus and so the security guards were somewhat of a mixed bag the city says there's no way to know for certain how much of a deterrent people watching the tracks have been trained deaths on the peninsula have gone down schools and community groups have also invested a lot and suicide prevention and education this there's a number of them a security guard stationed at tracks near palo alto high points to a new surveillance camera will soon replace him the city is hired an outside company for one and a half million dollars to monitor the tracks twenty four hours a day vegas advantage the city believes is that cameras will be able to detect movement at night and see up to a thousand feet in each direction people will monitor from a remote location and we'll be able to talk through a speaker to anyone near or on the train tracks as a security guard points out the new cameras palo alto resident mike coffee stops to talk to us on his way to work he ponders this idea of technology being able to replace the presence of a person that day to day rach nothing you know it definitely seems like it's treating the symptom sorry it's treating the symptom rather than treating the disease caroline cami says she's learned there is no one solution to solving the problem of suicide by train surveillance cameras she believes could be an even better deterrent than a human presence how do these things are just hope we try and we hope it works and then we see where it works and we see where it doesn't work when we try and we hope again that that is really the nature of this whole process the security guards will stay in place throughout the summer as the city tests the new cameras that transition to full time surveillance will come in the.

twenty four hours million dollars thousand feet three years ten years
"tanya moseley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"tanya moseley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is npr news it's k q e d news i'm tara siler after months of protests from employees google has decided it will not seek another contract for its controversial work providing artificial intelligence to the us department of defense project maven is the name of the pilot program launched last year the idea is to take a i and use it to analyze video footage collected by military drones more than a thousand google employees signed a petition against involvement in the project and many others quit cake acuity silicon valley editor tanya moseley talk with gizmodo tech reporter kate conger who's been covering the story since the beginning she asked conger why google employees were so upset by the pentagon contract google that feel that the company should not be involved in any pentagon business whatsoever they feel really strongly that google just shouldn't be in business with the military at all there are other ways that have specific objections to this program particularly around using a are you in this context just sort of the environment that we're in right now there are a lot of people who have a lot of concerns with the current administration and so i think that kind of informs the feeling of not wanting to be involved there's also i think for google irs a really strong sense of identity with the company you know people really feel like they're a part of google and it's a part of who they are and there's the longstanding informal motto is don't be evil and i think that those people feel like this project and military work in general are just sort of the antithesis of what they stand for and there's a lot of conversation about you know how what are the ethical principles that we want to put in place before we arrive at the day where is really deeply intertwined in everything that we do speaking to the sheer number of employees that google mobilized in this effort does this speak to maybe a larger shift and a change around labor organizing in the tech industry here in the silicon valley i mean one of the the things that has been really unique to me about this story is we're starting to see a little bit.

tara siler tech reporter google npr us editor tanya moseley kate conger pentagon
"tanya moseley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"tanya moseley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Welcome back to forum i'm tanya moseley and today for meena chem three years ago the cdc reported that more than seventy two thousand babies were born in the united states from harvested eggs that means they were conceived from either donated eggs or eggs from out the women who decided to freeze them and this hour we want to take a moment to unpack the benefits and risks associated with egg donation storage and retrieval and we want to hear from you if you have chosen to freeze your eggs or use an ed bay bank or donate your eggs what was your experience what we're discussing egg donation and freezing with diane tober here in studio she's the associate professor and medical anthropologists at that uc sf school of nursing and she's been conducting research with egg donor since two thousand thirteen her upcoming documentary is called the perfect donor we also have with us amy advise a day she is a reproductive endocrinologist based in san francisco host of the weekly online egg whisper our show and founder of freeze and share a program that gives egg donors the opportunity to freeze their eggs in exchange for donating half of them and later in this hour we'll hear from a woman who was an egg donor herself welcome very much to the studio lady thank you so i wanna kinda start with a primer but i wanna say seventy two thousand babies born each year from harvested eggs that sounds like a lot of babies this includes of course donors and women who freeze and then use their own eggs dr tober how common is this it's a lot more widespread than people realize i think the thing about the cdc data's it's likely an underestimate as well so because there really hasn't been a lot of there's no registry to track the numbers of cycles whether it's egg donation freezing and so on so i think that that seventy two thousand number is already an underestimate but it is quite common both to donate eggs for other people's purposes as well as it's becoming increasingly common to freeze eggs for oneself dr amy let's let's do a quick egg freezing so what is the process for a woman who's interested in egg extraction and freezing.

tanya moseley meena chem united states associate professor founder uc sf school of nursing san francisco three years
"tanya moseley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"tanya moseley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Consulting curator of african arts the museum's collection of african art numbers more than five thousand pieces and in her statement pasternak wrote that overseeing it required a specialist with a phd in this area pasture next statement also comes in response to an open letter from the activist group decolonize this place which called the hiring tonedeaf rose friedman npr news new york the dow is up three forty six or one and a half percent this is npr from k q e d news i'm brian watt facebook ceo mark zuckerberg is expected to issue an apology before congress this week he's expected delivered the same testimony before committees in the us senate tomorrow in the house on wednesday the committee's released the text today zuckerberg says that facebook is an idealistic company and that it did not do enough to prevent fake news foreign interference in elections hate speech and app developers that harvest users data the release of zuckerberg's testimony comes the same day that facebook says it's adding a feature a mini accounts now you will be able to see all the apps that have your data and specific ways to delete them k q e d senior silicon valley editor tanya moseley has more the social media company also says it will begin notifying the eighty seven million individuals whose private info may have gone to cambridge analytica that's the political data firm hired by the trump campaign the firm offer tools they claimed could influence voter behavior ahead of ceo mark zuckerberg's testimony before congress chief operating officer sheryl sandberg went unim media blitz to talk about the company's mishandling of user data we know that we did not do enough to protect people's data i'm really sorry for that marks really sorry for that and what we're doing now is taking really firm action zuckerberg is expected to testify before congress tomorrow and wednesday i'm tanya moseley k q e d news you can read that testimony in advance.

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"tanya moseley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"tanya moseley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"By the trump campaign cambridge analytica reportedly harvested personal information from fifty million facebook users without their consent after days of silence facebook ceo mark zuckerberg responded to the growing scandal in a blog post and interviews zakar brook said facebook will take new security measures and restrict access to some user data by third party apps me well some lawmakers wants to testify before congress and there's now a social media campaign urging users to delete their facebook accounts joining me now with more on this are cake silicon valley bureau chief tanya moseley marketwatch tech editor and san francisco bureau chief jeremy owens and electrician frontier foundation researcher jenny gephardt's welcome to you all well there are so many issues here trust regulation data privacy how facebook is responding to all all of that but tanya i have to ask you first of all lay out the senior figure for us because the misuse of data involving cambridge analytica happened in twenty fifteen when did facebook know about it and why did it not notify users who were affected earlier so facebook received word that cambridge analytica had this data around that time in twenty fifteen and they went to them and said please you need to destroy this and cambridge analytica said yes we will do that and they actually gave them an agreement saying that they would do that from that point i want to tell you though they found out about it from reporters from the guardian reporter there as well as another publication notify facebook that this was a possibility and it's this was happening i think the million dollar question is why they didn't notify the public until now we received word before the new york times published its piece about all of this that facebook was going to deny cambridge analytica on there platform and they were we receive that in a facebook post as well as on their newsroom blog as well so that's the big question is why we didn't know about the sooner and what do you think the answer is i mean it's were they wanted to practice protects their profits or what do you think happened here.

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"tanya moseley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"tanya moseley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Service in san jose for low income families offering internet four as low as ten dollars a month but some argue at this lowest tier the internet is so slow it sometimes useless worth of loyal and the thought of your down the street from them does as is the romme's family they recently signed up for that lowcost internet service with comcast but 11yearold anthony romme's says trying to work online with his classmates can be excruciating just a day ago they asked me to be online on a group when i get onto the internet is very slow it can take several minutes for a page to load so instead that he goes to a community center after school to do his homework unnamed the rest of us studies homer over there because my internet here is not that good the community center that anthony goes to is a good option says the city it's working on outreach efforts to let more people know about them the city is also working to expand it's free wi fi network to places like east san jose all of this to make certain that everyone who lives in the heart of silicon valley can be connected any san jose i'm tanya moseley kqed news now let's talk about the connection some people have two devices that keep tabs on their health activity trackers blood pressure and heart monitors a lot of those devices or made right here in the bay area maybe you use of fit bit or have one lying in a drawer somewhere but to these things really help us become healthier i talked with kqed science editor danielle vinton who've been thinking a lot about this the first question why i got interested in this because of a recent study and it tried to take a broad look at whether these devices help patients become healthier when they were asked to use went by doctors hope was that these devices without patients lose weight.

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"tanya moseley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"tanya moseley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Percent of new hires and design engineering and product management that's up from ten percent two years ago aubrey bland says language software is not a silver bullet the company has also made recruiting diverse candidates a priority it is all of those changes together that have helped us get their language is just one piece of the puzzle i'm tanya moseley kqed news all right let's turn now from getting a job to getting into school i'm not even talking about college i'm talking about kindergarten in a place like san francisco that can seem like a highstakes game in fact appearance call the system the places kids in the city's public schools a lottery as parents wait anxiously to see whether they're kid gut placed in their first choice school for kindergarten next fall we're going to talk to kqed's lisa pick off white about how that lottery is played lisa i'm almost afraid to ask how the lottery works but i think that's where we have to start it is a little complicated but will go threat so basically parents it starts a choice parents are able to put together a list of the schools that they want their children to goto and they submit that list to the school district the school district than takes all those less and runs them through a computer algorithm that essentially a a school to the student but it's not quite over yet this is where it's not completely random so then the algorithm also looks at a couple of different factors for instance do you this sibling that attends that school do you live in the neighborhood of that school or do you live in a kind of a neighborhood that has historically low test scores and that will influence where you're assigned in you in the bay curious team have done a deep dive on the odds of winning at this lottery what did you fight while the odds are in your favour we found that sixty one percent.

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"tanya moseley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"tanya moseley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The listeners of kqed the time is now six twenty three it's morning edition on kqed i'm brian watt labor unions are gaining traction in silicon valley over the last three years 5000 contract workers for big tech companies like apple twitter cisco and most recently facebook have organized with hopes of boosting salary in benefit negotiating power is it working and what can the union really do for a service worker living in one of the most expensive places in the country he acuity senior silicon valley reporter tanya moseley is exploring these questions in she joins us with more tania five thousand workers have joined the union in just a few short years this seems to signify a groundswell of support but what's driving this a few years ago back in 2015 shuttle drivers for several area tech companies like apple joined the teamsters union and they were very vocal they used traditional organizing tactics for example they were very vocal about their wages and about working conditions and benefits and this effort seemed to be a tipping point right and since then silicon valley rising that's a coalition of unions and civil rights groups they've been instrumental in organising janitors security guards in cafeteria workers more recently who are employed by outside companies to do service work for big tech companies like apple and facebook so it was after the facebook cafeteria workers organized that you became interested in asking this question about how effective all of this organizing in silicon valley is what have you found are there benefits that workers are actually seeing if you look back on the history of.

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"tanya moseley" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

02:28 min | 4 years ago

"tanya moseley" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"When they talk about death to police officers that bothers me yeah it's it's confusing because the message has gotten so uh sullied and i think that the concept of black lives matter again is taken on a life of its own and it depends on where you're coming from but added space for me it's as it seems like it's a nuance message for kids of that age as an adult you can hold to both concepts in your brain at the same time ago by saying black lives matter doesn't like some people go oneup who lives like they're this kneejerk all lives like all of these things and that's where tanya moseley who talked about earlier in the our talks about co voting like the concept of microaggressions encoding all these things are relatively new to me but lahser that's what they mean when they talk about that's a coded message when if i just can't say black lives matter and have that sit there and not have an addendum and not of an astra or not have to attach every other life color on the end of it can that just sit there and the brave people of color take it as coding to go we also stabilize yasser while i've also all as i know can was just for five minutes can we do say black lives matter and have that just sit there and it makes a lot of you uncomfortable to just let it be and so i one in trying to say yes black lives matter no and then in a different day in a different discussion different segment i can talk about how i support police support equality in all of those other issues but for in a moment like this this technology that is powerful the was it like to be virgil police officer in knowing that they may not come home you'll hear fromn a woman next who uh fears that deeply enough same on has been a very moved by surely the lives of sorts shirley ally alls in by or death over the weekend we'll talk about that next it's running don't you uncovered this law mckenna when i was attorney general for the state of washington we received lots of complaints about contractors that's why it's nice to hear about a company like guardian roofing with tons of great reviews and rated a plus by.

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