17 Burst results for "Tanya Lewis"

"tanya lewis" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

07:22 min | 2 weeks ago

"tanya lewis" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"We bring you up to speed on the science behind the most urgent questions about the virus and the disease demystify the research and help you understand what it really means. I'm tanya lewis. I'm josh fishman. We're scientific american. Senior health editors today. We're going to talk about masks. I why people resist wearing them despite all the evidence that they work. Then we'll explain. Why the kind of mask you wear matters and how to find a good one and president biden's latest update it's been baffling to watch. How angry some people get about wearing masks. They refused and some politicians back them up. It's a simple piece of fabric or material that stops the spread of kobe. So where does the pushback come from. Josh you've spoken to an expert on mask attitudes any explanation. Well like many strong reactions mask. Backlash combines a bunch of different causes and personal values emily mendenhall. A medical anthropologist at georgetown university has spent many months talking with anti mask people in an iowa town called oko boji for her book called unmasked which is coming out next year. I talked with emily this week about what she's found out. Oh kabbage is a small town on a lake in northwestern iowa. It's also where. Emily grew up so she knows a lot of people there. She knows steelworkers grocery store managers and her father's on the city council. The town sits in clay county which has about seventeen thousand residents but it balloons up to about one hundred thousand during the summer because the lake is a big local vacation spot and the economy depends on summer. People going to restaurants and amusement parks marinas the need to make money was partly why people resisted activity restrictions. Emily says and mask wearing got caught up in all that people push back. When local health agencies wanted to limit occupancy at businesses that was expressed as we don't want government telling us what to do the attitude extended to mask mandates to many people it was another example of pushy government overreach. Emily says this view is very much a part of a midwestern value of rugged individualism. You're tough enough to make it on your own and you pull yourself up by your own bootstraps. It's a fiction. She says and it ignores the history of agricultural subsidies and other government help that dominates the region. yet it's a very powerful fiction that people really believe all of that made for very fertile ground in twenty twenty when donald trump repeatedly said the virus was no big deal. His message was echoed by the iowa. Governor and at the time there were not many cova cases in this area so trump's falsehoods really worm their way into the thinking of many people in clay county. Who felt that. Since the virus wasn't a threat there was little benefit to wearing a mask. They were tough enough to deal with the disease and government. Safety measures simply took away their freedoms for no good reason. Finally mask rejection is very public act. In clay county and oko boji it gives people legitimacy among their community. Emily says it shows your neighbors that you're knowledgeable that you're smart enough not to buy into the line that liberals and scientists and the government or push it that public stance increases your standing in the eyes of many people around you now privately. Some people told emily they worried about a child getting sick or their father falling ill but publicly so many of these different anti mass cultural values came together that they became an overwhelming force. Tanya we often talk about face masks or coverings as if they're all the same but you've been looking into it. I know and you've found some masks or better than others. Can the public at their hands on and their faces into the better ones. Yes in fact the masks that work the best are those that fit well and filter the air you breathe adequately a type of mass known as respirator. Such as an end ninety five provide some of the best protection early in the pandemic health agencies including the cdc h. o. Told the general public not to wear ninety five's or other medical grade masks because they were in short supply and healthcare workers needed them. But now these masks as well as similar masks made in china or korea are much more available we also know that the virus that causes. Kobe is spread through aerosols tiny droplets float in the air and can get around a loose-fitting cloth or surgical mask. I spoke to several experts in aerosol science including lindsay mar of virginia tech and kimberly author of uc. San diego. who say that it's high time experts start recommending that people wear these high filtration better fitting masks especially with the extremely transmissible delta variant circulating and kids going back to school. These masks include ninety. Five chinese made k. And ninety five and korean made kf ninety four us. They're pretty easy to find. Nowadays online and many of them are affordable. Less than one dollar mask. I talked to a guy named aaron collins who calls himself the mass nerd. He's a mechanical engineer. With a background in aerosol science and he has converted his home bathroom into our facility where he tests different masks and reviews them on youtube he measures three parameters filtration fit and comfort which is important filtration refers to the amount of particles that get through the mask or through gaps around the edges of the mask fit is how well it fits on your face and he measures comfort in part based on the pressure drop of air entering the mask. Basically how hard it is to breathe on. The mask nerds youtube channel. You can find videos of his top mask. Picks including mass for kids for ninety five. He recommends ones made by well known brands. Such as three m mold-ex honeywell. He also recommends several types of kf ninety four's and cayenne ninety five's many of which filter upwards of ninety eight percent of particles and are often more comfortable to wear. These fit a lot better than most cloth or surgical masks and are more likely to protect both you and others counterfeit masks are concerned but you can find reputable brands through sites like project and ninety. Five dot org. You can't access these types of masks. You can still get some pretty good protection if you wear surgical mask with a well fitting cloth mask over it. But it's time to ditch those loose bandannas and gaping me masks. That hang off your nose. The dvd my fellow americans talk about where we are in the battle against cove. Nineteen the progress. We've made new work. We have left to do president. Joe biden made tens of millions of jobs contingent on vaccinations. This week in a speech biden said he'll require millions of federal workers to get vaccinated. He also said companies with one hundred or more employees will have to give workers the shots or test them. weekly one trick will be enforcement. It's not clear whether the labor department which is in charge of workplace safety as a way to make sure companies are really doing this. He's also requiring that healthcare workers at hospitals and other providers receive federal funding be vaccinated. And that's not all. He aims to make rapid testing more widely available by enacting. The defense production act to make more tests and having walmart amazon and kroger seldom and amid the anxiety over school starting and some elected officials obstructing basic safety measures. He said that the government would compensate any educator who faced retaliation biden admitted that these measures will take time. But it's clear. His approach is moving from carrots to sticks..

Emily clay county tanya lewis josh fishman emily mendenhall iowa emily biden georgetown university lindsay mar donald trump Josh aaron collins Tanya cdc virginia tech youtube Kobe kimberly
"tanya lewis" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

05:55 min | Last month

"tanya lewis" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is your fast track update pandemic we bring you up to speed on the science behind the most urgent questions about the virus and the disease we de mystify the research and help you understand what it really means. I'm tanya lewis. I'm josh fishman scientific. American senior health editors today. We're going to talk about the fda approval of the pfizer vaccine whether new reports of breakthrough infections mean. Vaccines are losing power. And what you need to know about vaccine booster shots this week. The food and drug administration granted full approval to the pfizer vaccine for people ages. Sixteen and older that moves the shot past. Its initial emergency use status and makes it like any approved. Drug or vaccine will the solid endorsement affect vaccination rates tanya. It could affect them in a couple of ways. A growing number of government agencies cities and businesses have already started implementing vaccine mandates for example the us military instituted a mandate for all active duty servicemembers. New york city is requiring all department of education teachers and staff to get vaccinated and lots of colleges and universities are implementing mandates to the other. Big question is whether the fda approval will sway any people who are vaccine hesitant on that front. It may be a big uphill battle while some people say that the lack of fda approval was their main reason for not getting vaccinated others cite mistrust of government and other concerns which are not likely to magically disappear now that the fda has given it its formal stamp of approval time will tell if the approval will have a big impact on vaccination rates right now though the delta various rapid spread is what appears to be driving an increase in vaccinations in many of the hardest hit states. We keep hearing more about breakthrough infections. When the virus infects people who are fully vaccinated. That doesn't mean the vaccines don't work anymore. Though right josh the vaccine still work really well tanya and we have some new numbers to back that up there have been headlines about prominent people who tested positive even though they were vaccinated three. Us senators last week. For example and when these stories appear in such cluster. It gives the impression that vaccines are losing protective power. The real story however is different. These vaccines never gave perfect protection. Even in clinical trials for instance visor reported eight vaccinated. People got infected out of about twenty thousand people got the shots but one hundred sixty two people in the unvaccinated trial group got the disease and that's a lot more with the highly transmissible delta variant. That's dominating new cases now. These numbers have changed a bit. But the pattern of good vaccine protection still holds this week. The cdc reported on forty three thousand infections in los angeles county between may and the end of july about seventy percent of them were an unvaccinated people about twenty five percent were in fully vaccinated folks so while. That's more infections than we saw. In the clinical trials vaccinated people. Were still almost three times more likely to repel the virus. Then where people without the vaccine when it came to people who got sick enough to need a hospital in intensive care the power of the vaccines was clear. Seven point five percent of the unvaccinated had to be hospitalized that was true of about three percent of the vaccinated people so the vaccines are twice as likely to keep you out of the hospital and hold the virus to just a mild illness. Oregon just reported on its co vid infections. In july eighty-one percent were an unvaccinated people. So that makes nineteen percent of them in breakthrough cases again. A big advantage for vaccines. That's also true. For the most serious consequences of cogut forty two of oregon's fifty five deaths wherein and people who did not get vaccinated the us has now vaccinated nearly one hundred and seventy two million people. The virus has now spread much more widely through the country. Both of these trends are going to run into one another more often and that means more vaccinated people will get infected but clearly a lot. Fewer of them will get the virus then unvaccinated people even more clearly. The vaccine will keep the huge majority of them from getting seriously ill and really. That's what any vaccine is supposed to do. The big debate now is about cova booster shots. The biden administration said it plans to offer boosters to all eligible americans eight months after their second shot of an mri. A vaccine are these needed and needed by whom those are important questions. And we don't have all the answers yet. What we do know is that some data from israel as well as the cdc's own studies in the us suggests that vaccinated people may be more susceptible to mild or moderate infections now than previously. This may be the result of waning immunity over time the effect of the delta variant or some combination of the two. The good news though. Is that the vaccine still appear to provide excellent protection against severe disease death as you mentioned. The vast majority of people hospitalized for kobe right now are unvaccinated as for who needs boosters. I spoke with some experts for a story earlier this week including selene bounder of nyu and shane. Crotty of the la hoya institute of immunology. They said it was clear that people who are immuno-compromised or the very elderly especially those living in nursing homes may benefit from an additional dose of vaccines. But there's not much evidence yet that healthy people will need to booster anytime soon. Both counter crotty agreed that the bigger focus right now should be on getting unvaccinated people their first and second shots because the benefits of doing so far outweigh the benefits of giving a subset of people. Booster shots vaccinating. The rest of the country and the world is really the key to ending this pandemic..

fda tanya lewis josh fishman pfizer tanya department of education Us cdc New york city josh biden administration los angeles county severe disease death Oregon
"tanya lewis" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

05:43 min | 2 months ago

"tanya lewis" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"Welcome to covered quickly. Scientific american podcast series. This is your fast track update on the kobe. Pandemic we bring you up to speed on the science behind most urgent questions about the virus and the disease we demystify the research and help you understand what it really means. I'm tanya lewis. I'm josh fishman. Scientific american senior health editors today. We'll explain why the cdc now wants vaccinated people to wear masks indoors again and we'll discuss one big reason why some people still refuse to get vaccinated. Just a few months ago. The cdc said vaccinated. People didn't have to wear masks in most settings but this week the agency reversed course saying vaccinated. People should wear masks at times. What do the recommendations actually say tania and why the sudden shift in position so in its latest guidance the c. d. c. says vaccinated people should once again wear masks in public indoor settings under certain circumstances for example if you live in an area with high levels of kobe transmission which includes people who live in places with more than fifty cases per one hundred thousand people in the last week the agency also recommended universal. Masking all k. Through twelve schools including all students teachers and staff. The cdc says the reason for the shift is new data about the delta variant and breakthrough infections. Delta's known to be much more transmissible than previous strains and appears to produce about a thousand times as much virus in the body as the original strain there have been reports of breakthrough infections among fully vaccinated people and in rare cases they may be able to transmit it to others so the reason behind vaccinated people wearing masks is to prevent them from transmitting the virus people who cannot get vaccinated such as children under twelve. Or those who are immuno-compromised breakthrough infections are expected as no vaccine is one hundred percent effective and they may be more common than we thought with the delta variant according to data from the uk in israel the vaccines are still extremely good at preventing severe disease and death. The vast majority of those hospitalized with kobe right now are unvaccinated. If you're vaccinated and you get co bid it doesn't mean the vaccine didn't work as former surgeon general jerome atoms. Put it in a tweet. Think of the virus like the ocean the vaccine like a life vest. You may still get wet but your life vest vaccine significantly lessens. The chance you'll drown and getting wet doesn't mean the life vest didn't work over the past. Several weeks cases deaths in hospitalizations. All been rising in the us. We have defenses against the disease but some people won't use them. Vaccinations have stalled and some unvaccinated people. Still refuse to wear masks. Most of us are baffled by all this. Why are people so resistant josh. I think there are lots of reasons. But there's one big one. Many people still do not think. Kovic is a serious and deadly disease. There are two factors that contribute to this one has to do with numbers. The other has to do with who we listened to. Let's look at the numbers. I we have three hundred thirty million people in this country. Cdc data shows that during the eighteen months of the pandemic two point three million have been admitted to the hospital and indication of serious illness. Now imagine a bowl of three hundred million marbles and then drop into million more. They'd be hard to spot so there's a good chance that out of hundreds of millions of americans. Somebody might not know another person who's had a severe kobe. 'bout it's easier to dismiss it as a mile illness. If severe disease is not part of your personal experience and that appears to be what. Unvaccinated people believe in june the kaiser family foundation polled people about getting the vaccine fifty seven percent of unvaccinated. Adults said. what's in the news about. Kovic is generally exaggerated only twenty two percent of vaccinated adult say this and seventy one percent of unvaccinated adults. Say they're not at all worried or not too worried about getting sick from the virus. That's pretty mind boggling. Who are taking their kids from that. Belief has been reinforced by lot of people over the past year and a half. Who have said that cove isn't serious. Psychologist robert shell dini of arizona. State university studies how people form beliefs and what influences them. So he and. I talked about this. People pay a lot of attention to what others around them. Friends family neighbors political leaders. Say or do shall dini says if others who share your values have a particular attitude that makes it more legit. The local patterns of low vaccine rates certain counties in alabama or missouri for instance are examples of neighbors influencing neighbors. In this way. Then there are the big national influencers. We all heard donald trump. Say that cova does not a big deal no worse than the flu. A lot of republican congress people governors railed against mask wearing and refused to wear masks. Themselves shall points out. These leaders were sewing uncertainty and uncertainty about what to do amplify their social influence. Now we're seeing the results as deaths in hospitalizations race higher and higher among unvaccinated. People but attitudes can change shall dini says social disapproval changes them not yelling or finger-pointing but if local leaders say that shunning vaccines hurts the community and hurts people themselves that can be surprisingly effective these notions ripple around neighborhoods the vaccines. He hopes will follow those ripples..

cdc tanya lewis josh fishman Kovic jerome atoms tania Delta robert shell dini israel kaiser family foundation Cdc josh uk dini us State university
"tanya lewis" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

01:57 min | 2 months ago

"tanya lewis" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"Just a few months ago. The cdc said vaccinated. People didn't have to wear masks in most settings but this week the agency reversed course saying vaccinated. People should wear masks at times. What do the recommendations actually say tania and why the sudden shift in position so in its latest guidance the c. d. c. says vaccinated people should once again wear masks in public indoor settings under certain circumstances for example if you live in an area with high levels of kobe transmission which includes people who live in places with more than fifty cases per one hundred thousand people in the last week the agency also recommended universal. Masking all k. Through twelve schools including all students teachers and staff. The cdc says the reason for the shift is new data about the delta variant and breakthrough infections. Delta's known to be much more transmissible than previous strains and appears to produce about a thousand times as much virus in the body as the original strain there have been reports of breakthrough infections among fully vaccinated people and in rare cases they may be able to transmit it to others so the reason behind vaccinated people wearing masks is to prevent them from transmitting the virus people who cannot get vaccinated such as children under twelve. Or those who are immuno-compromised breakthrough infections are expected as no vaccine is one hundred percent effective and they may be more common than we thought with the delta variant according to data from the uk in israel the vaccines are still extremely good at preventing severe disease and death. The vast majority of those hospitalized with kobe right now are unvaccinated. If you're vaccinated and you get co bid it doesn't mean the vaccine didn't work as former surgeon general jerome atoms. Put it in a tweet. Think of the virus like the ocean the vaccine like a life vest. You may still get wet but your life vest vaccine significantly lessens. The chance you'll drown and getting wet doesn't mean the life vest didn't work

cdc tanya lewis josh fishman Kovic jerome atoms tania Delta robert shell dini israel kaiser family foundation Cdc josh uk dini us State university
"tanya lewis" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

06:25 min | 3 months ago

"tanya lewis" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"Pandemic bring you up to speed on the science behind the most urgent questions about the virus and the disease we this defy research and you understand what it really means. I'm tanya lewis. I'm josh fishman. And where scientific. American senior health editors. Today we'll talk about clinics for long-haul cova patients the rise of the delta vary. And what you knew about it and using barbershops to get vaccines to communities. That need them most early. In the pandemic there were some reports of people with odd symptoms such as fatigue and memory issues that continued long after their acute infection. Now these long haulers are getting some specialized help more and more. Data's coming out about long cohen. That's serious physical and mental effects that can last half the year after people. I get infected. The latest study came out last week in the journal. Nature medicine researchers looked at health records for a few hundred people in bergen norway. That was almost everyone in the city. Diagnosed with cohen. During several months in twenty twenty overall sixty one percent of the group had symptoms six months after they were first infected. Their most common problem was fatigue followed by difficulty concentrating. Disturb smell or taste memory trouble and a hard time breathing to striking things about these patients. One was that many had just a mild or moderate case of kobe at the star. The other was that a were young age. Sixteen to thirty other. Studies have reported similar symptom cluster. Such as one by university washington. Researchers that found about thirty percent of people was covered. Had these lingering troubles to doctors know what's causing these problems. That still a mystery. Tanya some people have organ damage related to the virus infection but some do not doctors are trying to figure out how best to treat them. Siam contributor melville newsome wrote this week about new covered recovery clinics that treat the whole patient rather than making people run from a lung doctor to a neurologist to an immunologist patients say the coordinated care helps and they feel more hopeful since they're being taken seriously and not dismissed as crank cases the nih is also taking it seriously spending about a billion dollars to study the disease. It now has an official job breaker of name post acute so calais of sars kobe to infection melba notes. However there's racial imbalance showing up at these clinics overwhelmingly. The people referred there are white but people of color are more likely to get cove it so access barriers. Such as lack of health insurance are likely keeping care away from many people who need it. It's yet another burden added to the healthy body. that's already hurting people. In the pandemic. Let's talk about the delta variant. It's red for more than seventy countries and it's now the dominant variant in the us. How worried should we be. The delta variant is definitely concerning particularly for unvaccinated people. It's already causing another surge in the uk where it makes up the vast majority of cases and a company that's been tracking virus sequences in the us estimates this variant now counts for about forty percent of cases. Here making it more than twice as prevalent as the alpha variant. That was previously the most common. As you've noted before josh research from the uk suggests delta is at least forty percent more transmissible than alpha and almost twice as likely to result in hospitalization. The data are a bit murky on whether it actually causes more severe disease or not though so far it hasn't actually caused a huge uptick in hospitalizations or deaths in the uk. Still it's spreading widely in the us. Where only about half. The population is fully vaccinated far less in some areas experts. Say it's not likely to cause another devastating nationwide surge like the one. We had last winter but it will probably lead to flare ups in some states. Where fewer people have been vaccinated such as alabama or mississippi and the risk could increase in places where hotter temperatures or more people to spend time in air conditioned indoor settings where the corona virus can easily spread. The sounds pretty grim. What can we do about it. The good news is that the vaccines work. More data from the uk show that two doses of the pfizer vaccine were ninety six percent effective at preventing hospitalization and two doses of the astrazeneca vaccine were ninety two percent effective but need both shots. A single dose of astrazeneca was only seventy one percent effective at preventing hospitalization and one dose of both vaccines was only around thirty four percent effective at preventing infection. We don't know yet how. Well the johnson and johnson vaccine works against the delta variant but it's likely to provide some protection meanwhile the world health organization is urging even vaccinated people to keep wearing masks and practicing social distancing just to be on the safe side given how much viruses still circulating. Cdc has not changed. Its guidance. Though it's still says vaccinated people don't need a mask unless they want to but with the delta being so transmissible it couldn't hurt to err on the side of caution. There are still plenty of people who are skeptical about getting vaccinated sometimes for valid reasons. Now some efforts are trying to build trust by reaching people in their neighbourhoods. The rate of cova. Vaccinations among people of color. Lags behind that of white people access barriers are one reason for this and so are negative experiences with the medical profession that we distrust lack run. Barber shops and hair salons may be able to counter. Some of this says stephen. Thomas who directs the university of maryland center for health equity for the last fifteen years hamas has been researching the trust placed in barbers and stylus by their communities. And he says it's a powerful thing he's been training these people to help educate their clients about ways to prevent diseases such as diabetes. Now this expertise is helping with co vaccines thomas's group is part of a white house shots at the shop campaign. Barbers and stylus are getting trained to talk to people about the benefits of vaccines versus the risks building on long relationships these conversations which can happen while snipping and combing are not lectures. And they're not magic and they don't convince all downers but they do have an effect on many people. Some shops have become up vaccination sites staffed by local health clinics solving access problems by bringing free vaccines into the neighborhood. Thomas's project is called the health advocates in reach and research and that rebates naturally to pay..

tanya lewis josh fishman acute infection cohen melville newsome uk Pandemic bergen Siam fatigue astrazeneca Tanya norway nih
"tanya lewis" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

02:08 min | 3 months ago

"tanya lewis" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"Early. In the pandemic there were some reports of people with odd symptoms such as fatigue and memory issues that continued long after their acute infection. Now these long haulers are getting some specialized help more and more. Data's coming out about long cohen. That's serious physical and mental effects that can last half the year after people. I get infected. The latest study came out last week in the journal. Nature medicine researchers looked at health records for a few hundred people in bergen norway. That was almost everyone in the city. Diagnosed with cohen. During several months in twenty twenty overall sixty one percent of the group had symptoms six months after they were first infected. Their most common problem was fatigue followed by difficulty concentrating. Disturb smell or taste memory trouble and a hard time breathing to striking things about these patients. One was that many had just a mild or moderate case of kobe at the star. The other was that a were young age. Sixteen to thirty other. Studies have reported similar symptom cluster. Such as one by university washington. Researchers that found about thirty percent of people was covered. Had these lingering troubles to doctors know what's causing these problems. That still a mystery. Tanya some people have organ damage related to the virus infection but some do not doctors are trying to figure out how best to treat them. Siam contributor melville newsome wrote this week about new covered recovery clinics that treat the whole patient rather than making people run from a lung doctor to a neurologist to an immunologist patients say the coordinated care helps and they feel more hopeful since they're being taken seriously and not dismissed as crank cases the nih is also taking it seriously spending about a billion dollars to study the disease. It now has an official job breaker of name post acute so calais of sars kobe to infection melba notes. However there's racial imbalance showing up at these clinics overwhelmingly. The people referred there are white but people of color are more likely to get cove it so access barriers. Such as lack of health insurance are likely keeping care away from many people who need it.

tanya lewis josh fishman acute infection cohen melville newsome uk Pandemic bergen Siam fatigue astrazeneca Tanya norway nih
"tanya lewis" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

05:08 min | 3 months ago

"tanya lewis" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"Welcome to kobe quickly. Scientific american podcast serious. This is your fast track update on the covid. Pandemic we bring you up to speed on the science behind the most urgent questions about the virus and the disease we demystify the research and help you understand what it really means. I'm tanya lewis. I'm josh fishman. Where scientific american senior health editors today we're talking about the danger of the delta variant and the path work vaccine effort around the world and lottery tickets or beers for a shot in the us the latest virus variant to grab headlines is called delta. Why are scientists particularly concerned about it josh. Because it's more transmissible and it seems to be putting more people in the hospital. Tanya and it's on the rise all around the globe delta was first spotted in india and spread quickly to seventy four countries in england. It accounts for ninety percent of new cases taking over from the version called alpha. It's got a bunch of mutations. That seem to help it. Get inside human cells and vague. Antibodies that for it. Researchers at public health england found the chances of people passing delta around their households were sixty four percent higher than with alpha. That's a big jump. England had started opening up more recently to couldn't that have also led to more infections in addition to some feature of the variant itself. Yeah there's stuff going on that can heighten the delta numbers people started traveling and businesses and restaurants. Were opening. But the bottom line here is. There's a steep climb in delta cases and delta appears to send twice as many people to the hospital as alpha does. that's severe illness. Such as being unable to breathe. A lot of these people are younger. Underage thirty according to research in the medical journal. The lancet now this isn't all doom even with delta vaccines keep people safe health records in scotland. Show two shots of the pfizer. Vaccine blocked delta infection in eighty percent of people both the pfizer and astrazeneca. Vaccines kept practically everyone. Who got those shots out of the hospital. Early data from england show. So what's this all mean already in the us delta accounts for ten percent of infections. So it's coming. With summer reopenings and people mingling unvaccinated. People could get delta during the next few months setting up ugly fall getting vaccinated. The numbers show is the best route to keeping infections. Down and getting live closer to normal more than half of the adult. Us population has been fully vaccinated. Now what's the situation like in other countries so far most of the vaccines have gone to the wealthiest countries in many low income countries. Less than one percent of people have gotten a single dose. An international effort called kovacs was supposed to fill this gap it's goal was to distribute two billion vaccine doses by the end of this year but as freelance contributor. Sarah reirden reported for us earlier. This week kovacs is far behind where it needs to be a big part of the problem. Is that wealthy countries bought up all the vaccine doses before many vaccines even approved kovacs. Says part of the delay was because it lacked enough funding. Early on to. Secure those doses. Even when vaccines are available they may be perceived as less effective or less safe than vaccines available in richer countries example in the democratic republic of the congo one point seven million doses of astrazeneca's vaccine sat idle while european drug regulators. Wade the risk of blood clots by the time the vaccines were cleared for use. They were about to expire and many shipped elsewhere. Even if kovacs reaches its goal it would still only vaccinate twenty percent of every country's population so many countries have been forced to negotiate their own deals with vaccine makers as well. There is some good news. Wealthy countries recently pledged a total of eight hundred seventy million vaccines to kovacs half of them by the end of this year but that still leaves a long way to go clearly. Vaccination is a lifesaving idea but in the us it's been tough persuading some people to get these shots now. States and businesses are using creative laura's to get folks to roll up their sleeves and you wrote about some free stuff people can get. What kinds of rewards well. Several states including ohio. California new york have created lotteries with prizes ranging up to a million dollars or more for people who've gotten vaccinated some states are also offering vaccinated teenagers. The chance to win scholarships to state colleges and universities other states are trying more unusual approaches. West virginia is raffling off rifles and shotguns. Washington state is leading marijuana. Dispensaries give out free joints and new jersey and connecticut have been giving away free beer. These offers may not last forever. So if you've just gotten backdated for updates these kinds of incentives work experts say a survey of unvaccinated. People found that offering a cash reward or saying they wouldn't need to wear masks anymore made people more likely to say they would get shot and it's the end result means more vaccinated people. That's a good thing..

Sarah reirden scotland india twenty percent ninety percent england josh fishman tanya lewis eighty percent kovacs Less than one percent ten percent seventy four countries This week seven million doses eight hundred seventy million twice one point two billion vaccine doses Tanya
"tanya lewis" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

01:54 min | 3 months ago

"tanya lewis" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"The latest virus variant to grab headlines is called delta. Why are scientists particularly concerned about it josh. Because it's more transmissible and it seems to be putting more people in the hospital. Tanya and it's on the rise all around the globe delta was first spotted in india and spread quickly to seventy four countries in england. It accounts for ninety percent of new cases taking over from the version called alpha. It's got a bunch of mutations. That seem to help it. Get inside human cells and vague. Antibodies that for it. Researchers at public health england found the chances of people passing delta around their households were sixty four percent higher than with alpha. That's a big jump. England had started opening up more recently to couldn't that have also led to more infections in addition to some feature of the variant itself. Yeah there's stuff going on that can heighten the delta numbers people started traveling and businesses and restaurants. Were opening. But the bottom line here is. There's a steep climb in delta cases and delta appears to send twice as many people to the hospital as alpha does. that's severe illness. Such as being unable to breathe. A lot of these people are younger. Underage thirty according to research in the medical journal. The lancet now this isn't all doom even with delta vaccines keep people safe health records in scotland. Show two shots of the pfizer. Vaccine blocked delta infection in eighty percent of people both the pfizer and astrazeneca. Vaccines kept practically everyone. Who got those shots out of the hospital. Early data from england show. So what's this all mean already in the us delta accounts for ten percent of infections. So it's coming. With summer reopenings and people mingling unvaccinated. People could get delta during the next few months setting up ugly fall getting vaccinated. The numbers show is the best route to keeping infections. Down and getting live closer to normal

Sarah reirden scotland india twenty percent ninety percent england josh fishman tanya lewis eighty percent kovacs Less than one percent ten percent seventy four countries This week seven million doses eight hundred seventy million twice one point two billion vaccine doses Tanya
"tanya lewis" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

05:05 min | 4 months ago

"tanya lewis" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"Hi and welcome to covid quickly. A scientific american podcast series. This is your fast-track update on the covid. Pandemic we bring you up to speed on the science behind most urgent questions about the virus and the disease we demystify the research and help you understand what it really means. I'm tanya lewis. And i'm josh fishman. Where scientific american senior health 's today we're going to explain how cova deaths have been seriously undercounted in many parts of the us and we'll discuss the raging debate over the origins of the pandemic causing virus a wild animal or a sloppy human lab. We know that. Kobe has caused unthinkable number of deaths. More than half a million in the us alone. But you've been looking at new research. Tanya and could the true number of deaths during the pandemic be even larger since have looked at the number of excess deaths or deaths beyond the amount you'd expect in a typical year and showed that there were far more deaths than usual in twenty twenty at the national and state levels in a new pre print study andrew stokes professor of population health at boston university and his colleagues calculated excess deaths at the county level disparities how these deaths were attributed to kobe in different parts of the country rural counties especially ones in the south and west had the highest rates of excess deaths not attributed to covid. Some of these. Were likely cova deaths that were mis attributed to other illnesses especially early on when kobe testing was limited others may have been deaths from other causes. That indirectly resulted from the pandemic social and economic fallout. Why did this miscount occur. More often in rural areas in cities deaths often happened in hospitals were doctors or medical examiner's pronounce the cause of death but in rural areas. Jobs often done by coroners or other elected officials who don't have a medical background stokes. His team hypothesized that. In some cases a coroner's political views might have influenced likelihood of attributing and death dacoven regardless of what caused the deaths. It's important to understand the true impact the pandemic has had on communities especially those that were disproportionately affected by it. The big noisy argument this week is about the origin of the coronavirus. That causes cohen was stars kobe to over from wild animals or did it escape from a lab in china. You've written about this dispute josh. What's your take all this. In my opinion tanya we need less opinion and more facts. Both of these theories are largely fact free. They're both built on assumptions. In circumstantial evidence that hasn't stopped politicians journalists from sounding off about them. There are piles assumption behind the lab. League guy. One is that the virus had unique features. That could only have been genetically engineered in a lab. That's not been proven. In fact one feature actually appears in a bunch of related corona viruses. Another notion is that the wuhan institute of raji in the same city where the virus was first detected was sloppy perhaps the lab brought the virus in then infected. Workers carried it to the community. The lab took its database with collected viruses off line. Perhaps it did so to hide. This link labs can be sloppy but there's no direct evidence for this sequence. We've got nothing showing that sars koby to was in the lab before the outbreak many scientists think a natural spillover event from wildlife is a likely scenario but that requires some assumptions. Too right. yep it's this in nature billions of corona viruses are constantly mutating and perhaps one went from bats into another animal then it jumped to humans. It's an assumption because nobody has found the mystery animal that does seem like a big missing piece. It is but it takes a long time to find these missing links. After the original sars disease broke out in two thousand and three it took fourteen years for scientists to find bats that i had the virus after hiv was detected. It took almost twenty years to find its route through chimpanzees. Still you're right. It's a gaping hole. So is there anyone out there. Taking the right approach to figuring out where stars kobe to came from yes. Joe biden is last week. The director of national intelligence announced that. Us spy agency's thought. All of these ideas fell way. Short of proof so biden told them to go back to the drawing board gathered more facts and give us a report in ninety days also some respected researchers published a letter in the journal. Science saying both ideas needed to be considered and scientists need to collect better evidence. It's the same message. Stop bloviating opinions based on assumptions and go get some facts. Do you think that's going to give us an answer. I hope so. Probably not as fast as talking heads. Want remember how many years it took for those other diseases but we should have a more informed idea corona virus origins if we stick to the evidence. Now you're up to speed. Thanks for joining us. Come back in.

Joe biden china josh fishman fourteen years tanya lewis last week two thousand three Tanya ninety days Both both ideas More than half a million biden twenty twenty first andrew stokes both billions this week
"tanya lewis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:10 min | 1 year ago

"tanya lewis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And infectious diseases and now a household name as the nation's leading the scientific voice during this crisis let's turn now towards the search for a vaccine when we could expect the vaccine and has your view changed on this no my my view hasn't changed so let me just reiterate it again we're going to go into an advanced phase three trial in the beginning of the summer with more than one candidate and it's going to be very large trial involving tens of thousands of individuals and we hope that by the time we get into the mid to late fall if things work out okay we don't get into any unanticipated speed bumps that by the end of this calendar year in the beginning of twenty one twenty twenty one that we will have a vaccine or maybe more than one vaccine that we will be able to deploy and utilize to protect people are you worried that we will see hesitancy from people about getting the vaccine driven by misinformation that seems to be proliferating already yeah that's always a worry that I have already know it dates back to the vaccine hesitancy around measles that we saw resulted in the unfortunate rebound the resurgence of measles in a country that it essentially eliminated measles I'm always concerned about the general anti science attitude and particularly the anti vaccine attitude so what we have to do is we have to intensify what we call community outreach to be very transparent with the community to talk to them about the trials to ensure that in the conduct of trials we don't compromise safety and we don't compromise scientific integrity we've got to be very open and honest and transparent about that and reach out to the community so they won't be hesitant to take a vaccine which could be life saving for them a question from another researcher Columbia University virologist Dr Angela Rasmussen Dr Fauci I'd like to know specifically what kind of evidence of vaccine efficacy would meaningfully accelerate vaccine approval in the US I also like to know if trial enrollment is sufficient to get that evidenced by the fall can you explain what she's asking yeah she wants to know what level of efficacy is going to be adequate I mean obviously what we would like to see is something that approaches seventy percent because if you do their calculations and modeling seventy percent protection of the community would give you what we call herd immunity we're hoping for that she also asked the question that's important is that what about the amount of enrollment I don't have any difficulty in thinking that we're gonna win role thirty thousand people per vaccine fifteen thousand in the control on fifteen thousand the experimental so all you need is a certain number of infections in the trial and you have a statistical projection of how many infections you would need to be able to determine if the vaccine works or not if we get those number of infections we should be able to have a determination of whether or not the vaccine is effective in obviously throughout the entire trial you're looking at safety when we talked about medical disparities on this program especially when it comes to testing out new candidate medicines we've had experts from African American communities also point to a reason people of color may not wish to participate and it's really a question of trust they they they point to the Tuskegee syphilis experiments the exploitation of people like Henrietta lacks is this a part of the problem of testing and something that NIH can fix I don't think N. I. H. can fix it alone but we certainly can pay attention to an IRA and that's what I mean about community outreach with doing that already right now we're reaching out to communities of different demographic groups but particularly focusing on those who have a reason to distrust because of the history of being mistreated so we have a very special effort to do outreach to minority communities not only African Americans but let TNX as well as native Americans because those of the minority populations that we seem to get the short end of the stick on things we want to make sure they understand that this is something that could be very beneficial to them particularly since as we know so well that with coronavirus there's a disproportionate burden of infection and complications leading to serious outcomes among the minority populations particularly African Americans so we really do want to get them into the vaccine trials because we need to know if it does work in them in a safe way so that when a vaccine becomes available we can make sure is equitably distributed to the people who need it the most in an interview recently with the AMA editor how about you you said that research shows that even with a vaccine immunization will not grant people long lasting protection and we could still be re infected yeah I wanna make sure that that's not taken out of context so let me clarify because there was some misunderstanding with that statement what I was saying is that the normal type of common cold corona viruses that we have decades and decades of experience with the ones that are relatively trivial in their clinical effect the common cold immunity to those generally doesn't last ten twenty years it generally lasts about a year we do not know at this point and I emphasize we do not know how long protection would last after someone recovers from infection we do know that we can induce a good response with the vaccine at least in the phase one studies that we've done the question is how long is that protection gonna last if it lasts a year or more or two or three or four that would be great we don't know that but if it does have a finite limited amount of durability we can always boost it so I'm really not concerned about the durability I just want to get to step one which is that it does protect at least for a reasonable period of time a question from the science communication world Scientific American editor Tanya Lewis do you think the pandemic is likely to continue spreading until a vaccine is ready or could it burn out on its own with possible later spikes of reinfection or are we just going to see infections plateau at a very high rate lastly how optimistic are you well I'm always cautiously optimistic about these things because I feel that we can put an effort that could contain it I mean the virus if left to its own devices would be out of control but that's not happening because we're doing something to contain it you asked about different potential scenarios you know all of the above are possible I do not think of the one of the things I'm fairly certain about is that this virus is not going to disappear from the planet the way sars did.

"tanya lewis" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:09 min | 1 year ago

"tanya lewis" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And infectious diseases and now a household name as the nation's leading the scientific voice during this crisis let's turn now towards the search for a vaccine may when we could expect the vaccine and has your view changed on this no my my view hasn't changed so let me just reiterate it again we're going to go into an advanced phase three trial in the beginning of the summer with more than one candidate and it's going to be very large trial involving tens of thousands of individuals and we hope that by the time we get into the mid to late fall if things work out okay we don't get into any unanticipated speed bumps that by the end of this calendar year in the beginning of twenty one twenty twenty one that we will have a vaccine or maybe more than one vaccine that we will be able to deploy and utilize to protect people are you worried that we will see hesitancy from people about getting the vaccine driven by misinformation that seems to be proliferating already yeah that's always a worry that I have already know it dates back to the vaccine hesitancy around measles that we saw resulted in the unfortunate rebound the resurgence of measles in a country that it essentially eliminated measles I'm always concerned about the general anti science attitude and particularly the anti vaccine attitude so what we have to do is we have to intensify what we call community outreach to be very transparent with the community to talk to them about the trials to ensure that in the conduct of trials we don't compromise safety and we don't compromise scientific integrity we've got to be very open and honest and transparent about that and reach out to the community so they won't be hesitant to take a vaccine which could be life saving for them a question from another researcher Columbia University virologist Dr Angela Rasmussen Dr Fauci I'd like to know specifically what kind of evidence of vaccine efficacy would meaningfully accelerate vaccine approval in the US I also like to know if trial enrollment is sufficient to get that evidenced by the fall can you explain what she's asking yeah she wants to know what level of efficacy is going to be adequate I mean obviously what we would like to see is something that approaches seventy percent because if you do that calculations of modeling seventy percent protection of the community would give you what we call herd immunity we're hoping for that she also asked the question that's important is that what about the amount of enrollment I don't have any difficulty in thinking that we're gonna win role thirty thousand people per vaccine fifteen thousand in the control arm and fifteen thousand experimental so all you need is a certain number of infections in the trial and you have a statistical projection of how many infections you would need to be able to determine if the vaccine works or not if we get those number of infections we should be able to have a determination of whether or not the vaccine is effective in obviously throughout the entire trial you're looking at safety when we talked about medical disparities on this program especially when it comes to testing out new candidate medicines we've had experts from African American communities also point to a reason people of color may not wish to participate and it's really a question of trust they they they point to the Tuskegee syphilis experiments the exploitation of people like Henrietta lacks is this a part of the problem of testing and something that NIH can fix I don't think N. I. H. can fix it alone but we certainly can pay attention to an IRA and that's what I mean about community outreach with doing that already right now we're reaching out to communities of different demographic groups but particularly focusing on those who have a reason to distrust because of the history of being mistreated so we have a very special effort to do outreach to minority communities not only African Americans but let's see next as well as native Americans because those are the minority populations that we seem to get the short end of the stick on things we want to make sure they understand that this is something that could be very beneficial to them particularly since as we know so well that with corona virus there's a disproportionate burden of infection and complications leading to serious outcomes among the minority populations particularly African Americans so we really do want to get them into the vaccine trials because we need to know if it does work in them in a safe way so that when a vaccine becomes available we can make sure it's equitably distributed to the people who need it the most in an interview recently with the AMA editor how about you you said that research shows that even with a vaccine immunization will not grant people long lasting protection and we could still be re infected yeah I'm gonna make sure that that's not taken out of context so let me clarify because there was some misunderstanding with that statement what I was saying is that the normal type of common cold corona viruses that we have decades and decades of experience with the ones that are relatively trivial in their clinical effect the common cold immunity to those generally doesn't last ten twenty years it generally lasts about a year we do not know at this point and I emphasize we do not know how long protection would last after someone recovers from an infection we do know that we can induce a good response with the vaccine at least in the phase one studies that we've done the question is how long is that protection gonna last if it lasts a year or more or two or three or four that would be great we don't know that but if it does have a finite limited amount of durability we can always boost it so I'm really not concerned about the durability I just want to get to step one which is that it does protect at least for a reasonable period of time a question from the science communication world Scientific American editor Tanya Lewis do you think the pandemic is likely to continue spreading until a vaccine is ready or could it burn out on its own with possible later spikes of reinfection or are we just going to see infections platter order very high rate mostly how optimistic are you well I'm always cautiously optimistic about these things because I feel that we can put an effort that could contain it I mean the virus if left to its own devices would be out of control but that's not happening because we're doing something to contain it you asked about different potential scenarios you know all of the above are possible I do not think of the one of the things I'm fairly certain about is that this virus is not going to disappear from the planet.

"tanya lewis" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

08:45 min | 1 year ago

"tanya lewis" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"The network strutton chorus of the Metropolitan Opera. This weekend as part of its at home gala. Yes they were performing together alone all in their homes. This is democracy now democracy now dot org the quarantine report. I mean. He couldn't then more than two hundred. Seven thousand people have died. Worldwide from cove at nineteen but there are still no drugs proven to help treat the disease. This comes out as fallout continues from President. Trump's dangerous suggestion last week that injecting or ingesting disinfectants could help patients get better disinfectant knocks. It out in a minute. Four minute and their way we can do something like that By injection inside or almost cleaning because you see gets into the lungs and it does a tremendous Nobilo interesting dejected. After President Trump's remarks on Thursday governors and other state officials reported a spike in phone calls about taking disinfectants trump. Attempted to walk back has come and saying he was being sarcastic. But everyone saw the videotape. Meanwhile the FDA has issued warnings against people self medicating with anti malarial drugs chloroquine and hydroxy chloroquine medications again. President trump also erroneously recommended after multiple deaths and poisonings were reported for more we're joined by Tanya Lewis Associate editor for health and medicine at scientific American whose recent pieces headlined. Here's what we know about the most touted drugs tested for Cova Nineteen Tony. Welcome to democracy. Now tot start off by just responding to this latest presidential suggestion and the horror of it for states around the country that reported hundreds and hundreds of people calling in to say okay to injector ingest. Clorox our lives saw me. I mean as you mentioned the president's comments You know really just there. Were not really based in any sort of scientific evidence there. There's actually a lot of danger in injecting these types of substances into the body. So I'm not quite sure what the president was referring to exactly But those disinfectants are definitely recommended for use on surfaces. Not on the human body or in the human body so Lewis. Can you talk about what is being looked at right now for people to understand for example Another drug that he recommended was hydroxy chloroquine and yet the studies had not been done talk about the latest round of studies that have just begun results of which have just begun to come out sure. So as you mentioned the drugs hydroxy chloroquine clerk clan are both anti malarial drugs. That are also used sometimes for rheumatoid arthritis and lupus which are autoimmune disorders But they are now being tested in clinical trials for Kobe. Nineteen because there's some suggestion that they might work as an antiviral or to prevent replication of the virus as well as to Affect the immune system and kind of prevent that sort of runaway immune reaction that we see in some of the most severe cases but as we as it stands right now. Those clinical trials are ongoing. There have been a few studies that have come out with these were not randomized clinical trials so basically in order to show any kind of benefit you really need to have randomized explain what randomized means stir so that just means that you're giving a random subset of patients the drug and a random subset of placebo so that way you can kind of really compare the effect of the drug so they don't know if they're getting the actual drug they're getting the placebo like nothing fake and it's very hard to do that right. If patients are sick and the president recommends a drug could save you. It's very hard to have them be willing to join a randomized study where they might not actually get drug exactly. And that's the concern here. Is that if you give patients the choice. Most of the time they will say yes. Give me the drug because there really isn't anything else available so in order to really show that there's a benefit or not. We really need to have these types of randomized trials. I want to turn to stat news. Which rates reported that the summary of a study of the antiviral drug grim death severe was inadvertently posted to the website of the World Health Organization Thursday according to the results which were quickly removed from the site. The drug quote failed to speed the improvement of patients with Kovic nineteen prevent them from dying unquote. The drug's manufacturer Gilead Sciences which President Trump is also touted. Refuted the results saying the data suggested a potential benefit World Health Organization spokesperson Daniele because he told Stat News a draft manuscript which provided by the authors to WHO and inadvertently posted on the website and taken down as soon as the mistake was noticed. The manuscript is now undergoing peer review. And we're waiting for a final version before. Who COMMENTS ON IT Tania Lewis talk about room desktop here and what we know so far sure. Sarim does Aveer is another antiviral drug. That is supposed to work by interfering with the viruses replication And it was originally developed. Freeh Bola But was later decided. You're they decided not to use it because it wasn't as effective as some of the other treatments But it was found to be effective against many other credit viruses like SARS and Murs in mice and in cell culture so this is a potentially promising candidate but as you mentioned some of the early data that was leaked. Mays suggests that it may not have much of a benefit and may not decrease the risk of death. Of course I have to say that those those data have not yet been made widely available and are not You know peer reviewed and so it's hard to sort of comment on that data without seeing the full data. But we'll just have to wait and see in the coming weeks when the official data's is released how effective it really is or not if you could talk about what convalescent plasma is sure so. That's another potential treatment that is being tested. Basically when you take the blood plasma. It's everything except for the red blood cells and you take the plasma from somebody who's recovered from the disease in this case Kobe. Nineteen and that plasma into a patient who is currently battling the virus and the ideas that the antibodies from that first patient will help some patients sort of fight off the virus But this is still fairly preliminary There are some trials going on now. And at this point you we'll just have to kind of see but it's a potentially promising treatment and can you in the last thirty seconds we have talked about the FDA now just approving a home kits now these four cove nineteen just to test if you have it or they for antibodies so there are actually both kinds of tests. The ones that I'm more familiar with are the the arna based tests which are basically tell whether I currently have covered nineteen and just to clarify these at home test. Kits are actually test cook collection kits. So you just collect a sample with the nasal swab and then send that off to the lab to test and the reliability of this. We have ten seconds. Sure so it's at this. Point is pretty early but we we think that they are fairly reliable but again There's always a risk that swab incorrectly. Maybe even have a false negative. Well Tony Lewis. I want to thank you for being with us. Associate editor for health and medicine. At Scientific American will link to your piece. Here's what we know about the most touted drugs tested for Cova. Nineteen and that does it for our show democracy. Now it's working with few people act onsite as possible. The majority of amazing team is working from home. I'm Amy Goodman. This is the quarantine report. Thanks so much for joining us..

President President Trump chloroquine Tony Lewis Cova World Health Organization FDA Associate editor Metropolitan Opera Clorox malarial Amy Goodman lupus Tania Lewis SARS Gilead Sciences Tanya Lewis Freeh Bola Kobe
"tanya lewis" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

WDTK The Patriot

06:09 min | 2 years ago

"tanya lewis" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

"And running back James hill at full back Stephen sure he's number thirty four a wide receiver we have to restore over some junior and raise on Williams Jackson that point and we have Nick potter rack in the big boys from we got where the Mitchell starting left tackle Wayne potter left guard Charlie younger at center and amid the junk in it right guard and Josie hadas at right tackle. of course is we mention slippery rock comes into this game right number ten in division two they're not going to make it easy on us tonight folks I'm telling you right now they have white nomex white jerseys white pants they have a little green trim and in may sometimes I wonder if it's me and my old man eyes but you told me the same thing these numbers will be a little difficult to read tonight numbers are to be a little difficult Nicole it's gonna be a little bit difficult for the team that won eleven three last year made to the super regional one championship and ended up losing the mower name college and so if you could Heil most of the top four floors open a will but I think they're ready for the challenge warriors. he won the toss and they are going to be receiving. so slippery rock thinking from the left to right on your dial in the twenty nineteen season is underway kick off thinking about the two yard line your site ten fifty mexicana twenty makes one man is twenty five all the way up to the thirty yard line good return to start out there by Tanya Lewis said we take a look at that starting offense that you were just talking about Mickey take am Rhein leading this team on the field and and boil tell you what you saw him take some steps last year it's going to be interesting to see how many more steps she takes this year of school is a big board two six four two twenty three you're talking to coach Werner quarterback coach pass game chorus guy can make all the throws as a big time are. formation right now and right under center James to depict the give us wasn't makes one minute responses. or to the thirty five yard line. and a five yard gain on first down it's so cold water so they're gonna come always over and try to run power right down their throats that's exactly what they did they ran a little more when a gap power running between the gap between the center and a life guard good point guard you don't the linebacker they really get five yards on their first here Los back now second five AM right shotgun formation. receivers split near site just under way here home opener twenty nineteen. warriors in those beautiful black uniforms with that golden moment. but James hill falls board maybe a yard and a half almost two yards here you one thing I notice about hill last year make and I know you saw him play this is a young man he doesn't go down at first contact he seems always fall board and that's the key yes absolutely runs low to me is a beautiful running back by comparison standards we definitely runs the ball very very hard. well the mark came almost back to the thirty six yard line so this is going to be a third down and we'll call it three and three quarters. man in motion from the right to the left and right shotgun formation slippery rock shows which they bring it and my back to pass away at the last second nice play there on the defensive side of the ball my number seven Eric Glover Williams a senior from canton Ohio he had a bad out there make good play by the defender absolutely hundred receiver had a seven wrote the defender was able to under cut a little bit it's it's a tough going to make this a little bit tough cuts to make the ball gets to. so the warriors. first a point here Dakota Cup stepping and so not only is he a backup quarterback but he is going to be your puncher as well stands on its own twenty one yard line. brings it in lets it go. point taken all the way back at the twenty five garland makes one man miss at the thirty trying to dance his way out of trouble but not down at the thirty two yard like that again Erica Glover Williams two plates of double duty just made a play on third down into a punt return up to about the thirty two yard line and that is where slippery rock will start with their offense in their first offense of possession the season. how about the backup quarterback Dakota company in the corners well Mrs tell your you know about the cases must be Asopus individual is do whatever you can do to get on the field to contribute you had a guide you did that exact George correct what a great teammate he was. to be able to play with that guy so many emotions slippery rock just under way little swing pass far side makes one bad missed thirty five forty. that's the forty what's the weather mark about they're going to say he stepped out at the thirty eight yard line but as it is back again is six and a first down. they utilize most of the twins a two by two sets to kind of get the numbers on there to their advantage over the left side have a three on two vans and they're able to get six yards on a play for receiver set single separate man in motion for the left to the right they give it to him makes one man miss look out forty forty five first down in more up to about the forty nine yard line boy they move quick quick to the line of scrimmage quick snap the warriors better be prepared for that mix and you can see either Rick definitely respecting the up the front the ways that has much trying to get the ball son left to play shot gun formation gonna keep it on the ground just plow ahead into war your territory up to a ball the forty seven yard line I can't tell you what that number is it's it's bunched up I believe it's twenty nine I think that is indeed twenty nine and that would be great in men the redshirt junior from Berlin Pennsylvania trips far side one near say quickly back to the one described up tempo offense now they're going to slow it down wait for the signal to comment role in reverse the third a senior quarterback Ellen would Georgia shotgun formation good to keep it on the ground again just put his head for trying to plow through that first line of defense not much space this time is spokesman gets up to about the forty four yard line big thirty three for coming. is a big quarterback for slippery rock as well as kid accounted for over three three hundred.

James hill Stephen Williams Jackson thirty two yard thirty eight yard forty seven yard thirty five yard forty four yard forty nine yard thirty six yard twenty one yard three quarters thirty yard five yards one minute five yard six yards two yards two yard
"tanya lewis" Discussed on F1: Beyond The Grid

F1: Beyond The Grid

14:05 min | 3 years ago

"tanya lewis" Discussed on F1: Beyond The Grid

"Me from driving wind was delayed nineteen eighty seven. That was the one where until last lap I had to fight with aired on for the win. Hot conditions treat circuit every leapt on the limit. That was from me personally driving is my best win. But the last was maybe my most important one in in in in different ways because it's supposed to end up my career. I changed from variety back to to to venom miss Flavio. I have the end of my career, Michael Rawson everybody due to anybody wasn't the way too for. So the deem collapsing little bit, I didn't do it Trump me and Shaw was needed. It was to end up my cardio civil species complaining that getting the sorted out, the problems, it just didn't fit together. It was. It was actually, it was over my time was over the seven year was not in a good healthy conditions, and we unhappy during those Benneteau near, yes, I was on. Not necessarily to do with the team of love your. Yes, also didn't fit where well, but also myself it was just, you know, when you get to end of a career sings are getting more difficult you. You start to be also different, moody, you start to be not so happy anymore. And that's all came together and the same time that team. It was brilliant start collapsing bit because my two out of the people he needs from for our and still being in the in the mood where they want ever seen with my children, it just didn't fit together. It was nothing I can say, well, that was the mistake of the deem that was the mistake of engine sick. Now it was a combination of everything, but nevertheless. It was fine. I worked okay, we deem but then I had a big sinus problem, but I carried already for while this me and it gets worse and worse than there was on antibiotics and the physically weakened weak. And then I was coming to a point where just couldn't do it anymore. And for three races out, or let's say, went to hospital to operation and and my problem. But it was for two races not in in the meantime, flabbier made already different plans. He already some new ideas how he could handle averaging. So I had a very difficult. Bad circumstance. We slab situation with Flavio so and then he didn't have me back in the car. I didn't really go back in one way, but the other way I would like to finish the chapter, did he say as much if you want to stop feel any pressure from me? No, no, no, no. Mature. Gadd you just at the Parisian stay at home, the rest of it more than. Listen before he was very gritty shown, but many came to do this duration Ibos in his rich from. Trying to be Sean little bit off, putting me of and. Well, I had my. Male peration I wasn't the hospital and and he scared, but you can try this weekend. You're not fit now and you. We need to see the doctor if you really can do it and all all this bullshit. So we had starting to get lawyers ready in place, ever contract. That's my contact. It's my singing, whatever. And. So finally everything went to and I should be back for the race and unfortunately, just when the race was going on, was it my cool or whatever my father, an airplane and died, so I couldn't do the race. And Sinn flabby was happy into that didn't do the race and then coming hook can I am? And same story again is flabbier together. I think you wait the more you need to be. I just couldn't understand what's going on. I just was disappointed. But anyway, say I go, can I'm an came to organize and everybody kind of Chinese smiled meet a whole buttock basically get so nice to your back, but what you doing here, you know you're sick, you're you're, you're a typical time, your died in in all this. And this cannot be my. My end of my career may end of my career. I haven't show everybody what what I can do. So I really said nothing. I made a breast conference saying that I stopped after this year. So again, five zero and the team was upset. Why did you not discuss this before as we have to do breast bresca noticing? Why didn't he? Because for me, it was clear. I didn't like the way how everything. Handled on to my own stuff. So whatever into the in the boss took him stunts. You can be not furthered. I deem doesn't want everybody Chinese smell issues. Okay. Let's let's see what you can do and then to have position win, the race could slip that was really, and then everybody was my friend in Flavius had win diversion pitchy what you will always quick at Hokkenheim actually, what can I think to my striving stellar speed quite well, Gary. I don't know if you're a religious guy, but fail at US little getting a bit of help from dad Johana stares very simple in trouble. I'm I'm very religious guy. Trump said, forget about it, but to be honest there, yes, I wasn't the boredom and say, listen, there must be some something. I mean in today's looked. Going on in your brain, and now we are one of your first question. Add on his strengths. He's he's concentration is. Brain broke was just brilliant. And here in can I. On my brain just yet you show everybody now what is in you, what you can do, what you ever do and that made my resort g failure performance went to another level that we can. Yeah, I, I actually everything I had my buddy just to prove that it now we're nearly at the end of this wonderful speech you, but if you had your time again, which you do anything different. You know, like everybody in life sheeting in Carnoustie. Can you believe if I know everything. What I know now. I was driving. I was running down remote sport. Now I'm running DM than at the Rosa and I know or this, and that will be just twenty four. Just jumping into EROs, how much success you would have, would you Fallas to drive knowing what. No, I I don't think you can be faster, but you avoid just all the mistakes and there was a lot. Okay. So with the experience you have now you might negotiate the paddock, but but actually you drove for the two best teams in Formula one at that time for aria McLaren let's say this just to. Timber, it will be different rated would start to training every day from the morning and the evening not to be tired after half assistant. So you would have taken it a little bit more seriously. Is it true that you are the man who was responsible for bringing reds boo into Formula one. I guess in somebody's, yes, because I've been the first sportsman offer a pool before the company even started. I was driving for EROs in one thousand nine hundred five in Australia. And there was this man in front of me. I want introduce myself. My name is Mr. Mattie sheets and I would like to sponsor you and fantastic. This is just like Christmas because I was in crop and he was my sponsor, and he says, just there's one Ovum's what's the ballroom? I don't have the money at. I gonna build a company are going to start a company, and I'm very convinced gonna be good. Smile and say. Historian very often before, but in some ways, I like the guy and you like me and we had a good chemistry so we entering can be and we together and we did the deal. I think that deal was at the time, maybe ten thousand dollars or something like this, nothing and to put his company on the helmet because the name didn't even exist. Distant, what did he say? It was going to build a company and gonna give me doesn't dollars if the company on on my helmet, but it was called red bullet? No. I mean, maybe he knows, but I didn't know. So then we were sitting entering something we, we made a handshake deal. Two months later or three months later, I got the telephone callers. I'm used to beg. You remember me. I'm Mr. Matt sheets. Yes, yes. I remember remember we had the Steelers, it's still on and say, yes, of course. I mean remitted here because I just I just started my company so that was the start of a working relation. And that was an, I started this report, and then I went reported into into Bennett on Ari and always carry these me and always responsible them. Remember I was going to do Mr. ripple. Which report Trink and burn even completely bananas because he said nobody goes up a print there and and stopped me do. This was the first casino able made these me, and that was a relationship with started there and growing. And then obviously, there things I don't know finally was was me brought him in, but I, I'm sure I have about of it at why was he interested in you? Was it because he believed in you as a sportsman because he were Austrian law was I was a multi sport fan, I think was very mature your rink fan. I think. Like my way, and I just decided to use motor sport as one of his forms. And at this time, nobody could ever image what this company on on a be, even him probably even him. But he was convinced that she gonna make his way. Okay. So you are sportsman one of his spokesman, but then also became a fifty percent shareholder in Torah. So why did you do that? Well, I mean, I stopped active rating and why we don't do something more together, and he just pulled me out of the at the time and we decided we do this together and. You know, we are very good friends which is sit together. We have an idea and it fits for both of us. We do it. And did you enjoy your time running running a foam, la- one team? Yeah. Nice to get fronts, which still there. We had a very good time and we won the first race about was a great success. Time at should be very good season do sinks report because Adrian and we could transfer lot of the of the. Technical bought. But in the end of the day we made, we make the success happen, Sebastian, the car. We won the first race in months. If you're a member and just had a very good time. I remember there was a good policy after that one, but that was an interesting one because I felt at the time that you were thaw figure to him in a racing context house, he developed over the subsequent ten years is the battle. We see today what you would have expected, knowing what you knew up shortly. Federal came to us. I don't know what twenty four years in our eighteen years, nineteen years, whatever. And he was he's brainwork like thirty and I spins two guys before Tony, Lucia, and and Scott speed in our when Dr stem, they look to your especially Scott speed look to your what you're talking. Didn't have a clue what experience, what two hundred ten on springs resort and which spirits you can transfer to them. Federal is completely different. He's excelled everything, fuel, he filtered it, the good things. He took the betting with them beside and he just put it race by race into into into the ground. So the guy was was just bake grownup erector sauce. And you could see these bakeries, right? He gonna be successful driver. Is he more emotional now than you're expecting. I feel it for Ari. He's become their some emotions that we didn't see in the red, Buddha, the incident with Lewis Hamilton, backer last start in Singapore, maybe even always emotionally been even emotionally in the way in the chairman way in the way of Sebastian. Not lazy way, you know. But what he always head when he smelled benico the possibilities to get success. He took it. You find a way to to to pick it up when he was not successful, his body language face everything. You can read these unappeased emotionally. He just moody. So which of the current drivers on the grid is most like you. To cannot comparison. None on. I just drive of it as a person -ality as well. I mean, does Daniel Ricardo? I look at him enjoying his time. Tanya Lewis is super, very nice, good guy like you. You cannot repeat me. You all you name eunuch. Okay, bug groom. Pre you're starting. You can do another Formula one team which of the current grid. Two drivers on the current grid would race few now money, no object.

Sebastian Michael Rawson Shaw Steelers US Daniel Ricardo Flavio Flavius flabbier Gadd Australia Sinn Trump Sean Tanya Lewis Scott Mr. Mattie
"tanya lewis" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"tanya lewis" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"Uh-huh. Hi, I'm scientific American podcast editor Steve Mirsky, and here's a short piece from the July two thousand eighteen issue of the magazine in the section called advances dispatches from the frontiers of science, technology and medicine. The article is called quick hits and it's a rundown of some science and tech stories from around the globe compiled by assistant news editor, Tanya Lewis from the US Hawaii state legislature announced it wants to get one hundred percent of his energy from renewable sources by twenty forty five. The state already gets more than a quarter of its electric electrically from such sources from the Pacific Ocean, a whale shark set a new distance record for its species by swimming, more than twenty thousand kilometers across the Pacific Ocean in eight hundred forty one days. The creature traveled from off the western coast of Panama to near the Marrianna trench from the UK caterpillars of the oak procession. Ery moth invaded London's parks, this spring, the creatures, long white hairs can irritate, is in skin and caused sometimes deadly allergic reactions from Japan. A Japanese engineer built a giant robot inspired by the animated TV show mobile suit Gundem fulfilling a childhood dream. The robot made by farming machinery company suck. Kebara kick guy, stands eight and a half meters tall and weighs more than seven metric tons from Sweden. Archaeologists discovered the remains of a bloody slaughter in Swedish fort from the fifth century AD the twenty six skeletons. They excavated including those of an old man and a teenager, show wounds from behind, suggesting surprise attack and from Sudan, new high resolution images of a meteorite found in the Nubian desert in two thousand eight revealed. It contains diamonds. Possibly from a lost planet that orbited the sun during the solar systems formation. That was quick hits by Tanya Lewis.

Tanya Lewis Pacific Ocean Steve Mirsky editor news editor Hawaii oak procession US Kebara Marrianna trench Sudan London Nubian desert Japan engineer Panama Sweden Gundem
"tanya lewis" Discussed on Yes, Girl!

Yes, Girl!

02:06 min | 4 years ago

"tanya lewis" Discussed on Yes, Girl!

"Oh man love and i'm going to go to the twitter's sat out two lw at el dubs i just discovered yes girl podcast and here's what i know to be true if you knew about the podcast and didn't tell me you don't love me all guess who loves you l we learned year of you ailing you every bang hashtag 'scope argonne this is from eve carter y'all got these toronto streets looking at me like gravy your help for diary has volunteers who love it gave grow we still praying for him paint many fishermen as international love hair tho ultimately i just love had an internet and everybody came together for tiffany how does show yeah and we're going to do it again thanksgiving is coming up you know how black families love to come together run a good black movie or show for the holidays and we are looking for real crowdpleaser you know there's nothing like a spike lee joint i don't know if you knew this but she's got to have it was his very first spike lee joint thirty years ago oh yes i dead because i want us to be nola darling and live in fort green mirza spike lee and i'm so ready to see the show because now is coming back as an original netflix siri's debut england thanksgiving day and his ten episodes yard so we have a lotta time to dig in binge watch it and then we can talk about it on twitter or facebook wherever but you know you watch it before or after dinner guests i will be doing that and can we please talk about this gasser though do otherwise who's on the show and also steiner underground you know she plays nola darling and she is a brooklyn based art as you know in her twenties and she's drug line life y'all work dating whatever and not just one man but three different men at the same time and just like in the film which i love she's dating mars greer and jamie so you know she's got to have it will bring a drama just like the original film did and they've contemporary is it for two days black woman spike leedirected the entire series and as crater an executive producer along with his producer wife tanya lewis lee who also executive produced which is so refreshing corey because there's no story being told from a woman like nola darling suspect.

twitter argonne nola darling mars greer jamie executive producer corey toronto thanksgiving fort green netflix facebook producer tanya lewis executive thirty years two days
"tanya lewis" Discussed on The PHP: Perez Hilton Podcast

The PHP: Perez Hilton Podcast

02:05 min | 4 years ago

"tanya lewis" Discussed on The PHP: Perez Hilton Podcast

"Pie roe v rhymes with perot at those are delicious caroline pair roe v is delicious catherine this though taye katherine desert oh please stop doing has allowing tottenham names are tiffany ripley i don't wanna be here till tomorrow let's go joe disalow good joe who's next the first of all he gave forty dollars joni mitchell is this the job at seoul that i thought it was a matter you shouted amount next name new i think i know here and i i thought i he hated may i hate you could you please get it live in that they threw god who cares to the next nato had calderon tanya lewis tweet me job it's all tanya louise the muchloved up on ten as stephanie pineda ten stepping it at every round round love ya katie radcliffe thank you janet savoy gave a hundred dollars and it's the burger raise and goose that mic gary dave five hundred dollars no way chris angles dead mick gary you should a lead with that jesus why hundred dollars ongoing chronological order by the day they donated so i started with most recent and ongoing down i don't care continue while chris angles that make gary on your biggest fan andrea fourteen you thank you mahdi saleh that guy's much love money celebrated guys alon draw mathis not a laundromat this at a stage a morgan i gotcha call we love you amy frost forty dollars thank you a me frost andrea symonds coal men much love.

mathis chris gary dave janet savoy tanya lewis tottenham taye katherine Pie roe andrea symonds perot mahdi saleh mick gary katie radcliffe stephanie pineda nato seoul joni mitchell joe disalow hundred dollars forty dollars five hundred dollars