18 Burst results for "Tansy Vega"

"tansy vega" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"tansy vega" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Miller is creator executive producer and show runner of the Handmaid's tale on Hulu, Bruce. Thank you so much for being with us. Thank you for having me. And have you seen the Handmaid's tale and Hulu? What was your experience like watching the show and was any of difficult to watch Jodi from Charlotte, North Carolina? I bought the Handmaid's tale of very disconcerting, especially hard to walk when all of the Handmaid's had just shown the other handmade or when they tortured or physically hurt the women this is Marissa from our county. I was unable to continue watching the Handmaid's tale just after the fourth episode when they featured F GM, which is female genital mutilation. It was too much for me to handle, and I had to stop watching from that point on this is Linda from Los Angeles, California. I have watched the Handmaid's tale. I found it both hard to watch and impossible, not to watch at the same time upcoming season will be especially pulling it for me in light of the Ondo. Owing attacks on women's reproductive rights time is Daphne Abrahams calling from Gardner. Ville, Nevada, I definitely watch him in steel on Hulu terrified he every time but I love it. I haven't watched in several months. And yet, the other night, I had a dream that Gilead was here and June was hiding in my closet, anyway. Definitely strikes fear in my heart but at the great ship. All right. That's our show for today. Thanks so much for listening. I'm tansy Vega. And this is the takeaway..

Hulu Bruce Daphne Abrahams tansy Vega Gardner executive producer Marissa Miller Jodi Gilead GM Los Angeles North Carolina Charlotte Linda Ondo Nevada California
"tansy vega" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"tansy vega" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is the takeaway tansy Vega. Earlier today, Indonesia voters across seventeen thousand islands went to the polls the incumbent president Joko Widodo pulled ahead it into an early lead over former general pervo so beyond two official results are expected to take weeks the country has nearly one hundred ninety million eligible voters making election day. A massive undertaking for Indonesia's government and would fake news swirling and divisiveness on. The rise. Grassroots group is stepping in to make sure the results are fair. I'm joined now by Rebecca Henchi editor at BBC Asia and longtime correspondent in Indonesia. Rebecca, welcome back to the takeaway. Thank you very much. So there are two candidates for president here. They come from very different backgrounds and have a very different approach to politics. Can you tell us about president Joko and what his record spin? Well, he came to politics through a very unusual route he was competent, and then a local mayor. The mayor of Qatar the competent, and then he became president. So it was a historic election last time around for him because he was the first Indonesian President not to come from the military trail the political elite. It was very much seen as a man of the people. Now the person who's challenging him for bolo Supriyanto is from that late. He was the former son in law of Suharto who ruled Indonesia the thirty two years. He's very wealthy, man. So the two from whole opposite ends of the kind of economic as well as the social spectrum in Indonesia and beyond the personalities of the two what were the big issues here for Indonesians. You've spoken to those candidates had very similar policies. Really? It's really about the kind of the identity. They represent the people on the ground in Indonesia that Kate you shoes is the economy jobs. President joke would Joe Joe has. Sort of embarked on a very ambitious infrastructure Bush, which he was selling to people. He's been building roads and ports and new trains in a way that Indonesia hasn't seen before and people would interested in that. And they were looking at that that in order to do this infrastructure building. He's also done deals with Chinese investment groups as well as Japan. And so that has been issues in this campaign about foreign workers. A lot of fake news about the number of Chinese workers in the region, and that something Bulla to be until has picked up on. So he's rallies. He's been talking about the country being sold to outside as to foreigners not civically saying Chinese. But really meaning that and saying that he would have a much more nationalistic economic policy talking about food securities issues that people do care about Rebecca. We mentioned at the top of the segment here that there is a grassroots effort to make sure that every vote is accurate and counted why was this necessary? You just mentioned the concern about fake news. Was that part of what this was about? There has been a huge amount of fake news, Indonesia is a big user of social media one of the top twitted comparables in the world is Jakarta, a spoke and we've seen from both teams on officially in somewhat. Officially spreading a lot of fake news. So these groups that are monitoring the election closely aware of this kind of fake news divisive campaign that is being run in this multi ethnic Moshi religious society that is largely very tolerant, and peaceful to make sure that nothing gets out of hand. And what we have seen today is a very successful election across a huge Vostok. Your belly goes seventeen thousand islands of same elephants ringing holding booths to people people trekking through jungles and using votes to make sure that most people today seem to have been able to have the vote and those votes are being counted very quickly now getting very clear quick count. We'll have. More on the Indonesian elections in just a moment from BBC.

Indonesia president Joko Widodo Rebecca Henchi Bulla tansy Vega Suharto Bush bolo Supriyanto Joe Joe BBC BBC Asia official Jakarta Qatar editor Kate Japan
"tansy vega" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"tansy vega" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Private prison companies are investing more in recovery centers and halfway houses. There are a lot of concerns with people who are certainly creating these new programs are the same ones who have been detaining individuals for the last twenty years private prisons in criminal Justice reform. Don't seem like they go together until you follow the money. I'm tansy Vega. And that's next time on the takeaway, weekday afternoons at three on ninety three point nine FM. I'm jaboomer Ron. I'm Robert krulwich is radio lab today. A whole hour on the Galapagos islands the place that inspired Charles Darwin to create his theory of evolution whose basic ingredients are lots of time isolation, and then constant change. But Darwin didn't consider this possibility. What if on these island thousands of tourists arrive everyday carrying fruits, and chocolates and souvenirs jumping from island the island? Now, the Galapagos government spends millions of dollars checking all the goods that come in and out trying to quarantine the ones that might have things that are a problem. But every once in a while a new species will slip under the radar and just recap Vic so one day this biologist Jaeger. She took me to see the highlands of Santa Cruz where we met up with this fellow Arnaud. My name is Jim Rome is an ornithologist from the university of and shortly after we walked up he reach out into this tree, and he grabbed this tiny. Little baby fins right off the branch. You described it just like that. You just put your hands around. Ask. Personal the first day the Dr he's oh my God. He said he he looks a little bit of furry almost really tiny vulnerable fledgling of a warbler Finch, Robert changes. The smallest of the dolphins finches can like see him pulsing kind of his his breathing. So Darwin's finches.

Robert krulwich Charles Darwin Galapagos Jim Rome Jaeger tansy Vega Vic jaboomer Ron Santa Cruz twenty years one day
H.I.V. Is Reported Cured in a Second Patient, a Milestone in the Global AIDS Epidemic

The Takeaway

04:02 min | 2 years ago

H.I.V. Is Reported Cured in a Second Patient, a Milestone in the Global AIDS Epidemic

"I read the times article and talked about a cure. And I thought sure what are they calling cure the impact of HIV people don't really want to know the science behind it. They just they're scared of it. But they still don't understand. And they don't want to know about it. I mean, it took me a long time to talk about it. And I walked around feeling like damaged goods for a long long time. There's other things in the relationship that defined by then just your positive satis. How can you ever really really fall in love or have sex because you've got this disease hanging over your head? And there is no cure having those conversations and not being stigmatized as negative is the direction that I would like to before it. And so to me that was big it was the first thing that popped up on my phone on the times live at that. E caught my immediate going. We'll something's going on because they're actually writing about it again. For only the second time known in history. A patient is in long term remission from HIV. I'm tansy Vega. And that's where we begin today on the takeaway, the anonymous London patient appears to be infection free for year and a half after receiving a bone marrow transplant for cancer. It's been nearly twelve years since the first patient Timothy Ray Brown went into remission by the same method. Many people have been calling this week's news evidence of a cure. But others warn that a true cure is a long way off even if there's a renewed reason for hope joining us to discuss this breakthrough and what it means for as research going forward is doctor Timothy j Henrik aids specialists at the university of California San Francisco, Dr Henrik thanks for being with us. Thank you for having me. Now, what we're describing the news here, obviously has involved some sort of special treatment for this patient of the Anonima. Mus patient in London. What exactly was that treatment? What did the patient have to go through the London patient underwent, an allogeneic stem cell, transplantation, stem cell, transplantation. It involves receiving relatively high doses of chemotherapies. They receive donor cells from an uninfected individual other genetically matched with this recipient. And this individual receives this procedure for lymphoma for cancer. But these cells also happen to have a rare mutation that's very reputation that rendered these cells inherently resistant to his strain of HIV in the in the conversation around this. There's been the word cure has been batted around quite a bit. Would you call this a cure or the beginnings of a cure? Well, I think it's a little bit too early to really say, this is a cure. And I think it also depends on how you define cure. If you define cure is being able to stop enter travel Serapio and not have virus rebound in the blood and not for this individual who is potentially quote Cuban unquote, to for example, not transmit virus to others or not experienced ongoing damage because of any residual virus that made me left that I think many people consider that a type of HIV cure. Now, I think we hope that this individual will achieve that state. But I think that over the next year or two there's a very small chance that virus could rebound in his blood. I've I feel that those chances are small, but they're certainly there. And I think that everyone is waiting but also waiting optimistically as well as cautiously can this treatment that we're experiencing be mass produced. Unfortunately, no, not yet stem cell transplantation is fraught with risk. There's an increase. Risk of death, for example, increased risk of infection increased risk of many other morbidity is or problems that can come from the transplant itself. It's not scalable. This is not something that we can do or give to individuals who don't need a stem cell transplant at this time, unless they have cancer or another serious or terminal illness that would otherwise require this therapy

Cure HIV Cancer London Timothy Ray Brown Tansy Vega Anonima Lymphoma Dr Henrik Timothy J University Of California San F Serapio Twelve Years
"tansy vega" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:06 min | 2 years ago

"tansy vega" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Breath. I'm tansy Vega. And today on the takeaway will break down the price tag of the shutdown. Also on the show will look at the impact of fuel crises across the globe from Mexico is in Bob way. Symbolic wayne's. I've spoken to they're not quite sure. Which is worse. The price of gasoline or the fact that they have to wait in line for several days before they can get any gasoline. Plus, what is the best man can get Gillette is rethinking that tagline in a new ad and reactions are split. I loved the new Gillette ad way overboard all men to take away. We'll be right back after these headlines. Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Lakshmi Singh. The government of British Prime Minister Theresa may survives. Three hundred and six the nose to the left three hundred and twenty-five parliament held a no confidence vote proposed by the leader of the opposition labor party. Jeremy Corbyn this coming a day after Theresa May's government suffered a crushing defeat in parliament over her Brexit plan under which the UK would break from the European Union. A move approved by a majority of voters well with the partial government shutdown now in its fourth week in the US the White House and congressional Democrats continue to swap the blame for the stalemate over border security and peers Windsor Johnston reports there's still no sign of a breakthrough in negotiations. At house press secretary, Sarah Sanders, says the shutdown will only end when Democrats get serious about border security. Our hope is the same that it's been since this conversation started, and that's it. We'll get actual funding for real border security, including the wall. Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer says the Trump. Administration is wasting its time blaming Democrats for the impasse. All your blaming. And flailing isn't going to open the government. We all know, Donald Trump is the obstacle here. You know it. I know we all know it this shutdown is now in day twenty six Windsor Johnston. NPR news Washington will it stay three of a teacher strike in Los Angeles NPR's clear Lombardo reports attendance at schools has been low. And that means the nation's second biggest district is losing money. Just over a third of the district's almost half million students showed up on Tuesday slightly more than the number who came to one Monday. The first day of the strike school. Funding is linked to attendance in California and every day that attendance is low LA unified schools are losing money. The district lost about fifteen million dollars. I'm just the first day of the strike, according to L A superintendent, Austin view that number accounts for the million saved in wages. They didn't have to pay teachers are asking for. Smaller class sizes and more, nurses and librarians in schools, but district officials say they simply don't have the funds to satisfy the demands of the union Clare Lombardo. NPR news, Washington. Michigan state university's board of trustees is calling an emergency meeting tomorrow morning to address controversial remarks. Interim president John Anglo recently made about young female athletes who were sexually abused by Larry Nassar, a former MSU employee. The Detroit News reports calls for anglers ouster escalated Friday over anglers remarks to the Detroit News editorial board about abuse reviver who publicly spoken out. He used the word spotlight and enjoying that moment at times, outraging rights activists who view anglers remarks as belittling survivors from Washington. This is NPR news from K Q E D news. I'm Brian watt. Buchanan where the campfire killed eighty six people last year is suing PG the lawsuit. Filed yesterday comes a day. After the utility announced plans to file for bankruptcy protection. The county's lawsuit will be consolidated with other fire related suits. The campfire is the state's deadliest most destructive fire in recorded history. It leveled the city of paradise and destroyed nearly fifteen thousand homes the lawsuit alleges that a spark from PGN equipment ignited the fire. State officials are still investigating. It's 'cause the utility has said it had a problem with the transmission line near where the fire began a number of bay area. Libraries are joining a nationwide movement in doing away with fines and fees for overdue books cake. Peter, Jon Shuler reports contra Costa and San Mateo counties recently dropped all overdue fines contra Costa library, spokeswoman, Brooke converse says the idea was to make sure all residents had equal access. We don't want there to be any barriers keeping people in our community from to access the library. And everything that it has to offer. So it was important to remove daily fines and clear accounts and give everybody a chance to restart their relationship with the library. San Francisco is also looking at starting a similar program, the Santa Clara county library district doesn't charge fines for kids and senior citizens and the San Jose public.

NPR Washington Costa library Clare Lombardo Gillette Detroit News Donald Trump Theresa May tansy Vega Mexico Bob Jeremy Corbyn wayne Windsor Johnston Lakshmi Singh Chuck Schumer Brian watt
"tansy vega" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

10:39 min | 2 years ago

"tansy vega" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Course, according to a Reuters investigation at least twenty eight pharmaceutical companies are. Expected to increase the price of more than two hundred and fifty drugs this year, and that leaves Americans spending more on prescription medications than any other wealthy country. I'm tansy Vega. And that's where we begin. The takeaway. Here to help us. Explain what this means for American consumers and the political fight to control prescription drug prices. Are that Carter a senior reporter with the Huffington Post and Craig Garth wait, a strategy professor and the director of healthcare at the Kellogg school of management? Thanks to you both for joining us. Thank you. Thanks for having me. Excellent. So Craig, let's get started with you. We just mentioned in the segment that Americans pay more for drugs than almost any other wealthy country. How do we get to this point? As a country. We've decided that were not gonna directly try and use our market power to drive down the price we pay for drugs. I think it's a it's a reason political calculus that we worry about providing the appropriate incentives for to develop new drugs in the future. And that we think this innovation is really beneficial. This society other countries have made a different choice, and frankly, the choices made easier by the fact that the United States is effectively willing to fund innovation for the entire world. And so they they can affect the free ride on the money that the United States spends on drugs. So we're we're we're we're doing that research though, on Americans are paying for it, essentially, right? Yeah. Absolutely. I mean, it's it's not a great situation. I think it's Barron the situation where no one pays for it. And that's my worry about sort of the United States. Pulling back a lot on drug pricing. Is that those profits? Go away, we really diminish the incentives for future products that will treat conditions for which are currently no options. And so we're trading off sort of access today where people pay have to pay high prices. So maybe they don't get all the drugs. They want today in order to create access in the future for new treatment options. So people who have pancreatic cancer or other horrible conditions Fe that are affectively death sentences. We want to provide the incentives to create treatments for those products in the fee for those treatments. Those disease in the future. I want to bring in some news here just less than an hour ago. We heard that the Bristol Bristol Myers Squibb and cell gene have merged. Does that will that impact prescription drug prices Craig, and I want to we'll get back to the access question in a minute. There's. As you said, it's been a recently announced merger. And so the exact specifics aren't clear, I don't think it's going to have a huge effect directly on consumer prices. You'd have to study at a bit more but drugs are currently patented. Drugs that we're talking about. And so they don't have a ton of direct competition between those two companies right now, I think it might affect and what would really wanna think about is when those companies develop products, they really buy them from smaller biotech companies that are often startups that are funded by venture capital in merging. These two together would remove one buyer for those smaller companies, and that that could diminish some of the incentives for innovation by taking out one potential buyer for those companies sack I want to bring you in here for a second President Trump as we mentioned made lowering prescription drug prices a big central argument for his campaign. What does he actually done so far we've heard a lot of rhetoric, but what's he actually done? Very little. The the rhetoric is is really the extent of the policy change we've seen under the Trump administration of volunteer price freeze from the pharmaceutical industry is a break with recent very recent history. But the long term trends haven't changed the administration of talked about maybe providing a little more transparency in prescription. The drug ads. So when you see an ad for Humira, for instance, on television that has to be a little price tag telling people how much this stuff costs. I think the idea there is to sort of shame drug companies into bring down prices because able to be shamed. It doesn't seem so high prescription drug prices in the United States are not a secret. We have a scandal of some variety every six or eight months and the prices keep going up, man. I think we can remember a few years ago epipens, I think more than doubled their price. They're still that high price. They didn't go down because of the public scrutiny. So it's very clear that you have a situation of market failure in the pharmaceutical industry where there is no competitive pressure on these companies encouraging them to bring down the price of life saving medicine. And there's no ability for consumers to negotiate down when their lives are on the line. And let's talk a little bit about that. I mean, why has this been so important for the Trump administration? Why is he sort of latched onto this even though he hasn't done actually much to change it? I mean. Find psychoanalyzing the president very difficult, but I will say during his campaign. This did seem like an issue just just based on a theater criticism of the of the rallies and the debates were he actually didn't seem to care, but you did see very early in his presidency. I think before he was even in office. He gave a press conference talking about prescription drug prices and how he was going to bring bring prices down. But he then had a meeting with Farmaceutica executives and suddenly the agenda went away. And if you look at what the administration has done on trade policy, for instance, it's made NAFTA a top priority for the administration. And there are a lot of critics of NAFTA who'd say on on things like labor, he's actually made some some progress that I think Democrats and progressives would would be enthusiastic about. But the flip side of that has been telling the farm line on intellectual property, and so he's advocated for pressed for a longer and stronger monopolies on prescription drugs in North America through that through that policy platform, Craig you talked a little bit about the the the fact that this. The research that we do in the United States on these drugs is essentially helping drug development across the world. It's giving us access to drugs improved drugs in the future. But it still seems to be really literally high priced to play to pay. We just heard a bunch of callers saying that they're spending hundreds and hundreds of dollars a month on prescription drugs. What would it take Craig at a policy level to bring these prices down? We'd have to start making some adult choices about how we want to trade off access saying access later. So I would disagree a bit that there's a market failure here for brand name drugs, not a market failure. It's a policy decision where we provide patents that offer monopolies the drug companies to recoup their RND costs Craig failure to who. Is it a failure for the consumer? Is it a failure for the company? I would know that market failures a particular term. It's a state of the market's not working, right? That's that's not what's happening here to choice. We've made to provide a monopoly. If we want prices to go down, we've got to be willing to say no to some of these drugs. I said earlier that we have this innovation access trade. It might be that we are providing too strong of an incentive for innovation because every new drug that comes out. We're willing to pay for we pay for no matter how incrementally improvement, and we might want to say to some of these products. You listen, we're not willing to pay for. And so it's nice that you developed this drug, but it doesn't it doesn't justify the price. Recharging? That means saying no, it means insurance companies not covering the drug. It means Medicare walking away from college product for cancer. If we don't get the price we want, and frankly as Americans were we don't seem to be willing to do that. That's an adult conversation. That's saying, hey, we're we're going to provide the right signal to the market. Instead what we what we want. What the what the president is saying? And frankly, Democrats are saying as well is we're going to get both lower prices and access to all the drugs we want and that's fantasy land. That's that's not the world. We live in. This is all based on the assumption that you give monopolies to prescrip-. Drug companies in order to create these incentives. These choices are created by the fact that these companies do not have market pressures facing them, and we talk about market failure in the prescription drug market. We have to talk about the innovations that aren't happening. Doctors will tell you that there is a shortage of antibiotics coming for antibiotic resistant infections, there isn't enough research going into that area. It's just one example, there's a lot of research going into hair loss drugs. It's not obvious that we need to be spending money on hair loss drugs instead of antibiotic resistant antibiotics, so there are clearly treatments that we're not getting right now that the market is not addressing it's difficult to measure that because these things simply don't exist. It's hard to measure something that doesn't exist. But the federal government pays a lot of money for research into pharmaceutical drugs and pharmaceutical companies essentially take that research over the finish line, and they end up spending more money on marketing than they do on our indeed. So the idea that this is the most efficient way to get money into innovation. I think is a little. Silly. And when you look at trade policy where we've really really the front lines of this policy agenda exist other countries look at the United States relationship with the pharmaceutical industry, and it looks corrupt. I like to get your thoughts on that. Craig? Well, first of all it's not based on an assumption that this is the way they do it's based on pretty solid economic research that what happens is that firms respond to potential profits. I agree. We should have more investment the antibiotics, but that just shows that we need to find a way to pay for antibiotics that we want right. And so what we need to do is we need to be willing to pay for more antibiotics, and I I agree completely. I'd like to see things tilted towards that in the market. But the idea that sort of pharmaceutical companies are just at the margin taking products over the line that the federal government invested a lot of money in RND just shows a lack of understanding of how Farmaceutica products come to market. I and then we'll jump in. Here we got about a minute left. And I want to hear from us Zach before we wrap here. But I think the question here is that most people would argue yes, we want innovation people don't want to be sick. And or, you know, saddled with these these issues that are requiring these drug prices. But it seems like Americans are still being saddled with the Bill. Zack. We can have different intellectual property incentives within the monopoly framework, for instance, before nineteen ninety-five with the WTO treaties were signed patents for seventeen years. WTO made them twenty years there is it is not at all obvious that the existing status quo to finance big pharma, essentially, the the incentives that they're talking about here. Just prophets. I mean is there any upward limit at which Edwards prophets stop incentivizing people. I don't think so I mean, you could always just say convert all of GDP to the pharmaceutical sector, that's providing more more incentive for innovation. You we have a history of turning over the levers of public policy to the pharmaceutical industry, and they use them to charge higher prices that Carter is senior reporter with the Huffington Post. And Craig Garth weight is the director of healthcare at the Kellogg school of management..

Craig Garth United States president Kellogg school of management Huffington Post federal government Carter reporter Farmaceutica Reuters WTO NAFTA director tansy Vega Bristol Bristol Myers Squibb North America Barron
"tansy vega" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:16 min | 2 years ago

"tansy vega" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm tansy Vega. And this is the takeaway also on the show is calls on the left for a green new deal gain momentum. We break down the actual policy behind those proposals. It's the first proposal that is on the scale of why scientists the world over say needs to happen if we're going to avert cataclysmic climate change. Plus we'll hear from someone on the front lines of solar power in Florida Rico. We're calling from bottom up process in which people can actively engaging the transition to solid our take away. We'll be right back after these headlines. Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Windsor Johnston. President Trump's former attorney Michael Cohen has been sentenced to three years in prison. NPR's Barbara reports Cohen has pleaded guilty to financial crimes campaign violations and lying to congress. Michael Collins defense attorney argued that by providing information about quote, the most powerful person in the country, meaning Donald Trump Cohen should receive leniency the government countered that Cohen's charges show a pattern of deceptiveness and greed, which warrants a substantial sentence Cohen, then address the crowded courtroom himself saying blind loyalty to the president led him down a path of darkness, and that he felt it was his duty to cover up for Trump's quote, dirty deeds at several points. He began to cry and pause to gather himself. He said his greatest punishment is seeing his actions. Bring shame to his family. Barbara sprint NPR news. New york. Federal prosecutors have signed a deal with tabloid publisher American media Inc. The agreement states AM I will not be prosecuted in exchange for its cooperation in the government's investigation into hush money payments made to a woman who claims to have had an affair with Donald Trump before he was president the deal was announced this afternoon by the US attorney's office for the southern district of New York. A secret vote is underway in the British parliament determined whether Prime Minister Theresa may will remain in power NPR's. Frank Langfitt reports may is facing a no confidence vote from members of her own party over her handling of Brexit. This withdrawal agreement that she's crafted with the European Union has very little support here in parliament. And the reason for that is as we've discussed is it would put Northern Ireland a part of the United Kingdom in this closer customs arrangement for a while with the U many people here in parliament feel that's a threat to the integrity of the United Kingdom could go on for a long time. NPR's? Frank langfitt. A man hunt is underway in France for the gunman in yesterday's deadly attack at a Christmas market in Strasbourg. At least two people were killed and more than a dozen others were wounded, Jake sagana reports the shooter had an extensive criminal record. A nuclear terrorism has struck our territory once again in Strasbourg said Paris prosecutor Remmy heights at a press conference. He added the threat of terror is still very real the shooter exchanged gunfire with soldiers at the Christmas market and took a bullet before escaping. Police are looking for a twenty nine year old man from Strasbourg with a lengthy criminal record before the attack. Police had gone to his home to arrest him in connection with attempted murder. But he wasn't there. The prosecutor said the assailants had been flagged by thirties for religious radicalization after a twenty fifteen stint in prison, the Christmas market remains closed and others around the country have heightened security for NPR news. I'm Jake sagana row in Paris. On Wall Street, the Dow was up two hundred sixty nine points. This is NPR from K Q E D news, I'm Brian watt. California's top insurance regulator announced today that insurance claims from last month's wildfires in the state have reached nine billion dollars insurance Commissioner. Dave Jones says that number is expected to increase about seven billion dollars in claims or from Butte county's camp fire that destroyed fourteen thousand homes, meanwhile to more lawsuits were filed against PG accusing the company of a wide range of safety violations that allegedly played a role in the campfire the suit target what they called deceptive advertising by the utility, Dan Brekke reports the lawsuits filed in Butte county alleged that PG negligence and maintaining its power lines led to the campfire which killed at least eighty five people and destroyed fourteen thousand homes the suits also accused the company of false and misleading advertising about the utilities wildfires safety measures adds that the lawsuits say have given PG any customers a false sense of security the day after the campfire started last month. PG any told regulators it had suffered a problem on a high-voltage transmission line at about the same time and place the blaze began. Cal fire is still investigating the cause. I'm Dan Brekke. K tweedy news finally Butte county authorities announced last night that another person has died in the campfire Larry Smith age eighty of paradise died late last month at the UC. Davis burn center. Smith was burned while trying to put out a fire that had engulfed his car. Eighty-six? People have now been killed in the campfire. I'm.

NPR President Trump Strasbourg Donald Trump Cohen Jake sagana Frank Langfitt New york president Michael Cohen Barbara prosecutor Paris tansy Vega Butte county Dan Brekke
"tansy vega" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"tansy vega" Discussed on KCRW

"Pm. Hey, everyone. The takeaway. I'm tansy Vega. Earlier this week we talked about the recreational use of drones on the program. You might remember my encounter with a drone that got trapped in my fire escape and prompted the conversation. Our guests Carnegie Mellon, professor vedic wadhwa had this to say about regulations the government has led us down here. It has not had the discussion is not developed a policies. So we're in trouble. But many of you our listeners pointed out that there are some rules on the books when it comes to drones to help us better understand what those regulations are and whether they are or aren't enforced. I'm joined by Allan Levin, and he's a reporter covering aviation safety drones and regulation for Bloomberg. Hi, allan. Hi. Thanks for having me. So let's break this drone situation down. We have commercial drones. And we have people who own hobby ING drones or drones for their own personal use are there rules for both categories. Yes. And in fact, just a couple of months ago, congress think it's fair to say. Tighten the rules on so-called recreational drones about five years ago. Congress passed a law that kind of left it vague it said on the one hand that the Federal Aviation Administration should not regulate hobbyists. But it also said the FAA could regulate safety in that set in motion kind of a clash in a couple of cases in the courts in congress just wanted to clear that up. So in fact, they clearly have rules that govern all these segments. I think it's fair to say there's somewhat of a question of how well they can enforce them. But they are moving forward on measures to make it easier to track and enforce rules on everybody. Now do those rules apply. Equally across the country, or are there different layers of rules are the rules different in New York City than they are say up state. So there are differences depending on where you're located a lot of that has to do. Do with whether you're near large airport. So New York City pretty much the entire airway as it's called anything above street level is highly regulated congested airspace. As result of all the big airports there. So as a result under federal guidelines, you have to get special permission to fly anywhere in New York. And for the most part hobbyists aren't allowed to do it. Now, there are a couple of exceptions like parks where people can fly and that sort of thing. But as a general rule, you're not supposed to fly. So as a result, it's a different standard than it would be upstate. Now. There's a whole different set of clashing standards going on between whether the federal government has primacy over this or the local governments do so far. The federal government is maintaining it has the authority. But I do see a growing how you say fight over this developing in the incoming years. Well, let's look a little bit. At what the FAA website says what their laws are. And they all a list a couple of them. They say never fly your drone higher than four hundred feet in the air. Don't fly drones near other aircrafts or near airports and never fly them over groups of people public events. How are those rules in force? And the reason why I ask this is because I had to involve law enforcement to come over and deal with it. And they were equally confused about what they should do about the drone, and whether they should take it and how it should be handled. I think what you've encountered is a clear example of how this is still a work in progress. I checked in with the FAA yesterday just to make sure and their guidance is contact local law enforcement and the agency has made a bunch of efforts in the past years to try to educate law enforcement about what the laws are and who at each regional FAA office. They should contact in the event of an incident like you encountered, but. I think there's still a knowledge gap out there about what to do with these cases at oftentimes, you have an overburdened law enforcement agency, and they may not have the time to figure out who to contact, and it sort of falls through the cracks Allen Levin is a reporter covering aviation.

Federal Aviation Administratio Allan Levin Congress federal government New York City tansy Vega Carnegie Mellon Allen Levin New York professor Bloomberg reporter four hundred feet five years one hand
"tansy vega" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"tansy vega" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Doers. I'm Helga Davis. I speak with artists like singer-songwriter salons and film director, Kenneth Lonergan. I'm curious a little newsy, and I want to know their paths from there to here. Join me for a special week of surprising conversations were together. We'll find the stories and experiences that connect us on all this week at nine pm on ninety three point nine FM WNYC. This is the takeaway. I'm tansy Vega on Monday. General Motors hit the brakes. The American car manufacturer announced plans to cut more than fourteen thousand jobs and halt production at five plants across the US and Canada, the pain of the announcement was felt from Detroit Michigan. An extremely disappointing decision. We moved to thousands of people under the businesses six churches and hospital to create that assembly plant Lordstown, Ohio. But for the holidays agency, people get news like this. But this isn't just a GM local issue piss you across the board with any auto manufacturer. Right all the way up to Oshawa Ontario, just north of Toronto where workers walked off the job. Are not closing. Our damp flat. About one hell of a fight. President Trump who's promised repeatedly to bring these kinds of manufacturing jobs back wasn't happy about the change either. This country's done a lot for General Motors. You better get back to Ohio, are you better? Get back in there soon. So we have a lot of pressure on them. You have senators you have a lot of other people lot of pressure. They the Chevy Cruz is not selling. Well, I say, well, then get somebody to get car that is selling well and put it back in. But it's not that simple automotive news predicts that in two thousand eighteen US car sales could fall below seventeen million vehicles for the first time in four years General Motors referred to the layoffs and closures as a restructuring. So where does that leave the American auto industry? I'm putting that.

General Motors US Ohio Kenneth Lonergan Helga Davis WNYC tansy Vega director Chevy Cruz Oshawa Lordstown GM Detroit Toronto Michigan Trump President
"tansy vega" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"tansy vega" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Q. e. d. Well it's a cloudy day at the immediate. Coast today sunny inland with some Hayes evident in the north bay we're expecting high temperatures to range from the low sixty s to the low nineties that along with southwesterly. Afternoon winds between ten and twenty miles per hour This is the takeaway. I'm, tansy Vega over the weekend thousands of hackers journalists. Lawyers researchers and computer security professionals descended on Las Vegas. For Defcon the world's longest running and largest hacking conference it's gotten to be a very big event panels partying and even some live hacking fiend hip hop Security Tag all the things Anything Someone's It's been going on for a long. Time the first Defcon was held in June of. Nineteen ninety. Three the things have changed since, then election security is front of mind after the two thousand sixteen election and new warnings of US intelligence officials that Russian actors are attempting to disrupt the midterms to and very concerned for upcoming election because the voting machine is eighteen different states and it's extremely, idiot admin access on this. Machine so let me show you how quick it. Is that's Rachel toe back the CEO of a cybersecurity company called social proof. Security and in this, video she posted to Twitter toe back is standing before a big voting. Machine Under two minutes Two.

Rachel toe tansy Vega US Las Vegas Twitter Hayes CEO two minutes
"tansy vega" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"tansy vega" Discussed on The Takeaway

"And those women sound like they are incredibly bright, really accomplished. And frankly, their employers should be asking themselves. Why are we willing to let these employees go? I mean, that's the other loss here. If women feel boxed in like they can't be there full selves, which sometimes means feeling rage and expressing rage and constructive manner. Then that means workplaces aren't getting our full selves either and Jeannie we are asking everybody. We talked to this week if you have a favorite song by women to rage out to we're creating a playlist oh, I totally have a song. Okay. Long, what is it? The song is called black me out and it's by a band called against me. Gina, Gandel. Thank you so much. The co host of battle tactics for your sexist workplace podcast from Kahlo, w. Thanks for being with us. Appreciate it. Thank you so much. Saw that way. No. Anymore. Wasn't obligation. As if. Brackley. Check out the rest of it on our Spotify playlist. And if you have a song by a woman, you like to rage to tweet us at partake away and be sure to check out our other stories on the series at the takeaway dot org slash women rage. That's our show for today. Everyone you can always call us with anything. Eight, seven, seven, eight my take or tweet us at the takeaway. Thanks again for listening. I'm tansy Vega and this is the takeaway.

tansy Vega Kahlo Jeannie Gina Spotify Gandel
"tansy vega" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"tansy vega" Discussed on The Takeaway

"This is the takeaway i'm tansy vega four members of a homeland security advisory council resigned on monday in protest over the trump administration's immigration policies in a letter sent to dhs secretary kirstin nielsen the members called the practice of separating children from their families morally repugnant under the policy enacted by president trump before he reversed it with an executive order more than twenty five hundred kids were separated from their parents now under a court order the administration has until july twenty six to reunite the families in a few minutes we'll talk about the post traumatic stress some of these children are facing as a result of the policy but first we turn to david martin he's a law professor at university of virginia and former deputy general counsel of the dhs under president obama until monday he was also a member of the homeland security advisory council under president trump david welcome to the takeaway ex very much so tell us a little bit about what the letter said and how you and your colleagues arrived at the decision to resign well this had been building for a while there had been concern among many of us who are members of the council centrally the first week of the administration about some of the actions taken that and that first week was the travel ban barring people attempting to bar people primary from primarily muslim countries several of us had been talking about our concerns then and had had voiced some of that in our contacts with officers of the department of homeland security the concern built from other actions overtaken for me personally the pardon of sheriff joe are pyo the controversial sheriff from the phoenix area that was a another event but the precipitating event was clearly the policy of separating children from their parents as they came across the border i guess the question is why now was there something specific that tip scales for you to do this now this policy has been implemented and then backtracked for a couple of weeks now well it did start coversation started right when the policy became apparent took a while we were there were many of our colleagues people had different views about the right approach we wanted to see if others might come along believe there still are other members who are thinking about resigning so yes it took a while at took a while to to reach agreement on the text of our joint letter and decisions by a couple of susan separate letters as well and the other question is now that the four of you have stepped down is this in a are you thinking you can have more of an impact on this administration's policies from outside of the council does resigning advance the cause of trying to get families to back together what we hope so that remains to be seen different members of our group had different motivations some simply felt that it was clear that that there's no way that we are being listened to here on these kinds of important issues and it wasn't just the child separation issue it was broader factors of immigration policy generally but others of us i'm i'm certainly committed to doing this trying to advance changes in whatever way possible i've been engaged in this area for for several decades i do a lot of writing i'm going to try to continue that and i don't have a lot of optimism changing the minds of those who are doing this in the white house but for this issue to remain a live one during the during these elections and for congress to get more engaged at whatever point they can there's a lot of folks watching what's happening and feeling very frustrated by the lack of ability to really stop this or have an impact on it we're seeing a flow charts coming for from the administration in terms of what they how they want to reunite these families but taking a step back from all of that and all the frustration you are a constitutional law scholar how do you think the treatment of these migrants fits into our legal framework in the.

tansy vega advisory council
"tansy vega" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"tansy vega" Discussed on The Takeaway

"It's the takeaway i'm tansy vega and primary season continued chugging along on tuesday voters went to the polls in new york colorado maryland utah and oklahoma to pick their midterm candidates more no cla home in just a few minutes but here to break down the other he races is dylan scott politics reporter for vox hi dylan hi thanks for having me so the big news today is so far is alexandria ocasio court this she joe crowley tell us a little bit about that why this is such a significant upset sure so joe crowley has represented the bronx and queens in the house for ten terms at this point he's member of house democratic leadership and there've been a lot of rumors in washington the mets nancy pelosi wherever to step aside he could be one of the leading contenders to become the next democratic leader or speaker of the house and so it was obviously shocking to have somebody in that kind of position lose in a lot of ways this primary roy ace represented a lot of the divisions that we see within the democratic primary right now a cossio cortez had kind of portrayed crowley as a corporate funded democrat who had lost touch with his district she on the other hand had endorsed medicare for all and federal jobs guarantee and free college for everybody and so we've had a lot of those races across the country this primary season but in in many of those instances it was two first time candidates running to run against a republican incumbent and so i think the real shock here was that you had a very high profile prominent democrat who seemed to fall to the same kind of progressive wave that we're seeing a lot in these races across the country let's shift a minute to maryland ben jealous was a big win for democrats there what do you see how do you see that race playing out very similar at least within the democratic party that's very similar story ben jealous bernie sanders supporter had the support of a lot of those progressive groups whereas the other prominent democrat in that race reserve baker was more sort of the establishment choice and so yet again we saw the more leftwing candidate emerging from the democratic primary a looking ahead to the fall maryland currently has a republican governor larry hogan whose relatively moderate he's a cancer survivor and and seems to enjoy some pretty broad popularity and so that race i think will be attention between you know we expect a very sort of anti republican anti trump national environment but whether democrats can use that to push through a pretty progressive candidate against a more moderate and relatively popular republican will be a test because on its face you know maryland as as a pretty blue state seems like an obvious chance for democrats to retake governor's mansion but between hogan's popularity and jealousies more progressive platform i think that'll be one of the more fascinating governor's races to watch in the fall of course we had a very familiar face mitt romney who won in utah if romney does win the general election what's your sense of how he might be able to his relationship with trump could potentially be seems to be playing both sides occasionally no absolutely i think there's a lot of never trump republicans who were losing jeff flake and bob corker two senate republicans who have been more critical of trump are leaving the senate i think they've in butte a lot of hope in romney that he might be the new gop critic of the president but as you said you know on on issues like immigration and taxes and trump's kind of deregulation agenda romney has been pretty positive towards the president so i don't think we should expect him to to come into the senate and suddenly try to make a mess of things he seems more likely to try to toa a delicate line when it comes to trump dylan scott is a politics reporter for vox dylan thanks so much for joining us thanks for having me and we turn now to oklahoma which also had a primary on tuesday and the much of the focus was on the fight for the governorship ten republicans were running for that seat but down ballot they were of new names for voters to.

tansy vega
"tansy vega" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"tansy vega" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Times we're we're warding really inefficient work now obviously a lot of our listeners will say that sounds great brigid but i can't just stop my job so what do we do what are some actual tangible things that people can do when they feel either overworked or that they have no control over whether they're overworked right well i think i think the very first thing to do is just take that moment to stop and really think about what is the most important thing in that moment and not just at work but in your life you know because there can be a time when you know there's just all sorts of stuff happening in your home life that can be really distracting at work so we need to stop thinking about those in separate you know work as the only the only thing that's important today we need to think about all of those fears and what is most important and there shouldn't be more than maybe three things on there and with a collective kyw of relief i'd like to thank you bridget solti as pulitzer prize winning journalist author of overwhelmed work love and play when no one has the time and she's also the host of new podcast better life lab bridget thank you so much for joining us thank you so much for having and that's our show for today but we wanna leave you with an exciting discovery in the animal kingdom last week scientists were able to capture the clearest sound recordings of nar wall so far these socalled see unicorns are lucid mammals that dive thousands of feet down into the arctic ocean to hunt but that's made it really hard for scientists to study how they communicate until now now we still don't know what these nar walls were gossiping about but these cryptic recordings will help researchers study the impact of human sounds on marine animals underwater hope you plied your dad thanks mr our wall and thanks so much to you for listening i'm tansy vega and this is the takeaway

pulitzer prize tansy vega brigid bridget solti
"tansy vega" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"tansy vega" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And their children but see officials could use discretion we contacted a former senior immigration official in the obama administration and he told us quote when a family is apprehended at the border it is indeed the case that the kids are placed in a location with other kids while the parent is initially screened this is because when the border patrol i apprehensive group of many people it is not safe to have grown men in cells with little kids he added that in these situations the parent and the child were in the same facility even when separated which is different than what's happening under trump today parents are being prosecuted and their child is being taken to an entirely different facility but we're telling you all oh story so we can understand what it feels like to seek asylum in the united states and be separated from your child even for one night and advert said ages did not explain where they would put his child they only told him he would be safe yes even though it was one night it's really hard being in that moment and i don't wish that on anyone that's happened so yeah it's really hard article we're finally together he hugged me and cried smashing what could have gone on in his little so young being separated that night it's really hard today a bertone his family are living in the united states and seeking asylum their cases pending but even now his son is scared to be too far apart woman book doesn't like being in that moment again like that separated from his mom sister he says so he doesn't wanna live that again now under the trump administration there is zero tolerance policy at the border the administration says migrants who try to cross illegally will be apprehended charged with a crime and separated from their children for an unknown amount of time there have been media reports of ice agents misleading parents telling them their kids are just being taken away for questioning or in one instance just being taken for a bath with parents learning hours later that their children are not coming back i'm tansy vega and today on the takeaway the trauma of family separation and its longterm impact on kids.

official obama administration united states tansy vega
"tansy vega" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"tansy vega" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of the cleared news boxes saying many had become eyesores but a free paper from brooklyn called the independence say their boxes were regularly stock and the city still hold it away peter rule is the papers associate editor we're pretty upset about this we have a first amendment right to get the news out to people so we view it as an affront not only to our newspaper into our readers but to the press in general spokesperson for the city says new standards will be discussed at a council hearing support for npr comes from the new york times where journalists are currently reporting more than one hundred fifty countries around the world to deliver coverage of the issues at stake from foreign policy to the second amendment the times reports this story people in north korea we don't care if we have no starving we are not feed people one in north korea is food and have freedom one north korean defector on the trump him summit and what the two leaders are not saying i'm tansy vega and that's next time on the takeaway weekday afternoons at three on ninety three point nine fm this is morning edition from npr news i'm david greene in culver city california and i'm rachel martin and singapore or the leaders of the united states and north korea have met face to face for the first time in a press conference president trump said he and kim jong un have developed a quote very special bond my meeting with german kim was honest direct and productive we got to know each other well in a very confined period of time after meeting and talking one on one with the help of a translator the two leaders signed an agreement which included a commitment to denuclearize the korean peninsula president trump had high praise for the north korean leader afterwards please retaliated anybody that takes over a situation like he did at twenty six years of age and is able to run it and run a tough i don't say it was nice or i don't say anything about it he rented very few people at that age you can take one out of ten thousand probably couldn't do it it's fair to say that's a change change in tone for the president who has had harsh words for the north korean leader in the past this guy this may i mean he's like a maniac is a.

rachel martin kim jong un culver city associate editor peter president trump united states brooklyn california david greene tansy vega north korea new york times npr twenty six years
"tansy vega" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"tansy vega" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"We're rounding out the hour here on the takeaway i'm tansy vega it's been twenty five years since the death of the colombian drug kingpin pablo escobar he was one of the wealthiest cartel leaders of all time and even made the forbes list of international billionaires every year from nineteen eighty seven to nineteen ninetythree but his name is also synonymous with extraordinary violence in the city of medellin where his cartel operated homicide spike to over six thousand in one thousand nine hundred one decades later the wounds remain but the escobar legends still draws flocks of curious tourists d'amitie in every year and one of the key attractions guided visits to key sites in bars life they're called narko tours a lot of people are coming to the city people from other countries people from other cities in colombia and they just want to know better he's story so there are like fifteen tourists in the city that are taking people to different places that are related to publish colour so we decided to do one of those to see what's this story they're telling to the tourists are coming to the city and it's pretty crazy got a value and engagement editor for npr's rather you got a buyer was born in and he took the tour for the rest of us so it costs fifty dollars they told me go to this supermarket in a very high upper class neighborhood in the city you will find a van that guide will be there so we started and from the beginning they were very apologetic about his kuwata they will make glorifying him they were telling you all the power that he got from nothing from thin air like he started just stealing cars in the city and then he became the most powerful drug dealer in the world with visited the building where he lived with his family before going before hiding from the government in eighty four a we went to the jail where he was and he lived there for a year and they were telling you like hey this is the library of public glad here are the booze at he was reading or his here is the forty two that he imported from england and i was like this cannot be true i can't believe this.

pablo escobar medellin colombia editor npr england one thousand nine hundred one twenty five years fifty dollars
"tansy vega" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"tansy vega" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In the small english town of windsor are getting ready for this weekends royal wedding between prince harry and meghan markle probably be there will be more in the shops because people are coming from all over the world and people like to buy something if they being to a royal wedding it's something to look at a remember them by a royal wedding preview yes we're going there next time on here now here now thursday morning following forum at eleven o'clock in that program followed by the takeaway thursday at noon cambridge analytica and the power of words that were segments of the population that responded to drain the swamp that weren't necessarily always reflected in mainstream political discourse a whistle blower tells congress that president trump slogans far preceded his election i'm tansy vega and that's next time on the takeaway from wnyc npr i public radio international on the next fresh air trump versus the deep state we talk with evan osnos of the new yorker about how hundreds of nonpartisan civil servants considered not loyal enough to the administration have been sidelined or pushed out of government key positions have been left open to an unprecedented degree leaving the president with few restraints on him join us terry gross and fresh air thursday afternoon at one and again thursday evening at seven partly cloudy bay area's skies overnight with lows in the lower fifty s and we expect mostly cloudy skies thursday morning then becoming partly cloudy.

windsor prince harry congress tansy vega evan osnos president meghan markle terry gross