29 Burst results for "Tandy"

"tandy" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:30 min | Last month

"tandy" Discussed on KTOK

"Sports fans of Tandy West and I'm here to take you on a journey back to this week in sports history. We'll start off way back in 1918 players on both sides threatened to strike the World Series unless they are guaranteed $2500 to the winners and $1000 each for the losers. They back off their stance when they are told they will appear greedy while their countrymen are fighting a war jumping ahead. This week in 1960, New York Yankee Mickey Mantle hits a home run estimated at 643 ft. Over the right field roof in Detroit. The ball landed in Brooks Lumber Yard across Tremble Avenue. Now, since then, many analysts have debunked the insane number. But regardless, it was a monster home run this week in 1985 at Riverfront Stadium in Cincinnati, Pete Rose, player and manager gets career hit number 4192 clips in Ty Cobb's Record this week in 1989. 5 days after hitting a home run for the Yankees in a 12 to win over the Mariners baseball and football player Dion Sanders returns a punt 68 yards for a touchdown with the Atlanta Falcons his first this week in 1990 19. Year old Pete Sampras beats Andre Agassi to win the US Open. And this week in 2000 and five Mark Messier announces on ESPN Radio that he will retire from the NHL won the Stanley Cup six times. Five with Edmonton and One with the New York Rangers. And that's just some of what happened this week in sports history..

Andre Agassi Mark Messier Dion Sanders Pete Sampras Tandy West $2500 Tremble Avenue New York Rangers Mariners Five Atlanta Falcons 2000 Riverfront Stadium US Open 1985 1990 Yankees 643 ft Pete Rose six times
"tandy" Discussed on The Fantasmagorium Show

The Fantasmagorium Show

05:31 min | 2 months ago

"tandy" Discussed on The Fantasmagorium Show

"But it's just kind of fun And so we do have some things coming up. And we're really looking forward to that. Steve you've been doing a whole lot of work. Go check out. The pg s all masters of the universe story continues with richard and bunions. Night and desperate tertiary says newton. I also heard greeted is upset. I oh tandy you know my first computer was a tandy tandy and the richardson's don't forget the post singularity larry all-stars double-o six What we love about masters of the universe part six. Yeah absolutely dude. I didn't forget trichet. Says i never drink a treat you. You've been to a metal concert so i'm richard. I think corrects himself on says at five thirty. Pm eastern thirty which is in a in a few minutes here. Yeah okay well. The richard says near dark is my favorite film of all time. I do live classical films based on books love. I think possibly yeah the says i'm all i am all in. This are all on this for ought to remake my favorite creature. I nostri had and boy. You know you couldn't ask for more A better more creepy kind of filmmaker right not creepy as a person but creepy eerie creepy tones and sets. That agar's films are he. He's a brilliant filmmaker in my opinion. And i love movies. Does it end you. When i call it the vich now. That's it's two fees. It's a double. V persia says to was a remake. I'm actually excited about that. One and ana taylor joy. I'm in the Oh come on really. Oh you can do it but i can't. I see how the game is played. Thank you very much. Well i come off. One of us has to be good cop. One of us has to be bad. We just discriminatively. did anyway. The richardson shadow of the vampire is my second favorite film of all time. Dude and i yeah and so. That's why i kind of feel remiss even knowing you. Richard like the fact that i haven't seen nostra to i. That was that was a revealing. I was over sharing. And i was afraid you were going to find out. Thursday says iceland had fermented shark meat. Don't go there stay at home. Oh man will no but if you have the absolute brass cojones to go and fermented shark horse. You're going to eat it of course. No i'm those. That sounds like a vikings duty go to iceland. Hang out with york. Sure they've got good jazz. Tj said she played the part of the light bulb in the lighthouses. Tip your waitresses. Be here.

richard tandy richardson ana taylor newton Steve agar iceland Richard vikings Tj york
"tandy" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

08:17 min | 2 months ago

"tandy" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Thank you for inviting me on. I'm really excited to talk about the book and to be on your program for sure. Thank you all right. Let's it's you basically do a history of the development of student loan in this country and sort of the. I don't know quicksand. I guess it's sort of. I don't know how think it will. It's also a story. I think of like absolute worst of intentions. You know if you really think about it but yeah you can absolutely disturb ceo sinking. It's funny 'cause. I always think when you look at the productions the debt that's increase it's always going upward. But yeah we're just sort of sinking into this morass. Which is why you know. Just continuing to extend the moratorium or even just forgiving. The debt is not enough to stop this. all right. we'll let's i want to circle back around to that But i give us some statistics on on what. I'm just sort of like the the steepest part of that trajectory or the steepest part of the declined depending on how you want to Assess it and that. That's actually one of the challenges so it looks like the steepest. Part of the trajectory has really been in the great recession era on forward right absolutely in terms of looking at actually the jump in college costs the amount borrowed however real data on this was not collected until two thousand eight and that starts to change everything. Because that's actually more than fifty years after the first federal loan program and when you actually go back to because i think that that's what's challenging For folks they look back at the past and a see just a couple of thousand dollars in terms of how much it cost to go to college. So in the early sixties. It's about it's a now. I course. I can't remember the exact. Is that a couple thousand dollars to go to college. Like the entire expensive in the early sixties. Jfk points out to a reluctant congress. That's war the median household income. We cannot expect people to borrow this much but of course now it has become just this expectation that that is what you do what you do so all right well i mean so i think if i remember correctly it was it was something like a forty five hundred bucks for for college and maybe the median income was was a little bit less. But what what do people do. At that time. I remember my my my step grandfather telling me over and over again. How he paid himself. paid his way through a harvard. I guess this must have been maybe in the early nineteen thirties. Maybe or something like that. He might have actually been a part of the work study program. The federal work study program which was an early experiment. And that's a great example. Actually about how. We get into quick sam because instead of actually sort of recognizing initially the new dealers did not resolution did not how important it was to have an educated Country actually how important colleges and universities were actually to the fabric of it That they actually had this work study program and it's something that colleges and universities would tolerate that basically what the federal government was doing was paying students to work And the colleges and universities got to assign what the jobs that they were doing. and so. that's exactly what it was. And even that work study program which was beloved at the time and like so many things this country was a casualty of partisanship It actually made it possible for millions. Six hundred thousand six hundred thousand young people to actually go to college and it also was away of wedging. Open that door of causing universities like harvard. That had re had no interest in admitting catholics jews people of color wave incentivizing them as opposed to forcing them working or just dropping out and not going at all right okay and and so since two thousand seven you said it is into the student debt has tripled as my understanding tuition since nineteen eighty has gone up eight hundred percent. That's extraordinary like i just don't understand like how the numbers prior to that could could like. There's not enough room. It seems to me when you're talking about you know for that kind of money for that type of growth. I a lot of our audience. A younger audience. One thousand nine hundred eighty seems like forever ago but i went to college in the mid nineteen eighties. And so it's this is not opt. I'm old but i'm not that old. And i mean this is the seems to me like the the velocity of the rate of the problem seems to have really picked up what was to tell us what was once that the decision was made during the new deal that there was value in education to have citizenry that was educated with higher education. Where does it go from there. The big fight is over. Our is overdressed spending. Are we going to directly spend on college universities to free them of their historic reliance on tuition. Is that what we're gonna do and it always always sort of founders on the questions of that means that schools. If you're going to get federal money you have got to be desegregated. And it is a massive fight it also as a huge fight about. Can you give federal money to support college. Universities that have a religious affiliation. It's huge and is continually. What derails everything is a unwillingness. An unwillingness to really tackle the larger questions of white supremacy in the country. Curious that is what happens and tuition. Assistance is an easy way to get around that. You're assisting the students so that they can spend the money where they will. What schools will admit thumb and you're not challenging schools on who they admit. That's the civil rights act. That actually does not that not the higher education act and then your question about like what happens in the in the eighties sort of. I wanna just want to make sure that everybody understands one that's happening. And then that hamic. So this is the higher higher education act of nineteen sixty. Five is the first stab at this. I mean or the are we back at nine hundred fifty eight with the national defense education act so that the work study program is talking about is in the thirties. And that's when you get the federal government first dabbling with really getting involved in college universities. Not way then you have the very things. Gi bill right. The gi bill of the mid forties early fifties the very first one and that existed again is paying the colleges and universities directly for the tuition for soldiers and giving them what they called a subsistence check which was designed not to be enough for them to actually really make up to do. Do not have been spending money to go to the movies or anything like that and it actually. Unfortunately the sad part about the gi bill. We think about is a huge success. But you had is having to borrow desperately trying to find work to make available to live and actually study often having to drop out if they could find them. 'cause they're rare at the time they could actually take out student loans but what keeps derailing all this idea about having direct funding for college in us. Universities is throughout the forties in the fifties over this question segregation and about supporting the separation of church and state. And the breakthrough is actually. It's true that the sputnik legislation that satellite. And i love that story. Which when everyone wants to tell me that by either. Partisan divides are sort of new in this country. Usually the story is usually told that there. There's a small satellite and automatically. There's all this investment in college. Universities actually was a year of fighting in congress and the white house and what you got was a limited temporary bill. Most important part of the last man minute was shoving in a loan program a..

harvard Jfk federal government congress sam national defense education white house
"tandy" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

07:25 min | 2 months ago

"tandy" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Community has assessed that the afghan government won't like the collapse. Those no true they do not stay did not respect conclusion. There's gonna be no circumstance where you see people. Being lifted off the roof of a embassy the likelihood there's going to be the taliban overrunning everything and owning the whole country is highly unlikely secretary. Blinken as you know. The taliban has closed on kabul where evacuating the embassy burning documents by an increase troops to point to the twice in three days. Just to rescue those there. This is not just about the overall idea of leaving afghanistan. this is about leaving hastily and ineptly secretary blinken. How did president biden. And get this so wrong jake i. Let's put this in context and as we discussed before we were in afghanistan. For one overriding purpose to deal with the folks who attacked us on nine eleven. That's why we went there twenty years ago and over those twenty years We brought bin laden to justice. We vastly diminished the threat posed by al-qaeda in afghanistan to the united states. To the point where it's not capable of conducting such an attack again from afghanistan. We're going to keep in place in the region the capacity to see any reemergence of a terrorist threat and to be able to deal with it and on the terms that we went into afghanistan in the first place. We've succeeded in achieving our objectives. When the president came to office he had a decision to make The previous administration negotiated agreement with the taliban that said that our forces are remaining forces. Only about two thousand five hundred would be out of the country on may first and the idea that the status quo could have been maintained by keeping our forces. There i think is simply wrong. The fact of the matter is had. The president decided to keep forces in afghanistan beyond me i attacks would have resumed on our forces. The taliban had not been attacking our forces. Nato during the period from which the agreement was reached. I the offensive. You're seeing across the country now to take these provincial capitals would have commenced In other words there was no. I mean joe biden. Get along or get it wrong. Or was he lying. We could have possibly said. Yeah actually no. It's going to collapse within moments as the plane's takeoff and yeah we're probably going to have to fight our way out. If he had said that a month or two ago we would we would there be the The will or would you know everyone on cnn or wherever it is. That mess nbc. I'm sure there are some people who are complaining about the same thing on every single news network. We can't leave. We can't leave and have that happen. It was inevitable. There is no time that we could stay. There is the we could stay there for another twenty years and it would be exactly the same. We could have gone back in time and say we were going to occupy a country for two decades actually use the over trillion that we spent on the war specifically in afghanistan to set up infrastructure to set up institutions. That would have created a government that would not have been susceptible to kleptocracy and to the taliban taking over so swiftly. It's an indictment of the premise. That the united states is imperialist wars. Do anything except destroy that. We saw this fold so immediately if the united states wanted to occupy nation for twenty years and i disagree with that wholeheartedly. They could've spent that money on creating a government and structures and investments. That wouldn't have led to this but we didn't do that. We use that money to enrich defense contractors. It was a very profitable war. Afghanistan was just collateral damage for the looting of us taxpayer dollars to go. Directly to lockheed martin. And other defense contractors boeing et cetera. So that's what this was and it was a war of lashing out after nine. Eleven bin laden was located there so afghanistan which already had faced the brunt of us imperialism decades before of course just collateral damage and then now the media which supported those efforts decade after decade turned around and turns around and say well what about the women and children about ghanistan with about people there. Yes that's what we've been saying the whole time. I just want to bring up if we have time how much you know we're talking about if we're gonna learn any lessons. This is the concept of the decent interval from vietnam. Decent interval interval is a theory regarding the end of the vietnam war which argues that from nineteen. Seventy one or nineteen seventy two. The nixon administration abandoned the goal of preserving south and set aimed to save face by preserving a decent interval between withdrawal and south vietnamese collapse. Therefore nixon could avoid becoming the first united states president to lose warlick. This seems to be the main thing we're preoccupied and the how do we save face when we reach. This is why obama should have done this ten years ago. And this is why it's happening now. Let's watch Jake tapper Go on and make this point about like. I love this concept of a saigon moment. It's not saigon moment. I it's not like the the definition of this is not a function of us flying out there and people are hanging onto the planes or the helicopters as it word saigon. The definition of this is the real lesson is that we're we can't do what we think we can do. And we stop pretending you think to do what we think. We can do. My point to like we can't what we think we can do. Which is you know. Set it up infrastructure by now and we didn't even put the effort to do it. Do the effort you know. Here's clip number. Two troupes served airlift. Americans out of afghantistan. Aren't we already in the midst of saigon moment. No we're not remember this is not saigon. We went to afghanistan twenty years ago with one mission and that mission was to deal with the folks who attacked us on nine eleven and we have succeeded in that mission the objective that we set bringing those who attacked us to justice Making sure that they couldn't attack us again from afghanistan we've succeeded in that mission and in fact we succeeded a while ago and at the same time remain in afghanistan for another one five. Ten years is not in the national interest. You know the british were there for a long time. The nineteenth century The russians were there for a long time in the twentieth century. We've now been there twice as long as the russians and how that's in our national interest I don't see. And as i mentioned a moment ago i think most of our strategic competitors around the world would like nothing better than for us to remain in afghanistan For another year. Five years ten years and have Those resources dedicated to being in the midst of civil war. It's simply not in our interest. I mean he's right there. He's right there. I just as i like the use of justice to include assassination in terms of bin laden nevertheless.

afghanistan taliban afghan government Blinken blinken president biden united states bin laden kabul qaeda jake joe biden nixon administration Nato warlick al vietnam nbc cnn boeing
Transforming From a Service Company to a Product Company

The Schmidt List

01:57 min | 3 months ago

Transforming From a Service Company to a Product Company

"Tell me how did you get into technology. Did you trip and fall into it. Like the rest of us Was it the plan always from we child to grow up in build a service and product company someday. Cute story is that my mom takes credit for. She was computer science graduate student at the university of minnesota and we had an old. Ibm tandy. at all. I learn basic there and hung out computer. Labs water for lab mates tommy c. video games. I was a kid. So i just tool around like a guy who is pretending not to be a nerd. Almost building computers and writing. Nothing serious. i didn't ever really grow into a software engineering role primarily. It was mostly still just tooling around with friends. But that's where i got the connections that allowed me to start the company first place okay. So that was a. I've seen it with agencies before that there some are purposefully created in some you you back value back into because you build up a network declined lists and you just you see the demand you need to fill demand where other people are more like okay. We're gonna this is what we're going to do. This is the plan. This is all the things which waited for us we were. We set out to build a product. Miho founder was one of the first engineers on google plus projects and his roommate was the ceo of mixed at all and so he had a very strong desire for building a product company. And very little to no desire for building consulting firm and so just took a lot longer. There's a piece of paper that i keep floating around where viable business plan. That was like custom software agency. Learn a half years and of course it took four and a half years to do all the work that we needed to do to get to where we are and to get to the point where we could switch into product but that was the plan from the

Tommy C University Of Minnesota IBM Miho Google
"tandy" Discussed on The Patriot AM 1150

The Patriot AM 1150

01:50 min | 3 months ago

"tandy" Discussed on The Patriot AM 1150

"Fans to Tandy West and I'm here to take you on a journey back to what happened this week in sports history will start way back this week in 18 77, the first ever Wimbledon tennis championship begins this week in 1914, the Boston Braves find themselves 15 games back in the National League. They go on a tear and go on to win the World Series against the Philadelphia A's jumping ahead this week in 1968 Wilt Chamberlain becomes the first reigning NBA MVP to be traded the next season when he moves from the Philadelphia 76 ers to the L. A Lakers this week in 1986, Atlanta's Bob Horner became the 11th player in major league history to hit four home runs in a game and it still wasn't enough to win the game for the Braves. The Expos 1 11 to 8 this week in 2000 and nine Chase Utley hit a three run homer and Shane Victorino Greg Dobbs each had to run shots during a 10 run first inning, helping the Philadelphia Phillies route. The Cincinnati Reds 22 to 1 this week in 2010 and Alive ESPN television special called the decision, LeBron James announced that he was leaving the Cleveland Cavaliers to play for the Miami Heat. James won two titles with the Heat and then return to Cleveland, where he won another championship in 2016. And this week in 2013, Andy Murray becomes the first British man in 77. Years to win the Wimbledon title, beating Novak Djokovic 647564 in the finals. And that's just some of what happened this week in sports history. The weekend sports Time capsule on I Heart radio. The free I. Heart radio APP is number one for music, radio and podcasts, All in one discover a new podcast from our library of over 350,000 titles. Here's an I. Heart Radio Podcast Preview 500. Years.

Andy Murray Wilt Chamberlain LeBron James Novak Djokovic James Bob Horner Shane Victorino Philadelphia Phillies Chase Utley Tandy West 2016 L. A Lakers 2013 Boston Braves Cleveland Cavaliers 2010 Philadelphia A 15 games Philadelphia 76 ers 10 run
Teams and Power Platform With Christina Wheeler

The 6 Figure Developer Podcast

02:05 min | 6 months ago

Teams and Power Platform With Christina Wheeler

"With us. Today is christina wheeler. Pristina is currently a principal. Solution architect at canvas consulting with over fifteen years of experience in the industry. Christina has knowledge and share point development administration branding and business intelligence. Welcome christina house so christina before we kind of jump into the media things would you kinda give our audience a little introduction to yourself perhaps tell them how you got started in the industry. Let's see i was born in the tech field now. I'm really going to show my age. When i was eleven i was copying. Gw base or deepa basic code. Can't remember which one it was out of a book using a ti ninety nine texas instruments ninety nine into a tape deck copying coats. My brother and i can play games. And then after that. I learned my dad learned how to my grandfather was real big into tandy computers in radio shack so he would by my dad tandys and my dad would learn how to take him apart and put them back together. So that's when he learned how to build computers and then he taught me how to build a computer when i was thirteen. So that was what i've done. And then i you know got into taught myself how to program but i couldn't at the time more like a hack developer where i can make things work but i couldn't tell you how i did it right if i had to interview at back then our film if i can sit down and code i was good but if you ask me questions back then forget it you know and then later in life i went back to school and actually learn all the technical terms So yeah but i've been in the. It field for a long time. So i was an old v c. Sharp developer been a sequel got into business intelligence. Business objects all that stuff then. One day i got thrown into share point. I think at the time it was actually called tahoe. But yeah i remember. My first production project was point. Two thousand one or something and was involved in for a very long time

Christina Wheeler Canvas Consulting Christina House Pristina Christina Texas
Are You Getting The Most Out Of Infosec Conferences

Cyber Security Sauna

05:33 min | 8 months ago

Are You Getting The Most Out Of Infosec Conferences

"Hi everyone and welcome to the cyber-security sonal. Thanks for joining us for another session. Where we sit out the hot topics insecurity welcome to all our listeners and be sure to follow us on twitter at hashtag. Cyber zone info conferences give cybersecurity professionals a chance to network here. The latest research exchange ideas and demo hacks and new tools but with so many conferences decide which wants to attend ho. Can you get the most out of your experience. Are they worth your time and money. What's it like to be a percenter or even an organizer today. We're speaking to f secure and founder of the t two infosec conference and nordheim mark head of coms for the nordic security event disobey and vice-chairwoman for health check association. Can you share with us. A little bit about your background and your involvement with infosec conferences in the background is on demos. San non freaking seen So naturally when. I when the first infosec conference he's came to be. I was really really curious. But the problem was that most of them were held in us So eagerly waiting for the european scene to wake up and when the first black hat came to europe. It was too damn most probably your two thousand or so. I booked my tickets there on being the fee niamh of first thing. I landed that the hotel. I went to the hotel bar and saw some guys there by t shirts on and when to the table and ask them so is it. Okay if i join you guys. And they're really. Yeah yeah yeah sure. Sure on four o'clock in the morning There was a guy called thor Of hammer of god. He asked me that. You're going to be talking about tomorrow and tandy and they were like okay cool and then because i was caught a part of the crew by now They invited me to all these cool. Invite only conferences like ph neutral. That was taking place in berlin and so on. And that's basically how i got involved. I'm like a person who pick and choose this. I'm not the one goes to the physical conferences. 'cause i what i would like to just know the topic and like ask around for my peers is something that you would recommend to listen or watch or whatever Because i'm not the kind of person who wants to attend to these these misleading conferences and all is these sales pitches. That's not ideal from. Am so yeah. I'm kind of picky. So therefore i i'm more and more no turning into surfing around the web and trying to ask from pierce what they would recommend me to attend like virtually roy do you do you go to physical events like at all. Yes i did. You know pre crow. Not yeah the disobey being kind of like the main event for me. It's near live in helsinki. That's kind of one that i've been like recently participated in so speaking of the recommendations like sometimes these events on conference get like glowing reviews Sometimes you just hear that they are like you said a waste of time. So what in. Your opinion makes good conference. I think the people who know their area of expertise. They're passionate about showcasing their findings so whatever and really like giving the practical examples of how they do it. That's interesting and inspiring obviously have pretty strong opinions about this one. The reason why. I founded t to was that i sold the difference between commercial offerings. An invite only events in a if you would go to places like si- mantech conference or something like that you see. These horrible sales pitches that would actually provide us zero value. And you would really learn anything besides maybe using a tool or two and then on the invite only events. You could see that. Yeah i i was playing this game called second life and then i used that port scan the internet and so on so that the discrepancy or the difference between these two it was. It was just huge. And i won't eat to have something like that. So i had some pretty strong ideals or opinions How a good security conference would look like first of all i think. Independence is a key thing here. So no sponsor can impact or affect the agenda no product picci's on each jenner represent theories on their estate on the stage because of their skills and and This is not true for majority of the conference is for of majority of the conferences. You buy this platinum sponsorship baggage or something You get a keynote. And is it's basically we have reach reached some ridiculous Papering points for this one because you go to. Rsa kino's is worth something like five hundred thousand eurostar. Something ridiculous so. I don't think that really serves the audience too. Well transparency i. that's the key ingredient. That's well so be honest how y'all don't sell your delegate packages to outsiders and so on that this is a common thing that i learned early two thousand and three or so that it's common practice that if you attend any type of event those delegates lists got sold

Nordheim Mark Health Check Association Tandy Twitter Berlin SAN Europe Helsinki Pierce ROY Rsa Kino Jenner
"tandy" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:05 min | 9 months ago

"tandy" Discussed on 600 WREC

"What's going on Sports fans and Tandy West and I'm here to take you on a journey back to this week in sports history. We'll start off this week in 1921, the New York Yankees purchased 10 Acres and the Bronx for the Future Yankee Stadium. This'll Week in 1926. The NFL rules the college Students are ineligible until they graduate college jumping ahead this week in 1969. John Madden is named head coach of the NFL's Oakland Raiders. He retired from coaching after the 1978 season. This'll week in 1973, the New York Islanders and Buffalo sabers playing almost unheard of penalty free games. This'll week in 1989 Kareem Abdul Jabbar becomes the first NBA player to score 38,000 points This'll week. 1990 Notre Dame Bucks the College Football Association and becomes the first college to sell its home games to a major network, agreeing to a five year contract with NBC that would begin in 1991 This'll week in 1995. John Stockton of the Utah Jazz surpasses Magic Johnson to become the all time assist leader appropriately. Stockton's record breaking assist came on a basket from Karl Malone, who had been Stockton's primary recipient his entire career. And this weekend, too. 1007 the Indianapolis This report is sponsored by the ex surgeon Temporal scanner. 6 21 is radio 1055 wkrc traffic and weather together six times an hour all morning. And here's Captain Karl along the Interstate this morning about a half mile of heavy, slow traffic approaching the leads Moody Area because of the road construction on 20 westbound approaching eggs of 1 47. After that, traffic moving okay and toward iron Dale that's about the only popular around trust fell on 59 South bound. We 11 a good shape as well as pensive Valley Parkway in Centerpoint Parkway. No problems on 2059 through downtown 65 million. Okay, leaving Shelby County heading up through Hoover Homewood So far, no problems on highway 2 80 traffic updates every 10 minutes all morning long your next report and 6 30 on NewsRadio. 1055 w E. R C.

NFL Notre Dame Bucks Stockton Kareem Abdul Jabbar John Stockton New York Yankees Centerpoint Parkway Future Yankee Stadium Karl Malone John Madden New York Islanders Tandy West Sports Bronx Captain Karl Shelby County Magic Johnson Oakland Raiders iron Dale Indianapolis
Prosecutor: Attacker not on intelligence radar

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

06:42 min | 1 year ago

Prosecutor: Attacker not on intelligence radar

"A young Tunisian man armed with a knife and carrying a copy of the Koran attacked worshipers in a French church and killed three yesterday prompting the government to raise it security alert to the maximum level hours before a nationwide corona virus lockdown be attack in the Mediterranean city of niece was the third in less than two months. The French authorities have attributed to Muslim extremists including the beheading of teacher who had shown caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad in class after the images were republished by satirical newspaper targeted in two thousand, fifteen attack. Thursday's attack Oh was seriously wounded by police and hospitalized in a life threatening condition after the killings at the Notre Dom cap. The imposing edifice is located half a mile from the site where another attack plowed a truck into a crowd on France's National Day in twenty sixteen killing dozens. President Emmanuel, macron said he would immediately increase the number of soldiers deployed to protect schools and religious sites from around three thousand to seven thousand. Franz. He's anti-terrorism prosecutor said, the suspect is June born in one, thousand, nine, hundred, nine, who reached the Italian island of land producer a key landing point for migrants crossing in boats from north. Africa. And travelled to Paris on October nine the prosecutor to set the attacker was not on the radar of intelligence agencies as a potential threat. Video cameras recorded the man answering answering the niece train station at six forty seven am where he changed his shoes and Tandy's coat inside out before heading for the church some four hundred meters away just before eight thirty, a m hit spent thirty minutes inside the church before police arrived virus side entrance, and after advancing down a corridor, they came face to face with the attacker whom they neutralized. An investigation was opened for murder and attempted murder in connection with a terrorist enterprise, a common term for such crimes.

Prosecutor Muhammad Mediterranean Murder France Tandy Macron Africa Paris President Emmanuel Producer
"tandy" Discussed on The Cave - A DC Universe Podcast

The Cave - A DC Universe Podcast

03:06 min | 1 year ago

"tandy" Discussed on The Cave - A DC Universe Podcast

"Bite is a new series here on Scifi. Talk and the Scifi talk, archive podcast and so parenting an apocalypse it's it's not the same way we would do. It either full interviews or a comment or question from passenger abuse time wise, it's about one to four minutes long on an average. When you, when you live long enough, all kinds of strange things happen. Very right in saying that the Greek heroes where the original superheroes. In part because of the nature of genes vision, but also because of its message of diversity and inclusion. Megan! Tandy is Sophie Moore, who is a woman from Kate Kane's Past Aka bat woman. She's doing her best. Because the thing is of course being in military school. That's got its own. You know dramas and and business so much going on just in of itself, but the fact that she had this secret relationship with Kate at the military school, and because of things that were in place at the time, they couldn't continue the relationship, so that in of itself definitely has worked on. Sophie's Psyche. If that's a good word to say, but now she's with the crows. He's right underneath. Jacob Kane and she's just pushing through. Will there be flashbacks? Yes, Maxxie really excited. Say That because see you get a little bit of it in the pilot. which is you know the first episode? Be later on in the season. You're going to get so many more flashbacks of that whole world, and you're going to understand why it went down the way that it did because the thing with Kate and Sophie is one went along with what the military said. The other one didn't and so you'll see exactly why that happened. What are Sophie Moore's goals? What do you like about her? Not Sophie Oh my goodness. I get all teary eyed. I really genuinely feel that I. AM telling someone story. I feel like so many women will be able to relate to sophie. Because the thing is you know? Of course you know. She's a very strong woman. She's very capable. She's highly trained but she's also got such the sweetest heart, and and it's just a very real story, so I just loved that there's a strong woman, but it's not just like. Oh, she's strong. She's also got that soft site twos if she's the best of both worlds, so I love that. She did her homework for the part. I did read the because I think ours is based off of the Elegy. Better hope I'm pronouncing that race. Version okay but the thing with Sophie is. She wasn't in the comics that much. Because in the story you know, we split up after military school, and then Kate goes on to. He sheds to other relationships, but in the CWC depiction of it. Sophie has more prominence role in the story, so we go about that kind of like my first time like it's the first time for everyone to be able to see a Sochi more in the bat woman world, so my only research was just that little bit in the comics. And now it's just whatever them but up, so yeah, the research I'm learning on the job. Look for Bat Woman Airing Sundays on the CW. Comments or questions or welcome at Scifi talk at AOL DOT COM for. This is Tony, Takada..

Sophie Moore Kate Kane Jacob Kane Scifi CWC Sochi Megan Maxxie Tandy Takada Tony AOL
"tandy" Discussed on Together Podcast | A conversation about faith, justice and how to change the world

Together Podcast | A conversation about faith, justice and how to change the world

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"tandy" Discussed on Together Podcast | A conversation about faith, justice and how to change the world

"Was great. Listen to that conversation. So many fills of wisdom that was reminded those what stood out to you me. I left when he was talking about. You know justice in how we can't lead if we're driven by FEE FOR SAVIOR COMPLEX. That means is we con- just move in do because we fade all we want. Look Good Oliveto be light sabeer. That's coming in to like take sweep you away and take you from this difficult situation but I stay. We have a laugh. We have to be like what Jesus did you. Not like. He went around and he just loved from people and so like even things in our take for example with the current situation. We in you know. We've introduced the climb. Climb isn't to make us look good that we're making the most of look down that we get fit but also were giving money to say people but actually doing our love it because we know this people in countries off cyclists to us now these these are global neighbors and they are going through a lot more than we are right now. So we're doing it because we wanna love them then and that's the way that we can show love right now and it's just you know doing Challenges Fundraising and sending this money to churches there and locally that they can then provide the names of people you know we were talking about T- from for example like we we don't just sit on a high who is and give them things that we think is going to be great for them but we actually go out and offs people what they want and as the community's and the church's locally what the greatest need is and we just serve and that's what. Jesus did he served for me. Sobbing is love. It's like you serve your friends because you love them. You serve your parents because you love them. You said you children your partner you sad because you love and it comes out loud. And that's Jesus stage setting that's really cool reminder for us even in this time where we feel maybe faithful or anything like that you know we can still love and we can still pursue justice in this time for sure. I think I really enjoyed to read that salary. Good I realize these to about with of saying. Let your politics shape relations as you shake tempted to do different climbs casually like we should see the biblical Lens. Food fooled into that. Maybe what interesting? I really enjoyed that conversation with reading listening back. Thank you come holding a sound. Just thank. You've everyone listening. We'll be back again on the fifteenth of May will be hearing from Tandy Kamensky an activist academic discussion wet is from South Africa. Today they make sure you hit subscribe photos on Instagram..

Jesus Tandy Kamensky partner South Africa
"tandy" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"tandy" Discussed on WTVN

"This week Ohio governor Mike DeWine said seven hundred and seventy five million dollars will have to be slashed from the twenty twenty fiscal year budget in the final two months state agencies as well as education will see millions of dollars disappear any cut to education is difficult but we have an obligation to do our best to balance these cuts and to protect the most vulnerable of our students and we intend to do that with these cuts a combined three hundred and ten million dollars will be cut to public schools and higher education the largest school system in the state Columbus city schools has the largest budget cut coming of nearly ten million dollars Worthington Olin Tandy and Westerville schools will lose over two million dollars from their budgets and Lancaster Indiana Jefferson will each lose around a million and a half the coronavirus outbreaks among employees at meat packing plants nationwide is causing a meat shortage in this week one in five Wendy's restaurants around the country sold out of be dozens of plans close across the country thousands of workers sick and it one of the actual canning plant in Wisconsin eight hundred National Guard brought out to test the workers and their family members now we are starting to see plants re open across the country but production is going to be significantly slower and union reps tell us that in order to protect the food supply we've got to protect the workers and that means better PP for them ABC's Matt Gutman the centers for disease control and prevention report is looking into how wide spread the virus season our nation's prison system the analysis found that of thirty seven jurisdictions that reported thirty two had at least one case of corona virus among inmates and staff those thirty two jurisdictions contained four hundred twenty facilities and as of late April there were nearly forty nine hundred positive cases among inmates eighty eight of them died there were almost twenty eight hundred positives and fifteen deaths among staff the CDC urges quick recognition of symptoms in inmates and workers as well as consistency and taking preventive steps to slow the spread in prison populations and in the communities that staff members call home colonel Scott fox news there are nearly three thousand coronavirus cases among inmates in Ohio state's prison with over.

Mike DeWine Olin Tandy Westerville Lancaster Wendy Wisconsin National Guard ABC Matt Gutman CDC Ohio Columbus Indiana Scott fox
Uncertainty Beckons Present Action!

Plan B Success

05:55 min | 1 year ago

Uncertainty Beckons Present Action!

"Certainity Morris's from time to time. We live in uncertain times. That's what we have often been told and we've seen it from time to time you know. Humans have been walking around uncertain since a pretty long time while. That's for certain because we've been there. We've done that for hundreds of thousands of fears. We often forget that problems often. Flaw greater problems or whatever crisis facing at the moment is not new. We actually face something similar before in an uncertain future leaves stranded in an unhappy present but does nothing. You can do in order to control it but wait yet. Uncertainity brings about certain panic and fear and some shaky ground that we stand on from time to time need epidemics war natural disasters accidents. Whatever it may be humans. We've been around for a long long time and face these yet. Every time there's uncertainty without question. We have doubts. We have panicked and we have fear. And that's what we need to understand is the said Tandy off uncertainty and that's what we need to use in order to control our emotions in order to help not paralyse us. And in order to take action to be in control of what's uncertain when you look at plans to change pats that change and there's no predictibility as to which way it's going clearly. Some of US have a higher tolerance for that but for others. It's not the same. Those that have higher tolerance for uncertainty. We end up putting a higher value on inauguration new discoveries you possibilities new ways of being in control and bringing sanity back whereas those that don't have a similar level of tolerance are enrolled in worry fear panic and are trying to figure out how to cope and how to survive in such an atmosphere. That's where we can all come together to understand that uncertainties certain yet does a certain idendity the uncertain circumstances coming and going from time to time. And that's what we need to understand. So what are the few things that we can do in order to survive uncertainity in our everyday life? Wealth For one. Let's not panic. Let's make sure you're looking for explanations. And we are exploratory by nature in terms of figuring out the root causes of panic and fear in trying to get a grip on it trying to control it. Let's focus on the present. You fear is always related to something. We're afraid bill or might happen in the future. Not What's actually happening in? The current present and not present is dictated by the future whereas we need to be in control of our future by dictating present. You know if we have controlled prison times and we get busy with the business of Coping Mitt. Whatever the future might throw it as and Bilby in control of that future. We can shave future the way we want it to be not self fears that actually give air to the threats that are down the road realistic or not and these are the ones that tend to paralyze. Us look at your president. Ask yourself the question very now. Are you in control? Are you okay right now? If yes then you have the time and the wherewithal to figure out how to be in control of Your Future. Keep perspective ask yourself. What's the worst thing that can happen here? And whatever that was thing that can happen. How do you take control of it? How do you change the dynamic of what the future can hoard or bring to you if you act on your prison? That's the perspective that you need to have not worry about the Dane and they out million not in control of your president as a result. You're not in control of your future. Also look at. What can you control? And what is not in your control and focus on the things that are in your control by taking action if there are things that you can be prepared for in dumps of something that is not a new control act on it and Puerto Bland together and get prepared if you have a plan a and if that doesn't work then have a plan be ready in order to execute on that learn to prioritize what's essential what's needed and what's not and be flexible. Stay flexible to change your plans as needed. Depending on how the president starts changing be open to options. Be Open to inauguration have ideas that are out of the box and be ready with them in order to implement them depending on whatever you face then once in a while stop take a deep breath and look around you and look how far you've come as a result of your pre planning. You're taking action. You'll being in control of the prison. And how you'll shaping that future in terms of the way you want it to be by taking control of your present that my friends is what's going to help you being controlled not just feel present but if your future and they'll help you so that uncertainty by bringing a certain level

United States President Trump Certainity Morris Puerto Bland Uncertainity Tandy Bill
Kathy Bates discusses her Oscar nominated movie 'Richard Jewell'

Popcorn with Peter Travers

14:01 min | 1 year ago

Kathy Bates discusses her Oscar nominated movie 'Richard Jewell'

"This is popcorn where we tell you what's happening at the movies and there's a great movie for you to see right now called Richard Jewel based on a true story but my guest today Kathy Athey Bates who you know from so many things I could mention them but then the show would be over because she has too many credits too many awards but she plays the title character's actors mother in this and she will break your heart six ways from Sunday. But today we're GonNa be having fun are absolutely welcome to the first time you've done done. This popcorns yours get no no. I've lost sixty pounds in managed to keep it off the last three or so I've been on. They sell popcorn pretty okay at least and we're smelling as Peter Stocks. The top doing this so you just got of course all the awards you have. Now you have a new nomination as best supporting actress for Richard Jewel for me. Ah The best award for this movie has been the fact that bobby jewel richards mom who's still alive Loves the movie. Because if she didn't now I know Gosh 'cause in the movie you know how she got Tom Brokaw. I know I know I know. We don't want her to be getting mad. Now you know and also You know there have been Statues in Centennial Park and young and Billy Payne who brought the Olympics to Atlanta. And finally there's going to be a a plaque with Richard's name and what did he say. Oh well that's a good thing should set that up or you should. Why should I work really really? Yeah that's it no Richard Jewel. That's the name of the movie. Clint Eastwood directed at but a true story. Can you tell us a little about Richard J. Just absolutely Richard had been a cop for a few years and then resigned or was fired depending on how you look at it. And then he we went to become a guard at at A college nearby and he got leftover the the thing with Richard that I found so tragic about this whole story story is that he was this hyper vigilant person. Ever since he was a kid at nine of the police the police even as a kid eight in church he wanted to help people And even in Turkey would run around and make sure everybody had a program and then later on when he was a cop he carried like one one hundred thirty pound you know battering Ram but he also had beanie babies for the kids who he might find who had been in accidents so he could give him he was is just this generous simple humble kind man who wanted to help everybody and it was that vigilance that Helped him in his job. He was hired to be a security guy for the Olympics. They were calling everybody in and he was at the sound and light tower and and he'd gone off to the restroom and he came back and there was a bench there and he noticed right away there was what they call an Alice. Pack this big military pack the officious very suspicious and so he told the sit idle like that and they say oh. Come on Richard he said no no I have a bad feeling and they so they brought in the bomb guys and he described it that the the guy went underneath and looked at it and then he just froze and he just back very slowly out and he told his buddy to turn turn a cell phone off and they tried to get everybody back as many people back but through a series of mishaps and nine one one calls and not being able to get in touch touch with people Eric Rudolph who actually planted the bomb and was not caught until like six years later Had this phone message You know there's going to be a bomb in Centennial Park in thirty minutes and thanks to Richard got all that is out of the tower. He was running up and down with doing everything everything a hand and suddenly he became this hero in and then for three days three days and his mother was all got that three day. Yeah my mom his his mom he's on TV. He's bets right he's on. TV is the hero of the day if CNN wanted to talk to him and what turned out was there was a leak from the FBI to Cathy scruggs at the Atlanta Journal Constitution and they decided to break the story and overnight they everybody turned against him and said he was the he was the guy he exempts Mama Except Momma. She was there for him she was they were very very close. She had two miscarriages ages and Richard was her only child and Both his real dad and his step step dad banished from their lives for various. The reasons and So he was her child her boy you know and she knows she knows how he can be be overzealous knows the things that he shouldn't be doing. You trust the police so much too much that it cost him by they use. This is what was so cruel colon. I remember when I started out working with Clint. We were all there to meet with him and I said why do you want to do this movie. And he said because I think it's an American tragedy and he said this is a story that people need to see Jon Hamm was down in Atlanta and people said well what are you doing down here. And he said Oh it's about the bombing and Oh yeah that guy. Richard Jewell who was the bomber summer. Because there's some suspicion and for eight days without any evidence People camped out you know media the FBI suspected in even when they brought him in for his first interview they already had a cell for him. Yeah we like him for this. That's what they always say. Yeah because the public. Everybody's demanding to know who did this. There's that desire. Why are to get somebody up there and say he did it well? There were millions and millions of dollars resting on this because of the Olympics and they had to get it sorted say it's nineteen ninety-six on this is happening so we weren't even in the big cellphone period of the everything was just taking off and don't forget we'd had waco the Federal Building we had Ruby Ridge. We had ninety three Truck Bombing World Trade Center so it was the beginning of the new normal ordinarily of this terrorism. And and it's that going. That's that seesaw. From we love you to stay away from us. I think that the real tragedy and I'm sure that this is what bobby default is that the very quality that enabled him to find that bomb his vigilance. They turn that into a liability And they beat him up with it that to me I think is just the tragedy of all. We'll one amazing scene that you have among renting in this is when bobby went on national. TV making a plea to President Clinton at the time yes to see what's happening and do something for some. Yes so let's look a little bit attack okay. My son is innocent. Richard is not the Olympic the big park bomber. He saved people's lives. Please hear me Mr President and help me. My son is a hero. If they do not intend to charge my son. You please tell us. Please tell the world Mr President. Please clear heartbreaking. Breaking it is is really is. I don't know how many times you had to do that. Well actually we got it in the first take. That's so clint into eastwood is fresh and real. Whenever I've been on a set of this it's always let's move on now but you know people say that the do said I J do when you're always think it's going to be quick but it's not that he takes his time and he leaves it open and it so efficient that he doesn't need need to do more than a couple of takes? Is this your first time with Clint Eastwood. Absolutely absolutely what was that like was a nervous wreck I was a nervous wreck. Check it I I and I think we all were because we all wanted to just I mean we all WanNa do our best all the time. But when you're with someone like client or Mike Nichols just you really and I think we also felt a real responsibility to bobby she survived. Of course she's still alive. And and Richard passed away ten years later he was thirty three when this happened and He got some money CNN NBC you know. They sued them and but the Atlanta Journal Constitution never accepted responsibility for it and the real. FBI Guy who's played by. I Jon Hamm went to his grave saying this guy did it. We see that teen in the movie where he says I still think yeah even when somebody else has confessed knowing it. That's the kind of thing. Well it's a movie that is pretty hard basically on the media and on the feds. It's really saying that in a world where we're supposed to trust certain things we've lost it you know that was nineteen ninety. Six things are worse now. Well and I think it's important to realize is that they just got it wrong and they were in such a rush to try and say the Olympics. That had really. This was only the second day I think it'd be Olympics and and So that was really driving it. And I don't WanNa paint it with two broader brush because look more than ever we need the truth from the press more than ever we I need the truth from the FBI. You know the government we depend on those institutions so that was very specific to this case and I hope people people don't feel that we're just trying to malign those institutions. What does Clinton do when after take? He's happy with it. Well this is what I love of about him and and I didn't realize this is that he just lets the camera. Keep going and we just keep going The scene may be done. I mean our lines. May It'd be done. But we just keep improvising and just continuing to live in that situation and he gets a lot of great stuff that he can use and it's also an opportunity for us to have more time together to experience the chargers together especially nowadays when you don't have rehearsal time you're you'd have your as my friend. Jessica Tandy God rest or used to say your kitchen work nowadays. You have to do your kitchen or in your kitchen you know at at home alone so it's great to have that it's been working. Well when he was when Clinton was here last he was saying that he hates movies. Where the director will say? Hey you know because he said I'm really quiet about it. I just go go when you're ready when you're ready. Just do something I also heard about. I don't know if this is is apocryphal. Or not was when he was doing Spaghetti Westerns and they would scream action the worst would at all also in TV. You know it's just also crazy. The and I think that's when he he developed his style he thought you know. Wait a minute. Everybody's just rushing in and getting it wrong and rushing and getting it wrong again and he just wanted to keep it real simple simple. He says when you're ready people going like this and I remember the first time adequate seen merge running downstairs in Iran into the sound guy who are really liked and I was was trying to speak French Dami said and I thought I thought the scene was over. You know and then that's when I realized it's not over till it's over it until he says it's yeah that's got it he also has. Can I just say he has an amazing cameramen Stephen Campanella he's he's been with them for twenty five years like many of the people on the crew. It's like a family and he just knows how to tell that story with the camera and one of my favorite shots and Clint's to win when the FBI are there. And you see Richard putting his blue gloves on and we've been telling him and telling them not to help the police and then it pans over to salmon. I just standing there looking at him. Like he's never gonNA stop. You know you just wants to throttling. But whatever he's doing he's doing great eighty nine now. Yeah he's still sexiest. Hell you go see. And you've turned that he is. He is sexy telling you. Imagine what it'd be like when he's ninety at like good wine. Everything is perfect to do. Well you you've worked with so many people you know Mike Nichols and primary primary colors. He's somebody I missed tremendously. He's not only a great director but he's just one of the smartest most fun people people that ever lived on this earth. Yeah I agree I remember. I was at an awards thing I think it was the EMMYS and and I lost you know and like about half an hour later. I get this text for Mike. Saying you're among one of my favorite actors I've ever worked with and I thought well that's it dude. I know it's like how lovely of him to do that. In that moment it is but he was right well he was well. It was one of the high points of my life to work with him. I and with that

Richard Olympics Richard Jewel Clint Eastwood FBI Bobby Jewel President Clinton Mike Nichols Jon Hamm Atlanta Journal Atlanta CNN Richard J. Tom Brokaw Director Peter Stocks Billy Payne Kathy Athey Bates Centennial Park Turkey
Chris Urmson: Aurora CEO - Autonomous Driving

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

07:17 min | 1 year ago

Chris Urmson: Aurora CEO - Autonomous Driving

"Hello and welcome to our first episode of behind. Find The tech in twenty twenty. I'm Christina Warren. Senior cloud advocate at Microsoft. And I'm Kevin Scott all right so Kevin. It is twenty twenty which Shh is both the new year and I guess a new decade although people will get weird technicalities and it's always a great Chance to kind of look back at what's happened over the last ten years and reflect on new opportunities. Yeah I mean I it. Is I think in their industry and for human beings in general really easy to get completely used to new innovations that in our lives. But like when you think back ten years ago the world looked like a very different place than it looks right now so smartphones were just catching on. They were nowhere near as ubiquitous as they are all right now and the things that you could do on them were far far more constrained than they are right. Now I mean for. For God's sake people were renting movies from blockbuster In two thousand ten right very blockbuster was actually still a thing and instagram hadn't even been invented yet. Coley different world you know I do now that we've hit twenty twenty. Do you have any forecasts about what the next year intact might bring her even the next decade. Well well I think one of the themes that we spent a bunch of time chatting about last year on the podcast was artificial intelligence machine learning and I think we are are certainly going to see the trends that that had started in the prior year's continue to accelerate as one of the reason why I'm really interested in chatting with our guest today So autonomous vehicles. For instance. I believe are going to make AK- ton of progress over the next couple of years in particular and I'm really looking forward to seeing some of that stuff. Play out yes I couldn't agree more. It's funny I don't have a driver's license But I've actually been on a few self driving car panels over the years and I I think the technology she behind it is so fascinating. Which is why? I'm really really excited about your conversation with today's guest. Chris Armstrong and Chris is an engineer. Who's known for his work in pioneering self driving car technology? Yeah and you know one of the reasons that I'm especially interested in self driving cars and I'm looking forward to this conversation that we're about to have Chris is that There's so many ways that the world is going to change for the good once we we are able to put this technology into the hands of lots of different companies so One of the things that will hear about Aurora's. They are a company building the self off driving car technology as a platform for other companies to use to build autonomous applications. And so you know one of the things that I'm sorta hopeful for that will come into the world in the not-too-distant future is some technologies. That may help my grandmother. So I'm I'm lucky enough to have a grandma that's still still alive. She's eighty nine years old and lives in a very rural place in Virginia And she can still drive which is awesome but the day is coming where she's not going to be able to To drive her car car in the same way that she is right now and Like then it begs the question of how she has access to all of the things that she needs in order to help her live and independent life. So how does she get her prescription medicines. Like how does she get her groceries and You know just just sort of the staple things that she needs to exist. And one of the things that I think could be really incredibly beneficial with these self driving thing. Technologies is Like the possibility that you'll be able to have autonomous deliveries for people like my grandmother. I think you're absolutely right. I think the potential for the stuff is really fantastic. So let's hear more about some of the potential for this technology from Chris Aronson Guest today is Chris. Samson Christie's the CO founder and CEO Vera accompanied the bill self driving vehicle technology before founding Aurora he was CTO. Google self driving car program prior to that. Chris was a faculty member of the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University where he was the technical director of the Darpa urban and grand challenge teams. I'm really excited to hear what he's up to these days. Hey Chris the the show. Thanks for having me so I love to start by learning how you got interested in technology in the first place as a kid. Were you taking engineering classes or programming classes when you were in high school. So are you discover that in college back. When I was in high school there wasn't really computer science at high school And so I Bought Oughta some kind of Tandy x eighty six clone or whatever Back when I was in probably ninth or tenth grade from money for my paper route A- and you know tried to learn to program at first where you go you know you don't if you recall this but you go to the bookstore and you'd buy You know this paperback for Back Book. That was program whatever it was and it was just the source code listing and this before C. D. Roms even pete which people probably don't even remember that that's right we Before that actually bought a commodore sixty four and of course that was exciting. Because it didn't have tape drive right right or it didn't have a floppy drive floppy yeah and five and a quarter inch. Discs that's what had YEP YEP so anyway so we was doing that and then this language C. Plus plus which seemed to be the hot new thing And so started. Actually the first programs I really learned with C. Plus plus. Wow that's rough. Yeah yeah it was a little crazy. A I mean I guess on some some level like CPS was challenging lodging first language. But the good thing is after you've mastered as downhill it's all downhill And so did. Did you know from all of this experience in high school that you wanted to get a computer science and engineering. Gary you know up in Canada so apply to you you know variety of schools got into into a couple of them And then in my senior here I met a girl Turns out now. She's my wife. And decided I wanted to stay at the University of Manitoba which is right in central Canada and Manitoba and got into the computer engineering? School computer. Seem like you know they had a future.

Chris High School Aurora Twenty Twenty Kevin Scott Microsoft Christina Warren Chris Armstrong Instagram Chris Aronson Canada University Of Manitoba Virginia Google Gary C. Plus Samson Christie Manitoba
"tandy" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"tandy" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Is prohibited without the expressed written consent of the university and we feel like him to Cali announcers are provided by Learfield IMG college and approved by the university yes fourth musketeer RK thirty nine thirty three and is the vigil scoring for saver they were led by Tyreese Jones who had ten points and six rebounds nicely Marshall played seventy minutes did not score he did have three assists in only one turnover you also had a still Jason Carter five point six three minutes two point loss growth six points three rebounds two assists when good and seven points off the bench Kiki Tandy played twelve minutes did not score price more than six minutes score three points for market they're back court of mark is Howard Sachar in the account for twenty seven of the thirty nine points for market Brenda Bailey hurt the musketeers with two big three pointers he's got sixty John has to chase Johnson has four points off the bench and I G. Marshall was tasked with trying to slow workers power down which she did a great job the first twelve minutes building scoreless for the eight minute mark on down to the other half of the hours were fourteen points but you can see that maybe is taking a call on our toll on Niger Marshall offensively he just over to the field yeah Joe he can't he can't he can't allow that to happen I mean he's got to continue to defend in again I understand you're not gonna shut out marks our but that doesn't mean that you can I don't mean it you still have the shoulder your responsibility of score points as a leading scorer for this the one year Xavier market all the for warm enough for a second twenty minutes here at Sentai center get the score halftime market thirty nine Xavier musketeers thirty three this is built the C. B. T. S. if time reports C. B. T. S. consult.

Tyreese Jones Kiki Tandy mark Howard Sachar Brenda Bailey John Johnson G. Marshall Joe Sentai center Jason Carter Niger Xavier C. B. T. S.
"tandy" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"tandy" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"So out of the window and then there's a really a crucial stretch coming up one of their next four games what did what did he tell his team going forward this is who we have to be every single day every single game our identity of our team it's got to be clear we have to play that if we don't we will not have success if we do we will have a lot of success here again the big piece of stuff every game start every game chart and anybody can beat anybody but I do know defense travels rebound travels effort travels added to the togetherness that we had travels and you'll also have a big challenge at great but if we if we can bring all those things with us impacted our suitcase we'll give ourselves a shot tell you what tiki Tandy was some kind of something last night he was special seventeen points career high I'm I'm sorry eighteen points a career high plus seventeen for the the game he played twenty seven minutes he hit three pointers he he put the ball on the on the floor to get to the to the ram he had not done that much I think going into last and Biggie's play I think twenty four of his twenty nine shots have been three point attempts he made he can slash should be done and I can get to the rim and he did it last night and it was it was breathtaking at times and I got to the free throw line for the first time in in conference play this year didn't didn't his free throws but but he got there which is kind of the next phase of his game in development but he was really really good last night all right to a one hour in the books UT basketball you see basketball Xavier basketball Anthony grant checks in Dave Lapham checks in will go in search of more in the seven o'clock hour and I will prepare you should prepare to begin laying the foundation for some.

tiki Tandy UT basketball Anthony grant Dave Lapham
"tandy" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

KHVH 830AM

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"tandy" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

"Before we go back to your phone calls now we have the answer to that question in nineteen eighty four what computer was introduced it was still widely considered to be one of the best Super Bowl commercials ever was it Hey IBM's eighty computer be the Tandy one thousand see the apple Macintosh de the compact portable and you're ready the answer is the apple Macintosh the sixty second ad that aired on January twenty second nineteen eighty four was based on George Orwell's novel nineteen eighty four of course you got Big Brother in the street in front of this a motion was crowd celebrating the unification of thoughts until one blows it up now enter the apple mac to save the day by the way it was Superbowl eighteen year member who play I had a look at LA raiders play the Washington Redskins after the Super Bowl was over everyone watch the second half as the raiders one thirty eight to nine I'm John in Saint cloud Florida hi there John how are you I'm good what's going on well that what is your question for put this together and and just kind of wanna ask I'm a I've been teaching special education now for sixteen years down in Florida and I don't want to go with the political direction here but education spending at least down here is so low is low all over really I mean I I think one now I mean teachers don't know yours don't make a lot of money for some reason we are putting them are the next generation in the hands of teachers but we don't want to compensate them for the job I don't get it well the you know those of us that have been doing this for a long time realizing you hate we have to have second jobs not just us are you know with ministry there's half have second jobs their spouses have to do the same fact well I think that's what I'm to my sister is that my sister is a special ed teacher and then so she went and she's phenomenal by the way and you probably are too because you have to have extreme patience and dedication to do this job you really DO and Christine worked for the public school system and then she became an administrator and then it got to be where she's like you know what I'm really not making a lot of money so she went off and she started her own practice and now she has her own school which is doing crazy it's phenomenal it's in southern California where she has won two she's a one to one ratio John one teacher for every student and mon more work and she yes it's it's pretty sure the results are dramatic when you see these kids come in and after a couple of years because if they are dedicated one on one in each teacher knows this child I mean they know is they know this trial probably even better than their parents and so anyway so she her school she's she cannot take any more kids right now because our schools just it's just grown too quickly we need more teachers need me hello me at one eight let me is the same way back into what I what what I was going into for certain jobs down here summertime it is just all day long I do this but it throughout the school year I know I do I go out and buy two thirty in the morning on Saturday and Sunday mornings I'm about out washing the windows on my car ready to take that first trip request with Lister Hooper okay and I usually I get a lot of people going out into the tourist area going to work occasionally somebody from my old town coming up to the one of the airports here in the central Florida area but well sometimes we get to be a little slow okay and when it does I I don't want to just sit there and waste my time and burn my gas so I pull into a parking lot and I start doing work for school sure okay yeah all respond appeared emails or work on I thank you so when you got all this stuff open are you wondering about what it's yeah are you missing like some possible drives yeah I don't want to miss some sometimes they don't make a noise but yeah I for one yeah this is a this is a common problem and there's a great solution it's called maestro driver okay and here's what it is it's an apt that a that a lot of uber lift drivers are using right now and so if you've got multiple things open on your tablet or phone whatever it is and it was also nice is that you can set parameters in this particular app so you can say I only want rides that are say between twenty and thirty five minutes away okay because maybe you don't want to take a somebody an hour away because then you got drive back for an hour right and doing is taking a short drive say five or ten minutes may not be worth the money for you so that's where you can recollect the morning yes exactly okay take what you get that's probably true tale well maybe go well if you're at a different time a day if you're on a Saturday morning okay or Saturday night or something like that where you can be more selective but what it does that I think you'll really like is that allows that ride sharing app to conference center right in front of your face is a okay here's the here's the opportunity yes Sir now and then you can actually see which rides that you took when did they come in and has a whole history in a log as you might expect it's called Meister driver dot com will post a link to it over on the website many will give you a direct link right in your email so that this way you don't have to look at John and thank you so much for your call still to come this hour some ways for you to secure your new attack you're on the Kim.

IBM Tandy
"tandy" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"tandy" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Go away I'm a father with Royce reed plenty of time Dr daisy Jessica Tandy and Morgan freedman we were talking about you talk about a man with a gift to deliver a line in a voice Morgan freedman hits all of those that that checklist everyone of them I would love him to narrate this my life right after all the poly round merry I mean he's just got such a biennial there made me eating breakfast right it will do it here Sam knew it actually it would be better than watching you eat breakfast you know they were really and he was so good and then he was a fantastic you know he's such an interesting guy I mean you know Sesame Street he did some time on Sesame Street he is a pilot he got his pilot's license at sixty five and he is also a beekeeper what yeah he's a beekeeper he turned his he's got like a hundred twenty four acre ranch and sanctuary and he turned it into a beekeeping area because he was so concerned about the decline of honey bees in the country you know I I can't say this for a lot of actors but there are a handful that I would like to sit down and have dinner with and he would be one oh absolutely how interesting would that be yes you know these other two guys are coming up that we're gonna hear from I'd like to have dinner with either of them because one of them super hot we all yes yeah but you know I think he has a nice mind that with I respect his mind of right Brad okay and Adam Sandler who actually super interesting sixty minutes did something on Adam Sandler this past week yeah just talking about his career was a great piece on him so he plays pick up basketball randomly it shows up in a bit of a cordon starts playing hoops right yeah right and he talked about his all exit from Saturday Night Live which was you know that the hard for him and that sort of thing but Brad Pitt and Adam Sandler we're going to sit down and talk in a couple of minutes they're going to talk about the people that they believe are among the best writers and movie makers in Hollywood we're gonna hear their discussion that's our featured auto club and that's coming up at the top of the hour and articles of impeachment now on their way to the full house of representatives at a local man is being called a hero for stopping a knife wielding man at a local library that is all the warnings big stories it all starts here in three minutes this is news ninety three point one K. F. B. K. live everywhere on the I heart radio app news ninety three point one KM.

Jessica Tandy Morgan freedman Sam Adam Sandler Saturday Night Live Brad Pitt Hollywood Royce reed K. F. B.
Michelle Obamas portraitist and 96 Tears

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

07:37 min | 2 years ago

Michelle Obamas portraitist and 96 Tears

"My father was the first of his family to go to college he was a dentist so I mean all those things matter it's about creating a legacy and they didn't see that happening with art you know my father was a dentist my great uncle was Titian and my aunt's found a way to get their master's degrees at Nyu back at that time they have programs for that kind of stuff but So education was important there was there was a Bishen yeah it was a way out yeah how did you make your way to art and decide I want to do this. I'd say it just chose me I don't you know I had a great art teacher who really encouraged me even from high school to create images that were my own ideal and it's just I don't know what I felt comfortable doing I didn't have to interact with people I was super self conscious and you know I didn't do a lot that was interested in because I didn't want to be in ruins the people that I didn't know it was just like over the top self conscious so it was easy for me to do it and it's what I excelled at and the There's no conversation about visual learning them but I was a visual learner so it's just you know what my proclivity was to do this stuff or to be jeff that's what I was cooking and you were like the last pre internet generation as well I got my email address when I was twenty which which might be why you have the time inclination to do this yeah I mean I say that when when people ask me why do I do I think it's because of when I was born because I didn't I had a Tandy two thousand we had to pretty much coded ourselves like make the Games work and for me making art was I figure I really didn't know who Jackson pollock was Andy were haller you know these other craters and thinkers that were bending the rules so I this is what I thinking I was supposed to do and so that's what I did to be good and be really be good be realistic yeah did you ever have a a non representational phase I kind of did when I studied with grace hard again in in graduate school the paintings got a little looser little drip easier but ultimately never lost the figure and it just wasn't something that I knew I could expound on on for the rest of my life and so I knew I was still looking for what it was that I was going to make you seem like you need an armature or I'm going to do within this thing you need some kind of almost conceptual aesthetic structure maybe me you to make work yeah I mean like you're not doing changing crazily from abstraction to this to whatever well the thing is you know I mean if you know you're doing this kind of know what you're doing once you become known or something then that's kind of what you do like I could change it but I think at this point in my career that would be a mistake career wise then you can expound on that and and you know like I went from individual to these multi figure and I'll keep challenging myself to do different things but they will all tie into you know what I this body of work in a practical view yeah well you know I had friends who particular one friend who made really great work became really well known and didn't want to make that work anymore any stops making the work and he doesn't he didn't have a gallery after a while he ended up not being an artist one time he still trying to make his way back in do you ever like God I'm going to do a still life or landscape to the I'll just keep it secret no I had no interest I love painting this painting the figures Silvio bombs yeah are they the only a commission you've done yes you want to do any others really I mean if I could choose to people to do I would do Serena Williams Do Meghan Markle I could happen yeah maybe when it was unveiled Obama told this story of meaning you at the interview in the Oval Office now I've been in the Oval Office wants with no president in it just empty and it's pretty amazing justice the thing is you a it's a big job interview the biggest job interview and it's the Oval Office and there's the president and the first eighty what was in your heart and feeling ahead I was I was nervous the first thing that happened and I don't know whether anybody else notices when they walk in but the rest of the White House has like this really kind of strange fluorescent green light and then when you walk to the Oval Office it's like lit for television and that almost triggered my brain to think that it wasn't happening when it really was happening here for about five seconds hours like stuck in this moment of like am I aaa meeting or is yeah or or is Barack walking towards me and so I sent out of it and yeah shook his hand I was nervous life so if she had been you know Michelle Robinson Chicago Hospital executive would you why would the image be precisely what we see in the National Gallery that's interesting Probably Yeah because what I presented to the world I think is the real well her and not the the image of you know the millions of photographs that we have on with her on the Internet means private and that's the kind of feel that I wanted to to something personal in private and not a glamour shot or anything like that it's a painting and it's it's a sobering moment in history and making it exactly but at the end of it when I look back at it like those are the things that I that I think we're kind of circulating in my head in ten years it will just be one big thing did you look forward to that time when it's not all about that all about the Michelle Obama's portraitist yeah it's funny I went from the artist who survived a heart transplant to become a famous painter to the artist painted Michelle Obama and I'm pretty sure sure I could climb out ever and I still be that because she is still who she is and she has such a great influence you know worldwide and you know and I guess I'm okay with that I mean sure it has been a great pleasure meeting you nice to meet you meet you thanks thank you

Titian NYU Five Seconds Ten Years
"tandy" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"tandy" Discussed on WTVN

"Columbus school where a teacher is now possibly going to be dismissed over this. It's a he shed. He said she said thing at this point. Students are saying the teacher said this teacher saying that they didn't. And I was like you know what? Why don't why get the cameras with sound in the classrooms? They're on the school buses, I at least I know in Olen Tandy the, the school district all of them have their school buses are equipped with that stuff because there's constant he said, she said stuff, and this is a way around it. And anyway, that, that was the kind of what we started talking about J, welcome into the show. Thank you for calling. Yeah. Yeah. There's no way I think tax dollars on a paid to monitor with cameras and microphones in the class and not the teacher wants to get a go crow or their cell phone or something to protect themselves. That's one thing by versa. The students ought to be able to take their cell phone and keep tabs on the teachers only thing that happened is you get education in that classroom with that, but tax dollars paying for it. There's no way that's an interesting point you made there because I actually was just Johnny down some notes. And I think about the possibility of your kids actually learning while they're at school, if they know they're being monitored, you know all the social the social hour goes away, right? Oh, yeah. It does. Yeah. You got pay attention now. Yeah. It's, it's pretty interesting. But Jay, thanks and yeah, I don't know as far as tax payers fan.

Columbus school Olen Tandy Jay Johnny
'Green Book' suffers from Hollywood's Common 'Magical Negro' Problem

Still Processing

08:13 min | 2 years ago

'Green Book' suffers from Hollywood's Common 'Magical Negro' Problem

"I know we talked about green book Schorr did. But the Oscars are this Sunday. And this will be might win best picture Lord. No Roma please let Roma win. I think we have to talk about it. Because there's one scene that I cannot get out of my mind. Okay. Which one so it's the scene were Tony Villalonga. Who is the Italian American guy from the Bronx who's been hired to drive. Don, Shirley, this black musician, two gigs. Okay. So it's a scene where Tony saves dawn from a bunch of unruly racist at a bar. I mean, I can imagine. What bothered you about that? But why bother you? This scene is meant to teach the audience that the guys that are beating up Don are the real racists. And Tony is kind of like a milk toast racist. He's not that bad of a racist. He's only ever called Don a couple of names behind his back and kind to face and the whole movie up into this point has given you the impression that Tony doesn't like black people. But the moment the movie takes you into the scene in the bar. You understand actually these are the real racist because they're capable of physical violence against someone just because they're black and Tony he's not really a bad guy after all a little bit of needing. He needs a little bit of coaxing. But you know, what he's actually on the right side of things, and you can bring him back over to the right side to the good side of history. And it's inferior eating it's infuriating Wesley. The idea that racism is only bad if it escalates into physical violence, and that's the tiny little microaggressions things that dehumanize. Is and demoralize and stereotype aren't actually really bad types of racism after all, so maybe they get a pass. Right. It feels like a very sanitize seen about racial mix that's designed specifically to make audiences fill better about themselves, and is amazing that you're bringing this up on the weekend of the Academy Awards. Yes. These same Academy Awards in which green book is nominated for five Oscars and is likely to win two or three including picture. Yeah. And you know, it's in company with movies like star is born in the favorite and vice about Dick Cheney, and of course, black klansman and Black Panther, right? Boy, if green book does win it'll be a really good company with the best picture winners of the last thirty years specifically when it comes to films about race, right? I just think America is obsessed with this sort of racial healing fantasy where there is a work that like being near. A black person can do to rehabilitate prejudice people and all that rubbing up against yelling at friction tension touching. Hugging. Driving will bring him to the light. Right. It's its own trope. Yeah. Right. What other films in the past have done this? What are you thinking about? I don't know. I mean, if we're just staying in the in the thirty year window, something like Forrest Gump. Ninety four win best picture ninety five the story of the very simple man name. Forrest Gump mom, always said life was lack of box chocolates sits on a bench and start just talking to anybody who sits down next to him about his his life. Never know what you're going to get. He winds up befriending. This other guy named Bubba Goodall. Bubba good day. You can catch pounds. Shrimp. Shrimp is the fruit of deceit. You can vote ball broad bike it so both have the same IQ. But the point is that force is the person on the journey and a person like Bubba is another step along the way. So one of which puts them on campus when George Wallace's denouncing the integration of university of Alabama. Right. And part of that sequence when Vivian Malone was one of the new black students drops her notebook on the way inside the school, the visual effects, people make it. So that forced picks up the notebook enhance it to Vivian. And it's just weird to me. Like, you realize like that like the movies about forest, not Vivian who? I would say has a much more interesting American story to tell. I country is all about and it isn't the forest gets made a better person because of black people. But it is the forest gets to look scans or not even see a lot of the problems in this country, all of which are shoulder by Jenny who played by Robin rate who is near some Black Panthers who do nothing when she's beaten up by her white piece boyfriend, the racial politics. This movie are crazy anyway, all the politics in this movie to be fair are crazy, but they all sort of benefit for his Gump the fantasy here, of course, if you're good enough and simple enough, America's racial problems can be hailed give this movie a best picture Oscar. Okay. I mean, what else crash best picture winner a two thousand six Lord. A movie. So frightening. The Geno worth refuses to watch it facts facts, only, basically, it's one of these race and racism are driving. Everybody in Los Angeles out of their minds, the Persians the Mexicans the white people the black people, but the thing that really takes me out. His you have all of these different people of different races all being nasty to each other because of race, but guess who the redeemed characters are in this movie. Oh my God. I don't even want to know, Sandra. Bullock, of course, like the second biggest racist in the movie, she gets carjacked, by ludicrous and Lorenzo Tate. Maybe I'm Alexis really tough. My think it'd be best. If you just went upstairs random, wait for them to break in. I just had a gun pointed in my favorite lower. Your voice was my fault. Because I knew it was going to happen. But the white person's he's two black men walking towards her. And she turns and walks in the other direction. She's a racist. Right. Well, I. Got scared, and I didn't say anything attend seconds later. I had a gun in my face. Now. I am telling you you're a Migo in. There is going to sell are key to one of his homes and miss time. It'd be really fucking great. If you acted like you actually gave us shit. And then what happens? She falls down the steps on a lot of pain killers or something. And decides at her Mexican-made Maria is her new best friend. I assume area wants to go home. But you know, we don't know 'cause movies out about Maria. It's about Sandra Bullock, but the real star that movie is Matt Dillon racists cop. Matt Dillon feels up Tandy Newton at a traffic doesn't like black people, but certainly put his hands all over a black woman. So she gets into a horrible car crash cars on fire cast who comes in to save the day. Hear me permissible be your. To get an extinguisher. Good that fire. Best supporting actor nomination for that gentleman. Okay. I'll get you out not Dylan approves he's not a racist because he's capable of saving some black person's life. Even after he's violated it and then driving miss daisy. Of this sort of problem. And it wins. Best picture nineteen ninety came out in eighty nine huge hit. Yeah. Better movie than you think. Actually, because I think it understands the thing that you and I are talking about right? There is something inherently impossible about black people and white people being friends at least, according to the way, the country is set up to like have both those friends be equal in the friendship. So it is a story of this old Jewish woman. Daisy were them. Sorry. This old named daisy were than related I hope. hope Not. not. Our son bully hires Hoke Morgan Freeman to drive her. And home nowhere else.

Tony Black Panthers DON Sandra Bullock Bubba Goodall Vivian Malone Tony He Forrest Gump America Academy Awards Maria Tony Villalonga Daisy Matt Dillon Roma Hoke Morgan Freeman Dick Cheney Schorr
"tandy" Discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

The Bill Simmons Podcast

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"tandy" Discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

"Daisy. It's Morgan Freeman driving Jessica Tandy. Now, Jessica Tandy is rehearsal. Ali and Morgan Freeman is Vigo Mortenson and Vigo Mortenson is basically playing like this Bulger negro, you know, this sort of like big mouth loud. I mean, he's I'm l- Tanisha. Leeann Italian type, but under the circumstances. What we're supposed to be seeing when we see Vigo Mortenson is like nasty, you know, foul mouth battalion guy is a negro and that is the comedy of the fried chicken sequence in which Vigo Mortenson character. Basically can't believe them Herschel ALI'S character has never had fried chicken, and doesn't apparently know how to eat fried chicken. And it's. It's like what's appalling about that? Sequences simultaneously obvious in some ways. But it also is very complicated. If thing we're supposed to be laughing at or the thing, we're laughing at is is, you know, hey, this blackout is in no anything about fried chicken. But the complicated part is he is supposed to be a black person who can be more than a black person who likes fried chicken. But the movie with what it thinks is funny is the fact that this black guy is so estranged from his blackness that he hasn't had fried chicken. Yeah. So weird. I that's pretty funny, by the way, Spike Lee was the one who created the term magical negro or popularized. I should say in two thousand one because he was doing college college campuses oozes right after the green mile and the legend of Bagger Vance, and you know, he had selfish reasons for it. Because driving miss daisy do the right thing. Nineteen eighty nine that whole thing sorry, yum. But here's the thing about the green book or Green Bay is. It's the green book it green book Krino. No article. Can I call the green book? I think it's funnier. Here's the thing about the green book. It's a good movie. I get why people have problems with it. But in the moment, if I'm just like, all, right? I'm turning a movie on I'm going into this world. I wanna see good actors told me a story. I wanna feel some attachment. I wanna see characters change like it does hit on the beats what gets more complicated as stuff like what you just talked about it. It's one of those movies where. In the moment. It's like, oh, yes. Pretty good. And then you're thinking about it after near like, man. Oh, wait a second. And then you talk yourself out of it within an hour. Well, the problem with the with the with the how did you put it like somebody changes like a character changes? Yeah. It's like a classic like the Rainman trope of Tom Cruise is dick is a narcissist. But as a brother taught him how to care about other people and be a good, brother. Right. But in this case Rainman is Don, Shirley, it's the Marsh Lally character, and Tom Cruise is begun Mortenson rate like and it requires I mean, the most depressing thing about this movie is that it really does work in. So you watch it and a hundred percent works. Yes. You were able to watch it as a movie and not think about all of the problems that it that it presents problem. The biggest problem for me is it spends fifteen minutes establishing what a racist life. This guy lives. Right. Yeah. These repairman are in his house. And he when he wakes up from having. Had a rough night at work. He wakes up to like the men in his family and his extended family being over at his apartment to protect his wife because two black repairman are in the kitchen with her, and they make these jokes about you know, these two sachse coal doing whatever they come. They've come to the house to fix and she gives them glasses of water..

Vigo Mortenson Tom Cruise Jessica Tandy Herschel ALI Morgan Freeman l- Tanisha Leeann Italian Green Bay Bagger Vance Spike Lee Bulger sachse Rainman Marsh Lally Shirley fifteen minutes hundred percent
"tandy" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:14 min | 2 years ago

"tandy" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"ES. Last week. The woman who owned this school Tandy Wayne Kubay went out to protest because she was so angry about the situation about the economy. She was hit by an army truck and killed daughter schooled Allen, she's thirty seven. She's here in Washington for the children's clubs. We do you blame. Government. The quasi economize. Okay. She won't protest. Would you protest now? Are we can stay because. We'll continue. So you're not afraid I'm not afraid in protest, even though your mother was killed. I didn't get because anger. Around a dozen toddlers that parents, find lodge unemployed to pull these days to pay the nursery schools modest fees. As for to tender man, we found beaten by soldiers he safe in a clinic now is wounds to heal a lot faster than his countries. And that report from Harare was by the BBC's, Andrew Harding. So what about the regional response to events in Zimbabwe or Stanley Newman Hindi is as Imbaba in law. He's also chief executive of the Southern African Development community or subjects Lois association, and he joined me from Pretoria. The principal position of lawyers association is that there has been ongoing violence in Zimbabwe, especially looking at the one August disturbances, and there has been excessive reaction by armed forces of the state, but they has been also wrong and unlawful reactions by members of the public. Our view is in the light of discontinuing and a repeat of this happening. The principal responsibility must now fall on the president to control the violence because we believe that the majority of Zimbabweans are not participating in this violence. They were genuine grievances which the government must facilitate his fully and therefore protects them and stop the excessive. And live. Our reactions by armed forces in preference to protecting the majority of the muscles controlling the violence by those who are coming from the civilians that are taking the law into their own hands. And immediately thereafter, not just facilitating the peaceful protests has been doing but to engage meaningfully in national dialogue and conflict resolution. So you're saying that the citizens of Zimbabwe have every right to protest peacefully. Definitely and president mnangagwa's did not go to Davos, he's come home. He is now talking about dialogue is that a hopeful sign if you look at our statement that was the first recommendation we made that he should come home, and then he should deal with the situation. And Secondly, we say that he should engage in this dialogue. Now, this is a no brainer. Because even more shanty commission is put these options and these recommendations out in the public. I think it was a mixture of time in overdue that the president was supposed to follow. This course of action. But what we want to remain to see is whether there is genuine commitment to reaching a genuine solution. And engaging all stakeholders and holding everybody that was wrong to account. Indeed, you referred back to the events of August. So this has been brewing for some time. Do you does you association have a have a broader concern about how the rights of the citizens in Zimbabwe are being treated at the moment. Yes, definitely. We do. I think the first concern is that the dragnet arrests. And the blanket painting of everybody in Zimbabwe is not on the side of the security forces as an enemy is wrong. Everybody must be treated innocent until proven guilty. We are having a situation where people are being arrested. I without there being adequate investigation and they're being taken through summary trials and being sentenced and being imprisoned or detained illegally beyond the forty eight hour period. So. We really are concerned about the lack of sticking to principles of fair trial and the following of Jupiter persists in the administration of Justice in the aftermath of this violence in Zimbabwe. What role do you think the region will play the regional organisations in bringing this under control? According to the original organization was to quickly respond and give direction to these. Bob win government on the next steps to follow. Unfortunately official position is not come from the regional body, which is Saddik. And well, fortunately, the president is already following the steps that we would have wanted them to insist which is to to have him back in his jurisdiction and to convene a genuine national dialogue. But I think now the the region must quickly follow these steps up and make sure that the national dialogue in the framework, and the rules sets facilitate genuine engagement and consensus with respect and frankness from all the people who are concerned in stakeholders, even if they. Diverging views to start off with. So the the the region must guarantee the outcome of those negotiations by purely symbolic stakeholders, and we're talking about the region, but your in the the biggest player in the region, South Africa at the moment. And and this is it going to be imperative on South Africa to to take more of a a role in ensuring the situation Zimbabwe is brought under control our own trajectory was to immediately engage the South African government as well. And the plea would be to say that this is your neighbor, and you are an economic powerhouse in the region. And also a lot of these countries that have had their own challenges have also been there for South Africa when it was having its own challenges of unrest, and this illegal administration of Justice. So we feel that South Africa must of necessity take leadership in the region to address the situation. There have been a lot of compassion. Flying around in the last few days with the Mugabe era from your point of view. How would you compare what has happened over the past week in Zimbabwe with what happened during Robert Mugabe's time in office from a legal point of view? We think that there's a continuation of the disrespect of the constitution and its provisions, and that we have not had a return to rule of law, which is complete sustained and necessary for the recovery of Zimbabwean population, and it and it and it citizens, so in essence, so you saying from a legal point of view, not much has changed. No, not much has changed in terms of five observation of preservation and upholding the rule of law and human rights violations that we ongoing in the Mugabe regime, a still ongoing you actually find sentiments coming from members of the public and different quarters that it's more intense at this point in time. Now Stanley Newman Hindi who is chief executive of the South African development community's lawyers association..

Zimbabwe president Stanley Newman South Africa Robert Mugabe chief executive Tandy Wayne Kubay Southern African Development c Allen Washington principal Harare BBC Pretoria Davos Andrew Harding Bob
"tandy" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"tandy" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Hey, sports fans Tandy west that I'm here to take you on a journey back to this week in sports history. Let's start back in nineteen zero two. It's the first Rose Bowl football game in Pasadena, California university of Michigan defeat Stanford forty nine to zero this week in one thousand nine fourteen Colonel Jacob Rupert and captain Houston purchased the New York Yankees for four hundred and sixty thousand dollars today. Forbes estimates the clubs value at four billion dollars this week in one thousand nine sixty to the American basketball league or AB L announced the suspension of operation the played one full season nineteen sixty one through nineteen sixty two. The was the first basketball league to have a three point shot this week in nineteen sixty seven the NFL championship game between the Packers and Cowboys was nicknamed the ice bowl. The temperature at Lambeau Field in Green Bay was about. Negative fifteen degrees in an estimated wind chill of negative thirty five. The Packers beat the Cowboys twenty one to seventeen this week in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight Mario Lemieux of the Pittsburgh Penguins. Scores a goal in each of the five different ways possible in one game even strength power play shorthanded penalty shot an empty net goal and this week in one thousand nine hundred nine another nickname NFL game took place. The font bowl a dense fog rolled into Soldier Field. In chicago. The fog was so thick that both teams for foresees the running game. Because receivers couldn't see the pass is being thrown to them, TV and radio announcers and the fans in the stadium. Had trouble seeing what was happening on the field. The bears beat the eagles twenty to twelve. That's your iheartradio weekend. Sports time capsule. Now back to the mess of.

Packers NFL Soldier Field Cowboys Lambeau Field American basketball league Colonel Jacob Rupert Mario Lemieux New York Yankees basketball Pittsburgh Penguins Green Bay Forbes California university of Michi AB L chicago Pasadena Stanford
Kylie Jenner Surprised Kris Jenner with a $250,000 Red Ferrari for Her Birthday

Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

00:39 sec | 3 years ago

Kylie Jenner Surprised Kris Jenner with a $250,000 Red Ferrari for Her Birthday

"Presents other surfaces seem super super generous. But I did some research, according to some websites. The median net worth of American under thirty five is about seven thousand dollars and kylie's net worth is said to be about nine hundred million dollars just shy of a billion. So this would be the equivalent of the average young American adult gifting their mom present worth a dollar ninety four cents. So layman's terms, Kylie, got her mama slurpee. I wanna thank Debra. Hey, everybody Tandy of the show is patriots season. Two premieres November ninth on Amazon prime video. The

Kylie Amazon Debra Nine Hundred Million Dollars Seven Thousand Dollars
NFL free agency preview: Kirk Cousins leads the top 10 quarterbacks

GSMC Fantasy Football Podcast

01:58 min | 3 years ago

NFL free agency preview: Kirk Cousins leads the top 10 quarterbacks

"Josh dots and could be taken the next step in his second season jameson crowder i think he'll be playing well with alec smith ryan grant i think he'll play well now expensive these players are more built for alec smith's abilities i think that makes any sense whatsoever kirk cousins is a better quarterback an auto is kirk has the better quarterback than alec smith uh i don't know i think washington pie thinks that they have the better quarterback now now it's myth did have an incredible career with kansas city this past season i probably the best year of his career a shame that the earlier got balanced the wild card round the tandy reads fault but that's a whole different story that we've talked about before both see kirk cousins i mean kirk cousins these just the the move the needle former all right and he i i don't know kirk kirca's the weirdest quarterback to talk about he's like could but he's not that good if it makes any sense like i don't know it makes like it's is weird to me lake kirk cousins is going to beginning at least thirty million dollars guaranteed at least can you believe that think about it goes rise unless you're driving think car cousins what you've seen not picture thirty million dollars a year for him doesn't seem right all right the just doesn't i don't get it it may be has to do with the fact that the cornerback position is so bad now all right you got your tom brady's your bend roth's burgers you drew breezes or those guys are all going to be retiring soon philip rivers eli manning they're all gonna be gone within the next three years after that what are you got air rogers y'all topped your quarterback hall of fame type quarterback they're andrew let you don't know what's going on with the shoulder their matt ryan secondtier quarterback.

Josh Dots Alec Smith Kirk Kansas City Tandy Kirk Kirca Tom Brady Kirk Cousins Washington Thirty Million Dollars Three Years
Adam Mansbach talks bedtime

Nocturne

05:42 min | 4 years ago

Adam Mansbach talks bedtime

Amazon Adam Publisher Lions Jennifer Garner Johnny Bhutto John Hamzah Sam Jackson Varner Tandy Newton Philadelphia China Brooklyn Writer Janet Elf Six Months