20 Burst results for "Tansy Nevada"

"tansy nevada" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"tansy nevada" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Please continue to say her name. Brianna Taylor. I'm Tansy Nevada, and this is the takeaway. The city of Louisville Kentucky has settled a wrongful death suit for twelve million dollars with the family of Brianna Taylor, the twenty six year old black woman who was shot and killed by police in her apartment six months ago while we await a decision from Attorney General Daniel Cameron on whether or not charges will be filed. In this case, my administration is not waiting to move ahead with needed reforms to prevent the tragedy like this from ever happening again. That was Louisville Mayor Greg and we're going to talk about the specifics of those police reforms in just a moment in the meantime Taylor's family and lawyers commended the settlement but said yesterday that justice for Briana will not have been served until Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron brings criminal charges against the three officers involved with her death. Here's Taylor's mother to Meka. Palmer speaking at a press conference yesterday. As significant as today is it's only the beginning of getting for justice for Briana. We must not lose focus on what the real drive is. And with that being said, it's time to move forward. With the criminal charges because she deserves that and much more. Her beautiful spirit. And personality is working through all of us on the ground. So please continue to say her name. Brianna Taylor..

Brianna Taylor Briana Daniel Cameron Louisville Kentucky Attorney Tansy Nevada Louisville Kentucky Palmer Greg
"tansy nevada" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"tansy nevada" Discussed on The Takeaway

"The New York Attorney General is investigating the trump organization and the trump family is dragging their feet. Every step of the way with the trump organization has learned over the years dating back way before trump became president is that it pays to stonewall in court cases I'm Tansy Nevada and today on the takeaway for Tuesday August twenty fifth look at the steps the Attorney General is taking and what it could mean in the lead up to November. Also, we'll look at how Democrats are approaching gun violence in this election cycle in terms of differences between. Harrison Biden there's really very little but of course when you compare either one or both of them to president trump or or vice president Mike Pence there's there's a pretty big Gulf there. But I on Brianna Taylor's case the public pressure to take action against the police officers who killed her let's get started. Those are protesters chanting Brianna Taylor's name in downtown Louisville Kentucky. It's been more than five months since Louisville police served a no knock warrant at Taylor's home shot the twenty six old emt to death. The officers involved in her killing have yet to face charges and only one has been fired. The incident was an example of a pattern of systemic racism and police violence that have spurred protests.

trump Brianna Taylor president Democrats Attorney vice president Louisville Tansy Nevada Mike Pence Harrison Biden New York Kentucky
"tansy nevada" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"tansy nevada" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Said he ordered a review of military aid to Ukraine because he was concerned about corruption to my mind that is really upside down world I'm Tansy Nevada and today on the takeaway for October second will untangle the ties between president trump and Ukraine to learn more about the impeachment crisis Also on the show a friend's tribute to Jamal Kashogi one year after his death plus Musician Robbie Robertson looks back on his decades long career Tori with Opt Dylan and playing in the band we've played music and eventually had to say the world is wrong where right this is good and I don't care what anybody says start in Ukraine right now as house Democrats move ahead with their impeachment inquiries and the president trump the executive branch is pushing back last week secretary of State Mike Pompeo was subpoenaed by the heads of three House committees seeking any comments that might illuminate allegations that the president improperly pressured the Ukrainian government to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden in response to a request from House Democrats to depose five State Department officials who may have witnessed wrongdoing pompeo struck a defiant tone accusing Democrats of bullying and intimidation we will of course do our constitutional duty to cooperate with this co equal branch and we won't tolerate folks on Capitol Hill bullying intimidating state department employees that's unacceptable at a press conference in Rome earlier today Secretary Pompeii Oh doubled down before confirming reports that he had been on the July Twenty Fifth Phone Call decisively what the American policy with respect to Ukraine it's been remarkably consistent and we will continue to try to drive.

Rome Secretary State Department Vice President Mike Pompeo executive Tori Robbie Robertson Ukraine Joe Biden Ukrainian government president Dylan Jamal Kashogi trump Tansy Nevada Twenty Fifth one year
"tansy nevada" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

13:22 min | 3 years ago

"tansy nevada" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm tansy Nevada. And this is the takeaway, when Robert Muller, spoke publicly for the first and last time a special counsel, he declined to clear, the president of wrongdoing. Instead, he reiterated the Justice Department's opinion that it would be unconstitutional to charge a sitting president with a crime. The opinion shows that the constitution requires a process other than the criminal Justice system to formally accuse a sitting president of wrongdoing a process, other than the criminal Justice system. Well that could mean impeachment. But while more House Democrats are calling to move forward with what the president calls, the I word, forty five percent of Americans said they support impeaching the president, but party leadership, however, is still holding off. Joining me now is someone who would be directly involved in those impeachment proceedings. Congressman Jamie Raskin is a democrat who serves Maryland's eighth district in the house of representatives, and he's also on the House Judiciary committee. Congressman Raskin, thanks for coming on the takeaway. To be with you. So congressman you've already called to start impeachment inquiries did Robert Muller statement yesterday change anything for those in the Democratic Party who are still on the fence. I think it did. You know, those people who have been calling for the launching of an impeachment inquiry, or the people who've been most closely involved in this process over the last several months of the members of the judiciary committee members of oversight committee. What did yesterday was to contradict attorney general bar on the number of critical points? The first thing that he did was to point out that the reason that Donald Trump was not indicted by special counsel Muller was because of the DOJ rule. Forbidding the indictment of a sitting president, it was not for want of evidence and he was very emphatic in clear about that. He he wanted. No further confusion about it. He also rejected in one sentence. Attorney general bars nineteen page single spaced memorandum, which basically said that that's president could never be guilty of obstruct. During Justice because he sits on top of the law enforcement machinery and attorney general bar said that that's absolutely wrong. Because when the subject interferes an investigation into himself that use the cardinal meaning of obstruction of Justice. And of course, nobody's above the law here. So I think that those points ramified in a very sharp way across certainly the democratic caucus. I hope some Republicans absorbed in hurt it, and, of course, we wanted mother to come right away to speak to the public because we know not everybody had read the port the port another everybody's going to read the report. But when he did, I think that it's struck everybody with gale-force congressman. Why is the democratic leadership? So split over whether or not to begin impeachment proceedings. Is it is it political? You don't see it that way, but there are lots of folks that do know about I know in. You know, this sells whatever the cyber equivalent of newspapers these days. I mean to make it seem like there's a big division or polarization within the democratic caucus. I think what you have rather isn't evolving situation. This is a moving target. There's some of us who've been living and breathing this for the last several months. There are people like me on the judiciary committee who read the reports was in the first couple hours. I you know, I hesitate to say that, even a majority of the houses, still read report, much less than majority of American people. So you see, we're, we're going through waves of public education about what's in their mother, talked about eleven different episodes of presidential obstruction of Justice. That's very serious business, of course. And, you know, people not everybody has a vivid sense of what's in there, but it's the evidence is quite overwhelming. And of course, they've been involved in obstructing congress ever since because the president has ordered his. It's not to participate in investigations to defy subpoenas, not turn over evidence and so on to that point, we did hear from Nancy Pelosi yesterday afternoon. She made remarks and it didn't sound like she's in a different spot than she was before Muller's remarks yesterday. Let's take a listen. Maybe thirty eight of them at ten thirty had said that they wanted to be as focused, which in many of them reflecting their views is Willis as their constituent, many constituents want to. Want to do what is right? And what gets results against results congressman. What gets results here. Well, of course, legislatively that speaker is properly focused on doing all those things that we got elected to work on, we want to lower prescription drug prices and an excellent doing that last week. We want equal pay for work for women. We passed the next one Bill on that we want to improve gun safety and closed. The gun show loopholes, we've all these bills that are just sitting over there in the Senate. The same kind of constitutional structure, as we're thinking the president, we're getting at the legislative side for Mitch McConnell. Look. I mean, here's the movement, that's taking place. I think that over the last couple of weeks, you know, dozens of members of our caucus have come out for launching impeachment inquiry. And I think that that's the key distinction. That members starting to focus on. There's a difference between an impeachment inquiry, which is just munching the investigation into high crimes, and misdemeanors versus articles of impeachment. Which is the end of the process, where you get what's affectively in indictment voted on. And then sent over to the Senate for a trial, but most impeachment inquiries, in the house of representatives, have not resulted in articles of impeachment. So I think that a lot of people on the leadership in the caucus are focused on the fact that we can watch an investigation and inquiry into whether there have been high crimes, and misdemeanors and then see where it takes us who's been. Of course, we know the president has been tweeting about this going to read you one tweet from today, and I'm quoting, highly conflicted, Robert Muller would have brought charges if he had anything, but there were no charges to bring congressman. Are you concerned that essentially that there were no charges to bring that if the Democrats did not impeach that means that the president did nothing wrong? Okay dot statement, which I had not heard before you read it to me is one hundred percent lie. That is completely contradicted by what? Special counsel found in what he did yesterday. What he said, was the reason that you didn't bring charges with simply because you don't bring charges against a sitting president. That is a department of Justice policy rule which special counsel mother things grounded in the constitution itself. So he was pointing out that all of the factual evidence that he's simple is still there. And that evidence is overwhelming. So I you know, I don't know who dictated that to the president or whether he's in cockpits himself. But that is completely contradicted by what special counsel mother did yesterday. And it's part of this thick fog of propaganda that the president and attorney general bar have been spreading across the country ever since the report was released. It's a remarkable thing they are counting on the American people. Not reading the report, which recounts multiple episodes of presidential obstruction of Justice, and they think they can just pull the wool over. Everybody's is now here's the pickle conger. Of course. Senate Republicans are going to have shown no indication that they're willing to impeach Trump. Doesn't that put you on the defensive or doesn't that put them on the defensive, if the Democrats are trying to impeach? I mean, is there a strategy there? Well, the constitutional standard is whether high crimes and misdemeanors akin to treason in bribery have been committed by the president in the past. Obstruction of Justice has been a cardinal high crime and misdemeanor. Our judgment is complex for this reason, there's a legal and political dimension to it. The legal dimension is whether the high crimes and misdemeanors committed. I think anybody who reads that report like Republican congressman Justin Amash. We'll come back and say that the evidence is simply places and overwhelming that the president did commit things fences. But even after even if we find that legally high crimes, and misdemeanors work committed we still have the political judgment to me which the framers were posed in congress about whether this is the best course forward for the public interest. Now, I think if there were high crimes and misdemeanors. The presumption is. Is that you do move forward? You know, speaker Pelosi has been sensitive to the fact that impeachment is a divisive thing at a moment when President Trump and Russian propaganda have already driven deep wedges within the public, and I know she's very attuned to that improperly properly. So, but it a certain point we have to determine whether the impeachment process would be more than a luminated and unifying experience for the public to get the truth out because there's been so much propaganda created by attorney general bar, and then tweeted out by President Trump with his inane mantra of no obstruction no collusion. When the report demonstrates, there's overwhelming evidence of obstruction. And at least some evidence of collusive behavior they're not rising to the level of criminal conspiracy, of course beyond the Muller investigation. The president also is under involved in a number of other investigations about. Seventeen including the southern district of New York here looking into the president's finances investigation into his mar-a-lago properties, and on, and on is the sheer volume of all of these other investigations, I guess the question here is are any of these investigations grounds for impeachment, or is it really all about the Muller report? Well, the, the fact that the investigations is not itself grounds for impeachment because existing investigation is not a high crime or misdemeanor, but the underlying conduct may very well be. And in fact, what's interesting is the mother report is not about the most severe egregious misconduct. Remember that the president said, you know, as he was making his very public threats against the special counsel in attacks on the special counsel investigation, as a witch hunt and partisan, etc. Etc. He said, if you go into my finances, that's a red line, you know, and he basically threatened above the whole thing up at that point, it is the finances. I think that are key to the whole corruption of this president and its administration going back to the money laundering. Taking place with Russian tycoons going right into the condos and office tower that was. I think the basis of how he got involved with the Russians, and they figured they had an easy target. They're there. There was not an original criminal conspiracy simply because the G R you environment. Putin, didn't need Donald Trump junior and Eric Trump to perpetrate, their Jack on American democracy. They use the Trump's in order to do it. I think if you read the volume one of the report, you see that they fit the Trump's into their pre existing design, but Trump's forced, you know, through their arms, open and unlocked, the doors open the windows for them to come on in, and, you know, praised the roughing effort, and of course, everybody remembers Donald Trump saying Russia, if you're listening, please, get those extra thirty thousand emails and get them out there. I mean that was the basic demeanor of it. And when you read the report, you see how much they there was not a conflict of interest so much as a convergence of interest between the Trump campaign and the Russian attack on our democracy. But my point is, is that the whole financial dimension of this, which I think, is the key. Has not been on earth yet. Trump is fighting tooth and nail to prevent the documents from being released a congress. But we are the article one branch, we are the lawmaking branch of government. The supreme court has repeatedly determined that congress has the fact-finding investigative power central and unassailable part of our duties in our powers, and they're going to have to deal with it and speaker. Plus, is right. We are winning in court in terms of obtaining all of these documents. But what the documents may indeed show is that there's profound financial corruption at the heart of the Trump operation. Congressman Jamie Raskin is a democrat who serves Maryland's eighth district in the house of Representative congressman, thank you so much for being with us..

president congressman President Trump Robert Muller special counsel Congressman Jamie Raskin Senate congress attorney Trump Donald Trump Maryland Justice Department Nancy Pelosi Eric Trump House Judiciary committee department of Justice tansy Nevada
"tansy nevada" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"tansy nevada" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The drivers for the ride hailing company are upset over pay and treatment, and they have been for some time. So in some cities across the country today drivers for Uber as well as for their smaller competitor, lift are striking hoping to bring awareness to their working conditions on the eve of historic IPO. And we asked you our listeners if you've had experience driving for Uber or lift my name is Pauline Cooper. I'm in Charleston, South Carolina drive for over and lifts. I've got something like two thousand rides. And I started out doing forty to sixty hours a week with Uber and lift now, I'm down to maybe twenty five. Pauline doesn't drive in a city. That's planning a big strike today. But she does echo the frustrations that many drivers experience while trying to make money with ride hailing app. Uber and lift, unfortunately, depend on desperate people with no other recourse. Both of the company goal is to make everything automated with no humans involved and to keep cost down. And it's very apparent when you're the driver trying to use the cheapest software or direct you somewhere, and it doesn't work. Sometimes you've done attributed. Does it show up on your fifty? You didn't get paid for it. So you call to say that and you end up an hour and a half on the phone with someone who doesn't understand you and doing what they hope you will do you say, you know, what never mind needle. There's already a yawning gap between executives at the top. And the drivers who make ride hailing businesses possible. And it's about to get a lot bigger. So let's talk about it. I'm tansy Nevada. And this is the takeaway. Andrew Hawkins is following Uber closely and he's a senior reporter covering transportation at the verge. Andrew, thanks for being with us. Absolutely. So planning on going public with a big IPO this week..

Pauline Cooper reporter Andrew Hawkins Charleston South Carolina tansy Nevada sixty hours
"tansy nevada" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"tansy nevada" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is the takeaway, I'm tansy Nevada. And today is the day the special counsel found no evidence that any American including anyone associated with the Trump campaign conspired or coordinated with the Russian government or the IRA in this illegal skiing, special counsel's report did not find any evidence that members of the Trump campaign or anyone associated with the campaign conspired or coordinated with the Russian government in these hacking operations, the special counsel found no collusion and they're having a good day. I'm having a good day. It was called no collusion. No, obstruction, the attorney general and peers to be waging a media campaign on behalf of President Trump, very subject of the investigation at the heart of the Muller report, Nancy Pelosi and Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer issued a joint statement is indefensible. Plan to spin. The report have resulted in a crisis of confidence. The attorney general has taken unprecedented steps to spin Muller's nearly two year investigation. We don't go through this process. Just to collect information and throw it out the public. We collect this information we use that compulsory process for the purpose of making that decision. And because of the special counsel did not make that decision. We felt the department had to and that was a decision by me and the deputy attorney, Jim. More than four hundred.

special counsel President Trump attorney Russian government Muller tansy Nevada Chuck Schumer Nancy Pelosi Jim two year
"tansy nevada" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"tansy nevada" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Rain showers will diminish in coverage this afternoon. Isolated showers might linger tonight into early tomorrow morning yet. Most locations will remain dry. Another frontal system pushes across the bay area. Friday with mainly dry weather expected Saturday into Sunday. Then unsettled weather returns for the first half of next week. Ambition rigor and academic excellence. Those are just some of the promises of the best public high schools here in New York City and this week some students got big news about whether they would become part of the next group of elite graduates of the class of twenty twenty three they're eight specialized high schools in New York City that focus on the arts. Math and science these elite public schools offer students a spot based on how well they do on a single standardized test it's incredibly competitive and historically admission has been skewed when it comes to race. The same is true this year, even though seventy percent of students in New York City are black and Latino only about ten percent of students admitted to elite specialized high schools are black and Latino Stuyvesant high school the most coveted admitted seven black students out of eight hundred ninety five offers for incoming freshmen, and that's less than one percent. I'm tansy Nevada. And this is the takeaway. In.

New York City Latino Stuyvesant high school tansy Nevada seventy percent one percent ten percent
"tansy nevada" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"tansy nevada" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of slates podcast, the gist and author of upon further review, the greatest what ifs in sports history. This is NPR news. And this is WNYC in New York. Good morning. I'm Richard Hake. Six nineteen stay tuned. Coming up in Thailand voters will head to the polls Sunday for the first general election since the military seized power in a coup five years ago, but few say that they expect the vote to be free or fair. We'll have that report coming up. These giant polices to go to the movies. And in the would be peaches plums, nectarines, it'd be like carcasses chicken and Turkey from the night before. Thermos and coffee thermos chocolate milk. It's like we were going to desert. Join us for this story and more next time on the moth radio hour from the public radio exchange. Pure x dot ORG tonight at eight on ninety three point nine FM WNYC. One district attorney's office in Mississippi strikes. Many more black people from its juries than white people. You just can't strike them because they're black. But the rough here is how can you tell why a prosecutor is striking a black juror allegations of discrimination in jury selection head to the supreme court, I'm tansy Nevada. And that's next time on the takeaway, weekday afternoons at three on ninety three point nine FM. Delays right now in nj transit service in and out of Penn station, New York, due to a disabled train.

New York WNYC Richard Hake NPR Penn station supreme court tansy Nevada Thailand prosecutor Turkey Mississippi five years milk
"tansy nevada" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:51 min | 3 years ago

"tansy nevada" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Forward slash BPL presents. This is the takeaway with tansy Nevada. It's almost here. The most watched television event in the United States this Sunday the New England Patriots face off against the LA Rams in Super Bowl fifty three. The one thing viewers might not see during the game our players protesting against racial inequality. This year, we didn't see as much coverage of activism taken on by NFL players. But that doesn't mean a disappeared. Joining me now is Michael Fletcher. And he's a senior writer with ESPN's the undefeated, Michael thanks so much for being with us. My pleasure. So as we mentioned, you know, there was a lot of there were lots of players and a lot of folks in media coverage about taking a knee. There hasn't been as much coverage, or at least visible representations of protesting. What kind of social Justice activism, if any have the players been involved in well lit a few players who've continued co their one field protests. Eric read a good friend of coin cabinet. The former formulas quarterback launched all others. You know, he played this season of Carolina and Emil some and and protested and even a couple of other players Kenny stills of the dolphins and others. But for the most part, you're right. I mean, there there hasn't been as many on-field protests, and certainly the coverage is kind of receded as essentially the story got got old for the press. But other players are doing other things they're doing more off-field kind of direct hands on social kind of Justice work. You have the Plasco, listen, which you know, a group of players and former players. There has been kinda derided by some in cabinets camp. But nonetheless, they've gotten tens of millions of dollars eighty nine million from the NFL, and they'd be doing work in various communities, you know, kind of a social worker essentially trying to help uplift communities, and that kind of thing. So I think the activism shifted to kind of more direct action in some cases. I think the bulk of it and you still have some on field stuff. So I was gonna ask you about the onfield stuff because I feel like there were you know, after the capper, Nick. Fiasco, if you will and everything that led that came after that there were lots of people who said they were going to sit it out that they were not watching the league this year. And yet, I'm seeing lots of people who are watching football did those more visible protests. Make a difference in getting people's awareness up about the issue. And since there aren't as many today. Could that be part of the reason why people are still watching the game? That's interesting. I'm we start looking at viewership things like that you kind of start to understand the dilemma of NFL owners. The polling numbers I've seen show that you have a block of people who did stop watching football is interesting more people who are kind of opposed to protest movement more of those people stop watching football than people who are aligned with the protesters. So that that that's an interesting kind of dilemma, so it gets complicated. When you start looking at the impact of the protests, and I'm wondering also we sort of. Glossed over Colin Kaepernick here, but he really started this. And I'm wondering if the fact that he hasn't been able to get signed. He's still you know out there. He's he did this this Nike ad, but other than that he's not playing and I'm wondering if that has may be dissuaded other players from being as open with this sort of powerful symbolism that comes with taking a knee on the field. You would think it has to read. And and you look at cabinet. He was kind of in a unique position. He was basically at one point. He was one of the top stars in NFL his signed a contract that if he had been paid out on it. He would've earned over one hundred and twenty million dollars as a was he was not cut, but he found out of his contract, but he's still collected one forty million dollars. Most NFL players don't have the kind of financial freedom. They're working, you know, the average NFL career believe is three years the salaries are much lower for these guys. You know, not that many players make over a million dollars a year. So it's tough for them. Right. It's hard, and I'm sure they had to be some kind of chilling effect when when cabinet didn't get signed because he was kind of a guy. Okay. He had sort of receded from his star kinda peak, but he was still a well-known well-paid quarterback and he suffered for it. So it had that they had to be some chilling effect. But I think other players also there's also a feeling of we need to move on. There's a group of another group of players like much in this place. Coalition. The Malcolm Jenkins of the Philadelphia Eagles is is a leader of that. And those people felt like, you know, we don't necessarily want to protest in perpetuity. We have actual goals with China achieve and the goal isn't to protest in the goal isn't isn't necessarily to get it back in the game. Even though they support that they will argue that the goal is bigger than the plight of one guy in the goal has to do with the reasons captain McNeil in the first place, the rampant police brutality, the rampant racial and economic inequality. We see around the country. What can we as a people do about that? And how can you know from their perspective? How can we as NFL players use our platform to try to make an actual dent in the problem? So outside of the sort of the larger goals, as you said, what started this whole thing was wanting to shed a light or shine a light if you will on police brutality against black Americans. But even within the league, there are lots of issues, and I'm wondering if NFL players are also trying to use this as a moment to or. Organize around their issues within the league whether that be pay or whether it be racial representation. I mean, we know that there have been coaches and quarterbacks in particular who the lack of diversity in. That is pretty stunning. A what are some of the issues internally that these players are trying to work out? It may I think you touched on a couple of them one is it's really pay and kind of job security economic security if you will. And also, we obviously we hear a lot about the health issues and that these things are kind of operating on separate tracks. But I believe that the cabinet protests have kind of lent fuel to them. We have story after story about former players who have up CT concussion syndrome and aren't able to function later in life. If you look at pro sports football players grant, can they make a lot of money at the young age, but the careers as I mentioned a short and the contracts are not guaranteed. We mentioned Sundays the big game. Do you expect any surprises? I mean, even when it comes to entertainment there were stars that decided not to do it to perform at the game. Are we expecting any protests or any surprises? Well, I met down in Atlanta to no, I don't think. So. But I wouldn't be surprised if even if there's a protest I'm not sure of like the actual individuals on each roster kind of where they stand on this. But you could well be and as we know the halftime show has been a big controversy. Big stars Cardi B Riyadh, they refuse to perform. We had Amy Schumer decide not to do any Super Bowl related commercials. And this is all because. The cabinet clearly capital. Plaque hangs over the game. And we'll see how it all plays out. Michael Fletcher is a senior writer with ESPN's the undefeated, Michael thanks so much for your reporting. Thank you. The takeaway is supported by indeed with indeed employers can post a job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on.

NFL Michael Fletcher football writer ESPN tansy Nevada United States New England Patriots Colin Kaepernick Amy Schumer Riyadh Nike Kenny stills Malcolm Jenkins Eric Carolina
"tansy nevada" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:32 min | 3 years ago

"tansy nevada" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Fifty. This is the takeaway with tansy Nevada. It's almost here. The most watched television event in the United States this Sunday the New England Patriots face off against the LA Rams in Super Bowl fifty three. But one thing viewers might not see during the game our players protesting against racial inequality. This year, we didn't see as much coverage of activism take it on by NFL players. But that doesn't mean a disappeared. Joining me now is Michael Fletcher. And he's a senior writer with ESPN's the undefeated, Michael thanks so much for being with us. My pleasure. So as we mentioned, you know, there was a lot of there were lots of players and a lot of folks in media coverage about taking a knee. There hasn't been as much coverage, or at least visible representations of protesting. What kind of social Justice activism, if any have the players been involved in well lit a few players who've continued Kerr there one field protests. Eric read good friend of coin cabinet, the the former finance quarterback who launched all others. You know, he played this season of Carolina in nailed some. And and protested in a couple of other players Kenny stills of the dolphins and others. But for the most part, you're right. I mean, there there hasn't been as many on-field protests, and certainly the coverage is kind of receded as essentially the story got got old for the press. But other players are doing other things they're doing more Warfield kind of direct hands on social kind of Justice work. You have the players coalition which. A group of players and former players. There has been derided by some cabinets camp. But nonetheless, they've gotten tens of millions of dollars eighty nine million from the NFL and they've been doing work in various communities. So, you know, kind of a social work essentially tried to help uplift communities, and that kind of thing. So I think the activism shifted to kind of more direct action in some cases. I think the bulk of it and you still have some on field stuff. So I was gonna ask you about the onfield stuff because I feel like there were you know, after the capture, Nick. Fiasco, if you will and everything that led that came after that there were lots of people who said they were going to sit it out that they were not watching the league this year. And yet I'm seeing lots of people who are watching football, this those more visible protests make a difference in getting people's awareness up about the issue. And since there aren't as many today. Could that be part of the reason why people are still watching the game? That's interesting. I'm we start looking at viewership and things like that. You start to understand the dilemma of NFL owners. The polling numbers I've seen show that you have a block of people who did stop watching football. But it's interesting more people who are kind of opposed to protest movement more those people stop watching football than people who are aligned with the protesters. So that that that's an interesting kind of dilemma, so it gets complicated. When you start looking at the impact of the protests, and I'm wondering also we've sort of. Gloss over Colin Kaepernick here, but he really started this. And I'm wondering if the fact that he hasn't been able to get signed. He's still you know out there. He's he did this this Nike ad, but other than that he's not playing and I'm wondering if that has maybe dissuaded other players from being as open with this sort of powerful symbolism that comes with taking a knee on the field. You would think it has to write. And you look at capital he was kind of in a unique position. He was basically at one point. He was one of the top stars NFL his signed a contract that if he had been paid out on it. He would've earned over one hundred and twenty million dollars as a was he was not cut, but he bowed out of his contract. But he's still collected one forty million dollars. Most NFL players don't have the kind of financial freedom. They're working, you know, the average NFL career believe is three years. The salary is much lower Phillies guys, you know, not that many players make over a million dollars a year. So it's tough for them. Right. It's hard, and I'm sure they had to be some kind of chilling effect. When when cabinet didn't get scientists here. He was kind of a guy. Okay. He had sort of receded from his star kinda peak, but he was still a well-known well-paid quarterback. And and he suffered for it. So it had that they had to be some chilling effect. But I think other players also there's also a feeling of we need to move on. There's a group of another group of players like I mentioned this player. His coalition. The Malcolm Jenkins of the Philadelphia Eagles is is a leader of that. And those people felt like, you know, we don't necessarily want to protest in perpetuity. We have actual goals with China achieve and the goal isn't a protest in the goal isn't isn't necessarily to get back in the game. Even though they support that they will argue that the goal is bigger than the plight of one guy in the goal has to do with the reasons Kevin Neal's in the first place, the rampant police brutality, the rampant racial and economic inequality. We see around the country. What can we as a people do about that? And how can you know from their perspective? How can we as NFL players use our platform to try to make actual dent in the problem? So outside of the sort of the larger goals, as you said, what started this whole thing was wanting to shed a light or shine a light if you will on police brutality against black Americans. But even within the league, there are lots of issues, and I'm wondering if NFL players are also trying to use this as a moment to or. Agonize around their issues within the league, whether that be pay or whether it be racial representation. I mean, we know that there have been coaches and quarterbacks in particular who the lack of diversity in. That is pretty stunning. A what are some of the issues internally that these players are trying to work out? I think you touched on a couple of them one is it's really pay and kind of job security economic security if you will. And also, we obviously we hear a lot about the health issues and things are kind of operating on separate tracks. But I believe that the cabinet protests have lent fuel to them. We have story after story about former players who have up E concussion syndrome and aren't able to function later in life. If you look at pro sports football players grand oak, and they make a lot of money at the young age, but the careers as I mentioned a short and the contracts are not guaranteed. We mentioned Sundays the big game. Do you expect any surprises? I mean, even when it comes to entertainment there were stars that decided not to do it to perform at the game. Are we expecting any protests or any surprises? Well, I'm not done Atlanta to no, I don't think. So. But I wouldn't be surprised if this even if there's a protest I'm not sure of like the actual individuals on each roster kind of where they stand on this. But you could well be and as we know the halftime show. It's been a big controversy. Big stars Cardi B Riyadh, they refuse to perform. We had Amy Schumer decided not to do any Super Bowl related commercials. And this is all because the Catholics clearly capital planet hangs over the game. And we'll see how it all plays out. Michael Fletcher is a senior writer with ESPN's the undefeated, Michael thanks so much for your reporting..

NFL Michael Fletcher writer ESPN football tansy Nevada United States New England Patriots Kenny stills Colin Kaepernick Amy Schumer Riyadh Nike Phillies Carolina Malcolm Jenkins Warfield
"tansy nevada" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"tansy nevada" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Stipple thirty below it really feels like another part of the world. We'll look at how some of the country's most vulnerable populations are preparing for the cold. I'm tansy Nevada. And this is the takeaway also on the show, the trial of El Chapo is drawing to a close when the US really puts his mind to it. They can capture and bring somebody light tropical Justice on the other hand we've seen time and time again, just how futile this is in terms of the dig picture war on drugs and in two thousand nineteen what does cultural assimilation mean in the United States. What is our closer? And why can't we express it fully have pride in it have joy? And we're being told not to be who we really are. And that's a problem. I take away. We'll be right back after these headlines. Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Lakshmi Singh. The prosecution says it has overwhelming proof that the Mexican drug Lord known as El Chapo flooded, the US with enormous amounts of cocaine NPR's quil Lawrence is covering closing arguments in Joaquin Guzman trial on drug and murder conspiracy charges that could land him in prison for life. If convicted here outside the federal courthouse in Brooklyn, there's very high security streets are blocked off their security dogs and extra checkpoints inside. The prosecution is laying out the closing arguments. Mostly a painstaking reinforcement of the cooperating witnesses who the prosecution admits are criminals, but she says that they have said the same things about Chapo Guzman's criminal empire as she could play for the jury on intercepted wiretaps, and even a video which she played there in the courtroom showing that he was involved in the violence in the corruption. And payment of officials and in the shipment of tons and tons of cocaine and other drugs to the United States of America. That's NPR's quil Lawrence reporting emergency measures are playing out this hour cross portions of the mid western US region.

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"tansy nevada" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"tansy nevada" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That was fake. Since you've been this story faith has remained fiercely independent face lives in Lagos Nigeria and works as a counselor in a domestic violence unit. She's also an advocate for people living with disabilities and a youth leader in the blind community to hear more stories from this moth night in Kenya. When faith took the stage. Check out the mosques global community playlist on YouTube. After I break and overworked trauma surgeon tries to save the life of a teenage girl. When the moth radio hour continues. The moth radio hour is produced by Atlantic public media in woods hole Massachusetts and presented by PR ex. On Capitol Hill, these days it turns out you can argue with science president said that climate change is a hoax do agree with him. I used hopes word myself in his confirmation hearing to lead the Environmental Protection Agency, Andrew Wheeler avoids the c words, so what can he speak to? We'll look at his long history in Washington, I'm tansy Nevada. And that's next time on.

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"tansy nevada" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

11:34 min | 3 years ago

"tansy nevada" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Marches in New York this weekend. We'll explain their political differences. And if you're looking to March out to decide which one is right for you to Mark the second anniversary of the Trump inauguration. Also police Commissioner James O'Neill talks about crime and police department reform in New York City and commission O'neil we'll take your calls. The Brian Lehrer show at ten AM on WNYC. I'm tansy Nevada. And this is the takeaway, thanks for joining us today. We begin on day twenty six of the government shutdown with the figure that might surprise you. How much the shutdown could cost the US economy? According to some estimates. The economy could lose roughly six billion dollars. If the shutdown continues for another two weeks. In other words, the cost could be more than the five point seven billion dollars. President Donald Trump is demanding for his border wall. And when Federal Reserve chairman Jerome Powell spoke to the economic club of Washington DC last week, he pointed out just how unprecedented this situation is in the short term government shutdown don't last very long typically not left much of a Mark on the economy, which isn't to say that there's plenty of personal hardship that people undergo but the aggregate level the economy, generally does not reflect much damage for a shutdown a longer shutdown is something we haven't had if we haven't extended shutdown. I do think that would show up in the data. Pretty clearly. So just how much is the shutdown costing the US tax payer. And when this whole thing is over and federal employees finally received their back pay. What will the long-term economic damage be here to help us out? A CNBC senior economics reporter, Steve Leeson. Steve it's nice to have you on the show to be here. So we threw out some pretty big numbers at the top a six billion dollar estimate on what this could cost us where where are these estimates coming from? And what exactly do they represent? Well, you have a private sector economists. And now the White House in a story that we broke yesterday. Actually, doubling their estimate of the cost of the shutdown. What they do is. They look at the wages that are earned by the federal workers. They look at the wages that are earned by the private contractors. They look at the amount of input to the economy by the government, and they come up with about zero point one percent subtraction every week and for the White House. That's double their prior estimate. They were at zero point one percent every two weeks, but they took a little finer pencil to the accounting there, and they they doubled their their cost estimate here. And they think about the the broader economic activity that their wages spur. Now, you have to say that after some point in time the economy will get back some of it because at least the federal workers will get their wages back but not necessarily the private contractors. And you're starting to read some pretty dire stories about some of these small firms and medium sized businesses that do business with the government that basically can't get by and pay their workers and their health insurance and those. Of things if they don't get the checks from the government for their work, even the back checks for works. He didn't November for a month or so. And let's Steve I'm wondering who you talk a little bit about the costs of government shutdowns tenths end up costing more money than keeping the government open. Why is that? Oh, yeah. Well, I mean, a couple of things first of all governments bring in revenue and part of the the issues are the extent to which the government can bring in revenue, and I assume also that there's some feedback from the people who get their work and pay their taxes back to the government. There's just different ways that the government actually adds to economic activity and its ability to together revenue. Now, we hear a lot of talk about this economists often say it's costing us, and that's us in quotes money. Who is it really costing? What is it that everyday Americans are feeling or how are they feeling this loss if at all? Well, I think the way the way I think about impacts like this and come back to this. But it's a similar to an impact of a hurricane is you draw sort of widening concentric circles start with the individual and the workers not getting their paycheck broaden it out to the community, especially communities that rely heavily on on either federal dollars or rely on a lot of federal employment. And then brought it out that I did some work on this. And there are eight hundred seventy nine thousand workers in the metropolitan statistical area of Milwaukee. So there are eight hundred thousand furloughed federal workers. So it's as if the entire metropolitan area of Milwaukee was not getting a paycheck for a month and just getting back to the hurricane idea. You have these situations where it happens, and there's a deep hit to it. And then you have kind of rebound from the additional spending. You don't have that. So we all sort of feel it, and it's also probably worth talking about, you know, the federal government provides services that people use their apart. Works and they're all sorts of things that the federal government does that we pay our taxes. Forget it. We're not getting those services now. And there are also a lot of banks and businesses that have been supportive or pretty supportive of the president. So far are you hearing anything from the financial sector in terms of how they seem to be viewing the shutdown? I don't hear a backlash at this moment against President Trump. If that's what you're asking. I do think that there's a lot of exasperation. I think it's worth maybe pointing out that this president was was supposed to be a boon to business in terms of providing stability and support for businesses. And in some way, he has been I guess the corporate tax cuts and some of the deregulation. But there are vast areas where the president, and this administration has added to uncertainty, and I think you can LOP in this extended government shutdown in with the trade tensions in there. And the otherwise volatile foreign policy and other ways that this administration makes policies in a way that is not friendly. To business. You can have an example of companies that have to kinda lineup for exemptions from their tariffs, so lopping altogether. And what you have is you have declining confidence among CEO's and the concern is you go back to the tax cuts in the president's express a desire there was to boost capital spending. Well, one of the things it's a huge inhibitor to capital spending is uncertainty. So we hear we hear stories of businesses that are holding back on capital spending because of the uncertainty from variety of policies. And I think the government shutdown was one of them. You know, we all talk about having a credit rating. Steve, you know, we don't have to talk about our personal credit scores here, but the United States kind of has a credit rating, and is this going to affect it not the shutdown itself. The question is what happens with the debt ceiling that is something that tends to impact the rating agencies views of America. And if this shutdown tells us that I believe it's later this year that the debt ceiling ability to bar to raise the amount of debt that we borrow if that becomes. Obstructed and this shutdown in the impasse in. Congress tells us that we might be headed for a more serious financial problem, which is a debate over the debt ceiling than yes. The credit rating would be affected in that regard. What about the SEC what's happening with them? How how is this impacting or the shutdown at being impacted by by what's happening at the SEC? I'm gonna tell you. I'm not one hundred percent sure, I know that they are affected by this. That's a lot of their workers have been furloughed. I have been dealing with several government agencies. I talked to one official who asked me not to use their name because they are forbidden being on furlough from doing government business. I don't know the extent to which the SEC has had limited enforcement as a result of their of workers being furloughed there. The last may I mean, we've been shutting down the government not just isn't something new. We've seen this happen for decades. And the last major shutdown was in two thousand thirteen when the White House's Office of management. And budget estimated at that time twenty thirteen that the country had lost two billion dollars. That's billion with a B in productivity. Because of the fact that federal workers were sent home the credit rating agency standard and Poor's put the overall cost to the country at twenty four billion. Again, we're talking about twenty thirteen government shutdown were there long-term economic effects Steve after that shutdown. I don't think so. And I think we do have issues now because the longer this last week, we aren't a pretty tight labor market right now and one of the longer lasting economic impacts. You could imagine is that workers say the heck with this. I'm not working for a company that every now, and then is going to make me work for a month without or longer without a paycheck. And so you can imagine that some of these workers have have better employment opportunities. And so at the end of this. They may have trouble finding people. I know they were having trouble finding people to begin with. So they may have more difficulty that way. Again, I think the overall disruption to business the volatility to businesses something that that creates uncertainty Wall Street doesn't mind very much when there's gridlock. They sometimes they say, this is a good thing. Other. The government will be passing any new laws. I think they mind when there's a shut down the government is twenty percent of the economy, and obviously it's only a partial shutdown, but you don't lose a chunk of the economy without businesses across the spectrum, and frankly American citizens across the spectrum feeling some impact of that. And that's you know, we're kind of waiting to see what happens with TSA employees in that sort of thing where if you get major disruptions to air travel majors disruption to commerce and transportation. That's when the human cry might finally reach those people with the power to end, the shutdown. What happens, Steve if this continues as it appears to continue with no end in sight at this point. Well, there are increasingly dire. Forecasts here it began with the White House upping its estimate of the shutdown, but there are other private sector, economists who think that growth in the United States could go negative or essentially the economy could shrink in the first quarter. As a result of this for reasons that are probably not worth explaining on air here. But but the first quarter is to typically weaker than the other three. It's a problem in the data. Everybody knows about it in the in the business. And so you're starting off from probably a weaker base. You take that off you add the trade tensions to it. What what happened is? There were these things that were not big by themselves, for example, economists estimated that the problems with trade and Taras might take off point one or point two. And then he thought oh, well, another point one point two. And then you LOP that into the idea that the first quarter ends up starts off from a weaker base. And at least Ian Shepherdson from pantheon macroeconomics. He thinks it's possible to have. Have a negative first quarter and a negative first quarter on top of a for Wall Street. The obviously you've been following what's been happening. We had thousand points swings in a pretty does substantial drop in stock prices, and that was before the shutdown. Right. So you had concerns about global economic weakness had concerns about the Federal Reserve raising interest rates the trade tensions that I keep mentioning. And then you LOP on the shutdown you keep adding up point one point two point two. And all of a sudden if you're starting on a two percent base. Well, you've whittled away a good chunk of that growth that we were otherwise gonna have Steve Liebmann a senior economics reporter at CNBC, Steve, thanks so much. It was great.

Steve United States federal government White House President Donald Trump president Federal Reserve CNBC SEC Brian Lehrer reporter Milwaukee tansy Nevada New York City Commissioner James O'Neill Mark Steve Liebmann New York Steve Leeson
"tansy nevada" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

13:40 min | 3 years ago

"tansy nevada" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is the United States leaving on the battlefield in theory? Militias have been instrumental in defeating ISIS. The biggest speaks to the came into clover two thousand seventeen when they captured the northern city of which was the disciple. Unexpected a look at the fate of the Kurdish fighters on the frontlines against ISIS. If and when US forces draw down, I'm tansy Nevada, and that's next time on the takeaway, weekday afternoons at three on ninety three point nine FM. Dissolve on WNYC. My guest is Hillary Frank. The name of her new book is weird parenting win bath wins bath dining family, screams, and other hacks from the parenting, trenches and hilly. We were talking just talking to break your night. Consider yourself an expert. You're just one of us. That's deep into it. And decided to collect all this. I'm a I'm a parenting journalist. Yeah. Excellent. So let's go back to food some kids just a really picky eaters. It's hard to get them to sit down. Yes. So or to to to get them to sit down and get them to like eat healthy. And so one mom sent us a win that she called fancy dinner. So what she does her son was starting to discover that she was trying to mix veggies into his muffins and stuff, and he he had an eagle eye for it. So she did this thing where she would call for fancy dinner, and she would bring out the fancy Goblets and the the like China and a good dishes as they say. And then the most important thing is she turns down the lights puts out some candles, and he never notices that she mixed spinach into his men marinara sauce fancy dinner little lies. It's fine. Hey, we're going to Pat online ten talking about dinner pats. Calling us from east Windsor, New Jersey. So Pat, what do you do when you have a toddler likes to disrupt dinner? Well, he's a little older than that. I'd say he was about five years old, and my grandson, keenly, disrupt dinner, and and just I if the terrorists and so one day, I just had it, and I taped him with my phone, and then I played it back to him. And he watched with this look of almost like shock in his face that he believes that this was him. Stop doing it. That is excellent. Thank you so much. You're welcome. Denise is online too. And she is calling us from Manhattan. Denise what do you have? Sometimes when you put down a newborn or an engine before they're walking they startled awake. They go to sleep in your arms. And when you put them down the crib? Iraq of his context startled awake in. This can go on for hours. When I put the baby down, I capture his arms under my hand and apply pressure to the chest. The same kind of pressure that was against his chest. When I was holding him and encourages them to accept being on their back and staying asleep, and then I can go half dinner. Well, there you go. Thank you so much. So Hillary in your book, it's interesting. You also talk about how to take care of yourself. Yes. Very important. And I love chapter six is called the art of keeping your cool like whenever possible, would you mind reading a page one Twenty-one and one twenty two people can get a sense of how you know. It's okay to take a moment for yourself to as a new parent share. So this is about keeping your cool. Okay. So this one isn't my strong suit. I'm the kind of person who holds it all in holds it all in holds it all in until I just can't anymore, and I blow on a good day. I catch myself before it happens, and I run into the kitchen and scream into a dish towel or hide in the pantry and stuff my face with my daughter's animal crackers and wash them down with a box of chocolate milk. Much better over the years. I've learned that things work best. If I let out a little steam if I let out steam a little out of time rather than waiting to burst. But old habits don't I easily and the holding it in moments can be so incremental that I don't notice a top blowing moments sneaking up on me one night. After my daughter was in bed, I stumbled upon something that diffused some of that holding it in my husband was at work late, and I was flipping around on the TV looking for a rom com, preferably something with Jennifer Aniston, something I knew he'd never agree to watch. With me. I didn't find that chick flick of my dreams. But I saw that Jill Solloway afternoon. Delight was on a mom friend had told me I had to see it. So I decided tonight would be the night. I won't spoil it for you. You really should see it. But it's about these two parents trying to navigate their relationship and their identities and their friendships and the judgment of other parents and their sex. Life and the looming. Question of will they are won't. They have another child. It was all feeling very familiar. So familiar that? I broke down bawling like the kind that makes you glad you're seeing this movie at home and not in a theatre after that. I felt great. I mean. Yeah, I was like man I got some stuff to work through. But the tension had been ravaging my body got knocked down a few notches. And the next day. I had more patients for my daughter since then I've gotten better at recognizing. When I need a big cry. Maybe it would help for me to hire an acting coach who could teach me how to cry on command. But since I'm more wired for stoicism than emotional outbursts. When I feel distress building. I'll sit down on the couch and channel surf for tear jerkers, usually it works best. If the show or movie is about parenthood. But in a pinch a sappy rom com will also do the trick. Thanks, Jennifer Aniston. It's so interesting in the book, and I and I don't want to give too much away. Is that you really also are very you're very candid about the difficulties with intimacy. You had some tablets some doctors who treated you pretty horrifically. I'm just going to say. Why is it as you've had gotten these stories from people why is that young parents, especially mom's going to be generally tend not to take care of themselves in those early days. Well, there's a lot of answers to that question. But I would say I'm definitely not alone in having doctors say terrible things to me or not believe that I was in chronic pain after I had a child birth injury. I was not believed. I was given misdiagnoses this is very common. And I think that. You know, I wrote I wrote an op Ed in the New York Times about the special misogyny reserved for mothers. And I think that this misogyny for mothers is rampant in our society. And I think it seeps into mother's psyches. It makes us feel like we're less than like the moment you pass from like women into mother. You're you're something like not as important are going to squeeze in one more hack, and we're gonna go to Michael from northport online one. I got a guy in here. Michael. Can you do not thirty seconds? Sure. There's two of them one. We. Although. Six and a nine year old and sincere since we've always give it them. Their veggies almost as a snack with sauce. So broccoli or cucumbers carrots cut up with some sauce before dinner that way, we know they get them. And then when we sit down and have the Mayfield just about getting them so protein and something else while we're eating it just helps it second thing is we're walking up and. Trickle left on the the sidewalk where garbage can used to being in. My daughter was finding and complaining, and I made a jump in the circle and circle shakeout grumpy, and I think the futility of it made her smile, certainly these. While in the kitchen on a tile. And then maybe the last thing is we tell our kids real facts that they have a scientific question. You know, what is the mood change shape or size? We give them the real science behind it dumbed down to their level. And they've surprised us on occasions by connecting the dots and enjoying the conclusions and winning out to applying that knowledge or something else. So why role is they're sponges. And you never know what's gonna stick. That's a three for from Michael before. I let you go Hillary. What do you hope somebody takes away from this book? Ultimately after they read the whole thing to trust your creativity. And to trust the collective wisdom of parents. The name of the book is weird parenting wins by Hillary Frank Hillary. Congratulations on the book. I think it's going to help a lot of people. We really appreciate you stopping by. Thanks, Alison, dissolve it. You're listening to all of it. I'm Alison Stewart writer and activist. Gloria Steinem has dedicated her life to championing the rights of women last fall. Some pretty incredible women got together to tell Steinem story in a play called Gloria alive. It was written by Tony award nominee. Emily, man. It was directed by Tony award winner, Dianne Paulus and features an all female cast lead by academy Golden Globe and EMMY award winning actor and filmmaker Christine Lahti Gloria alive is playing the Darryl Ross theater through March thirty first and Christine Lahti will take her final bow on the role on January twenty seventh and fun. Fact, the production has rescheduled it's January nineteenth performance in solidarity with the women's March, which takes place the Saturday. They'll hold two performances the next day. Instead, I spoke to Emily Mann. Diane Paulus and Christine Lahti last fall. Take a listen back to our conversation. It's really interesting. I'm gonna describe the play for folks. So we can all get on the same page. So the first part of the play is a description of glorious life of her her heroes, her mentors the way. She grows up, and then the second part grows up as a little kid, and as a woman and the second part of the play act too is a talk back with the audience where people get to share their stories their feelings about what's going on. So Emily as you started to write this play. And you decided on your structure, you know, it's not strictly chronological. How did you decide how we're gonna structure? I guess it's a very basic question. How do you balance biography with the need to tell a story was such a good question? Because of course, that was the struggle all the way through a new from the beginning that it was going to feel like talking circle because that's the central image for a glorious life in her life and activism. So I always thought there was going to be an act to I always knew that. There was going to be not the usual, cedar talk back. But in fact, at talking circle, and it was really once I met with Diane and she embraced that. And she understood that it wasn't going to be ordinary that she actually. Designed the entire production around that idea. So we are sitting at a circle for the entire show the whole show is talking circle. And then it just goes into the next phase enact to and it seems quite organic to to everything that I ever hoped for. So that was was wonderful in terms of telling the story. It's a long rich life. So choosing what those stories were and how to sort of string the string of pearls. If you will, you know, each pro being a story was was part of the challenge, we call each other the dream team because the three of us just sort of have a mind meld, and we always take the best idea in the room. It actually is almost the same stories told in the same order as when I started and went with my impulses. But then how to activate it how to make it theatre how to make it true to Christine how to make you know. And there's no one on earth who shape space better than the director. Diane Paulus in terms of theater. So with that in mind, we work to go from one woman play into a play with a cast of seven and make it highly theatrical. I didn't really answer your question. Try did you said you had to pick your shoes? And then you knew you were going to have this other aspect this intimate aspect, and I, you know, I it was big and splashy and hair. And and this is really intimate and small how do you keep interest and pace? When you're dealing with one person. A it's an Osama, but Christine onstage whole time in such a small room where we can all see each other. It's like there's nowhere to hide and there's nowhere to get lost in the fantasy. I guess is what I'm saying. Yes. I think I'm always interested in community. You know that that's one of my driving passions in the theater weather. It's a company doing acrobatics and pip bidder or catfish row in bass. Or in this case as Emily mentioned moving the show from the idea of we're going to tell one woman's life to say, what is the community that has been glorious life. And I think dramaturgical that was so important from the get-go that in actually to be true to glorious Dunham's life. We needed to talk about other people 'cause that's the theme in her life. What she's what she has facilitated for other people and how she's been inspired by other women. So it's quite critical that there are six women surrounding Christine the whole night and they play..

Christine Lahti Emily Mann Diane Paulus Hillary Frank Hillary Jennifer Aniston Michael United States Hillary Frank Gloria Steinem WNYC Pat Denise Tony award Alison Stewart Manhattan Windsor New Jersey tansy Nevada New York Times China
"tansy nevada" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"tansy nevada" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Interesting way to give a hint. This is your last clue Will Smith and Tommy Lee Jones. Join Chadwick bozeman and Michael Jordan to fight aliens in Kanda, Christina men in Black Panther. Yeah. That's correct. Super hard game. You both did amazing Christina you won that game. And you're one step closer to the final round. Wanna mash up your dreams and your goals? Be a contestant on ask me another and realize neither Goto AMA. Tickets dot org coming up we have a game about Nobel prize winners. Did you know that the prize is about a million dollars? Yeah. That's the same amount. You get if you win survivor. Okay. I'm your Eisenberg. And this is asked me another from NPR. How do you parent from a prison cell? No one ever told me how to keep from losing my children. What I needed to do to continue to have my parental rights. No one ever told me how why some parents accused of violent or low level crimes lose custody from behind bars, I'm tansy Nevada. And that's next time on the takeaway, weekday afternoons at three on ninety three point nine FM. Support for.

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"tansy nevada" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"tansy nevada" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Next time on the New Yorker radio hour, author and activist Janet mock on growing up transgender in Hawaii, the fact that, you know, the department of education hired a trans woman like my everyday life was changed and shifted. I didn't have to look to law and order or as mentor pet detective or silence of the lambs. Trans people represented Janet mock next time on the New Yorker radio hour tonight at seven on ninety three point nine FM WNYC. On January eighth more than one million Florida felons can officially registered to vote. My biggest concern is I don't want seven supervisors of election coming up with their own way to the holiday. This person is eligible, but is the state ready to roll out the law that voters passed in November, I'm tansy Nevada. And that's next time on the takeaway, weekday afternoons at three on ninety three point nine FM. I'm Krista Tippett and this is on being today. I'm with the beloved visual storyteller. Myrick hellman. She is well known for her books for children and adults her love of dogs. Her New Yorker covers her New York Times illustrated blogs become books with titles like the principles of uncertainty. Myra comments words and her pictures bring life intrinsic quirkiness in into relief, right alongside life's intrinsic seriousness. I feel like you. What.

Janet mock Myrick hellman Krista Tippett tansy Nevada WNYC New York Times department of education Myra Hawaii Florida
"tansy nevada" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:54 min | 3 years ago

"tansy nevada" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Welcome back to the takeaway. I'm tansy Nevada back in may of two thousand eighteen when I I took this job at the takeaway. I thought a lot about what I wanted to accomplish with the program and I highlighted three gaps. I felt that we need to fill in this country. And in our media coverage, the wealth gap, the truth gap, and the empathy gap, and I talked about all of these back in September with two prominent activists at the prosperity summit in Washington DC, the feminist writer thinker and leader Gloria Steinem and civil rights activist Deray McKesson I wanna play that part of the conversation today because some of the most meaningful pieces of it were about sustaining hope and optimism as we struggle to close those gaps so often I've seen in my own life lately people are feeling discouraged as they think about social Justice and civil rights, but as we enter a new year, I wanna play some of the advice from de Ray and Gloria about fighting for change. I would say the first thing I would. Do is listen to them. I mean, you know, because listening is maybe the most revolutionary thing we can possibly do. If just in the beginning, we remember not to look up all the time. But look at each other. Well, be part of the way there because we all have friends and people who trust us and adversaries and things we can do internally. And I think part of the despair comes from the case of the should you know, what should I do as opposed to every day getting up and thinking, I'm going to do everything I can and I'm going to speak the truth. And I'm going to reach out to anybody who needs me in the moment and take it from the bottom up instead of the top down. I'd say two things. My one is at the status quo drives on people not believing that they power like that is one of the ways that like we get into the musical chairs with the status quo. Instead of actually changing the wrong is that people one of the beautiful things about the protests in the city in city and city all of a sudden, you found people who are like I got it. Right. Like I half power. I get it. I can shut this down. I can speak this truth. Like, you saw people all over the country realized that they could do something different. And they always have the power. They just didn't know. So when I give people advice, it's like, you know, that you have more power than you think being in the school system is that I used to manage all staffing in his one parent one day, she emails, and she's like, hey, Mike, my kids classroom as forty kids like a first grade class. So a lot of kids in first grade and we've two hundred schools I didn't hear that from principal. I didn't hear from the teacher. I heard from this random parent rain, a pair emails redundancy, written emails me, we literally read you the staffing in elementary school because of this one random Email. So never know was her Email the chains the staffing in the school. But it was it right imparted that as her believing that like her voice actually mattered in some way. And I think there has to be part of how we think about this. How do we sustain movements black lives matter and a lot of the movement that came out of Ferguson and feminism has had multiple waves of multiple? And so is the broader fight for civil rights. I remember a dark time in the nineties when feminism and civil rights were sort of not the issue in college campuses. Unlike today, how do you sustain interest in a movement? I remember telling someone in college. Well, there's a center for women's concerns. And there was a joke about what women were concerned about right? And at the time, and yet today, every young woman that I know is proudly calling herself a feminist and even going beyond that, and there's been this real embrace of black lives, matter and other civil rights politics. I wonder if we're going to see this level of sustained engagement or will we have?.

Gloria Steinem Nevada Washington principal Mike Ferguson writer de Ray one day
Mental trauma may be greatest challenge for boys rescued from cave

The Takeaway

04:10 min | 4 years ago

Mental trauma may be greatest challenge for boys rescued from cave

"That was the first audio and video the world was able to hear of the youth soccer team trapped in a cave in northern thailand many people this is the takeaway i'm tansy nevada and today a story that has the world watching this weekend dramatic and intense rescue operations began in thailand's chiang rai province to free a group of twelve boys and their soccer coach who've been trapped in a cave for more than two weeks so far eight children have been rescued four remain along with their coach the team was exploring the cave when monsoon rains flooded in and it was nine days before their exact location was pinpointed on friday a thai rescue diver died when he ran out of air while underwater petty officer soman gounon had delivered oxygen to those trapped in the cave but on his way back through the long and complex cave tunnels he ran out of oxygen for himself and lost consciousness to get a sense of how these rescue operations happen and what makes them so tricky we turn to greg moore who's the northeastern regional coordinator for the national cave rescue commission greg thanks for joining us thank you for having me here now i've seen you know there's been lots of talk about what it takes to do this and i want to get into the specifics of how this rescue is happening but i also want wonder if you could help our listeners understand what exactly the depth of the of this cave is i'm hearing it takes two or three hours to bring a child out yeah i don't know the exact numbers i've seen two kilometers which i know most listeners probably thinking oh that's not too far of a walk i could do that pretty quickly but what people do have to understand is first of all even in the dry passages they can be tight narrow which means possibly crawling or moving in a not easy walking fashion and then of course in this particular cave they have the huge complication of waterfield passages which for an experienced cave diver definitely can take some time in now when you're taking boys who literally this will be the first dive of their lives they're taking the time moving very slowly because they don't want to make any mistakes so let's explain the process the mechanics of getting these children out of the cave and of course the coaches well what exactly are the cavers doing when you confront a situation like this what do you do what is the first step to actually rescuing people out well and i'm gonna talk mostly my experience which is all dry caving but the hardest part in some cases they've done here which lily was finding the boys is you may recall for nearly two weeks there was a question of where they were gonna they could even find him so when we do not oftentimes we start out with a search party once we find him the next step is generally a medical evaluation and then after that you go into a period of planning a lot of people i know and i'm as a parent i'd be one of them wanting children out as quickly as possible they want to see their loved ones i can't blame them but in a situation like this do wanna take your time because you wanna plan for every possibility the other huge factor here and one that i don't think can be overemphasized is the psychological considerations for example if the boys have a leader of the team with something like that having ligo i may be a real benefit for them because you can say hey they do it i can do it or conversely you may want the leader stay behind in order to boost the morale and cheer up the voice for maybe a little more scared a little more worried about the extraction you mentioned psychology and as i'm listening to the story i'm having panic about the claustrophobia what do you do about the claustrophobia what if there is someone who is absolutely in a panic who cannot handle the trip out sure i will say in it surprises some people that know i'm a caver i've been in a couple of tight passages myself where all sudden you know you get that tightness of chest or whatever and i know the.

Soccer Thailand Two Weeks Two Kilometers Three Hours Nine Days
Are the Kurds of Iraq and Syria About to Reconcile?

Here & Now

01:22 min | 4 years ago

Are the Kurds of Iraq and Syria About to Reconcile?

"On friday and saturday in canada as the us imposes tariffs on steel and aluminum imports markle says there will be quote no sense papering over divisions between nations a us backed kurdish group in northeastern syria says it's prepared to hold talks with syrian government over the area's future at move comes a day after u s and turkish authorities agreed on a roadmap to revolve resolve divisions over a border town under kurdish control at kurdish group remains the us is top ally in syria government forecasters say may was a record warm month for the continental us national oceanic and atmospheric administration reports the average temperature rose to sixty five point four degrees breaking the nineteen thirty four record of sixty four point seven you're listening to here now when climate gentrification causes climate evictions they've not gonna projects before moved them somewhere else never moved back climate change pushes developers onto higher ground forcing residents out i'm tansy nevada broadcasting from miami and that's next time on the takeaway from wnyc and pri public radio international we'll bring you that story and more on the takeaway just about twenty minutes from now that'll be noon today here on k q e where support for k q e comes from berkeley wrapped presenting what the.

Canada United States Syria Syrian Government Miami Berkeley Twenty Minutes Four Degrees
Family members react to study showing shocking death toll from Hurricane Maria

Morning Edition

02:35 min | 4 years ago

Family members react to study showing shocking death toll from Hurricane Maria

"From npr news in washington i'm dave mattingly president trump is traveling to texas today npr's mara liasson says the president will be meeting with survivors of this month's deadly attack at santa fe high school along with family members of those shot to death he's unlikely to encounter calls for gun control in texas it's a pro gun rights state and most of the focus there has been hardening schools making them more secure against potential shooters the shooting at the high school left eight students and two teachers dead a seventeen year old student at the school is facing capital murder charges the president's trip to texas includes a speech at a republican fundraiser in houston the mayor of san juan says she's not surprised president trump has been silent about a study from harvard university researchers suggesting thousands of people in puerto rico were killed by hurricane maria not one tweet not one tweet from a man that tweets about the sunrise to say look people puerto rico we're sorry that's mayor carmen ulan cruise speaking yesterday the study published in the new england journal of medicine estimates maria directly or indirectly killed more than forty six hundred people in puerto rico that's more than seventy times higher than the official death toll i'm dave mattingly in washington i'm robin young as we head into the wedding season a wedding planner has some of the latest trends including influences from the royal wedding children instead of bridesmaids flowers since her bouquets since megan's was so small i've had a few calls about wanting to change their case and it was picked by prince harry apparently next time here and now here and now at eleven am later on this morning followed at noon by the takeaway turning a drug lords life into a tourist attraction so they go to the cemetery they go to jail for he was for one year they go to the house where he was killed what's the price of glorifying pablo escobar i'm tansy nevada and that's next time on the takeaway from wnyc and pri public radio international the takeaway at twelve noon and then just one chance to hear marketplace today and that will be at four o'clock because it's thursday so that means at six thirty this evening it's political breakdown she may be.

NPR Pablo Escobar Robin Young Official Puerto Rico New England Journal Of Medicin Carmen Ulan Harvard University Houston Murder Santa Fe High School Dave Mattingly Washington Prince Harry Megan Hurricane Maria San Juan