20 Burst results for "Tansy Nevada"

"tansy nevada" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

04:17 min | 2 months ago

"tansy nevada" Discussed on The Takeaway

"The New York Attorney General is investigating the trump organization and the trump family is dragging their feet. Every step of the way with the trump organization has learned over the years dating back way before trump became president is that it pays to stonewall in court cases I'm Tansy Nevada and today on the takeaway for Tuesday August twenty fifth look at the steps the Attorney General is taking and what it could mean in the lead up to November. Also, we'll look at how Democrats are approaching gun violence in this election cycle in terms of differences between. Harrison Biden there's really very little but of course when you compare either one or both of them to president trump or or vice president Mike Pence there's there's a pretty big Gulf there. But I on Brianna Taylor's case the public pressure to take action against the police officers who killed her let's get started. Those are protesters chanting Brianna Taylor's name in downtown Louisville Kentucky. It's been more than five months since Louisville police served a no knock warrant at Taylor's home shot the twenty six old emt to death. The officers involved in her killing have yet to face charges and only one has been fired. The incident was an example of a pattern of systemic racism and police violence that have spurred protests.

trump Brianna Taylor president Democrats Attorney vice president Louisville Tansy Nevada Mike Pence Harrison Biden New York Kentucky
"tansy nevada" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"tansy nevada" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Said he ordered a review of military aid to Ukraine because he was concerned about corruption to my mind that is really upside down world I'm Tansy Nevada and today on the takeaway for October second will untangle the ties between president trump and Ukraine to learn more about the impeachment crisis Also on the show a friend's tribute to Jamal Kashogi one year after his death plus Musician Robbie Robertson looks back on his decades long career Tori with Opt Dylan and playing in the band we've played music and eventually had to say the world is wrong where right this is good and I don't care what anybody says start in Ukraine right now as house Democrats move ahead with their impeachment inquiries and the president trump the executive branch is pushing back last week secretary of State Mike Pompeo was subpoenaed by the heads of three House committees seeking any comments that might illuminate allegations that the president improperly pressured the Ukrainian government to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden in response to a request from House Democrats to depose five State Department officials who may have witnessed wrongdoing pompeo struck a defiant tone accusing Democrats of bullying and intimidation we will of course do our constitutional duty to cooperate with this co equal branch and we won't tolerate folks on Capitol Hill bullying intimidating state department employees that's unacceptable at a press conference in Rome earlier today Secretary Pompeii Oh doubled down before confirming reports that he had been on the July Twenty Fifth Phone Call decisively what the American policy with respect to Ukraine it's been remarkably consistent and we will continue to try to drive.

Rome Secretary State Department Vice President Mike Pompeo executive Tori Robbie Robertson Ukraine Joe Biden Ukrainian government president Dylan Jamal Kashogi trump Tansy Nevada Twenty Fifth one year
"tansy nevada" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

11:34 min | 1 year ago

"tansy nevada" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Marches in New York this weekend. We'll explain their political differences. And if you're looking to March out to decide which one is right for you to Mark the second anniversary of the Trump inauguration. Also police Commissioner James O'Neill talks about crime and police department reform in New York City and commission O'neil we'll take your calls. The Brian Lehrer show at ten AM on WNYC. I'm tansy Nevada. And this is the takeaway, thanks for joining us today. We begin on day twenty six of the government shutdown with the figure that might surprise you. How much the shutdown could cost the US economy? According to some estimates. The economy could lose roughly six billion dollars. If the shutdown continues for another two weeks. In other words, the cost could be more than the five point seven billion dollars. President Donald Trump is demanding for his border wall. And when Federal Reserve chairman Jerome Powell spoke to the economic club of Washington DC last week, he pointed out just how unprecedented this situation is in the short term government shutdown don't last very long typically not left much of a Mark on the economy, which isn't to say that there's plenty of personal hardship that people undergo but the aggregate level the economy, generally does not reflect much damage for a shutdown a longer shutdown is something we haven't had if we haven't extended shutdown. I do think that would show up in the data. Pretty clearly. So just how much is the shutdown costing the US tax payer. And when this whole thing is over and federal employees finally received their back pay. What will the long-term economic damage be here to help us out? A CNBC senior economics reporter, Steve Leeson. Steve it's nice to have you on the show to be here. So we threw out some pretty big numbers at the top a six billion dollar estimate on what this could cost us where where are these estimates coming from? And what exactly do they represent? Well, you have a private sector economists. And now the White House in a story that we broke yesterday. Actually, doubling their estimate of the cost of the shutdown. What they do is. They look at the wages that are earned by the federal workers. They look at the wages that are earned by the private contractors. They look at the amount of input to the economy by the government, and they come up with about zero point one percent subtraction every week and for the White House. That's double their prior estimate. They were at zero point one percent every two weeks, but they took a little finer pencil to the accounting there, and they they doubled their their cost estimate here. And they think about the the broader economic activity that their wages spur. Now, you have to say that after some point in time the economy will get back some of it because at least the federal workers will get their wages back but not necessarily the private contractors. And you're starting to read some pretty dire stories about some of these small firms and medium sized businesses that do business with the government that basically can't get by and pay their workers and their health insurance and those. Of things if they don't get the checks from the government for their work, even the back checks for works. He didn't November for a month or so. And let's Steve I'm wondering who you talk a little bit about the costs of government shutdowns tenths end up costing more money than keeping the government open. Why is that? Oh, yeah. Well, I mean, a couple of things first of all governments bring in revenue and part of the the issues are the extent to which the government can bring in revenue, and I assume also that there's some feedback from the people who get their work and pay their taxes back to the government. There's just different ways that the government actually adds to economic activity and its ability to together revenue. Now, we hear a lot of talk about this economists often say it's costing us, and that's us in quotes money. Who is it really costing? What is it that everyday Americans are feeling or how are they feeling this loss if at all? Well, I think the way the way I think about impacts like this and come back to this. But it's a similar to an impact of a hurricane is you draw sort of widening concentric circles start with the individual and the workers not getting their paycheck broaden it out to the community, especially communities that rely heavily on on either federal dollars or rely on a lot of federal employment. And then brought it out that I did some work on this. And there are eight hundred seventy nine thousand workers in the metropolitan statistical area of Milwaukee. So there are eight hundred thousand furloughed federal workers. So it's as if the entire metropolitan area of Milwaukee was not getting a paycheck for a month and just getting back to the hurricane idea. You have these situations where it happens, and there's a deep hit to it. And then you have kind of rebound from the additional spending. You don't have that. So we all sort of feel it, and it's also probably worth talking about, you know, the federal government provides services that people use their apart. Works and they're all sorts of things that the federal government does that we pay our taxes. Forget it. We're not getting those services now. And there are also a lot of banks and businesses that have been supportive or pretty supportive of the president. So far are you hearing anything from the financial sector in terms of how they seem to be viewing the shutdown? I don't hear a backlash at this moment against President Trump. If that's what you're asking. I do think that there's a lot of exasperation. I think it's worth maybe pointing out that this president was was supposed to be a boon to business in terms of providing stability and support for businesses. And in some way, he has been I guess the corporate tax cuts and some of the deregulation. But there are vast areas where the president, and this administration has added to uncertainty, and I think you can LOP in this extended government shutdown in with the trade tensions in there. And the otherwise volatile foreign policy and other ways that this administration makes policies in a way that is not friendly. To business. You can have an example of companies that have to kinda lineup for exemptions from their tariffs, so lopping altogether. And what you have is you have declining confidence among CEO's and the concern is you go back to the tax cuts in the president's express a desire there was to boost capital spending. Well, one of the things it's a huge inhibitor to capital spending is uncertainty. So we hear we hear stories of businesses that are holding back on capital spending because of the uncertainty from variety of policies. And I think the government shutdown was one of them. You know, we all talk about having a credit rating. Steve, you know, we don't have to talk about our personal credit scores here, but the United States kind of has a credit rating, and is this going to affect it not the shutdown itself. The question is what happens with the debt ceiling that is something that tends to impact the rating agencies views of America. And if this shutdown tells us that I believe it's later this year that the debt ceiling ability to bar to raise the amount of debt that we borrow if that becomes. Obstructed and this shutdown in the impasse in. Congress tells us that we might be headed for a more serious financial problem, which is a debate over the debt ceiling than yes. The credit rating would be affected in that regard. What about the SEC what's happening with them? How how is this impacting or the shutdown at being impacted by by what's happening at the SEC? I'm gonna tell you. I'm not one hundred percent sure, I know that they are affected by this. That's a lot of their workers have been furloughed. I have been dealing with several government agencies. I talked to one official who asked me not to use their name because they are forbidden being on furlough from doing government business. I don't know the extent to which the SEC has had limited enforcement as a result of their of workers being furloughed there. The last may I mean, we've been shutting down the government not just isn't something new. We've seen this happen for decades. And the last major shutdown was in two thousand thirteen when the White House's Office of management. And budget estimated at that time twenty thirteen that the country had lost two billion dollars. That's billion with a B in productivity. Because of the fact that federal workers were sent home the credit rating agency standard and Poor's put the overall cost to the country at twenty four billion. Again, we're talking about twenty thirteen government shutdown were there long-term economic effects Steve after that shutdown. I don't think so. And I think we do have issues now because the longer this last week, we aren't a pretty tight labor market right now and one of the longer lasting economic impacts. You could imagine is that workers say the heck with this. I'm not working for a company that every now, and then is going to make me work for a month without or longer without a paycheck. And so you can imagine that some of these workers have have better employment opportunities. And so at the end of this. They may have trouble finding people. I know they were having trouble finding people to begin with. So they may have more difficulty that way. Again, I think the overall disruption to business the volatility to businesses something that that creates uncertainty Wall Street doesn't mind very much when there's gridlock. They sometimes they say, this is a good thing. Other. The government will be passing any new laws. I think they mind when there's a shut down the government is twenty percent of the economy, and obviously it's only a partial shutdown, but you don't lose a chunk of the economy without businesses across the spectrum, and frankly American citizens across the spectrum feeling some impact of that. And that's you know, we're kind of waiting to see what happens with TSA employees in that sort of thing where if you get major disruptions to air travel majors disruption to commerce and transportation. That's when the human cry might finally reach those people with the power to end, the shutdown. What happens, Steve if this continues as it appears to continue with no end in sight at this point. Well, there are increasingly dire. Forecasts here it began with the White House upping its estimate of the shutdown, but there are other private sector, economists who think that growth in the United States could go negative or essentially the economy could shrink in the first quarter. As a result of this for reasons that are probably not worth explaining on air here. But but the first quarter is to typically weaker than the other three. It's a problem in the data. Everybody knows about it in the in the business. And so you're starting off from probably a weaker base. You take that off you add the trade tensions to it. What what happened is? There were these things that were not big by themselves, for example, economists estimated that the problems with trade and Taras might take off point one or point two. And then he thought oh, well, another point one point two. And then you LOP that into the idea that the first quarter ends up starts off from a weaker base. And at least Ian Shepherdson from pantheon macroeconomics. He thinks it's possible to have. Have a negative first quarter and a negative first quarter on top of a for Wall Street. The obviously you've been following what's been happening. We had thousand points swings in a pretty does substantial drop in stock prices, and that was before the shutdown. Right. So you had concerns about global economic weakness had concerns about the Federal Reserve raising interest rates the trade tensions that I keep mentioning. And then you LOP on the shutdown you keep adding up point one point two point two. And all of a sudden if you're starting on a two percent base. Well, you've whittled away a good chunk of that growth that we were otherwise gonna have Steve Liebmann a senior economics reporter at CNBC, Steve, thanks so much. It was great.

Steve United States federal government White House President Donald Trump president Federal Reserve CNBC SEC Brian Lehrer reporter Milwaukee tansy Nevada New York City Commissioner James O'Neill Mark Steve Liebmann New York Steve Leeson
"tansy nevada" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"tansy nevada" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Welcome back to the takeaway. I'm tansy Nevada back in may of two thousand eighteen when I I took this job at the takeaway. I thought a lot about what I wanted to accomplish with the program and I highlighted three gaps. I felt that we need to fill in this country. And in our media coverage, the wealth gap, the truth gap, and the empathy gap, and I talked about all of these back in September with two prominent activists at the prosperity summit in Washington DC, the feminist writer thinker and leader Gloria Steinem and civil rights activist Deray McKesson I wanna play that part of the conversation today because some of the most meaningful pieces of it were about sustaining hope and optimism as we struggle to close those gaps so often I've seen in my own life lately people are feeling discouraged as they think about social Justice and civil rights, but as we enter a new year, I wanna play some of the advice from de Ray and Gloria about fighting for change. I would say the first thing I would. Do is listen to them. I mean, you know, because listening is maybe the most revolutionary thing we can possibly do. If just in the beginning, we remember not to look up all the time. But look at each other. Well, be part of the way there because we all have friends and people who trust us and adversaries and things we can do internally. And I think part of the despair comes from the case of the should you know, what should I do as opposed to every day getting up and thinking, I'm going to do everything I can and I'm going to speak the truth. And I'm going to reach out to anybody who needs me in the moment and take it from the bottom up instead of the top down. I'd say two things. My one is at the status quo drives on people not believing that they power like that is one of the ways that like we get into the musical chairs with the status quo. Instead of actually changing the wrong is that people one of the beautiful things about the protests in the city in city and city all of a sudden, you found people who are like I got it. Right. Like I half power. I get it. I can shut this down. I can speak this truth. Like, you saw people all over the country realized that they could do something different. And they always have the power. They just didn't know. So when I give people advice, it's like, you know, that you have more power than you think being in the school system is that I used to manage all staffing in his one parent one day, she emails, and she's like, hey, Mike, my kids classroom as forty kids like a first grade class. So a lot of kids in first grade and we've two hundred schools I didn't hear that from principal. I didn't hear from the teacher. I heard from this random parent rain, a pair emails redundancy, written emails me, we literally read you the staffing in elementary school because of this one random Email. So never know was her Email the chains the staffing in the school. But it was it right imparted that as her believing that like her voice actually mattered in some way. And I think there has to be part of how we think about this. How do we sustain movements black lives matter and a lot of the movement that came out of Ferguson and feminism has had multiple waves of multiple? And so is the broader fight for civil rights. I remember a dark time in the nineties when feminism and civil rights were sort of not the issue in college campuses. Unlike today, how do you sustain interest in a movement? I remember telling someone in college. Well, there's a center for women's concerns. And there was a joke about what women were concerned about right? And at the time, and yet today, every young woman that I know is proudly calling herself a feminist and even going beyond that, and there's been this real embrace of black lives, matter and other civil rights politics. I wonder if we're going to see this level of sustained engagement or will we have?.

Gloria Steinem Nevada Washington principal Mike Ferguson writer de Ray one day
"tansy nevada" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:03 min | 2 years ago

"tansy nevada" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Fifty seven degrees in San Jose. Fifty four degrees in Santa Rosa right now. Fifty one in San Francisco and Oakland fifty three in Sacramento, we'll have some lingering precipitation throughout the day possible. Sunshine and warmer. Temperatures tomorrow into the weekend. Welcome back to the takeaway. I'm tansy Nevada. More than one million. We are being detained in the Xinjiang region in northwest China. China's intensifying its campaign at home and abroad against the Muslim minority and its most sweeping internment program since mouse, cultural revolution. US officials are now weighing measures to punish the Chinese government for its mass detention of leakers. Rashawn Abbas aunt and sister are among the disappeared about this a weaker American activist in managing director of the campaign for workers. She believes the Chinese government has detained her relatives since September because of her human rights work for weaker. And she told me about the conditions inside the internment camps where she thinks her relatives are being held from what we hear the situation is horrendous the or a crowded than hygiene and then being so Venus twenty four hours a day. The one girl who came out of the camp recently, she described as that she begged for them to kill her because of the horrible situation will tell us a little bit about the extent of the Chinese government surveilling its citizens specifically in Xinjiang. Yes, we call it eastern standard. And then in our now, it's being called Xinjiang the entire region of historic son is under siege. These days the punishment is directed to basically wipe out religious and cultural traditions, and it's being waged collectively against all people is to extend if we talk about the over a million people have been detained in concentration camps. They are being uprooted from their homes and sent the way goes Soviet gulag style concentration camps for indoctrination, and they're constantly. Going so Chinese communist philosophy studies and speaking Chinese and then their children, let com are sent to orphanages. A majority of the warriors today that on the target are d academy university professors presidents intellectuals musicians, and then the writers and poets. So imagine over a million people over a million people being detained and reporting on the detail real situation is hindered. By the information. Blockade by the communist state, so we don't get real counts of the actual conditions. But one of my classmates brother he jumped out of eighth floor window killed himself because she was called to take into the camp. That's how bad the situation is in those camps. Are you able to draw? Any parallels? Comparisons to the cultural revolution under Mounsey do. We can compared to the great cultural, revolution breath only worse than that. Because at that time, the technology wasn't that great. This is back in the sixty seven to seventy seven and those ten years now detainees using high-tech and the other like we have accounts of monitoring systems even in the toilet area and stuff like that. So it's weakened Sates far wars then Greg cultural revolution. More with Roussin Abbas Wieger American activist about the detention of workers in China coming up after a short break. Stay with us..

Chinese government China Xinjiang Roussin Abbas Wieger Rashawn Abbas San Jose Santa Rosa San Francisco tansy Nevada US Sacramento managing director leakers Oakland Fifty seven degrees Fifty four degrees twenty four hours
"tansy nevada" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

11:17 min | 2 years ago

"tansy nevada" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"More of these caravans are coming and they're only terrorists. That's what they are. But many of the changing attitudes towards migration within Mexico precede, the Trump presidency, and that's where we start today. This is the takeaway, I'm tansy Nevada. Maureen Meyer works for the Washington office on Latin America, and she's the director for Mexico and migrant rights there, Maureen welcome to the takeaway. Thank you. So how surprising are these protests, and how much do we know about who the protesters were? I think that the protests are fairly surprising giving how much support we've seen for members of the caravan during their entire journey through Mexico. Many people in southern states, the poorest parts of Mexico, offering them food helping to take care of them while they were on their journey. And so I think it is surprising to see so much. Outpouring of frustration and Teno phobia towards this population. It seems in part fomented by a lot of fake news being circulated on social media into wanna about the members of the caravan being members of criminal groups bringing crime as well as a mayor the mayor of two Quanta who has certainly helped from Memphis by talking about the migrants in ways that would say that they're invading their risk to the population. How much of the current American climate is influencing what we here. I mean, this was a protester in our in our introduction. Who was clearly referring to President Trump's rhetoric. I think people in Mexico follow Trump a lot. They're very upset. Most of the time by what he says how he characterizes Mexico Mexicans. Remember, the, you know, the idea that Mexicans are criminals. They're bring coming in the rapists. And so I think it certainly is something that Mexican see. And this case, it seems that the mayor who has a hat that Elsa says make Tijuana great again has taken. On that same role of using migrants criminalising migrants often for political gains and for for posturing in terms of his own politics. And what he wants for his city talk a little bit about the numbers. Of course, we know that I guess the question is is migration to Mexico up. And if so could that also be driving some of this Mexico has been a transit country for decades of people much more in the recent years of central Americans. It's estimated around four hundred thousand central Americans and others from different parts of the world us Mexico as a way to travel to the United States, but Mexico's increasingly being a destination country, we have seen asylum requests increased by more than five hundred percent since two thousand fourteen over fourteen thousand people requested asylum Mexico last year, the similar numbers this year so far. And so I think Mexico is more and more a destination country in in a way that hasn't been in the past particularly for Central American is that because in part of the United States. Recent stance. The President Trump's administration stance on immigration are people just saying, you know, we'll stay here versus even trying to attempt crossing the US border. I think that's certainly part of it is a more viable option. Mexico's definition of who might qualify for asylums actually broader than the United States. So that's also part of it. But we look at the way that the UN refugee agency UNHCR has also worked to educate migrants about their rights how they might qualify for asylum. Mexican civil society organizations are also working to support the tension asylum. So I think there's more awareness also from central Americans that they could qualify for asylum in Mexico, and there are places where people are settling including in northern Mexico and states like walkway, which is on the US Mexican border as well and people start to feel that you know, Mexico is a place where they can be safe and raise their families and not have the same fear on that they had back home. You mentioned the mayor of Tijuana, and we know that the mayor has referred to migrants as a quote, unquote, hoard, folks. That he didn't want them in his city. He's also called upon a federal authorities to help with the situation is this is this an incident that's isolated to Tijuana, given the mayor's approach to the migrants, or is this something that we're going to start to see more broadly across Mexico. We have not seen it yet anywhere else. So far, I think the the unique situation to one of those it has become the main destination for many asylum-seekers. So before the caravan arrived, you already had around three thousand people waiting for their turn to have an appointment with us officials to request asylum that backlogs about a month. So I think it's part responding to the number of people, but it it is likely not. Probably likely isolated case. I think the mayor himself has been negative towards immigrants in the past including the Haitians that arrived in Tijuana a few years ago, there also have against Mexicans that have been deported to Tijuana framing them as criminals as well. We've seen that in other parts of the US Mexico border, particularly in terms of Mexicans being deported. But I don't think we've seen ever this level of of characterization of migrants as an invasion or not wanting them there that we see right now with the mayor of Tijuana. We're seeing a lot of you know, just across the world we're seeing refugees and migrants trying to enter different countries, not just in Mexico. And I'm wondering are you seeing this as part of a more global trend that there are citizens across the world who are turning their backs on migrant or refugee populations. I think certainly it is part of a broader trend. We see it in the United States with president who's seeking to limit as much as possible legal ways for people to request asylum in the country think Mexico is going through growing. Pains of being a country that has historically sent migrants quantified self so city built by migrants, many of them who have been returned from the United States to becoming country that's receiving much more migrants. And it is a country that given its size has a very small immigrant population. And so I think it's part of those adjustments to a global phenomena of people moving throughout the world seeking protection that Mexico as other countries, including in Central American countries. Costa Rica, Panama also going through given the ongoing violence and instability in the northern triangle countries of Central America. Maureen Myers, the director for Mexico and migrant rights for the Washington office on Latin America, Maureen thank you for joining us. Thanks for having me. Some of the first Central American migrants to make it to the US border were a breakaway group of about eighty lesbian, gay bisexual and transgender. Individuals many of them fleeing violence and discrimination in their home countries because of their sexuality Eric Dudin of Honduras Umberto. Marla made a public display of their love over the weekend, by tying the knot amid cheers from other migrants. And really this is a dream come true. Because in our countries, you don't see this. And we have always wanted it. And today that we have this opportunity, very happy, really, very happy. So what's leading so many members of the LGBTQ community in Central America to flee? The Molina's is transgender man and a volunteer for Deka LGBT, I in El Salvador, and he told me the daily risks of life are high. I've experienced leaving in in the US and in Europe in here in Salvadorian. I can tell you there's no comparison. It's very hard to be out. Usually, you cannot get a job you're shunned from your family. It's really hard to access resources. The security angle is also very delicate because for those whose gender presentation does not fall within conventional standards. It's a bit more difficult. A lot more difficult. Gang members have actually vowed to exterminate the transportation. And unfortunately, these individuals are easily identified I can give you an example. There is a trans guy. He was nineteen years old. And he was unfortunately, murdered by gang members that a couple of months ago, and so tell us what type of work you do with that community in El Salvador, sure, so decay has a few functions here in all Salvador, the organization does civil rights advocacy. We also try to advocate for protection of civil rights advocates themselves as they themselves have become targets violence. We also have a put a strong emphasis on education law enforcement in government or Guineas Asians on how to deal with LGBTQ people. And we we also do some work with disability. And and research, what is the stance of the El Salvadorian government. There is. Politic of silence when it comes to the TV t q community here from the government. It's it's a very touchy issue. They try not to address it. We don't have explicit rights. You can be fired for being gay or for being transgender. You can be denied housing. I've personally had issues with healthcare showing up to a hospital in trying to get care for a bronchitis attack. I had a couple years ago in I was not able to receive care from from a doctor just because of the way that I looked there supreme court did order the government to acknowledge the problem of forced migration in general, not just failed you btcu people in June, July. They actually ordered the government to introduce legislation that would address individual cases of gang violence that would require relocation and. And the idea is that these new legislation would provide for legal in financial assistance to the victims. So that they are not forced to to leave their home country. And if that legislation does not pass are you concerned about the safety of LGBT Q, El Salvadorians, and even broader beyond the country. Yes, yes. We are. We have presidential elections coming next year. And as you've experienced in the US yourself, sometimes that can polarize things even more and people become become targets due to political rhetoric. And so we do expect the issues to get a little bit tougher for the OJ btcu community within new election cycle coming up, and you know, it's really easy talking point for some politicians to make you know to have a strong stance against would they consider to be evil in this. It's just you know, stems from our religious culture, here are extreme religious culture. Urinal Salvador, we are we are deemed evil. You know, we are not going to go to hell heaven. We're going to hell we are ruining families into that kind of rhetoric doesn't incite violence. So we're hoping dot the administration will propose legislation that will encompass the the community in the issues that we face the violence issues that we face Diego. Molina's a volunteer at Deka LGBT, I in El Salvador Diego, thanks again for joining us..

Mexico United States Tijuana president El Salvador Central America Trump Maureen Deka LGBT Latin America Maureen Meyer Molina tansy Nevada director Washington Salvador El Salvadorians El Salvador Diego Memphis
"tansy nevada" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"tansy nevada" Discussed on KCRW

"Respond would strengthen not letting the patriot stop us. Just ahead. How the area is coping with their loss bass coming up on morning edition here on KCRW for the first black woman to own a license cannabis dispensary in the United States. It's personal to find out that my brother had received a felony for cannabis was shocking to me, we have to change this and the only way to change a system sometimes work from the inside changing the ratio from within. I'm tansy Nevada. And that's next time on the takeaway from WNYC NPR. I that's today at noon on KCRW. News headlines are next. It's three thirty live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Janine Herbst. The Pentagon says more than seven thousand troops are already being sent to the southwest border to serve in support roles. President Trump says he plans to double that number as groups of asylum seekers from Central America, head north through Mexico as NPR's Mara Liasson reports Trump's hard line on immigration and against birthright citizenship is energizing his base ahead of Tuesday's midterms. Don't forget immigration is the number one issue. It's the number one culture war issue that he thinks energizes his voters. That's what birthright citizenship is four. He also ascending fifty two hundred troops to the border. Even though that caravan is filled with women and kids, and it's hundreds of miles away from the US border NPR's Mara Liasson. The State Department says it's greatly concerned by uncoordinated Turkish artillery strikes. Northern syria. And here's Peter Kenyon says Turkey is vowing to attack Syrian Kurdish fighters allied with US. President register bear to one warns that Turkey's military may need to launch another operation into Syria targeting Syrian Kurdish, white PG fighters onc reviews, terrorists state media, say at least ten white g fighters were killed in recent artillery barrages. A State Department spokesperson says it's concerned about the strikes, especially if you as personnel or nearby NPR's Peter Kenyon. Asian markets were mixed by the closing bell. The Nikkei down just over one percent. This is NPR. In indonesia. The flight data recorder from the ill-fated lion air jet liner that went down with one hundred eighty nine people on board has been found officials say they may be homing in also on the fuselage the low cost lion air flight crashed into the Java sea north of Jakarta, thirteen minutes after takeoff. Monday morning NPR's. Julie McCarthy reports that the retrieval of the data recorder could be a turning point for investigators probing the cause of the crash investigators want to know why a three month old seven thirty seven max eight fell out of the sky on a clear day the plane updates Boeing's best selling model in discovering. The flight data recorder is a step towards solving the mystery the box, which is a bright orange was hauled aboard a recovery vessel and divers said they had to contend with strong currents and dig through debris to reach it. NPR's Julie McCarthy reporting around the world, hundreds of engineers and other workers at Google are expected to walk off. The job this morning protesting the company's lenient treatment of executives accused of sexual misconduct. Last week. The New York Times reported the creator of Google's Android software. Andy Rubin got a ninety million dollars severance package. Even though the company found allegations of sexual misconduct against him were credible. He denies the allegations. Crude oil prices are trading lower down about three quarters of a percent at sixty four dollars eighty two cents a barrel. I'm Janine Herbst. NPR news in Washington. Twenty five year old Nadia Murad has been telling the world about the genocide of the eighties. And she recently co won the Nobel peace prize. But what is it like for a young woman who's already suffered so much to have the future of her people largely in her hands? That's the central question of the new documentary on her shoulders, the document will screen this powerful understated film for KCRW members on Tuesday the thirteenth in Beverly Hills for more information and reservations, go to KCRW dot com slash screenings. On.

NPR KCRW President Trump Janine Herbst Mara Liasson Peter Kenyon State Department Julie McCarthy United States cannabis Washington Google Andy Rubin tansy Nevada syria Nadia Murad WNYC Turkey Jakarta indonesia
"tansy nevada" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:26 min | 2 years ago

"tansy nevada" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm tansy Nevada and today on the takeaway, the story of unaccompanied minors fleeing to the United States and what happens once they arrive. We've been talking a lot in this country about the children separated at the border under the Trump administration's zero tolerance policy as we should be. And we will continue those conversations, but those children represent a small segment of the minors crossing the border to come to the United States young people like Melvin come to the US by the thousands each month on their own fleeing horrific situations in their home countries and finding a new set of challenges when they arrive here in search of asylum in the not too distant past a young man like Melvin would have had a narrow shot at asylum, given the violence he was looking to escape and the physical evidence on his body of the cruelty he faced in what the Malla, but in the last few years under the Trump administration. The asylum process has gotten more complicated with us now as Beth Fertig, a senior reporter covering immigration courts, Ed Legal Affairs, at WNYC Beth. It's great to have you with us. Thanks so much. So let's start off because this is. Is such a complicated story. I think for a lot of Americans when we say unaccompanied minors in the United States. What do we mean unaccompanied minors, or as they're known by the government unaccompanied alien children are kids who cross the border without apparent more than half of them are over the age of fifteen they're mostly from the triangle countries of Central America, El Salvador, Honduras, Guatemala places that are very dangerous and also very poor, and they will come by themselves or maybe with friends or other relatives who were not their parents come to the US border, and sometimes they sneak in but very often they go to a border agent and say, I'm I'm seeking asylum. I wanna stay here. And then after they are sent to stay with a sponsor, another relative who staying in the US, they will go to immigration court and have their case heard by a judge prior to the Trump administration. Tell us a little bit about what that process was like so in the past it was never easy to an asylum from. The immigration lawyers have spoken to but this past spring attorney general Jeff Sessions who controls the immigration courts there an arm of the US Justice department. He ruled on case about a woman fleeing domestic abuse in Central America. And he said that people who are fleeing gang violence and domestic abuse, they're fleeing criminals who are private criminal actors. They're not part of the government. It's not like the government was beating the woman or the government was committing violence on these teens who are trying to be recruited into gangs. So he said those are private criminal actors, and it makes it much tougher his orders to the immigration judges were it's very tough right now to grant asylum in the past. However, the judges would have some discretion. They could say, well, you know, I think in this particular case, I'm going to side with the kids lawyer, and what's happening now is there is no guaranteed right to a lawyer in immigration court for anybody. But it's especially difficult for children because their children. They don't know the law. They don't have an adult coming with them. And so there's been an effort over the years to provide lawyers for the children, but in the past year, it's the the number of kids who are represented goes down. If you don't have a lawyer, you're virtually never going to get your case heard last year fiscal year, two thousand seventeen only about forty percent of the kids got lawyers. And what's happened is the lawyers are saying that they are so busy now with Trump immigration policies. There's cases are taking longer it's harder to get new clients and Tenzin or there's also a weird quirk in the New York City immigration court where they used to have a room for the lawyers to meet with the kids on certain days when the kids would come to court and there'd be three judges assigned to hear their cases. And now that room was taken away because they needed to turn it into another courtroom. So the kids come to court, and this is how I meant Melvin they come to court by themselves. There's nobody to meet them and say here, here's how to get a lawyer. There's just some lawyers passing out flyers in the hallway and Melvin is by himself completely afraid thinking. He's going to get deported that day when that's not actually what's going to happen. He's just appearing. And the judge is asking do you have a lawyer? He didn't have a lawyer. He was told. Okay. You have three more months come back. Hopefully, you'll have a lawyer then and he leaves terrified thinking, what am I gonna do? I have to find a lawyer. So if a minor does not have say, a sponsor or a family that's waiting to take the men. They can't find a lawyer. What happens it's very difficult. Melvin was lucky because he came in the beginning of the year. He was released to an uncle who lives in Bushwick. But if he had come later this year, the Trump administration made it harder for the sponsor, the relative to take the child by adding of stricter background check with fingerprinting that would also inform immigration of that sponsors status. So Melvin uncle is undocumented a lot of the kids who are coming now are staying longer and longer in the shelters where there. Place when they first crossed the border like Melvin he only stayed for about a month in Arizona, then he was placed with his uncle. But these days the kids are staying several months. The shelters are backlogged now with kids, and that's why they're moving some of the kids to attend city in Texas where they don't have the same rights to an education every day that they would in normal shelter. That's contracted with the federal government has to meet certain standards. They can stay in this tent city and kind of harsher conditions. They're trying to pick. I've heard the kids who are ready to be placed with sponsors, very soon. So they're not little ones who are going to be hanging out for a long time. But it's still a difficult situation. And it's because of this bottleneck right now that the background checks of made it harder to place the children given that bottleneck and given these delays. Are there concerns about what could happen to these kids when they're in this limbo? Are they more susceptible to running away? Are they more susceptible to mental health issues because there's this? Limbo? Like what happens when this is? Now extended this time period where they're staying in this limbo is extended to these kids. Well, I these kids are in trauma, if they are fleeing violence, and even if they're not it it's pretty traumatic journey to come to the US. And Melvin case he wrote the beast, which is this a series of cargo trains that kids and other migrants jump on top of and ride for days. It's very very dangerous, and he was actually robbed at the end of it before he got to the border some bandits took money from him. But it's a tough experience getting to the US, then you're staying in this kind of limbo for awhile without somebody who loves you. It's an agonizing wait and the longer you drag it out child experts and trauma and child psychology say it, it just makes much much more difficult for these kids to become more resilient when they come out. They don't feel the love and support of somebody. They've been living in limbo. They don't know their future. These are young minds that are still developing. Some of the kids are at many of the kids remember are younger than teenage. Majors. So it's not a situation that you want to prolong on the other hand the government says we're doing these background checks because sometimes the kids get placed with traffickers that has happened. There have been cases where the government doesn't really do a good job of checking who the kids went to in the past, and they wound up going to people who could take advantage of them and exploit them. So you do want to make sure that they're going to someplace safe, but to delay at this long as what immigration advocates is saying is very dangerous for the children. And can you give us an update on where he is now? Yeah. First of all, he's very typical. So he's in in some ways, and I don't want to be clear about this. He is he is just like thousands of other kids. Okay. But but he's not he's his own person with his own story of being threatened of being cut on the arm by people who tried to recruit him to join a gang to sell drugs and to kill people. And that was very very scary for him and his family said you you have to leave because they pray on teenage boys. And if he had known more about. The process, for example. He could have photographed his wounds when he was in Guatemala. He could have gone to a doctor. Although he said there was no hospital in his town. He could have maybe gotten some affidavits or something from people to say what had happened, but he just came. He didn't know what to do. And now his story suspect. It's just a story. He still has the scars. He's going to have to now that he has a lawyer. He's going to meet with a trauma expert clinical social worker to kind of piece together his story because it's a little bit fragmented. You know, it's it's hard. He's very reserved. And it's tough. It's going to be a few years probably before his case goes to court and ironically because the courts are so backlogged, it could hurt Melvin case that it's taking so long. But it could also help him if there's another president at the end of this with different immigration policies. So we don't know what's going to happen. But in the meantime, he's working at a pizzeria to pay for his lawyer. He's not supposed to work until he gets working papers, which you do after you file for asylum, but he has to pay for his rent. He has to pay for his lawyer and. This could work six days a week. And he's a very industrious kid. He'd like to learn English. She doesn't have the time to take classes he could conceivably enroll in high school, but he doesn't have the time because he wants to pay and he wants to do the right thing and go to court Beth Fertig is a senior reporter at WNYC Beth. Thanks so much for helping us with this story. Thank you for having me..

Melvin uncle United States Beth Fertig reporter Guatemala tansy Nevada federal government US Justice department Central America WNYC Honduras Ed Legal Affairs Jeff Sessions El Salvador New York City Tenzin Bushwick
"tansy nevada" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:44 min | 2 years ago

"tansy nevada" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is the takeaway, I'm tansy Nevada. It's been seventeen years since the nine eleven attacks that killed nearly three thousand people on US soil. I know I'm thinking today about my own memories from that day. And I'm sure many of you are as well nine eleven drastically altered the course of this country, and it also altered the lives of many Muslims in the United States forever. Changing political affiliation career, aspirations, family, dynamics and beyond. And today, we talked to people who've experienced some of that change, and they want to share that with us, and they're also experts in American Islamic relations and observers of what this seventeen year period has meant for Muslims across the world. And in the United States shoddy Hamid is a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and author of the book Islamic exceptionalism. How the struggle over Islam is reshaping the world and Zane of Chowdhry is director of Maryland outreach for the council on American Islamic relations. Welcome to you both. Thanks for having me. Thanks. Thank you. Thanks for being with us. And so how questions to both of you? And then we can get specific how did your relationship change with Islam after nine eleven what was it like being a Muslim American during that time? So I was actually a freshman in college. When nine eleven happened, so already very impressionable time. And I think that before nine eleven obviously saw myself as Muslim, but it wasn't something you are super conscious about because most Americans didn't really know much about Islam. They didn't care about it that much because they're still wasn't a major national security component than nine eleven happens. And I think for us as American Muslims, it's sort of a tragedy in two ways, of course, as Americans. But also as Muslims who are trying to make sense of how people possibly do this in our name. And for me, it was a it was a formative political moment than anti Muslim sentiment increases afterwards, you have the Bush administration's Patriot Act, then you have their rock war. So you have a chain of events that happened in in in this very rapid series. And it forces forced many of us to become more. Political and I became more interested in Middle East politics. There was a sense that the relationship between the US and the Middle East was going in a very dangerous direction. And that's part of what actually pushed me to to move into the career that I happen to be in right now. So of of looking at the role of Islam and politics of looking at US foreign policy, and I think for many American Muslims, you see that shift of trying to get more involved in American politics and trying to do whatever we can to serve. I know. It's a bit of a cliche, but to serve as a bridge between the US and the broader Muslim world, and do whatever we can to play a more constructive role to to a large degree do agree. I remember nine eleven is one of those moments in history when you know, everybody remembers where we were what we were doing at that time. And I think for many American Muslims, we can define our lives is pre. Nine eleven and post nine eleven. I was actually in pharmacists goal. I had just started. My fall semester of my freshman year in pharmacy school in Baltimore. And I remember very visceral fear like that the angst amongst our communities that day specifically, my father had called me while I was sitting in class, and I had just started wearing headscarf the hijab a few months prior. And he immediately told me he said take off your head scarf. And I was shocked, and I was like why should I do that? And he said we'll talk about it when you get home just take off your hitch app. And I remember limits and powerful thing for a father to say, I mean, and you had no idea why? While we had we were just starting to learn that a plane had hit the twin towers in New York. We were just giving you information of the attack in Pennsylvania. And we had just learned from our as vice dean associate dean who had come down to our our our classroom and told us that class was dismissed in school was going to be closed for the day, and we could leave. And so we knew something was going on. We knew that it was serious. But we didn't know at that time exactly what the implications of the of those days events were going to be it wasn't until later on when I was at my friend's storm. She lived across the street from pharmacy school, and I went to her dorm. And we were just watching TV, and I remember sitting there on the couch like just with a sinking feeling in my heart thinking that life is ever going to be the same again. And sure enough in the days following that. We saw a spike in anti Muslim incidents anti-muslim bigotry hate crimes finds incidents targeting to seek American community specifically there was a murder of a Sikh gas gas station owner, and I remember that, you know, the the climate of suspicion and scrutiny in fear, especially against American Muslims was something that can't be really articulated properly in words, but it was something that I knew was going to change the course of my life and short enough, even though I. I did go on to complete pharmacists goal. There was all always this like sense of wanting to do work that would help to connect the American Muslim community with broader society. I think pre-nine eleven many Muslim communities tended to exist in silos and the tragic events of that day forced many Muslims to kind of break out of our silos and be more vocal entertainment about our narrative, and what Islam is and do a lot of introspection as well do a lot of research about what our religion says. So that we can explain it while to others and demystify and break a lot of the stereotypes that exists about Islam and Muslims to get both of your thoughts on this. Because when we'll talk about this a little bit the current administration and a little bit. But after nine eleven the Bush administration created a foreign policy that basically targeted the broader Muslim world, and I'm wondering what or made a target out of the broader Muslim world. And I'm wondering whether that. It had any effect on as you were mentioning American Muslim communities here in the United States. So one affect was that it it pushed American Muslims away from the Republican party towards the Democratic Party. And and I know this might be hard to believe now. But my parents, for example, and. A plurality of Muslims in two thousand of voted for George W Bush, and there was a real sense that even some communities that Muslims should rally around George W Bush for. So part of the hat to do with Muslim seeing themselves as a more socially conservative community. And but then after nine eleven the Bush administration becomes associated with these with these very problematic policies at least from a Muslim perspective of many Muslims. Would of course, as I mentioned before the Patriot Act. The Iraq war was very unpopular among American Muslims, generally and Democrats overtime start to start to portray themselves as more accepting of American Muslims. Just like they're more accepting of a number of other minority communities, and that's a really important realignment. I think and we're seeing the facts of that to this to this very day. And I also want to bring up the current administration. Obviously, I'm wondering if either of you consider to speak to the whether or not you think the relationship between nine eleven. Has impacted and the Muslim community or the commerical community writ large has really influenced where we are today politically, particularly with the election of Donald Trump. Particularly given this sort of the Brown menace policies, if you will that have come out of this administration. That's my description for many of the policies that sort of paint communities of color as menacing and threatening one thing that we've seen is definitely the normalization of an even the encouragement of bigotry and fear mongering towards communities collar including American Muslims, but not just limited to to that one community. We saw during the presidential campaign season in twenty fifteen to twenty sixteen for the first time in recent history where an entire campaign that was based on fear mongering and inciting bias and hatred towards one feet group. Specifically was successful in reaching an electorate that helped to elect a president that ran a campaign on demonizing Assam and vilifying Muslims who called for. Openly called for complete and total shutdown Muslims entering the United States who promised to build a wall to protect American interests in in to make sure that Americans were safe who've really ran like this this entire campaign that was rooted in demonizing communities of color in specifically American Muslims, and it helped to not only normalized, but also encourage bigotry towards Muslims. And I remember having a conversation immediately after the two thousand sixteen presidential election and many Muslims felt betrayed that. We had our country had any fact elected a president who had promised to do everything that was he was he was that we could possibly do to prohibit Muslims from being a vibrant part of society of the United States. And a large part of that is tied to the phobia in the fearmongering the big. Guitry that we've seen in the aftermath of nine eleven. However, one thing that is a little bit different is in the aftermath of nine eleven. We saw from President Bush. There was this almost immediate kind of sense of distancing the war on terror from a slam he visited a mosque. He reached out to the Muslim community. He invited shake comes Yussef who was a prominent scholar at that time to sit down with him and half conversation, and he made this very concerted effort to kind of distance Islam and Muslims from the campaign on the or the war and terror which in theory on paper, it seemed like it was effective. But in reality, we saw from the spike of hate crimes and incidents towards Muslims. One could argue that it might not have been as effective as one would have hoped, but there was a concerted effort to try to distance the terror attacks from the broader Muslim community and that in to some degree did help to control the number of hate crime. And incidents that took place against Muslims. But over the course of the decade following that with the Patriot Act and with a blanket surveillance of the American Muslim community that incited fear and suspicion and paranoia. Unfortunately, that those policies have effectively created this dichotomy where many Muslims have been seen as other as the other. As a second class citizens is not worthy of being. With with equal Francis. Other americans. This is the seventeenth anniversary. It's hard to believe. There are people who are weren't even around when nine eleven happened. And let them curious what your thoughts are for younger Muslim Americans who are learning about this today, and sort of dealing with the ramifications of nine eleven without having even been there for younger American Muslims. I think their formative moment's gonna be different. It'll be primarily about the Trump administration, and that's negative is aimed mentioned. But there's also the positive in the sense that a lot of Muslims are becoming even more politically active, and we just saw two young American Muslim women will be serving in congress. We saw it running for governor in Michigan. And I think a lot of that has to do with with a positive reaction to Trump of Muslim saying we made some progress since nine eleven, but we gotta do even more right now shoddy Hamid is a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and Zane. Chowdry is director of Maryland outreach for the council on American Islam relations, many thanks to you both for joining us..

United States President Bush Brookings Institution Maryland Hamid Zane senior fellow director Middle East tansy Nevada Donald Trump New York Chowdhry Iraq murder vice dean associate president
"tansy nevada" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"tansy nevada" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Mu dream it printed a confirmation hearing, unlike any other this is something I've never gone through before in fifteen supreme court nominations since I've been on here. The Senate Judiciary committee continues the supreme court nomination hearings for judge Cavanaugh, I'm tansy Nevada. And that's next time on the takeaway from WNYC and PRI public radio international. It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Rachel Martin in Washington DC, and I'm David Greene in Culver City, California. The Trump administration is vigorously denying claims laid out in a new book. The first leaks from the book by Washington Post journalist Bob Woodward began to circulate yesterday as did tape of Woodward's phone, call with President Trump describing his efforts to interview Trump for the book. We miss the opportunity to talk for the book spoke with Kellyanne achie- asked me if I if I got a call, I never got a call. I never got a message who did you? Did you ask about speaking Germany NPR's Mara Liasson covers the White House? And she's on the line with us. I'm Mara either. David. Wow. That tape is just something. And Kellyanne actually walked into the room during the phone call which which is even. Yeah. I mean, I could just listen to this for for the entire thing over and over again, it seems so revealing so this this book is called fear. Why is that what kind of picture of the White House is emerging in this account from Bob Woodward? Well, the picture that emerges through Bob Woodward steep reporting, and his vivid recreations of scenes in the White House is very similar to what we already have heard about the Trump White House a lot of dysfunction. Lot of chaos. Lot of disparagement of Trump by his top officials were Trump would consider a lack of loyalty. But also it shows people close to the president trying to protect him from himself from his worst instincts and protect the country from him. Whether it was ending a trade deal with South Korea that they thought would damage US national security starting war with North Korea or sitting down for an interview with Bob Muller. Yeah. I mean, th they actually I mean, there was some pretty dramatic. Language used by one of the president's attorneys talking about whether or not you testify with Muller. That's right. He is reported in the in the Woodward book to have told Donald Trump that he could sit down the choice was between testifying to Bob Muller or an orange jumpsuit. That's amazing. And that was attorney John Dowd who used to be one of the lawyers in the White House. I I just want to listen to a little more of that phone call between Woodward and the president here. Go.

President Trump Bob Woodward Bob Muller White House Trump White House president David Greene Kellyanne achie Mara Liasson NPR Senate Judiciary Washington Post Rachel Martin South Korea tansy Nevada Cavanaugh Culver City Washington Germany California
"tansy nevada" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"tansy nevada" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Broker dealers. A confirmation hearing unlike any other this is something I've never gone through before in fifteen supreme court nominations since I've been on here. The Senate Judiciary committee continues the supreme court nomination. Hearing for judge Brad Kavanagh, I'm tansy Nevada. And that's next time on the takeaway from WNYC NPR. I public radio international. The US and Mexico have their outline of a trade deal but tough negotiations with Canada resumed today. Marketplace morning report is supported by Kronos HR payroll talent and timekeeping in one unified system. Learn more at kronoScom Cronos workforce innovation that works. I'm David Brancaccio in New York. Canadian officials sit down with US trade representative's today in an effort to hash out their differences in a possible. Nafta overhaul many differences, here's marketplace's Nancy Marshall genzer in Washington. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says Canada will not bridge will not budge on two key issues. I insisting the new NAFTA keep something like the current dispute resolution process, which involves private panels have investigators that said on NAFTA disagreements second Trudeau is insisting the new NAFTA, keep cultural exemptions, protecting Canadian media from US takeovers. It is inconceivable to Canadians that an American network might by Canadian media affiliates. Whether it's newspaper or TV stations or TV networks. It would be a giving up of our sovereignty and our identity. President Trump is threatening to exclude Canada from the renegotiated NAFTA. The Trump administration is aiming to submit final NAFTA language to congress by the end of this month. Marketplace's Nancy Marshall genzer in Washington. Let me check the markets. The one hundred index in London is down half a percent SNP. Nasdaq futures reach down three tenths of a percent. Crude oil is back down below seventy dollars sixty eight ninety a barrel with that big storm in the Gulf losing energy inland. Preparations for the storm curbed about nine percent of daily crude production in the Gulf later this morning. Congress is set to vote on a Bill that would require student borrowers to receive financial counseling.

NAFTA US Canada Nancy Marshall Justin Trudeau Gulf Senate Judiciary Washington Brad Kavanagh David Brancaccio President Trump WNYC Kronos Congress New York Prime Minister tansy Nevada NPR
"tansy nevada" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:02 min | 2 years ago

"tansy nevada" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is the takeaway I'm tansy, Nevada over the weekend at least seventy four people were shot over the course of a sixty three hour window that ended early Monday morning in the city. Of Chicago the shootings which. Mostly took place in the city south and west, side neighborhoods left twelve people dead. And angry mayor Rahm Emanuel addressed the press on Monday we have a heavy heart Our souls are burden What happened this weekend did not happen in, every neighborhood in Chicago but it is unacceptable to happen in. Any neighborhood of Chicago Reverend Gregory seal Livingston is the pastor of the new hope Baptist church and the president of the coalition. For a new Chicago and he joined me to talk about the reaction among the communities dealing with this gun violence. On, a regular basis one they're numb and it's become. Somewhat normative to them the second is they're afraid and they're becoming to basically tried to deal with. The the great fear they have of being shot walking down the street standing on their steps or or just sitting in their house in a bullet. Coming through the window so. It's it's pretty rough now let's be clear which communities are being, affected by this majority are we talking, about working class communities black and Brown communities who is being affected, by this, gun violence the challenge the disadvantaged communities that are black and Brown that are working class that are poor are. Being affected by this Because you caguas been intentionally segregated and when you intentionally segregate a people two, things happen insulation and desperation there's installation for folk with the. Assets and there's desperation for the folk without the assets let's talk a little bit about what provoked some of the violence if. We know are these strategic issues are attacks or is this just indiscriminate violence so much of it is indiscriminate and. By, that I mean you have a lot of what. We call renegades these young men and some women as well who are part of a gang in. Name only because the gangs have no leaders in many ways in Chicago right now sometimes what people tend to not know if you don't have boots. On the ground many of. Them, live in places with no air conditioning no working toilets you, you'd be surprised they have buckets in, their house and so you have people living in these less than, twenty first, century standards of humaneness and they're outside and it's one hundred degrees and things get rough and heavy and oftentimes The gangs informed? Because people are trying to find. A way and, again I'm, not condoning but these street organizations are formed because. They're trying to find a way develop alternative economies to get power and to be able to get the assets that oftentimes segregation denied so I wouldn't play a clip, from Rahm emanuel's press conference yesterday and this is the Chicago police department superintendent Eddie. Johnson talking about the need for the community to be, a part of the, solution we need the community and community leaders to, work with us we need parents to be parents we need neighborhoods to be neighborhoods you all know who, these individuals are wherever Livingston who is he referring to I. Don't know We're? Talking about the okeydokey trying? To pull the wool over your eyes look Rahm and Eddie first of, all Eddie was illegitimately hired by Rahm to be his yes man and then Ryan is talking about. That we, need to report, these murders still he covered up the murder of lukewarm McDonnell to win an election and here's the other part he sitting on a half a billion dollars of hood low. Income housing money for most of his administration I'm telling you right, now I was talking to the cops we're, doing our electro drive down a Wrigley field March last Thursday I said wouldn't it make. A difference if someone had a decent place to lay their. Head down at night wouldn't it. Make a difference if they had. Heat in the wintertime and running water in the summertime these monies have not? Been spent yet Bien stealing that one billion dollar tiffs last slush fund those is, are going out to his developer cronies You, know at tens, of, millions. Of dollars at a time and so there's a great deal of hypocrisy we you see Rams crocodile tears. They're bloody because you wiped him with his hands to. Have the blood of so many folk on them I want to continue along those lines because what we just heard from, the police chief here is, really a call to community? And here's the question that I have what does the community want when we watch these reports that are coming out from, Chicago and you see two, second sound from residents. Who were saying, we want to be safe but what. Does? That mean what, are the residents asking. For a nephew who was. Shot in the head paralyzed on the right. Side of his body and he was, a father, married and everything, else and you know these tragedies don't escape any of us right and so we we. Wanna be safe I live in, the, hood here's what I want. To say to you I was suited up. The other, day, you know suit and tie and I'm in the hood is a little girl about three years old with her mother she looks at a mama, says mommy, he he's DCFS in Chicago that's the problem.

Chicago Rahm Emanuel Reverend Gregory seal Livingst Nevada hope Baptist church Brown president murder DCFS Eddie Johnson Bien Rams superintendent McDonnell developer Ryan one hundred degrees one billion dollar
"tansy nevada" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"tansy nevada" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm tansy nevada and all week here on the takeaway we're looking at how police use technology to fight crime and how these technologies are changing our relationship to privacy in the name of public safety for decades police officers have been keeping track of alleged criminals and today one method of doing that is through with some people call gang databases victor dempsey thinks he might be in a gang database here in new york city last fall he was pulled over for failing to use his turn signal and what was supposed to be a routine traffic stop but then things shifted so he escorts me to his cruiser places me in the back of his crews he did not sit me on the side of the curb you did not please me to stand by the trunk of the car i'm in his cruiser in handcuffs for routing traffic slow so as visiting and moving around the lean forward at the bottom of his monitor there was a picture of me and then like little red letters is that srg security risk group security risk group that's what dempsey thinks the letters he saw meant at a young age before my days now i was involved in a crew that was actually a member of the blood gay when he was seventeen dempsey was arrested for attempted robbery and served two years in prison today he's a community liaison with the legal aid society but dempsey said he still feels as though his past is following him i'm thirty two years of age now i have not been in trouble since day team so all as time went by and i'm still in a database whether dempsey is one of the more than seventeen thousand new yorkers in the database will be almost impossible to find out according to the new york police department the databases private we asked the nypd about the s rg acronym and they said it actually stands for something else and we'll hear from them in a minute but first we go back to victor dempsey and anthony prasada a lawyer for the legal aid society and they're both sounding the alarm about the use of these gang databases to be placed into the nypd gang database right now as it exists there is no requirement that a person commit wrongdoing or crime so in other words anybody could end up on the gang database is that right that's correct but i would just say that not just anybody but primarily people who live in communities of color and in nitra buildings where surveillance and gang policing has been really intensified.

attempted robbery victor dempsey new york anthony prasada nitra thirty two years two years
"tansy nevada" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"tansy nevada" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Dot com this is taken away with tansy nevada does the constitution guarantee the right to an education last week a federal judge said no in two thousand sixteen seven students in michigan sued the government saying they had a basic right to learn to read and write in school and that they're underfunded inferior education in detroit had denied them that right but judge steven murphy said in his ruling last week that as devastating as the conditions in those detroit schools are the constitution provides no protection for literacy not everyone agrees with that interpretation derek lack is a professor of law at the university of south carolina specializing in education the federal district court said there is no rod under the federal constitution to literacy now we do have state constitutions in all fifty states do protect the right to education so if you went into state court you could have got a different decision in a lot of a lot of states but at the federal level very limited ability to pursue education routes it's still sort of surprising to me that that's not part we have the pursuit of happiness but they're at education doesn't seem to be a part of that yeah and i think part of it is the word education doesn't appear in the federal constitution and i think that's the the biggest challenge to get over how could the constitution protect something if it if it doesn't mention it but we had lawsuits back in the nineteen seventies it went our way that supreme court case was san antonio versus rodriguez where civil rights advocates had tried to argue that basically the right to education was connected to so many other things like free speech in voting that the constitution implicitly protects it but the court rejected that idea in san antonio versus rodriguez and so we have these newer cases trying to identify some narrower aspect of education that maybe the constitution protects like literacy like how could you function as a citizen if you're not literate and so people have gone for a narrow arrived but this this lower court just said no to that as well so what is the federal government's role all in ensuring that americans are provided with an education is there no role at all i mean they have the department of education right well the department of education is really about spending money and getting things back in exchange for us what's kind of like a contract between the federal government and the states but my research is actually said that there is a federal role in education and that's that our constitution does guarantee everyone a republican form of government and the states it's actually congress's job to make sure all states have republican form of government and that sort of a fancy constitutional term for democracy but you know my research has shown that at the end of the civil war when congress is trying to put our democracy back together and we've got a couple of million slaves in the south who've been denied the right to read been denied the right to vote been denied alright and for that matter a lot of poor whites were suffering in terms of education in voting as well the congress had looked southern states if you want to become part of this democratic union again you gotta do the three things you got to ensure that everyone gets to vote you gotta provide public education to all your citizens and you have to enact the fourteenth amendment so i sorta i argue that from that point four what we see is that the federal constitution does require states to provide public education to its citizens but going back to the requirement of a public education what about the quality of education we mentioned the do is is the department of education obviously funds certain initiatives so there is a role that the federal government is playing and i would ask you what role is that when it comes to the quality of education not just the right to be educated but to have a good education yeah i mean i think when we were trying to bring these states back into the union congress wanted them to.

Mental trauma may be greatest challenge for boys rescued from cave

The Takeaway

04:10 min | 2 years ago

Mental trauma may be greatest challenge for boys rescued from cave

"That was the first audio and video the world was able to hear of the youth soccer team trapped in a cave in northern thailand many people this is the takeaway i'm tansy nevada and today a story that has the world watching this weekend dramatic and intense rescue operations began in thailand's chiang rai province to free a group of twelve boys and their soccer coach who've been trapped in a cave for more than two weeks so far eight children have been rescued four remain along with their coach the team was exploring the cave when monsoon rains flooded in and it was nine days before their exact location was pinpointed on friday a thai rescue diver died when he ran out of air while underwater petty officer soman gounon had delivered oxygen to those trapped in the cave but on his way back through the long and complex cave tunnels he ran out of oxygen for himself and lost consciousness to get a sense of how these rescue operations happen and what makes them so tricky we turn to greg moore who's the northeastern regional coordinator for the national cave rescue commission greg thanks for joining us thank you for having me here now i've seen you know there's been lots of talk about what it takes to do this and i want to get into the specifics of how this rescue is happening but i also want wonder if you could help our listeners understand what exactly the depth of the of this cave is i'm hearing it takes two or three hours to bring a child out yeah i don't know the exact numbers i've seen two kilometers which i know most listeners probably thinking oh that's not too far of a walk i could do that pretty quickly but what people do have to understand is first of all even in the dry passages they can be tight narrow which means possibly crawling or moving in a not easy walking fashion and then of course in this particular cave they have the huge complication of waterfield passages which for an experienced cave diver definitely can take some time in now when you're taking boys who literally this will be the first dive of their lives they're taking the time moving very slowly because they don't want to make any mistakes so let's explain the process the mechanics of getting these children out of the cave and of course the coaches well what exactly are the cavers doing when you confront a situation like this what do you do what is the first step to actually rescuing people out well and i'm gonna talk mostly my experience which is all dry caving but the hardest part in some cases they've done here which lily was finding the boys is you may recall for nearly two weeks there was a question of where they were gonna they could even find him so when we do not oftentimes we start out with a search party once we find him the next step is generally a medical evaluation and then after that you go into a period of planning a lot of people i know and i'm as a parent i'd be one of them wanting children out as quickly as possible they want to see their loved ones i can't blame them but in a situation like this do wanna take your time because you wanna plan for every possibility the other huge factor here and one that i don't think can be overemphasized is the psychological considerations for example if the boys have a leader of the team with something like that having ligo i may be a real benefit for them because you can say hey they do it i can do it or conversely you may want the leader stay behind in order to boost the morale and cheer up the voice for maybe a little more scared a little more worried about the extraction you mentioned psychology and as i'm listening to the story i'm having panic about the claustrophobia what do you do about the claustrophobia what if there is someone who is absolutely in a panic who cannot handle the trip out sure i will say in it surprises some people that know i'm a caver i've been in a couple of tight passages myself where all sudden you know you get that tightness of chest or whatever and i know the.

Soccer Thailand Two Weeks Two Kilometers Three Hours Nine Days
Are the Kurds of Iraq and Syria About to Reconcile?

Here & Now

01:22 min | 2 years ago

Are the Kurds of Iraq and Syria About to Reconcile?

"On friday and saturday in canada as the us imposes tariffs on steel and aluminum imports markle says there will be quote no sense papering over divisions between nations a us backed kurdish group in northeastern syria says it's prepared to hold talks with syrian government over the area's future at move comes a day after u s and turkish authorities agreed on a roadmap to revolve resolve divisions over a border town under kurdish control at kurdish group remains the us is top ally in syria government forecasters say may was a record warm month for the continental us national oceanic and atmospheric administration reports the average temperature rose to sixty five point four degrees breaking the nineteen thirty four record of sixty four point seven you're listening to here now when climate gentrification causes climate evictions they've not gonna projects before moved them somewhere else never moved back climate change pushes developers onto higher ground forcing residents out i'm tansy nevada broadcasting from miami and that's next time on the takeaway from wnyc and pri public radio international we'll bring you that story and more on the takeaway just about twenty minutes from now that'll be noon today here on k q e where support for k q e comes from berkeley wrapped presenting what the.

Canada United States Syria Syrian Government Miami Berkeley Twenty Minutes Four Degrees
Family members react to study showing shocking death toll from Hurricane Maria

Morning Edition

02:35 min | 2 years ago

Family members react to study showing shocking death toll from Hurricane Maria

"From npr news in washington i'm dave mattingly president trump is traveling to texas today npr's mara liasson says the president will be meeting with survivors of this month's deadly attack at santa fe high school along with family members of those shot to death he's unlikely to encounter calls for gun control in texas it's a pro gun rights state and most of the focus there has been hardening schools making them more secure against potential shooters the shooting at the high school left eight students and two teachers dead a seventeen year old student at the school is facing capital murder charges the president's trip to texas includes a speech at a republican fundraiser in houston the mayor of san juan says she's not surprised president trump has been silent about a study from harvard university researchers suggesting thousands of people in puerto rico were killed by hurricane maria not one tweet not one tweet from a man that tweets about the sunrise to say look people puerto rico we're sorry that's mayor carmen ulan cruise speaking yesterday the study published in the new england journal of medicine estimates maria directly or indirectly killed more than forty six hundred people in puerto rico that's more than seventy times higher than the official death toll i'm dave mattingly in washington i'm robin young as we head into the wedding season a wedding planner has some of the latest trends including influences from the royal wedding children instead of bridesmaids flowers since her bouquets since megan's was so small i've had a few calls about wanting to change their case and it was picked by prince harry apparently next time here and now here and now at eleven am later on this morning followed at noon by the takeaway turning a drug lords life into a tourist attraction so they go to the cemetery they go to jail for he was for one year they go to the house where he was killed what's the price of glorifying pablo escobar i'm tansy nevada and that's next time on the takeaway from wnyc and pri public radio international the takeaway at twelve noon and then just one chance to hear marketplace today and that will be at four o'clock because it's thursday so that means at six thirty this evening it's political breakdown she may be.

NPR Pablo Escobar Robin Young Official Puerto Rico New England Journal Of Medicin Carmen Ulan Harvard University Houston Murder Santa Fe High School Dave Mattingly Washington Prince Harry Megan Hurricane Maria San Juan
"tansy nevada" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"tansy nevada" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is the takeaway i'm tansy nevada and i'm so glad to be with you on this friday special counsel robert muller's russia investigation is more than a year old but do you know how many crimes it's unearth seventeen indictments and five guilty pleas michael flynn paul manafort and gates alexander's popadopoulos thirteen russian nationals and three russian companies richard pinedo now indicted by the special counsel crimes from conspiracy to bank fraud to lying to the fbi and if you didn't know that you're not alone a new survey says the majority of americans fifty nine percent don't think the probe has yielded any evidence of crimes and then of course there's this repeated refrain through it all have this witchhunt constantly going on for over twelve months now it's a total witch hunt good for a long time phony witchhunts like a witch hunt entire thing has been a witch this is a pure and simple which well we're going to try to cut through some of that noise because whatever you call it there are some truths to lay out some stories to get straight and some questions to answer about the russia investigation and to help us make sense of all of this i'm speaking with josh gerstein a senior reporter for politico covering the white house and the justice department and in the studio today we have ryan goodman he's an editor in chief of just security and former special counsel to the department of defense welcome to you both thanks for having good to be here so josh it's friday and it feels like the end of another insane week in the muller probe and i mean i hate to say it but what we've doesn't yesterday the justice department briefed congressional leaders on sensitive material regarding an fbi informant who met with trump's aides during the campaign so this is what the president is now calling spy gate so first of all josh if you could tell us about who this alleged spy or informant is and his role well so the spy has been despise the president calls him or the informant as others call him is reported to be a fellow by the name of stefan helper who is a former white house official state department official under several republican administrations if we go back about twenty or thirty years to the.

trump white house stefan editor in chief richard pinedo paul manafort michael flynn russia official president robert muller special counsel ryan goodman justice department politico reporter josh gerstein fbi
"tansy nevada" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"tansy nevada" Discussed on KQED Radio

"First state to ban any marriage involving people under eighteen years old turns out so called child marriage is still legal in many states more and more girls under age eighteen were calling to beg for help and what i realized that there's almost no way to help them that's next time on here now that'll be just one of the stories they'll bring us as we present here now beginning at eleven o'clock this morning here i'm k q e followed at noon by the takeaway the us olympic committee can win medals but can they protect their athletes what are we doing to protect these young people right now so this never happens again members of congress demand answers about the sexual abuse of athletes that extends far beyond gymnastics i'm tansy nevada and that's next time on the takeaway from wnyc and pri public radio international the takeaway beginning at eleven o'clock hour rather noon here's a news update from npr now at eight nineteen from npr news in washington i'm lakshmi singh president trump scrapping next month's planned summit with north korea he size pyongyang's recent open hostility and says in light of that holding face to face on north korea's nuclear program would not be appropriate well some lawmakers including the ranking democrat on the senate foreign relations committee bob menendez are not surprise menendez says the art of diplomacy is a lot harder than the art of the deal while we applaud robust diplomatic efforts to try to denuclearize the korean peninsula many of us were deeply concerned that the lack of deep preparation that is necessary before such as summit is even agreed to was not taking place menendez addressing secretary mike pompeo who told the panel quote we've not been able to conduct the preparations between our two teams that would be necessary to have a successful summit the justice department will conduct a bipartisan briefing on secret russia probe documents is afternoon democrats it cried foul at being excluded from a republicans only meeting led by deputy attorney general rod rosenstein npr's ryan lucas reports is briefing will follow an early at republican only session with congressman trey couty and devin newness so democrats and republican leaders are worried about what sort of precedent a special briefing like this for newness might set the gang of.

congress devin congressman ryan lucas rod rosenstein deputy attorney general russia secretary senate president lakshmi singh npr us trey couty justice department mike pompeo bob menendez pyongyang
"tansy nevada" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"tansy nevada" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is fresh air this year you may not have to go to las vegas to bet big on the super bowl philadelphia eagles route is over as the supreme court paves the way for legalized sports betting across the country nevada gets company i'm tansy nevada and that's next time on the takeaway weekday afternoons at three on ninety three point nine fm this is fresh air and if you're just joining us my guest is michael pollen is the author of books like the omnivores dilemma and the botany of desire books about food books about plants his new book is about psychedelics their history their current use in research and also his own experiments with psychedelics the book is called how to change your mind but the new science of psychedelics teaches us about consciousness dying addiction depression and transcendence so we were talking about the use of psychedelics in treating depression and anxiety there are also research projects now using psychedelics with people who have terminal cancer and they're in there they're facing their death and they're very anxious about it so our psychedelics being used in that setting so far the most exciting trial i think has been giving it to people with lifechanging diagnoses they're not all terminal but many of them are and i spent a lotta time telling the story of a man named patrick mattis who is a a journalist in his fifties who had bile duct cancer that had spread.

las vegas philadelphia michael pollen depression cancer patrick mattis nevada