35 Burst results for "Tana"

Boston - Cape Cod’s oyster growers struggle to recover from pandemic losses

WBZ Afternoon News

00:52 sec | Last week

Boston - Cape Cod’s oyster growers struggle to recover from pandemic losses

"But you might have heard that saying the world is your oyster. We use it pretty frequently, but it seems like that's not the case right now for the oyster industry on Cape Cod before the pandemic oysters were at the top of the shell fish food chain. As faras popularity with consumers now demand for half Shell oysters has seen a sharp decline in Massachusetts restaurants and that's really hurting Cape Cod oyster Farms. Oyster sales dropped by 80% back in April, and the Losses keep coming, even though restaurants have reopened at a limited capacity Micro knock owns an acre family run Oyster Farm in Mashpee. His business is way down, probably 60% of their still selling some stuff now, but I don't hear anyone who's outside feeding goes away. Grownup, says. Some farms and wholesalers air trying to move oysters to food banks with limited success. Kim Tana Cliff W. B Z Boston's

Cape Cod Oyster Farms Oyster Farm Cape Cod Kim Tana Cliff Mashpee Massachusetts Boston
Indigenous leaders condemn Portland violence before Indigenous Peoples Day

Native America Calling

00:37 sec | Last week

Indigenous leaders condemn Portland violence before Indigenous Peoples Day

"A group of native leaders joined the Mayor of Portland and in indigenous lawmaker Monday in condemning violent protests that toppled statues of Theodore, Roosevelt, and Abraham Lincoln over the weekend and damaged buildings including a Museum Oregon Live reported lawmaker Tana Sanchez who is Shoshoni Bannock, and you'd called the damage to the Oregon Historical Society as well as downtown businesses and buildings at Portland State University. Obscene. Inappropriate and unconscionable protesters broke windows at the society's building a quilt made by black women to honor contributions by the black community. Ahead of the country's bicentennial was left in the street in the

Oregon Historical Society Shoshoni Bannock Museum Oregon Live Tana Sanchez Portland State University Portland Abraham Lincoln Black Community Roosevelt
Boston - MCAS Tests Still Planned For Spring, Massachusetts Education Commissioner Says

WBZ Afternoon News

01:00 min | 3 weeks ago

Boston - MCAS Tests Still Planned For Spring, Massachusetts Education Commissioner Says

"New crisis. The covert 19 pandemic caused a Massachusetts education officials to suspend the M cast testing requirement for this year. But that does not appear to be the case for 2021. W. B. C's Kim Tunnicliffe has that, Education commissioner Jeffrey Riley says, Like it or not, M cast tests will be back in the spring after the cancellation of the 2020 assessment exams. Damps. There is a bill on Beacon Hill that would suspend the M CASS exams for four years due to the pandemic. But Education board member Matt Hills believes that would be the wrong thing to do is just unconscionable to go a second year, especially with all that this rock and not have a view as to what's working and what not, I understand the politics and the rhetoric is going to get really heated. It's a horrible policy to avoid giving in, supporters argue students need a break and shouldn't Have to worry about covert 19 along with a high stakes testing. Kim Tana Cliff W. B. Z Boston's

Kim Tana Cliff W. B. Kim Tunnicliffe Education Board Beacon Hill Jeffrey Riley Massachusetts Matt Hills Commissioner Boston W. B. C
No Betty's Angels Restaurant Day this year in North Attleboro, southwest of Boston

WBZ Morning News

00:54 sec | 3 weeks ago

No Betty's Angels Restaurant Day this year in North Attleboro, southwest of Boston

"Restaurants in the North Attleboro area will not be participating in a popular fundraiser state. Rep. Bette Porter was forced to cancel her annual fundraiser Betty's Angels restaurant Day this year due to the pandemic. Dozens of restaurants normally donate a portion of their proceeds on a chosen day toe, Leonard's food pantry Warrior says, because eateries air hurting this year she did. Sided, not toe hold the restaurant day. Instead, she held a food drive in front of town hall over the weekend, and it went much better than expected. The challenge was to build the front end loader. We filled it five times with food for us old pantry as well as taking many generous monetary donations. People are aware of the situation and they're very generous and willing to help people who don't have the same images. They Kevin Tana Close W. Easy, Boston's news radio and it's now

Rep. Bette Porter North Attleboro Kevin Tana Betty Leonard Boston
Aruma Malbec 2018

The CheapWineFinder Podcast

04:31 min | Last month

Aruma Malbec 2018

"The chief flying fighter DOT com. Today. A nice wine at the mall. A Little Bit Cooler All the way. On the horizon. The fees and forties. Looking for some red wine. Phones and say we have the other room. Twenty eighteen from. Argentina. Ruma is a project by `less container who's been in Argentina since the eighteen hundreds and baron. Child. Feet of Bernardo fame when I growth in Grand Cru and all those. This is their continuing project, their entry level value priced Mulbah. And it's funny because a lot of times in this price range. Get value priced wines from people who who produce value price wise, and they have a little bit different philosophy. From. These high. Lines. Awesome. It's just different and what's different about this. Is even though. Kits from some of the same vendors more expensive than what they do is they specialize in mile that. And Saban Young, which are two grapes that are well, Dabur nate sub Yang and Bordeaux and Mullebeck used to be before blocks all that but there to. Bordeaux wines or grapes. And they specialize that, and this is from those vineyards scale not maybe the the fancy parts of those vineyards but good solid parts those. But they don't use oak barrels. It's a fermented in stainless steel. That brings out the bright lively fruit and it's a two thousand eighteen of vintage, which means you know. It's it's a drink wine, but it's got a little bit of aging and that aging isn't cement tanks. They're lying tanks you're not getting reaching out whatever's in the some met. And that is something will actually getting more popular like central coast to California and then the. Valley in a place in France. And why that's good for ages. especially. Like this Mullebeck has got. Really rich flavors has got tannin's. Need any more edge to it that Oakwood rain. And the cement tanks. Thick. Enough. Insulate the wind and the need. From variations in temperature outside. He'll stainless steel that serve fairly. Thin stainless steel. Barrels earlier you know are are. Not Thick, they don't get a lot of temperature art. And when you look at. Wine that is being young age. They've put it in sellers where. It's protected from variations and temperatures and humidity. Now, this doesn't feel the steel tank doesn't go seller. Control but it's pretty good. So it actually helps to wine age. It helps deal recover. Without any outside interference with cement this. Sounds Weird maybe at first. But or just start taste, and it's fine and this is a really rich. That's Mullebeck. It's got great flavor you sometimes, we get chocolate stuff going to get that because Joplin the no are going to be here. There's no hope. But you don't Miss It. There's Tana's dusted. Shannon's there's really rich speak. Very liquorice. Softer Plums FABS. Yes got flavor and another thing Zenit. Opens Up Close flavors open up. Your first glance might be moon. That's your second. Oh, that's nice. Yeah it's a solid really. Focused Moba.

Mullebeck Argentina Mulbah Ruma Saban Young Bernardo Zenit Grand Cru France California Tana Joplin Shannon
The Different Types of Herbal Tonics

The Plant Path

04:53 min | 2 months ago

The Different Types of Herbal Tonics

"Hey everybody say Popham here founder of the School of Evolutionary herbalism and what exactly does the word tonic mean you know this is a word that we see used a lot in herbal medicine and in the alternative health world here about health tonics and rejuvenated tonics and nutritive tonics and bitter tonics and Chee Tonics and. Tonic gets used a lot and I think this is one of those terms in western, herbalism or herbalism as a whole really that can really use a little bit of clarification to make sure that we're all on the same page when we use that word. So question came up in a recent Q. and A. Session with my students and around what's the difference between A. Tonic from the perspective of Physio. Medical ISM versus. The way the word tonic is used in, say your medicine or Chinese medicine. So that is what the topic for this video is, and hopefully it provides some clarity for you on what is oftentimes a little bit of a nebulous term question number one is coming to us from Stephen Roberts in the chemical. And Steven is asking are the PHYSIO medicalised? Term Tonic and the IR Vega, Russell, Yana for the most part interchangeable in your view. If not could you share some situations that might highlight where they do not correlate that? Well, that's a really great question Stephen. And it really brings me to the. Kind of conversation about the word Tana can and what the word tonic means. It's in Western herbalism a pretty loose nebulous term that. I find being used in a wide variety of contexts and depending on those contexts. The word has a very different meaning. So I'd like to define this term tonic a little bit and. Kind of elucidate a little bit of those different context. So we can understand what this word actually means. So oftentimes will see the word tonic be used alongside something like a bitter tonic or a nutritive tonic or a rejuvenating tonic. Or just a tonic herb. And oftentimes, those really all mean very different things and so to me like when I think of the word. Tonic. I really like at all right I really like thinking about the roots of words and how those roots of words correlate to other words and through understanding other words that are related words that are related to one. Another I think we can get a better sense for what they actually mean, and so if we look at the word tonic, the root of that word is tone. Right tone and when in the context of herbalism when we're looking at tone. We're looking at tonal quality of tissue which really is looking at how tight is it or how relaxed is it, and this is one of our. Kind of polarities that we see. In terms of herbal energetics oftentimes, we just look at temperature and moisture of hot and cold and Wet and dry, and it's very common to overlook the tonal aspect. and. That really is what makes up the six tissue states of the Physio medicalised you're mentioning here. So you have a heat check citation and cold depression in terms of temperature, and you have damp stagnation and dry atrophy in terms of moisture, and then you have a tension and relaxation. In terms of tissue tone and tension and relaxation are really really important to consider when we're looking at a tissue. It's not always pertinent but when it is, it's really pertinent. Right and you got to really address it because if the root cause of an imbalance is due to the tone of tissue. It's not GonNa be corrected just by attending the hot cold wet and dry right. So this is a very, very good understanding to have about. The energetics of a the tissues and conversely how the re what remedies we want to apply

Chee Tonics School Of Evolutionary Herbali Yana Stephen Roberts Popham Stephen Founder Steven Russell
Boston - Some law enforcement wants Massachusetts courthouses to continue virtual hearings

Jay Talking

01:00 min | 2 months ago

Boston - Some law enforcement wants Massachusetts courthouses to continue virtual hearings

"The the pandemic. pandemic. The The Massachusetts Massachusetts court's court's issued issued an an emergency emergency order order forcing forcing all all court court hearings hearings to to be be held held via videoconferencing. A local sheriff wants to keep that practice going even after Corona virus wanes as we hear from W. B Z is Kim Tung Cliff? Norfolk County Sheriff Jerry McDermott thinks it's worked so well. He's signing on to a bill filed by representative Allyson Sullivan that would make the Videoconferencing of court hearings permanent by statute. McDermott believes videoconferencing would cut down on the spread of Corona virus and have other benefits as well. My predecessor, Sheriff Mike Bellotti, and I agree needless trips from the jail to the courthouse on Ly cost the taxpayers money. It's not good for the environment, and it also opens up the opportunity for courtroom violence. It also opens up the opportunity for contraband to be smuggled from the general public to somebody at a courthouse and then back into the jail in House of Correction. The bill would also replace existing local police lock ups with regional detention centers and sheriff's Department's Kim Tana

Jerry Mcdermott The Massachusetts Massachusett Sheriff Mike Bellotti Kim Tung Cliff Sheriff's Department Kim Tana Allyson Sullivan Norfolk County Pandemic. Representative
Young adults the focus of new Tik Tok awareness campaign on Cape Cod

WBZ Midday News

00:54 sec | 3 months ago

Young adults the focus of new Tik Tok awareness campaign on Cape Cod

"W. B. C's Kim Tunnicliffe. We want Cape Cod three. Open safely and stay open. We all need to show up wearing our masks. It's called Show up with a mask. The one minute video features Cape Cotter's between 15 and 25 years old, urging young people to wear a mask with out at a party or in a crowd. The Barnstable County Health Department is displaying the video on its newly created Tic Tac Page, Health Department deputy director Erica would says there's been two new clusters of Corona virus cases on the Cape. There's been some House parties on the Cape and there have been spikes from those house parties. Unfortunately, a lot of these younger people work for the hospitality industry, which obviously creates more issues. The county Health Department is also challenging young people to make their own videos with themselves wearing masks and posting it on Tick talk. Kevin Tana Cliff W. B. Z Boston's news radio, It's estimated the Koven, 19 has put at least

Barnstable County Health Depar Cape Cod Cape Cotter Kevin Tana Cliff Kim Tunnicliffe Health Department W. B. C Boston Deputy Director Erica
"tana" Discussed on Yeah, She's Driven

Yeah, She's Driven

03:36 min | 4 months ago

"tana" Discussed on Yeah, She's Driven

"Reason, so if you are symptomatic than that's a reason to do it just like if you broke your arm, but then let's say two years from now. You were another accident. You go get a CD skin you not. You would not get a scam right. He would do that. Broken arm is not the right example, but my point is you get a scam? Because, you would want to see what's happening because you're symptomatic. So. But we do have so much like Nope I. WanNa See Improvement Because I've been doing everything I need to do, and that's fine. I JUST WANNA make sure I. Don't end up with a dementia or Alzheimer's, but some point and I know that Shalini was showing her skin, saying that she was heading in that direction, and she was a health check, and is l.. Check right, so I think like that part. Part knowing that you can do things to prevent that you know in your brain. Showing Signs is really powerful to, and there are so many things people do that. They don't know our Harvard Brandon just learning just getting the information. Sometimes, it's a matter of literally nutrition. It's like and I don't mean just knew their vitamin D is low, or this is like a simple stop where they need to take Bischel. Times, it's just you need to get the nutrients up in your body. You improve that part of your life well, unfortunately, the advice out there so random depending on who though to that unless this is why I think your network is your net worth, and when you have friends and were connected, it's like you can call each other and successful. Powerful people hang out in the same circles. Other circles of people who don't know vetted if they're veterans, not somebody asked us their area that you can go in Canada to go get a scan. O'hare we actually I? Near Vancouver. There's one group that we actually. My husband holds a training for doctors transient. When people onboard, there is a hostile somewhere near Vancouver and I'd have to get the name of it. Maybe I'll pass that onto you help. Your gone couvert. That does it awesome so. I don't think we can get your new book out yet. When does it come out January fifth? Bali Elections A. Little Bit I will here's the deal will promote your book incentive. In Our community when it comes out where people find you if they want to connect with you or no more so either instagram I'm always. I'm always on pages. INSTAGRAM facebook also tenant human dot com awesome. CAST. That's what my husband and I are like frequently, yeah! The PODCAST! What is the main workers way? It's brain warriors. Way podcast rain. Warriors Way podcast awesome. Thanks, China, you are amazing. Read a little longer than we normally do, but you are so. So much love and knowledge in you. We really appreciate having you. Blast thank you so much. I hope you enjoy this episode of Copy Sham the driven podcasts, so here's the deal you love this episode. It would totally thrill me if I could correspond with you on Instagram Page live over there probably right now. Streaming live close to live over there live all the time in podcast is not live, so please screen shot episodes to that I know that people like this episode I four votes, and then go posted on instagram and tag me at Sham Death, sumpter shambolic at Shamba. Sumpter all right talk to sue..

Shalini Vancouver sumpter INSTAGRAM Harvard Alzheimer Canada O'hare Bischel China
"tana" Discussed on Yeah, She's Driven

Yeah, She's Driven

08:17 min | 4 months ago

"tana" Discussed on Yeah, She's Driven

"With lasix. and Andy hydrated for two days, so he dehydrated. He was eating chicken and Broccoli and dehydrating for two days, and so that's what they do. They intentionally in order to shred right, and so he's like okay. Do me a favor. Go hydrate like crazy in. There will rescan you. Rain was beautiful. How dangerous is that? Only basis. We tell me to two studies. It didn't study on pilots so all the people you don't want dehydrated. Let me tell you. It's pilots because they did a study on pilots and pilots, who were only two percents dehydrated. Two percent dehydrate lower than normal. That affected dramatically affected their comedy reasoning and spatial their ability to spatially fault. Yes, so that's one the other one is. They didn't on fitness. People who are. Not bodybuilders that fit like A. Prosecutors but a group of people who work out all time yet you Jim and what they discovered was when they were hydrated, they were nineteen percent stronger. Lift weights when they didn't do hot when they were rated, they were nineteen percent weaker. You Kerr and you don't think straight when you're dehydrated. I'm more concerned about what that would do in the long run if you kept a lifestyle like is your brain. Select. Drinking Alcohol dehydrates your rain to drink too much. You're not hydrating in ages right? I mean Alcohol Ages Ran- anyways, but it's also dehydrating you. All The stuff coming from that type of stuff. Alzheimer's or dementia. Do so we have a model called bright minds, and it's the bright minds as pneumonic is, is basically those are all their eleven? Risk Factors and one event is how your nutrition. It's the nutrition, so the in bright minds is nutrition it's it's what you're eating and how you are. Basically, a nutrition also includes water. You've got gotta be hydrating So one of the fastest way to improve I often post that hydrogen is one of the fastest ways for you to wake your rain. Versus coffee. Yeah, because hoppy will quickly make your brain up, but then it's GonNa. Make you sleepy later. Because blood loaded right it actually so here's how you know. We would often We often tell people like you got bronchitis, or you've got some sort of problem going on in your like your your bronchial. Your long coffee is helpful because it. Actually Basil Constricts? So you can. Vasil constricting when you think it's doing to your brain, it's basil constricting the blood vessels. Right so long term like one cup of day as one normal sized cup is not going to really do it, but if you're having too much of it, what happens is yeah. You feel really awaken than you feel really tired because that construction is decreasing blood flow. How early can we scanner kids at the clinic and asked because my son fell off a coach at one point, it almost run out, but didn't I always like I always wonder he's five. How early you can go in and scan, so we don't just automatically skits. Okay, so it really depends on. The kid depends on behavior depends on what's happening with that kid. Really young kids would need to be sedated in. It's one of the reasons we only do based on behavior. Are they symptomatic? Is it really necessary wreck? Lots of ways we treat people, but also do something called Q. E. So for kids that can't be scanned or aren't ready to be scanned, or we don't want us today we will do something called a q. e. until they're older ricans scan them, or but if they are truly symptomatic of you're having serious issues with your kid then, yes, we can talk about it. It's just it's not. Only. Thing we door the first that we for little kids. Okay so serious like massive amounts of anger or drying announced Bangor if it, if it is greatly affecting their life, your life, their school, cognitive impairment that. Yup, what about add things like that? So. We're GONNA dig into a whole thing here and I don't want to. I don't want to presume to be taking a medical position here. I'm a nurse, not a doctor, so let me be very clear. Anything I say is very generalized statement. It's not based on your child, and it's not a medical statement, and I want to be very clear about that. Okay. I generally speaking. There's a lot of things like I said. We're GONNA. Take that for circle approach because we're also going to be able to. We don't just automatically medicated child. Because we. We WanNa also do everything we can to. To change their lifestyle we we're in a society where it's become so easy for parents in we understand, enhance your intended difficult right now, especially being at home with their kids all day. We thought they had a difficult when they had to go to work all day right now. It's way more difficult because they're working from home and they bought kids at home during school so there quickly giving kids stop to placate them. Television is one. We just talked about you. See what happens to the behavior of your title. But it's not just that it's snacks. It's sugar. It's Red Dye. It's all of these things so cleaning up their nutrition, making sure they are getting proper exercise moving their bodies, dylan their minds with the right things teaching them how to control their thoughts. All of those things are so important because what we see is that the symptoms of add go down dramatically. In fact, there were two studies done in Holland two major studies, and they found that seventy percent of eighty symptoms went down in kids that they did the study with, and this was just nutrition. Just I eliminating sugar, red dye gluten, and dairy! Think that was it. And, by just those four things eliminated them and seventy percent of symptoms, and it was done twice two different styles, so it's really critical that we do that before we start throwing a bunch of medications at kids I just heard a study yesterday that. That when children breathe through their mouth at nighttime, if they if they can, they teach them how to close their mouth teeth together and their mouth, and breathe through their nose that it changes their brain function of eighty in the new starts to go, which is fascinating and keep them breathing other knows that it goes. It's fascinating. Wow, this is so much stuff we don't know and how quickly when we go to a doctor, not lying you guys. Are Your husband's a doctor, right? They are given the medication to put them on well. So I can get into that, too. One of the things I do is because I had a I was in a bad car accident when I was younger and I didn't know it affected by right, and so now looking at my skin I realized Oh, oops, and so now under hyperbaric oxygen affected the temporal. Excuse me, the frontal Lobes so I'm doing hyperbaric oxygen stimulant blood flow to that area, so we did that with our son because he's. Speech thing and it's. It's pretty much cleared now saw. Forty towel, but you gotta have some cash to go into hyperbaric oxygen chat. A little pricey, yeah okay one last question. At so if someone goes and gets their brain scan. You guys have tons of clinics aiming clinic DOT COM. You want and by the way it's not even that extensive. You guys, it's not. It's not expensive at all to get your brain scans so I recommend everybody. Does it but once you do that? How often should go back? It depends so we don't necessarily said it you. You must come back, stand. It's not like a thing where you come back with something like that. So it really hands have a lot of executive types. They're super, competitive or entrepreneurs. They're super competitive, right. They WANNA see the improvement and that's okay. We don't want you doing it over overdoing it because it is a nuclear scam. But it's about the same amount of radiation flying from California to New, York yes, about the same amount of radiation as getting a seascape, so it's not an excessive amount of radiation. We don't want you doing a ton of. What we want, but people who want to see improvement, yeah, or if you've got a.

Alzheimer Holland lasix. Kerr bronchitis Jim executive Andy stimulant Bangor California dylan York
"tana" Discussed on YouTuber News: The Podcast

YouTuber News: The Podcast

02:41 min | 5 months ago

"tana" Discussed on YouTuber News: The Podcast

"Boobs. I don't think people mind on her instagram story. Tennis said quote. I just couldn't fumble the only fans bag swipe up which is basically a way of saying. I could make a lot of money for only fans. I'd be a fool not to try. That's her logic care and it seems like it's probably paying off for her now. This isn't a huge leap Fatana. She's never been the most prudish person she's always posted. You Know Bikini photos semi nude photos on social media. She's not shy about that stuff so it's not the craziest surprise in the world that she started this mean. I hope it's going well for her. She actually started it alongside her best friend. Ashley Swann. Who has made one as well called? Ashley's knockers Which which is to do with. She has an extensive collection of door knockers and presumably. She stands naked next to them. And that's that's the only explanation. I can work out for that and he may come to me and you may say benedict. This isn't news. This doesn't matter wine earth. You telling us about this. This is ridiculous. Well I will say this I will say this aside from the fact that yes you're correct I will say this for the news worthiness of this story. This is the first instance of a very very popular. You Shibo well apart from Japan tests but this is the second instance of very very popular youtuber moving from the Youtube Platform to an adult space and that is in itself interesting and newsworthy. And I know this probably fifty thousand other examples if you cheap is doing this but Tanna is one of the most well known and popular you cheat in the world It's a new level of star Going into this space from Youtube. So it's interesting in that sense because perhaps it will inspire a wave of you. Cheapest move into that space and that will be quite interesting because you chief is traditionally have quite young audiences. Of course each year becomes more and more popular over time and all kinds of people from all walks of life and wages use youtube but the most fanatical and that is of course what. Fantasy shortfall fanatical the most fanatical. You chief fans do tend to be young. Kids is the kids who by so it will be interesting to see if these things ready payoff because obviously these young kids hopefully not going to be following these stars onto these platforms so we shall see. We shall see bay the way if you're underage Do not visit these websites and for legal reasons. I'm emphasizing again. I am telling you not to visit these websites. If you of legal age do what you want. I'm not a COP..

Ashley Swann Youtube instagram Tennis Tanna Japan
Get to Know Tatiana Maslany

Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls

02:49 min | 6 months ago

Get to Know Tatiana Maslany

"Now is a good time to go back and check it out Tetiana. Would you like to introduce yourself hi? I'm Tana's Lonnie. I'm an actor. I am a feminist and I love food and cartoons invention. You Clinton live without the invention that I couldn't live without is actually very connected. Hetty because Wi fi for me or internet connection is the way that I get to talk to my family who live in another country. I get to keep up with my friends who also live very far away from me. It's like my connection to the people. I love the most so that I could definitely not live without hetty filter. Beauty got in the way. Have you felt that way? I have never felt that way. I love how I look. I love who I am in the world but I've never felt like the way that I look was so beautiful that have stopped people from taking me seriously. I was never I never had that struggle however I did have the struggle of being very small and very young looking and that would sometimes get in the way of people taking me seriously because people thought I was a kid and then sometimes I dress like a kid and so then they continue to think that's not doing myself any favours sweat. Does it mean to be a rebel girl to me. Being a rebel girl is embracing the things that you feel are weird about you and like loving them and doing them full out and expressing yourself in all of the ways that you want to without asking permission or waiting for someone to tell you can or somebody to show you how to do it for me. Yeah being a rebel girl is embracing your your Weirdo and loving your Weirdo. Tell us about your girlhood. Mike girlhood happened in the plains of Saskatchewan Canada. So I spent a lot of time outside on the street playing ball game playing tag until I was way too old to be doing it. Still play like hide and seek with my friends in like fields when we were very much too old to do it and also I often made movies or claymation with my brothers. We would spend summers doing that or making music together. We're always creating something. I also had a group of friends who I did Improv. Fight Club with so we get together in a park and do Improv. For each other so it was like a very joyfully nerdy girl head and I also never totally felt comfortable in the idea of what people said girl should be or look like or how she should talk or how she should

Hetty Tana Clinton Fight Club WI Saskatchewan Canada Mike
Murphy Murri on Cannabis Extraction, Hydrocarbon Safety, Aquatek, Standardized Extracts

The Curious About Cannabis Podcast

09:20 min | 7 months ago

Murphy Murri on Cannabis Extraction, Hydrocarbon Safety, Aquatek, Standardized Extracts

"Hey everybody this is Jason Wilson with the curious about cannabis podcast. Thanks so much for tuning in once again so today. I'm joined with Murphy. Murray a fellow cannabis educator and also a cannabis extraction consultant. And today. We're going to be talking about Oh let's see what we get into primarily cannabis extraction. Thanks much murphy for being willing to come on the podcast. Yeah absolutely thank you for having me. Yeah Really Soak. Our paths hadn't crossed Before now So this is kind of been long awaited for me as far as I followed some of your work and senior classes like from a distance. So it's cool to finally connect and and Talk about common interests for those. That aren't familiar with some of your work and your background is kind of diverse Do you mind kind of sharing just a little bit about some of that background. What led you into getting into specifically like the cannabis chemistry and extraction. And all the work that you're kind of focusing on now yes sure. I started in the canvas industry When it was fledgling in Colorado so we had the caregiver structure in two thousand nine and we started seeing retail dispensaries. Open up but there wasn't licensing for it and It still kind of mimicked. What California has going on in at the time in a lot of ways and so You know I got involved on the retail end. I lived in the Vail Valley and we wanted to sell high end cannabis products do those high end medical patients and in two thousand ten licensing started and in Colorado that meant vertical integration so being from a marketing background and working on the retail side of things. I had no preparation for an extraction lab and certainly no preparation for large-scale consult a cultivation and so It was all just something that was kind of thrown us and we had to get involved. I did my best delegate where I could but the lab was one of the hardest ones to To delegate out because they're you know a lot of people had grown for decades but there wasn't much for extraction historically You know like a lot of people were doing bubble ash but that is not even in the same department especially at the time. We were We were just starting to see things like amber glass which was shattered made for methanol. We're starting to see the butane honey oil and we were still really just calling it honey oil at the time and not even really referencing how it was being made because everything was still a big secret for a really long time which is part of the reason why education so important to me because the first three to four years of. I can't miss career especially in the extraction world. There was no where to get good information. There was a couple of hard to navigate forums with a lot of code words and screen and it was really difficult to use that information in a practical way and not having that. Chemistry background was certainly a disadvantage. But at that time we were doing chemistry. We were barely extracting material. We were cannabinoid behind. We are not purifying anything and we have no analytical testing to support it so you know the concentrates that we made we had no potency data on. We had pesticide data. We had no heavy metal testing. We you know I couldn't tell you. How many milligrams of THC or anything else? It was all anecdotal. It was all descriptive and you know I look back that and just get anxious about all of the products that I made and sold that I wouldn't do today because we just didn't have the tools so fast forward a few more years and the Internet makes things a lot easier. You know. Ten years is a long time in terms of Internet development and so more information became accessible which is good and bad. A lot of bad information became accessible. But what is more relevant is that we have the social media aspect of it and so now I could actually network with real humans. Ange as more states became legalized. People were less afraid to actually share what they were doing and Like real consultant jobs started becoming a thing and so we started to talk a lot more and develop methods. And that's where I kind of got into the extraction space You know in a very much more serious way. Because we started to actually have real standards to pursue and I started to meet the type of people who were doing things that I wanted to emulate and from there I got involved on the equipment and things in two thousand fourteen. I started working for extraction tech solutions. Which was one of the only hydrocarbon equipment manufacturers at the time and I started doing private consulting from there. I just became fully immersed in in the world of extractions so from You know just straight up cannabis extraction to also the burgeoning hemp industry. And we've just kind of gone all the way from black oil to white powder right. Yeah the last few years yeah. That's it'd be fascinating to kind of see that laid out on an image timeline. Memories can be scary sometimes. What is it that Particularly about extraction? Now that's really driving your passion to kind of continue that focus in that arm of things I think one of my favorite things about extraction has always been that You know it's it's very objective you know. Once we started bringing out a little testing into it and started actually doing chemistry labs. It was really rewarding because I could perform a process could get results than I could repeat those results Compare that to like cultivation. Where the you know every step you take today. You say the results of that weeks months ahead of Point so there's no instant gratification and cultivation whereas extraction is instant gratification every thirty minutes I get to see the results of what I've achieved and so It feels very productive and it also gives me a lot of room for error which is very exciting for me because I love the experimentation of it with cultivation even just having a table that you try out new nutrients on can affect literally the rest of the garden whereas with extraction. I can have a new idea. I can try new piece of equipment. I can tweak a process I can make these changes. You know minute to minute. Day to day and get to evaluate the efficiency and so the potential for growth is phenomenal Because it's exponential every day. Try something new and you know. Every new test result gives me ten more questions to go chase down the rabbit hole so it is constant change in very fast moving which I find personally rewarding. I'm the type of person that rearranges my furniture. Often extraction is nothing but change. Yeah Yeah I could see that. That'd be really exciting. To be caught up in that accelerated process of refinement. Refinement technologies and process and everything. You really get to see it unfold. In a way that that's unique when you were learning about extraction. What were some of the resources that you found most valuable to kind of understand what you needed to do to take things to that that next level I know skunk farm is obviously one resource that we all probably know pretty well. That's a huge one Or some others that you those online forums were enormous but through those online forums. I actually got to meet really competent people. I think both ten years ago and even today the mentorship for finding someone smarter and better than you is the most valuable lake. I look back on my career to some specific individuals who brought me in and were willing to share. What at the time was like trade secrets? You know The things that we didn't discuss Out Loud in part because it was a legal but also in part to keep our brands. Unique and those people were enormous for me I had a couple of chemists who were involved early on that were really helpful in explaining some of like the basic safety issues that I would never have even thought to ask questions about probably without their help Not to mention just some. You Know Industry Pioneers people like Nick Tana of essential extracts. Who you know was willing to teach me how to make bubble Harrison is kitchen and get involved in this industry when it was still barely an industry. We were barely for profit at the

Cannabis Colorado Consultant Murphy Jason Wilson Nick Tana Murray Vail Valley California Ange Harrison
Weird Growth Experiment: What Neil Learned Spending $162,301 on Clothes

Marketing School

05:30 min | 7 months ago

Weird Growth Experiment: What Neil Learned Spending $162,301 on Clothes

"Welcome to another episode of Marketing School. I'm Eric Su and I'm Patel and today we're GonNa talk about a weird growth experiment which is really what Neil learn over one hundred sixty two thousand dollars on clothes so Neil. This is fun episode. Because you're GONNA do most of the heavy lifting so what exactly happened here because he actually wrote something about this a while back as a blog post so tell us what happened so years ago when I was less known house out there hustling much more. I need to go back to doing that. I decided to try to run an experiment. Where if I dress nicer would I be able to charge people more money and make more money so I decided to spend a ton of money on clothes? I probably spend too much and when I would go to business meetings. I'll make shows super nice. You know and see if it would help me. Close more deals in generate more income. Got IT and so. Tell us the process here. I mean the the one hundred sixty two thousand. Did you pick out the clothes? Like what did you do exactly? What kind of clothes were you wearing at in? Pick why she closed or anything like that. I picked me these suits briefcases nice shoes. Think of business attire. But extremely nice business attire things like dull Jacobina Tom for burberry Tana Kashmir little beyond stuff like that Yup. Did you pick up the stuff yourself? I had other people helped me pick out the clothes so what I quickly learned is mainly did this when I was in Las Vegas and I was living there and I lived literally right on the strips. Also close to a lot of the shopping. What I learned is if you spend enough they actually come to your house with racks of Clothes Anna Taylor you. They don't charge you extra for that. They just bring stuff you try it on you get fitted and then once it's done they bring it back to your house and by the way I mean some of that's you still have that look like whenever people see you. It's not like you're wearing suits all the time. It's your worrying. You have a casual look but it's nice clothes correct correct yes well technically now just like a bum. There's nothing wrong with being Bomba. I dress really poorly at this point. I thought you're still wearing nice. You just like a bomb. But you're still wearing nice stuff. Probably might t shirts four hundred dollars so my point is when you look at Neil. He dresses fairly casually. But you can tell. It's still nice stuff. I think that's the point. I'm trying to get people to visualize it a little bit. So maybe let's talk about the before and after results before maybe you weren't wearing as nice stuff and then you started wearing nice stuff like what exactly happened. Can you share any case studies? Yeah so when I go to in person meetings to try to close deals Mike. Closing ratio went up from twenty five percent to forty percent which was huge and innocence brought me over six hundred ninety two thousand dollars in revenue now. That doesn't mean prophecy. That doesn't necessarily mean it pays for the close. It just means I brought in extra revenue and keep them on pitching enterprise big corporations and I think why it worked really well was is because people like all right this guy successful portraying a bigger company and yet. Maybe he's worth the price that he's quoting. I also do believe that its regional base. You know places like Los Angeles Seattle New York Chicago. I think it matters a bit more places like San Francisco. I don't think it matters as much. Yup that's completely true and I mean I mean the typical look as you're wearing like Patagonia vast or something like that and then you're wearing all birds and you're good to go exactly and I also think it depends what phase you are in life because depending on what phase you are in life in business Helps as much in Class A fear. Reid Hoffman Co founder of link Denmark. I don't think it matters what you wear your hundred percent so I mean that's a four point. Three X return to six ninety two on the one sixty two so I guess you know looking at things from a personal experience here. I used to just have a backpack like a normal back. You know meal night. We have a late friend named Brandon who he had kind of a similar back as I do. We look like school kids but once you switched up his backpack to a nice Pat toomey backpack. That's T U M I. He said like everything changed. When you went to route people will compliment on his backpack and then he would get seen a little differently even though he dressed casually. I changed my backpack and I know how to me backpack to and I will say I get a lot of Nice comments about it and people do the first impression how people see you. You'll get one chance to make it right so you know. Even let's say you still want to continue to dress casually that's fine. Maybe you look at the other stuff. Maybe the briefcase right or maybe look at the backpack because you do typically get a couple of nice comments about like Neil the briefcase you have generally. It's always something people talk about right not anymore because I have a child and she plays with the zippers breaks. It and all that kind of stuff in the east you. Yeah makes sense so yeah guys. I don't think you necessarily need to spend one hundred sixty two thousand dollars on clothes. I think we're just saying Zara or any place has affordable clothing. Alex Niccolo unique goes good. I don't know where you go for female codes. Nic Business Attire. It's not necessarily the price it's more so the fit. Yep exactly I that's a really good point you don't necessarily is spent thousands of thousands of dollars if you get a good Taylor. That's probably a little more important on to make sure things look fit. They look a million bucks.

Neil Anna Taylor Marketing School Tana Kashmir Las Vegas Eric Su Pat Toomey Alex Niccolo San Francisco Zara Reid Hoffman Co Patel Mike Los Angeles Brandon Denmark Founder Seattle Chicago
"tana" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

06:02 min | 8 months ago

"tana" Discussed on The Book Review

"It was great fun. The book is roughly encapsulated. It's it's IT'S. It's the story of this of this spirit. It's kind of based on the on sort of fabled the wandering Jew and she she wanders without respite sort of haunting people that are very lonely and abject sort of getting her to join them for some mysterious purposes and the book opens in the Present Day in Prague. And there's this woman we meet Helen. The main character who seems to be obscurely suffering. She's doing this. Incredibly elaborate ritual of private penance. We don't understand is clearly something that she has done it wrong in her past and she's trying to suffer in the present and she sort of learns of the story mammoth and mammoth obviously becomes very interested in her. And like the best go stories. I write in the review. Keeps you reading this book as you're never short? Is there even a ghost or Business? A certain kind of projection of her own secrets and guilt. And you know it's really. It's an interesting book. It's really well done book because it also moves into the present and it sort of moves into these questions of of our own feelings of complicity of our own feelings of. What do we owe one another? And and how do we sit with our inability to save each other or sit with our inability to grievously hurt each other so it was a really interesting book but I will say that you know it's it. It isn't the kind of book that I would ordinarily read. It's incredibly gothic. It's full of incense and you know circling birds and doom and gloom and all of these things and it was really interesting to as I reviewed it to not hold those things against the book. Those are part of the genre you know but to work through the review giving I hope the reader enough information to be like this is what it's about. It's a complaining that a musical has songs like. This is these are. These are the features of the book so understand that this is what's happening understand that you know it may not be for you but there's luckily to to pay his crowd. It's so much happening. It's a very very layered book. I feel like this has been happening to a lot parl lately. 'cause like this will show no in reading reading in life to perhaps but in reading because the Chonbuk you said for example a container that you know mythological creatures and fairies in yeah no rainbows and I don't know what else that you don't ordinarily like to read. That's like I think this is like the good. The one of the best parts of the job is to be able to push yourself you know and then to also interrogate. Why don't I like this? What does it mean to me you know and I have a book about UNICORNS and stuff like that and reflexively dismiss it you know. What am I missing when I do that? All right. I want to ask one final question of everyone Since we started with libraries. What's your favorite library? Ooh Well The New York Public Library. Come on it's beautiful but named by a main branch but nobody for me. Sorry leap by growing up the Naples Florida. I mean I was born with central named I. I spent my second match altered in Florida and in the place you went when you were a kid you know anyway and most famous for getting tons of books out and never ever returning them so my mother had to pay these fines all the time. Do you still have them? The the the books returned eventually actually called up this library about about a year ago says working on some writing about my childhood and I really. I should any chance you kept the records. That really want would want to know what they said. No they card cut hospital records about school libraries when you could when you had to handwrite in your name you know in the little slip in the back and it was always fascinating as a social document because you learn things about your classmates that you wouldn't have ordinarily wouldn't have suspected like that. You know this boy over there took out you know a dancy drew or whatever you know what about you Parl Dwight. I think it's I think they're libraries. That I love New York when you asking. That question zoomed back to my the libraries of my elementary school years in my high school libraries and I moved a lot and I think the one thing I always did when I went to a school. Which is every two three years was to quickly find the librarian or myself there and to be like as long as I had my coordinates. You know Had My role doll. I had my whatever I needed at that point. I felt grounded. Yeah well I I mean for me. I remember going to the Neighborhood Library in Toronto where I grew up and yeah I still remember very distinctly like I remember exactly how it was laid out where the children's section was where the WII section was and and then also. My University Library at Toronto was this enormous hideous building called robarts library which is the sort of big brutal structure that I think was intentionally made in the shape of a peacock if you get it from a certain distance. It's really weird looking but I have. I don't know that to me was sort of the library that I remember really at sanctuary. Yeah and I mean it was. You know when you're in the stocks that was sort of window is I mean. There was nothing really charming about it but I I have really good memories. Someone's yours Powell. Well one point about university libraries at my school we had you know the sort of major main library the Rockefeller Library which was referred to as the Rock and then there was this other library which I never set foot in called the Sciences Library. Or the CY lie and it was also a brutal structure not like a peacock really just like a you know a drop pin but apparently what interested me about it. Metaphorically was that the architects had evidently not accounted for the weight of the books in engineering. And so the Sinai is sinking. I don't know if it's subsequently been reinforced by some kind of generous donation to the school. But I loved the idea that this this really ugly scientists library that I had no desire to enter was just gonNA sink into the ground and go away forever. Don't know thanks remember. There's more at times dot com slash books and you can always write to us at books at NY TIMES DOT Com. I write back the book review. Podcast is produced by Peter Asada from head stepper media with a great help of my colleague. John Williams thanks for listening for the New York Times on Pamela Paul..

New York Public Library robarts library Sciences Library Neighborhood Library Rockefeller Library Toronto Prague Helen Parl Dwight New York Times Florida Naples Florida Peter Asada Pamela Paul New York John Williams Powell
"tana" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

09:30 min | 8 months ago

"tana" Discussed on The Book Review

"Johnny s now are three book critics. Jennifer Salai Dwight Garner and Pearl Siegel. Hi Guys. Let's with Eugen because you had to review. That just came out today. Tell us what you read this week so I read the library book by Susan Orlean. You know it's one of these books. I mean she. She's done this with their other books to where she sort of. Has this idea that she's GonNa follow something. So there was the orchid thief there was written thinks she wrote a book about what people do on Saturday night and then she ends up. Finding sort of these really interesting obsessive people and in this case because her book is about libraries in the role of libraries not only in her life but in all of our lives public libraries specifically she ends up just sort of taking up residence essentially in Los Angeles Central Library and just finding out how it works and the occasion for the actual book was that she found out when she moved to Los Angeles. I think about seven years ago that there was an enormous fire in nineteen eighty six. That destroyed more than I think. It destroyed more than a million books or at least damaged as many as that so she takes that story of the library fire and the mystery of what happened and how it may or may not have started and uses that sensibly her frame but then it just turns into an Orlean book where she talks to people and find out what they're obsessed with and interested in and just like a really enjoyable experience. I'd say and you sort of come out at the end of it really. I think deeper appreciation of what it is that libraries do and also just the really sort of. There's some things that happened in libraries that you don't even necessarily think about and when she talks about how the library adjusted after the fire and how they tried to save some of the books that were essentially ruined by water damage because of the firefighters coming in and so they put these books into deep freezing for like a couple of years and then hope for the best when they thought out. So it's a whole thing is just very very interesting it straight. That was even something. I couldn't even find room to mention that. But that's you know it always strikes me that Susan Orlean is not only allows for tangents but she allows herself to kind of give candidates and so totally. That might be one of the reasons why it's always very hard to F- captured in simple. Yes and to be honest. I mean the the parts where she tries to sort of contain it with the message about the libraries. Those really the weakest parts of the book in Class Culinary Question. Maybe it'd be up on this won't be. Maybe it's in the book. Maybe it's not but we all remember. I think maybe fifteen years ago when people like Nicholson Baker were obsessed with the demise of the card catalogue right around my mind. Skewing card catalogs and in putting him in a truck heart catalogs. Do I love card catalogs and taking them back this warehouse in Maine and say. Is this still a thing is still an issue or card catalogs just being being tossed me and burned or are they being? Do you know anything about the only. If the only thing I can remember from the book that Mentions the Card Catalogue. Is that in the elevator of the central branch the Los Angeles Library. It's lined with cards from the old cartoons. I rescued them out of the. Yes essentially but I think I may have feelings about that but it's wool you can by used card catalogues on the Internet. I often use them as like new cards when I give talks and he just no you don't use the other the other side confession here the written on one side. Yes yeah I the old typewritten card catalogues with all of the categories and everything and you can use them as you know in place have posted. Its her regular index card. Kind of like my sleep. We're all staring at Pamela me to bring in backs of old receipts that's That's visiting I got one as a gift from my husband else and actually I should say all right how about you I. I read a novel this week by Youngest writer now named John Ray W. R. A. Y. Is New one is called Godsend? And it's about it's based on the Walker Lindh case you know the American Taliban young man who was spectacularly caught on place at the wrong time after nine eleven he had gone to study at a madrassa in to learn about Islam and ended up fighting and was captured doesn't enemy combatant in two thousand in one or two. I can't remember now but anyway raise new novel. Pretty much follows the the the traces of Lynn's life except that it features a young eighteen year old woman from California who disguises herself in dental fashion As a man and goes to study and then to fight it's very serious very sober very sort of one of those novels whether or not peaks and valleys. It's one long sort of slow rise to sort of re rather smashing ending. It's impressive. I was amazed at the amount of learning. He clearly absorbed to write this novel. Just I mean the learning has not come at you in undigested chunks. It's very measured the entire book. But it's clear that he a lot of work under this any travel there. He traveled there but yeah but a lot of people travel. Stone aren't so but we're right obvious. Deleted show I've been to Pakistan. I've been and I've spent time. Yeah exactly so. This is a semi review. It's not really my kind of book. The kind of book that's so intent on portraying the inner workings of a mind giving us off to religion and and I just lack the spiritual. Gina'S I say in my view in so watching someone off a cliff into superstition to me is claustrophobic experience. That's intentional. Install. Hold the connection with the spiritual. Because at the lead us into Karl's book this week but I'm curious when you say this is not my kind of books. Do you like sometimes to deliberately set out to review books. That are not your kind of book we talked about this a few episodes ago. GonNa talk about in this episode. Nope it. It's one of those issues of perma fascination to me because you know as critics were always reviewing I mean. Most of the world's literature runs against the taste. You know and it's true of all of us. Think so no. I don't set out to the thing about books as you don't know if they're gonNA be start reading them and you're always surprised you know John. Ray tends to read a different kind of novel every time out in so I had no idea to expect with this book and you know. A lot of novels have peaks and valleys and ups and downs. And this is not the kind of book I mean. Famously maligned book about about nine. Eleven bioterrorism has John Updike's novel terrorism. Which frankly I don't think is quite as bad as critics say but upticks novel is a big high and low meditation on Religion and culture and this is kind of book that it's not that John Ray's book puts you in the little bubble in the little capsule heading towards Mars. Which which which is the madrassa. And you're you're in the bubble and you're just this limited point of view it makes a powerful and it makes it limiting at times but when I was like this work and this does I think it's it's powerful. Can we gossip for second sure? Did you guys article New York magazine about how he owns the found stone in park slope by. And he's John Ray John Ray. And he's rented out bedrooms two writers to use his offices but they're all like amazing writers like Marlin James's on one floor Nathan Englanders on another a kill shot and they have visit literary Frat House in the down and play Ping Pong or something. They commemorate like one woman then. It's kind of a right there. Do they live there? But I think is a general partner. Yeah but the rest of them kind of just mentioned this on the back of the book it says that Ray Lives in Mexico City. So maybe he has a Frat house there. I thought that such a bread. Cavenaugh kind of thing now but I remember John Sorry. We remember wanting a photograph that I loved. He got one Scott a tattoo on his back of our former colleague. When she Kukoc Kotani back fullback? It was temporary and it said machiko forever. I think like Ev. Ah and he took it off on stage and it was it was. I cannot remember now whether positively reviewed. I can't remember now whether she liked didn't like his novels. I suspect she liked them. Because the Chris through quite good but I could be wrong. I am looking at our producer in the other room and he is saying the sensually through facial expressions. This is staying in the park offers listeners. You all now know about Roy S. summit something to aspire too you know you're not slightly touchy. What would they do to it? Horrible no never all right. Let's elevate the conversation notes spiritual round pearls were view. This caused a conversation on the floor of the book or view in which one editor did not want to edit review because as she put it to another editor. You're better at transept stands you do it. What did you reviewed? I mean this is just sort of you know building off. Dwight's point about reviewing things that are sort of outside of your cans out of your taste. I deliberately did that this week. I picked up a book. That's you know more commercial. It's called mammoth by Sarah. Perry who wrote a book called the Essex Serpent which came out I think last year the year before and it was it was a hit. People really loved it and so two years ago Yon People. I figure that people will be curious about this new book and then I think I was also kind of interested in in reviewing something that felt a little bit more genre.

John Ray John Ray Susan Orlean Jennifer Salai Dwight Garner Los Angeles Central Library Los Angeles Eugen Johnny s John Updike Nicholson Baker Los Angeles Library editor Walker Lindh Pakistan John Ray W. R. A. Y. Class Culinary Question New York magazine Pearl Siegel Ray Maine Kukoc Kotani
"tana" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

08:36 min | 8 months ago

"tana" Discussed on The Book Review

"You were the author of this so so you must have set out in some way to do this. Even if not quite consciously I also thought you know you talk about this novel being in large part about look to that point of unreliable narrators to me. It felt like a book about memory and about memory as essential to storytelling particularly the stories. We tell about our cells and family stories which rely so much on the very differing perspectives of of all of the various characters. That were there. I think the the narrative that we construct within memory a minority that we construct from on ice are essential to our sense of identity of who we are and we shaped though than reshape to fit the narrative that we want to construct about ourselves and then it can be a huge shock to find out that maybe some of the other people who participants in that narrative at the time. Do not remember them the same way that they've focused on different bits or they've reshaped them differently and maybe they're right and maybe you're wrong and this is the possibility and this is something that toby comes up against with a bang and a wall in the course of the book because he have family home the Ivy House which to him has been absolutely idyllic childhood picnics. And Its forts in the spare room. And it's sleep outs in the garden and teenage parties and first kisses. That's what this place is to him. And that's what's in his own mind. He has constructed of he and his cousin. Susanna I'm Leon were this lovely little trio where he kind of took care of them because they weren't as cool as he was but he was the the cool cousin and looks after them and everything was lovely but in the course of the book as a Detective Start Peeling back the layers of their past and asking questions and he starts asking questions to find out what might or might not have gone on. He realizes that design the. Liam's memories and there have only intersect with his at certain points and the rest of the time they do not have a lot in common. And that's a huge shock. Then because he's got a point where his sense of Celtic smashed and the one thing that he thinks he might be able to use to reconstruct it. Is that shared past which he considers to still be stable but as he realizes that they're now at their memories are not the same as his are much darker and that not only their past but their relationship with him and all the events of that pasta or not. The same from their perspective is pass starts to be stabilized as well one of the things. I liked about that. It's sort of unveiling of the pass through these different perspectives. It was almost like Russia on lake. Where you you tell a certain story about yourself about your family. And then he hears it. It's like it turns. And then you hear it through another family members is and you have to kind of reconstruct the way that you see it now based on that new information and that you kind of keep returning to certain central events of the novel but from Shifting Perspective and then a kind of reconstructive narrative with this new information but I'm fascinated by rushland style idea or fact or whatever you want to call it because it comes back to what I was thinking about what this book. If other people have their realities and to what extent do you recognize them to what extent you aware of them? To what extent do you feel attacked or undermined by them? And to what extent are you able to hold onto your own reality in the face of the Fox that other people's a real to where's that balance and he's unable to find a balance because he's never as we said had to even consider the fact that other people might have their reality still. That's never been on his horizon and so when it is forced upon him he's unable to find a balance between holding any sense of his own center. Which is of course not in great shape as it is and allowing dares all right. This is the hardest question and it's because I want to try to ask and see if you can answer it without any plot. Spoilers this novel. Let's see if we can do it. This novel is so of this movement. Did you deliberately set out to write about? Something is very much percolating in the culture. Or are you just like go for one time with people are thinking a lot about who gets to define what the realities and about whose reality should be listened to and in a time where people were many people who have not doin the high card in one area or another of life are less and less willing to be silenced and to be marginalized and who is speaking up to say hang on minority matters as well minority wheel? My narrative has as much weight as anyone else who also time in which people who have always been able to set the narrative who always been considered by default as the objective standard of reality. They don't like the idea that they no longer get to set the narrative. Some of them are very angry about that and so that tension is running also society. And if you're seeing it and thinking about in daily life and we considering your own assumptions about it that you've always held and taken for granted I think it's not gonNA come through in the book. Non Spoiling Yeah we did not reveal the ending but it leads me to ask you another question which is do you always know the ending. Do you start knowing where exactly you're going to end up. Oh God no no. I don't know anything basically. I'm not one of the office to have this full outline and know exactly the shape of the book when they start and all of that and I kind of envy it because at least they know there's going to be a book there but for me no I start with. I've got a very strong sense of the narrator. I've got a strong sense of the basic premise. And I've got a core location usually and from there on I just died in and right and figure it out as I go along and just keep my fingers crossed. There is in a book in there somewhere. I kind of figure it comes from having been an actor where I'm starting everything from character rather than from plots because it means that I have to wait the characters for a while before I get to know them enough to know who would do what like. I don't even know who done it when I start the book. I figure it out halfway through and go. Oh of course that makes sense to go back and read right to make sure that it all is properly rooted in seated in the beginning of the book. But perhaps there's something more naturalistic than about how that comes across to the reader because the person who knew the ending is kind of planting the Buffon's and things along the way whereas if the writer doesn't even necessarily know then everything sort of full of mystery impossibility and you don't have to plant anything because that's the way the landscape looks well. I certainly hope so because I I do have those moments where something comes as a very startling revelation to me as well you know what I'm doing and go into my husband in the other room and go. Oh my God. I think this is going to happen not going. That sounds good. I startled myself so I sort of hope that some of that revelatory quantity comes through the readers art. I have to ask you two more questions about other books. The first is. Are you going to go back to the Dublin Murder Squad? I don't know I kind of him so but I figured it would be good to take a little while and a little away from it and come back to fresh is like the one I just started working on now is another standalone. So the W is quite. Didn't I'm not going back to immediately? But it's definitely on the plan for some time all right and then lastly because everyone I know is reading the witch I HAVE TO ASK. What are you reading? I have just finished reading lonesome dove but he worked for three which is a an amazing book. I don't know how it hadn't come on my radar before because I liked great big ethics. I like books that take you with characters along with huge journey and there isn't much much bigger of a journey than this. You know these men driving this huge herd of cattle from Texas all the way up come and Tana and it's a wonderfully done book where you dip in and out of various characters viewpoint and get to see more and more deeply as a book goes on and get more and more of an insight into their world and I love it all right well. There's a book recommendation for you Tana. Thank you so much for joining us from Dublin. And so much for having me. The book again is called the witch ELM by ton of friendships review. This week on our cover by Stephen King.

Ivy House toby Dublin Russia Dublin Murder Squad Liam Tana Susanna I Texas Stephen King writer Leon
"tana" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

05:48 min | 8 months ago

"tana" Discussed on The Book Review

"That he that he so disables the federal government that we all wake up and realize it's importance and there's there starts to be some energy between behind genuine reform place. I mean the pay scale for example. There's a there's a there's a pay scale that's in place. It was put in place in the pay structure in the forties. And it was premised on the idea that everybody in the in the government's a clerical worker in so the pay and the government has not kept up at all with the private sector getting a scientist to move from a corporation into the government even when we really need him to do. It is difficult. The flexibility to hire and fire is a real problem. The average higher takes a hundred and six days the age of the federal government. They're five times more people over the age of sixty than under the age of thirty in the government that's like the reverse of the private sector. I mean certainly Wall Street Goldman Sachs. Probably the opposite. It's the tech. The technology in the government ninety billion dollars spent on technological infrastructure like the computers that run the tax system. Seventy billion of that is spent just keeping up ancient system systems from like the sixties. So there needs to be someone who needs it needs to be a radical but investment in the government right. That's what needs to happen in order to get young smart graduates with computer science degrees to one. Actually go in there. The backlash to trump might be that there might be a new narrative about all this I could. That's the silver lining all right. I WanNa talk a little bit about the mechanics of this book because you approach this in a different way from your previous books which is to say you did part of this on audio before you did it in front and I'm curious if that changed the process at all sort of talking out your book before putting it down on paper in its final form a little bit. I've found so I have read my books before audiobooks. Not In the last few in the liar's poker that kind of thing and I found when I read the book I was. I pulled out a pencil. Even though the book was the book already and I started and I realized some sentences could be better so improved the pros to have to speak in. It also encouraged me to let a couple of characters breathe who I might not have let breathe quite as much. It gave me a license to just tell the story a bit more and I think I think that audio does do that. I think that you you're slightly different in the way you tell a story when you're on a stage talking to an audience than when you're in alone in a room with a pencil. You're you're more attuned to the emotional effects of the stuff on the page. I think so. I think it had subtle effects Nut massive effects. You torture us a little bit on the on the journalism end here by your books. Come and we have no idea what they're going to be about and they land at the last minute or but that's okay but what's next. I don't know I I didn't finish this till two months ago and I do think that every time I published a book I need to take a few months and ask myself. Should I really right another? Because I think people writers who have a market for their books they just start to generate them to generate them. And I don't want to do that. I WanNa feel like each one has its own real mission so I will wait a few months before I even decide and think about it that I'm still a writer. I have one last question on. You dedicated this book in memory of Tom Wolfe Fighter why he met the world to me pulling radical chic off my father's shelf when I was maybe twelve or thirteen and reading even though I had no idea who the black panthers were Leonard Bernstein. I was rolling around on the floor of our house in New Orleans laughing and I remember distinctly having this thought. Someone wrote this book and that had not occurred to me at any book. I've ever read read the hardy boys or legends of the NFL. I'd never died. There was an author. They were just books. Books were books and all of a sudden I had a sense of a writer is voice was so strong and then a writer was giving pleasure and I trace my interest in being a writer to that moment and he was he couldn't have been sweeter to me in the beginning of my career and I became very fond of him and I thought well I wanted to dedicate the next one to him anyway but he always said you know one of the subjects that he avoided politics in Washington. That was boring. He thought that American Democracy. He said at one point in one of his letters that it's like this train is rolling down the tracks and people will scream at it from the right and people will scream at it from the left. Just GonNa keep rolling down the tracks and says you know Richard Nixon steps down as we have a revolution or give me a break. I think. Now that's no longer true to say you prove them a little bit wrong here in this all right. Michael always a pleasure to have you here. Thank you so much thank you. The book is called the fifth risk by Michael Lewis. It's reviewed this week in the perfect. Hi I'm Tara. Parker pope creator of well the healthy living section from the New York Times. If you're looking for simple ways to build healthy habits join me each day for the well minute our new flash briefing skill on Alexa to get started searched from my well minute in your Alexa APP and tap enable then ask Alexa to play your flash briefing to hear your daily challenge if you need detailed instructions go to ny times dot com slash voice. Be well and I'll see you soon to start this journey. Our second guest on this episode is the fantastic time French other of the Dublin. Murder Squad series here. She is talking about her latest novel. A Book I thoroughly enjoyed.

writer Alexa Michael Lewis Goldman Sachs scientist New York Times New Orleans Richard Nixon Tom Wolfe trump Murder Leonard Bernstein Parker pope Dublin panthers NFL Washington
"tana" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

01:51 min | 8 months ago

"tana" Discussed on The Book Review

"Collects the census in is in the department commerce economic statistics in the department. All the weather data is in the in the department cameras. So Y- it's a massive data collection. Enterprise and the value of this data is if it's actually used properly and made publicly accessible is unbelievable what we've heard about what they've been at least one thing that they're doing with the census which is to have the citizenship question on it which does have broad implications have. We not heard about three quarters of the budget. The Commerce Department goes to Noah the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and three quarters. That goes to the weather so I I. I wrote more more about that. Because that's an that actually seem the most urgent story I did go interview the people who had run the census and their fear that to fears was that the data is going to be corrupted by by scaring people from answering it. Because that's is your question but the second the bigger is they have an organized it will. It happen there behind their behind schedule. And it's a massive undertaking. I can't remember how many people they hired. But it's like hundreds of of people get hired to go out and collect this data every day. Try to register every person in the in this country and get information about them and that information is extremely important. The picture we have of who we are as a society all kinds of businesses depend on that data. And it's just it's just being neglected. Is the problem right now. So is there anything good that can be said about? I mean you have to ask you have to wonder. I mean for so many years as you've said it is a misconception and a mischaracterization and it's not true that these are huge bureaucracies. Do nothing nonetheless. Presumably these are institutions. That could use some kind of change. Is there anything good in this change? Well as I said the one unintentionally good thing.

National Oceanic and Atmospher Commerce Department Noah
From the Archive: Michael Lewis and Tana French

The Book Review

11:16 min | 8 months ago

From the Archive: Michael Lewis and Tana French

"Michael thanks for being here. Thanks for having me. So you've covered very exciting topics before. Wall Street is exciting. Sports is exciting. The Department of Agriculture is not generally considered exciting. How did you decide to to turn to this? So it wouldn't have been exciting before trump. I think trump electrified all the material. So what happened. Several things at once happened. I just finished a book about Danny. Common name is diversity to Israeli psychologist who Study the way people Miss Miss Value. Risk price risk and one of their insights. Was that if you take a catastrophic risks. I mean it's like a one in a million chance of happening and and make it a one in ten thousand still very remote increase the likelihood one hundred times people don't feel it and I had this sense. When trump was elected in the way he was approaching governing that he was he was doing that across a big portfolio of risks that. I thought that the one way to think of the federal government is a manager of giant portfolio of risks many of them catastrophic and that people weren't feeling it exactly. I was doing on this in about how to write about it when he made Rick Perry the Secretary of Energy of Course Rick. Perry had said that he thought the Department of you should be eliminated when he was on stage in a debate but he couldn't remember even the name of the place and once he collided with it he realised. Oh maybe it shouldn't be eliminated because the departmental has nuclear weapons in inside of it and I thought well maybe this is the this is the way maybe actually kind of want follow it follow ric currency what it means for. Rick Perry to be running this place and then somewhere in all this. I learned that the Obama Administration partly because they're required to by law partly because Obama was a responsible person had essentially Had BEEN AT WORK. For a year to create these briefings for the whoever was gonNA roll into the federal government and run it and there was a there have been thousand thousand people across across the government who had spent the better part of a year creating these briefing books thinking about how to present the government to someone who didn't know anything about it and these briefings were supposed to happen the day after the election. I mean they're gonNa roll and that's what happened. When Obama rolled in to replace Bush and the trump people hadn't shown up at all so then I had a hook but now I do too in the hook was I'm GonNa go get the briefings. Briefings and trump people never bothered to get and kind of learn about this portfolio of risk and try to get a sense of what we should be worried about why that was the start and then you ended up covering not just the Department of Energy but also the Department of Commerce and the Department of Agriculture. You know I had a selection problem that reminded me a bit of the selection problem. I had with the big short and the big short there was a pool of kind of fifteen Wall Street guys who had seen the crisis coming or thought they'd seen it coming and made a fortune betting on the collapse of either Wall Street or the housing market and I wandered around a long time on a casting. Search figure out which ones were the best to tell the story through. Who are the other contenders? There were a lot of them. I mean they were. They were hundreds of them but they were fifteen of them and and all were willing to let me write about him. It was just who could kind of teach the reader the most important things what was the best way to dramatize this. And in this case I had actually fifteen cabinet level positions fifteen departments to choose from and I had a narrow down. I couldn't do the federal government. I wasn't gonNA keep the reader for more than a couple of hundred pages. I knew right away it was going to be three or four and I thought I had some criteria I thought one. It's gotta be something that I suspect. Most readers have no idea what it does and I just. I would just market test this. I'd be at a dinner party and say they might tell me what the Department of Commerce does and nobody had any idea that half the budget went to weather collecting weather data. You know or in the department energy most people didn't like Rick. Perry as opposed to the Treasury Department of the State Department of people have some vague idea. What does it? I wanted to be out of the public eye because I thought among other things I think. The risks are greater when public not watching the trump administration and finally. I thought they started to be very important so the Department of Education. I mean it's nothing's not important in the federal government but some of it's more important than than others so i. I spent time in most of the departments. I mean are talked to people from most departments and eliminated things along the way and then figured these are the three I wanted to do. Having said that I mourn not having written about the State Department and more not having read about the Department of the Interior. I think you could drop a writer into any one of these places and he would come away with a really. There's a wonderful stories to tell I mean. The Department of Education Is One. That's been written about a lot because of that. The high profile of the appointee to a lesser extent repairing sort of when he came in there was a flurry of attention and then kind of died away. So what is Rick Perry doing at the Department of Energy and what the Department of Energy supposed to be doing? It's a really good question what he is doing what. I dipped out of this story. I mean the last time I interviewed someone at the department injuries. Maybe six months ago and what I'm told. Is he set himself up as a kind of cheerleader ceremonial head of with the. Who isn't all that interested in the place? So you seem tweet a lot about it but we never got the briefings presumably. I know more about it than he does. Because I sat down with people had them walk me through the whole department. Maybe by now. He's accumulated some information. But what does it do? It's a vast science project what it is and part of the science project is tending to testing assembling nuclear weapons. That that's a big part of the budget. Another big part of the budget is cleaning up nuclear. Waste their sites in this country. And you wouldn't believe it. It's sort of like green type. Post-apocalyptic PLACES PAN for Washington. The Department of Defense three billion dollars a year trying to clean up the remains of the plutonium factories that that generated the atom bombs for World War. Two you ask the people in the department energy to give you an honest estimate how long it's GonNa take to to clean the place up hundred years one hundred billion dollars. I mean that's not trivial. And and what is at stake is there is a giant plume underground of of nuclear waste. That's slowly drifting towards the Columbia River which is not that far away said up on the Columbia River because they need the water to cool the it was there for a reason but if it leaches into the Columbia River. It's a catastrophe the for the Pacific northwest and it's managed in a very short term way. Things happen there. That are very alarming but does that predate trump or is it always been managed in a short term way although trump was the trigger for my story and trump is by far the most negligent manager of the federal government. We've had my lifetime Fisher probably forever. I never thought of his story. Just about trump. I thought of it. A story about the narrative we have created has poisoned or at Lea- screwed up the relationship between the society and government. That that this whole notion that the government is filled with lazy stupid. Bureaucrats who were kind of dead weight on society is a really dumb story. It's not true story. Department energy actually illustrates this. There is within the Department of Energy and his science project a seventy billion dollar loan portfolio and a few hundred million dollar venture capital fund. That is responsible for the entire. Solar power industry is responsible for Tesla. The first that were given to Tesla it is. It's it's the only place where dollars will be allocated to long term innovation. Industry doesn't do this if you she track back. Where the the innovations that led to the current American economy came from almost always it started with a government some government investment the Internet. The iphone wouldn't wouldn't exist without govern investment. When I think about the government I think of it as this. This exquisitely important exquisitely complicated machine that. We've let rust for decades telling ourselves a story that we need to basically just kick it every now and then it keep it from being too lazy and this guys come along and got sledgehammer. Trump has come along and he's getting this is getting you. He's going to do really mortal damage to it all right. So here's a short term thinking way of looking at this if you have things like nuclear cleanup. That are one hundred year. One hundred billion dollar projects is this potentially four year maybe eight year term of neglect. Kind of benign neglect. Because it's just GonNa it's all moving so slowly anyway or is he actively doing something in these departments. That is making it far worse. We have to worry. I think we have to worry a lot in. That's not me saying there's there are people who were kind of professional watchers of the federal government who are independent reps of the situation and then they're terrified for a few reasons. One is just the people who were in the federal government in the first year. The trump administration twenty percent of the top six thousand managers in the government civil service senior executive types left Biz. A hollowing out of the talent. And there's real talent there. These are not trivial. People people who were there in a lot of people federal government could be being paid a lot more money in the private sector and they've been drawn to some mission whether it's school nutrition or tending the nuclear arsenal or the weather service. They're there because they love the mission in because they know how important job is and we've mistreated those people for a long time. But now the level of mistreatment got very high and the dispersion of those people is a problem but then there are lots of things that are not so long term. I mean the trump budgets zeroed out both the loan program and the investments in the Department Energy Department of Agriculture Department. Agriculture has a three billion dollar research. Budget typically always overseen by a scientist and agricultural scientist. And if you talk to the woman who previously occupied the place Kathy Woteki a re a one a distinguished agricultural scientists who've been in government. Thirty years really knows what she's doing. She's all of his budget right. Now is one way or another being directed to research tied to climate. Change that we're to feed ourselves we're GONNA have to think differently. Be where how and where we grey sheep and cows and grow wheat and the climate change and have a big effect on the food supply trump appointed to this job right wing talk show radio host from Iowa who happened to support who knew who has no science background whatsoever named Sam Clovis now he has recently been removed from consideration. And there's nobody on his anybody in the job right now but the neglect of investment right now in the government will have consequences down the road. The bright spot is make it so bad and this is the point of the book. It make it so bad that people may wake up and we'll have a different narrative about our government.

Federal Government Donald Trump Rick Perry Department Of Energy Department Energy Department O Department Of Agriculture Department Of Education Department Of Commerce State Department State Department Of People Department Of Defense Columbia River Barack Obama Treasury Department Danny Michael Obama Administration Department Of The Interior
Outbreak-Tested By Measles, Washington State Officials Feel Ready For Coronavirus

Weekend Edition Sunday

03:18 min | 9 months ago

Outbreak-Tested By Measles, Washington State Officials Feel Ready For Coronavirus

"There are now three confirmed cases of the coronavirus in the United States the first confirmed US case was found in the Pacific Northwest Snohomish county north of Seattle the man who had it had returned recently from a trip to Wu Han China but is will stone reports the local health care system isn't panicking in fact they feel ready because of a recent wave of measles this medical clinic in admins is not far from the hospital where that first infected person ended up after traveling from Wuhan China so it's natural that some patients have been asking questions we do have patients that are calling in and we do have patients that are talking about it with their provider staff Tobi's Compton is the head nurse here at the community health center of Snohomish county Compton is unfazed in fact she already had all the right protocols and infection control gear at the ready like this air filter stashed in health clinic supply room that fits over your whole head good that connects to the to and so the providers head is completely contained and all of the years filter staff at our clinics have practice getting ready for an infectious outbreak pretty recently last year there was an alarming measles outbreak in parts of Washington state mostly among unvaccinated children no one died it's often says he was a wake up call for the health system the measles really kind of in my industry body about while there's a lot of things out there that can be really contagious and can get really sick really fast measles is one of the most contagious diseases honor in contrast experts think this new coronavirus requires close contact to spread between humans but they're still investigating scoffed and says she's glad last year's measles outbreak forced them to improve we've recently grown our infection control program so it's kind of at the forefront of a lot of what we do and it wasn't just measles that push health providers to get ready for an outbreak it was also the a bowl a scare back in twenty fourteen that prompted a Snohomish hospital to prepare for high level infectious pathogens the set of isolation rooms with robotic devices Dr Amy Compton Phillips a hospital executive says they also have special isolation gurneys so that you can delete a person through a hallway you can keep the germs contains that hospital Providence regional Medical Center in average is where the man with Wuhan corona virus was transported after returning to Seattle infrastructure had been put in place to ensure that when something came around weekly ready but what about the people who came in close contact with the infected man before he went into that hospital health officials have tracked down more than fifty of them and are monitoring them in case they develop symptoms but overall the public health messages the risk of corona virus spreading here remains low Dr oz while gay Tana is the chief medical officer for a handful of clinics in the Seattle area that serve lots of patients from Asia and the Pacific islands she says some of our patients have already traveled to China for the holiday celebrations and come back and some told her they gots sick while there and were hospitalized in China that they'd come back and they are a symptomatic it's possible that it was gonna virus but she says it's also possible it was another type of

United States
Why Neuroscientists Love Running

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

06:28 min | 9 months ago

Why Neuroscientists Love Running

"Exercise has really really emerged as one of the areas that has grown with real biological evidence that it can prevent and improve brain function and brain health. And we used to think as you said. There was an and north of the neck and south of and that everything in the Alzheimer's was north of naked. Nothing south of the neck was related to it. When in fact now we know that things things like gut microbiome can alter your immune system and having a healthy microbiome can keep you healthy? And by the innate in you can boost your innate immunity addity which might reduce inflammation across the board across the body including the brain. Yeah and Exercise Helps Reduce Inflammation and B. D. and F. so the exercise. I have to tell you I hated running. But I've taken up running because of what is that This brain derived neurotrophic factor. Because I'll miracle Michael Growth for the brain in the funny part about it is almost neuroscientists are runners. They don't do anything but run. They have to have something to is the fastest way to raise. Major beat the NFL's which is basically this growth factor in your brain cells together so called Neuro plasticity which increases connections and neurogenesis genesis. Which is the developing new brain cells? Chris we never thought that was possible. Remember thought it was puzzle. Is that once. You'RE GONNA get it but we now know that the brains making neurons throughout their lights unbelievable soda so these things like Diane and exercise and optimizing your gut microbiome and stress reduction. They incense work by regulating inflammatory. That's correct that is correct. That is the inflammation of course is the unifying common pathway. That we can manage people think that you go to the doctor. They're going to fix you but the truth is eighty percent of your health is determined by what you do not with us. And that's the thing I want people to take away from. This is that you can engage in your own life plan to alter your risk. Don't wait you know people should start. They can change your diet today. They can I started exercising today. They can do yoga starting today. They don't need to wait so new research. Neuro brain cells. Don't age it's your blood vessels day. Yeah so anything anything that damages. Your blood vessels damages your brain so few know how to increase blood flow so things like exercise as and Gingko and beats and Rosemary and pepper. I mean really simple things Can actually help improve the function. Shen of your brain being upon us your table tennis. You're not stuck with the brain you have. You can make it better. And most people don't know that there's actually actually study from England on who leads the longest so they looked at sports. And so if you don't play any sports you don't live long. Tennis players live seven seven years longer if you play football or soccer you don't live longer than anybody else. Because you're putting your head with the ball. People who play racket. Sports live the longest. That's why play table tennis. Because you gotta get your eyes hands and feet all to work together while you think about this spin on the ball. Yeah Yeah I picked picked up tennis when I was forty five and I work at it as much as I can. It's just makes me so happy and I think it has kept me younger and well. It activates your Sarah Bellm and the Sara Bellum You know you're the young people listening. You're not going to know who. This is it horrifies me. I called the Sara Bellum the Rodney dangerfield part of the brain. You gets no respect. He even though it's ten percent of the brain volume it contains fifty percent of the brain's neurons and the cerebral is not just involved in coordination. It's involved in processing speed and thought coordination and so when you play Tana's you're activating the cerebral which has reciprocal connections since with your frontal lobes so it's actually making us smarter more focused. It's really a great game and my goal is really to keep getting younger a younger. I had my telomeres done. which are a measure of the the M caps of your chromosomes and they shorten as you get older but we know from research that through through diet through various vitamins through exercise stress reduction meditation you can actually lengthen your telomeres? It's not a one way street. I'm fifty nine but my telomere says I'm thirty nine. which is pretty awesome correct? TELOMERES are big big. Part about program we use and telomeres for many years But you're right just walking looking thirty minutes sixty minutes walking sixty minutes a day will let them your telomeres and increase your lifespan. By twenty five years just walking sixty minutes a day to some net easy. Yeah let's say you exercise your whole life compared to someone who is sedentary their whole life and you both had a heart attack from the books members for some of these studies. The person who exercise is going to have a smaller heart attack the person doesn't excise level large heart attack. What does exercise do grows? New Blood vessels I can speak for. Hours was on just cardiology and traditional disease management. But I mean here. We're talking about you know more natural ways to stay younger and healthier and live longer. It's great great. It's really great and I think the thinking about aging as a process that's not necessarily inevitable we can with a little effort work. Intelligence Urgence use lifestyle plus various innovative treatments that are regenerative to actually optimize maintain our health and even reverse some of the the things related to aging. Now I look at myself more. I've understood about diet exercise the more. I've implemented it the better I am. I you know I can tell you my my my bone density and my body composition was better than even just three years ago. Even though I'm getting older I'm getting healthy. So there is hope for all of us who are aging aging. Because that's the fastest growing segment of the population. And the baby boomers are all heading there and even if you're young important start young if you're listening because what you invest early pays off later. I've been taking care myself my whole life. I've never really been overweight. I've exercised and as you see. I'm almost sixty and basically as fit as a thirty year old or younger and I think that's possible for everybody. I just wanted to to have hope and believe that if they understand the basic workings of their biology if they understand how to create health that that it's available to them at any time and it doesn't take a long time. You're talking about really months or weeks for people to start to see massive

Sara Bellum Alzheimer Michael Growth NFL Diane Tennis Chris England Shen Tana Rodney Dangerfield Rosemary Sarah Bellm Soccer Football
Stolen Lives: The Skelton Brothers

True Crime Brewery

13:58 min | 9 months ago

Stolen Lives: The Skelton Brothers

"On the day after Thanksgiving in two thousand ten ten years. Zuber's reported her Three young sons missing from her home in Miranshah Michigan. Her husband was supposed to bring the boys back to her on Friday morning but he never did. The couple had been living apart in plan to divorce Andrew. Nine Alexander. Seven and tanner just five years. Old had spent thanksgiving Thanksgiving Day with their father. John Skelton Win Tan. You tried to get them back the next morning. John told her that they were with a friend of his. John then turned up at a hospital. Following an apparent suicide attempt in the years since family and authorities have searched for the skeleton. Boys is without success. John Skeleton has refused to disclose their whereabouts. As time passes the chances that the boys will be found alive continued. Can you to dwindle today. The quiet end. We're discussing the details of the Skelton case and the possibilities of what happened to these three young boys in stolen lives. The skeleton brothers will go over family history and the timeline of events in an effort to better understand what happened and if anything can be done to bring these boys home. So we've got a Nice Michigan Beer for you today. From one of my favorite breweries. This is is K B S Espresso. KCBS stands for Kentucky Breakfast Stout and it's got coffee in it hence the Espresso. This beer is is an American imperial stout clocks in at twelve percent alcohol by volume. So you and I will be splitting our twelve ounce serving the beer is from founders. Brewers I said located in grand rapids. It's a black coloured beer little tiny tan head but did leave a little bit of lace on the side it is a glass and when you get the aroma. It's boom coffee just smacks you in the face. Ladda coffee little bit of chocolate taste. I follows the nose big hits of Espresso followed by some chocolate and the end of the SIP. You can get a little bit of Vanilla. This is a big bodied beer. Little bit on the dry side which is fine with me very nice beer. Let's open it up. Then you got it and off. We go to the quiet end where it's pretty quiet all right. That's descriptive descriptive. Well why don't you go ahead and start the story. I mean it's it's a difficult one it is and you would like to think that the kids are you're still around somehow and all their father has to do is tell us where they are exactly. That's the frustrating part. But I don't think they're around anymore. The skeleton family lived in Marinsky Michigan in two thousand ten and Miranshah small town populations about three thousand as located near. You're the Ohio border. The father John Skelton was raised in Jacksonville and he is thirty nine years old when his three sons went missing when he finished high school John joined the army a move several times he lived in Washington. DC worked at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda Maryland it also spent some time in Alaska and California and eventually he became a truck driver. He and Tania Nia married in two thousand and two actually Tan Ya. I know that doesn't seem right. But that's how she is said that she wants pronounced. Excuse me we'll start over John. Tanya married in two two thousand and two now they had both been married and divorced was previously tenuous first husband filed for divorce from her after she is charged with criminal the Middle Sexual conduct more on that later. According to many people including Tanya John knew about this conviction now John worked for several years and Tanya stayed home with the three kids according to tenure the problems in their marriage began after John Lewis is job job following a Dui yes so Tanya filed for divorce from John Skeleton Back in September of twenty ten before that attenuates say that their relationship was pretty good but Tang you did have history. Tanya had two older daughters from her previous marriage and and she did have a large support system of friends and family nearby but she was far from perfect years before her sons went missing before she even knew John Skeleton. TANU had sex with a fourteen year old boy and she was convicted of fourth degree. Criminal misconduct for this in the late. Nineteen he nineties. But it's believed they. John knew all about her past before he became involved with her but still he would end up using this as ammunition against Hanya claiming naming that she had been sexually abusing his sons when he abducted them. And that's where he took them. He wanted him out of the house right. That was his claim. It's very difficult to believe John. Skelton will find out because he has an ever changing narrative. Yes he does so in September of two thousand ten and John Thiel Tanya that he wanted to move the family to Florida. His parents still lived in Jacksonville where he had been born and had recently gone to his high school reunion there so he had as we said lost his job in Michigan after his Dui conviction and in Florida he told Tanya he could get a job. Bob and the boys could get to know his family now. Tanny didn't WanNa live in Florida and she also had that felony conviction on her record. which meant that? You'd have to fulfil oh specific requirements with the state of Michigan before she would be allowed to move. It was Monday September thirteenth. Twenty ten when John said that he he was leaving for work but that afternoon he signed the three boys out of school. The school called and left a message on Tanis home phone and the school schools secretary had called because she was confused. Tenure had brought the voice to school that morning and dropped off their medicines and lunches and everything but John came in that afternoon said that the family was going on a vacation to Florida and sign them all out of school early. So tenuous confused. She called John After after speaking with the school secretary but he was very vague claiming that he discussed with her taking a family trip to Florida and she had said she didn't want to go with them but Tanja said wait a minute. We talked about maybe moving to Florida and I was looking into it. There was no talk of a family vacation. So it's not really making sense. Let's not sure doesn't bear we've got two divergent reports here. So a friend of ten is called the Miranshah police and spoke with chief Larry weeks weeks offered to mediate between Tan. Yan John so he contacted John and he learned to John and the boys were still in Morandi. John had also set up a meeting with an attorney. This didn't make any sense at all right. And if you supposedly going on vacation in Florida why is he doing all this stuff. Exactly exactly. He's up to something joined told chief weeks at. He is taking the boys with him to see the beach and they were being Florida for three to four weeks so this just this wasn't right. Tanya s John he was taking the boys out of school when the school year had just begun then. He said that he would enroll them in school down there which was even even more confusing. I mean the entire situation was raising some red flags. If this was a vacation why would the boys be getting enrolled in the Florida schools. Also she knew. He couldn't enroll them without their birth certificates and she had those so she tried stalling him for time as her adult daughter's met with an attorney on her behalf and the attorney told her daughters that the only way for tenure to stop John from taking the boys to Florida would be for her to file for divorce divorce from him and ask for emergency custody of the children so things escalated quickly. Where the sure did could it would sound to me? Like he was planning Dan taken into Florida and staying Florida absolutely now. He's going to enroll in school and stuff so share. That's the worry very much so so at this point. John's been driving around town with the three boys. Tenuous stalling him and she said I'm going to look for the boys birth certificates so Johndroe back to the house. Once he's at the House tanny pretended to be looking for the birth certificates. You know she knew where they were and she was stalling until daughters could return with the legal paperwork and then an officer was prepared to serve John with the papers which would make it illegal for him to leave the stay with the kids. Yeah but coincidentally it ended up that both Tan Yan John had met with the same attorney. But because Tanya's daughters had met personally finally with the attorney and paid him before John did Tanisha was the one who retained his services so unfortunately the attorney's office called John and told told them that they couldn't keep their appointment with him because Tanya had hired him and this set John Off. I mean he was furious now he felt like she was trying to trick cam so John left the house angry of course but he did leave without tanner the youngest boy because tanner had come into the house and was kind of hiding behind behind Tania's legs so John Yelled at him to get in the car because his mother was lying to him but he just cried and didn't go to his father Tian her friend protected checked tanner from being taken by John but the two older boys Alexander and Andrew were outside playing and John was able to order the older two boys into his van Tangy told him he couldn't take the boys but he ignored her. The papers for custody were prepared. But you know John hadn't been served with them yet so. John sped out of the driveway in his van. With Alexander and Andrew tenuous sister happened to be walking up the street toward the House and John Nearly hitter hitter with van but fortunately she was able to jump out of his way but John Actually left just minutes before Tana's daughters arrived with the divorce papers in hand the end so John was able to escape Michigan with his two oldest boys and he drove all the way to Florida. The next day he allowed the boys to call their mother. It was her birthday. They actually and they told her that they were swimming. And staying at their daddies friend's House Hillary but ten. You didn't know who Hillary was. She was actually one one of John's friends from his class reunion which he had recently attended down in Florida and he talked to Tanya About Hillary after he'd returned from that trip so Tanya was able to find Hillary's address and contacted her attorney and he gave her papers which gave her exclusive. Custody of the voice Tania Tania's mother intangible. Two daughters drove to Jacksonville to pick up Alexander Andrew and to bring them back home so by that Friday they met with a sheriff's deputy to accompany them to Hillary's apartment complex and the deputy was able to serve papers to John and take custody the two boys the local district court and the sheriff's office were involved so they had to meet with the judge before they could return to Michigan with the boys. What a mess? Yes so they actually had to hang out in Florida for a bit. She's so the following Monday tanny and her mother hired an attorney in Florida and John also also hired an attorney so in front of the judge at the hearing. John immediately brought up tenuous previous conviction for having sex with a fourteen year old now. This was quite a shock for Tanya because John had never indicated any problem with her past admitted that he had known about tennis history since before they were married he had married her and had a family with her and had never before raised any issues about it. So the judge called the court back in Michigan and this is a court familiar with the scouting's uh-huh case and it was determined. The TANNIN would return to Michigan with her sons. Then was the crossed. The line in Michigan tanny would have full custody rights so finally things seemed to work out correctly and after returning to Michigan the boys were back with their mother. John asked Hanyu if there was any chance that they could could work things out and stay together now. Tanja would later say she felt she was really done with the marriage but she agreed to counseling in order to help with co-parenting the boys and keep John Happy so to keep John from becoming angry. She did pretend that she was still interested. In repairing the marriage to John they were working on the marriage when he was anxious for things to get back to the way they were but Tanja felt she'd never be able to trust John Again. She and her attorney made the decision that that it would appear more favourable though to judge if she allowed John to have some time with his kids so instead of maintaining the exclusive custody that she did have a right to you and keeping the boys away from their Father Kanye decided the best thing to do would be to allow him some time with them and she said at this point she really really didn't fear that John would take off with them again because when he'd done it before she'd followed him to Florida and brought them home so he should have known that she wasn't GonNa to let them get away with it again. I guess she also kind of rationalized that he wouldn't leave with them because she had kept him under the impression that they were going to get back together as a couple

Tan Yan John John Thiel Tanya John Skelton Florida John Skeleton Michigan Attorney John Lewis John After John Again John Actually Alexander Andrew Jacksonville John Nearly Miranshah Miranshah Michigan Win Tan Tania Tania John Yelled
More earthquakes may be on the way for Puerto Rico

Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

00:36 sec | 10 months ago

More earthquakes may be on the way for Puerto Rico

"Sadly experts are predicting more earthquakes in Puerto Rico so the US Geological Survey says that the latest quake could just be a part of a sequence. That's leading up to bigger earthquakes earthquakes because of the way that the island is sitting on the fault lines so currently there are already sorting through the damage left behind after three. Earthquakes hit in the past two days. They're dealing with blackouts. Hospitals have been evacuated. Accu it'd there's massive structural damage one of their landmarks has been destroyed in Tana which is really sad so beautiful so far one death and eight injuries the Red Cross dot org also. They're saying UNICEF is a very good organization. Do whatever you can to help our friends and our families in Puerto

Earthquakes Puerto Rico Puerto Accu Unicef Red Cross Tana
Cancun businesses insure a coral reef

Climate Connections

01:11 min | 10 months ago

Cancun businesses insure a coral reef

"Insurance is one way to protect something of value. Oh you such as a car or a home and now businesses in Cancun. Mexico have insured at Coral Reef. The Coral Reef actually reduces the risk of storm impact impact on the hotels and resorts in Cancun Dave Jones's with the nature conservancy and is the former insurance commissioner of California. He says a healthy coral reef can reduce ninety seven percent of a wave's energy as it barrels toward land so having a healthy coral reef makes a big difference in terms of whether the Hurricane Peter Storm is GonNa Destroy Your community or not but a reef can also be damaged by a strong storm which puts communities at greater risk in the future so in the Mexican the state of King Tana row coastal property owners pay a fee that helps fund and insurance policy for the nearby reef and beaches with a storm of a certain magnitude hits. The policy pays out the money will be used by local residents trained to remove debris that could cause further damage reattach coral pizzas and set up nurseries where corals else can regrow. Jones says. It's a way to pay for the restoration of an ecosystem that can in turn. Protect people. From the intensifying effects of global warming

Cancun Dave Jones King Tana Row Nature Conservancy Mexico Hurricane Peter Commissioner California
Self-Tanning & Self-Love With Jules Von Hep

Breaking Beauty Podcast

05:00 min | 10 months ago

Self-Tanning & Self-Love With Jules Von Hep

"I am Gills on Hap- I I'm renowned global spray town artist county. Believe doesn't even a jump title I basically spend my life looking at the China's Nipples I'm dope by my clients. And they leave me feeling incredible and probably better than they did a nice job. I founded the Hunting Company the eye of paradise which is essentially my whole career in a bottle. I'm it combines. Collaborative makeup with South Town at and I'm I'm all about natural healthy looking skin. I think Tanning House lend so far into dryness orange tones that do I have to wait ages to my skin too dry. Is it GONNA look fake. Is it GONNA lie. I'm that was just never will. I was a bow and all about looking like yourself. But it's about how you feel when you look in the mirror. Defeat Amazing guy out that it'd be a kind past make good pass said and just be happy. Tanning is a huge part of your life. Obviously now you have of your own business around it. What were you doing before you got into this line of work so I started my career. Why studied fashion at university? It was accost that literally changed my life oboe. Scores like really posh on everyone went to do law or medicine and I just did not fit in. I decided my the university calls by flipping a coin it landed on heads and so instead of doing interior design and fashion studied for three years and had an intense shape in fashion PR agency. I'd say I liked it but I didn't. I wasn't about the people fashion is I like to look at it but to be in a is quite quite different I met a faceless Nikola colledge office and she said to me. I think it'd be really good at spray tanning and I was like no. I don't know like I'm not sure let's park now. Come back to it. I flipped cleaning. Gada move to Australia. I worked for vogue as a beauty assistant in Australia. Loves beauty was no about aditorial and there was just something about being in an face. I'm being a desk that it was quite soul destroying at the time. I thought that is what everyone's career is supposed to be. And nobody. I had never had career advice of. You don't have to work in an office and you have to wear a suit to work. And I just didn't know that these other careers existed so came back to the UK. So Nick Lurgan and she said you know. Let me try new timing so I tried to tanning I trained in like facial massage and then I did a course in makeup and I just loved it. I loved the fact that it wasn't a bow. There was no obvious louder. There was no structure. Which I'm I'm very good? I have the most creative brain. I'm an every single day I would make people feel good. I'd go into you saw here. I just walk in. I don't care it's my. That's my job. I walk in people's houses and I have to make myself really comfortable very quickly and I have to make them comfortable with may actually it transpired that being a spray tunnel isn't just about painting fans as it were. It's everything else that comes with it. And it's almost like being a life coach and confidence boost And and you're almost your kinds cheerleader. Your when they're naked and you're you are amazing you this and you have to be a certain type of person to say. Oh you know. I'm training assistance at the moment. And I'm trying to teach them in the art of giving and Ajay and it's not just about the spray time that is secondary to what we do. They say I then Mike kind of break as it were. I was tanning. I'm just hunting grantham clients in this one Client was a makeup artist and she said to me she was like you know you really good at Tommy Bailey. Am I know I have no comparison and she said look look. I'm the head make parts. It's on the x factor. Do you want to do the spray tons. I had been touting for six months and I was like okay. This is a window opening to me and then and from that I got poached onto dancing with the stars in the UK. That show was known for bad orangutan's that's all the headlines written about. It's like everyone everyone who went on it. They were like. Oh I'm going to have spare time orange and I just thought I'm going to change this. I'm GONNA flip this about. Why is this show known for time? It shouldn't be about about that. People forget that the best time should look real. You should look like you've been on holiday not like you've been involved bottle of time. So I really carved entertains changed the way that people thought about town on that show and I did it for three years and by the end of it no one was writing about the timeless and my clients. They all call me like the Secret Tana because I I'm not really contradicts myself. I'm not a big mouth when it comes to Korea but I it's it's not about me. It's about them so I'm not gonna it do outrageous things. I just want them to look their best and gone the red carpet and feel amazing with glory. Skin it's not it's not about looking

UK Australia South Town Hunting Company China Nikola Colledge Nick Lurgan Grantham Mike Kind Ajay Korea Tommy Bailey
"tana" Discussed on The Urban Astronomer Podcast

The Urban Astronomer Podcast

15:35 min | 1 year ago

"tana" Discussed on The Urban Astronomer Podcast

"Your just your name and a little bit of a self okay my name is Donna Joseph I am an astronomer from the town and I'm as studied at the University of Cape Town for my undergraduate on as Mazda's degrees and wind to the University of Southampton in the UK for my PhD. I have worked as as he search at the University of Cape Town and at the South African Astronomical Observatory also cave Tom that's why we have the suburb of Observatory in Cape Town as another of somewhere near you was well up in outing and they go back because that's the way they both observatories that's observatory in the giants mix and Uncle Society still meets at that old observatory there they still ill scope but that's restore themselves because it was abandoned years ago and when they found it so they found that people were using it to derive parties and had to compete rebuild all structure the so they could reclaim it yeah I mean yeah I can imagine like you know everything kind of moved down south like the dod search absorbed he's obviously in wealth equal dozen noise but the actual data scope citing the northern Cape so Just kind of quietly I'm glad to hear that they've been restored in that they stole an interest in astronomy in used form yes oh I after I was done at is a of the South African Astronomical Observatory where I was the actually just automates was a fee eighty fun job I moved to Texas for fellowship twist takes us to Texas Tech University in Lubbock and main with Mad Fellowship Stein move to Manchester on a Royal Society Newton International Fellowship Okay Okay that sounds like a you've traveled you've seen World Yeah Bailey lucky even during my PhD six months of my PhD in the UK are actually spent in the US I'm ahead of a fellowship for six months to work at the Harvard Smithsonian Saint for Astrophysics was great the as well Yeah so I've I've been very lucky ned without you know all the travel for conferences and all that kind of stuff was low so what made you what what got you interested in the first place was like a child interested you always add or was it something that developed while you're studying or what it was a child in just thought always been interested in science from a video young age by patients were High School science teachers and just always was interested in science and win the Hubble Space Data Scope was launched and subsequently fixed the pay pines used to plant what we call hub Ligasi images so particularly beautiful images that they that now will you purposes but once they started publishing them in Indonesia days so the newspaper was important stuff at that are watts actually buy newspapers from a person was that was days and I followed by the Bay and I see these images when they were on the front page and you know the plastic companies even just like a hit Nebula and the Andromeda galaxy you know those iconic ones even if you don't know if you've seen those images before suddenly and Scott Cook and so this was about this was in the midnight talks about eleven and I decided that this was the signs that I wanted to do because not only would these beautiful images taken to the space telescope they were actually signed state two cents obviously in those days I didn't know that that's what you call them but I knew that these beautiful pictures were being used to do Ryan to learn about the universe and I just was so blown away by that because you know the scientists so beautiful but also it'd be so much to learn from these images that's when I decided to choose astronomy as my science okay now that's interesting that's a good everyone always has their own different story about this and some people it was just they just loved this space when when they were children sometimes they would need to sit at all until they were at university the and discovered that so what does y'all what if you want to be your main research interest in the duck what was your what was my phd is was based on exit Strana me so high energy astronomy and I was focusing on finally store also to overtake each other we one of the is a black hole neutron star and and these so they could today buying these lake your whole lot of extra light and particularly its findings outside of our galaxy so these is a big group La- most of my colleagues outside work on these by these inside out galaxy but I don't I welcome in yet in other gangs sees the kind of was slightly different where did you get your data from other is that all orbital observatories or or can you extract from the ground observations that you can't do from the ground because our atmosphere blocks stack or out advice we would be in a lot of trouble kid massively radiated in yeah a guy that's so it's raise all space faced I'm used the Nassar's Chanda Space and in the European Space Agency's ECZEMA Scope of the two main ones that is useful mind science and then also you just be sort of romantic pony like Oh yeah if you want to do your science property at Morgan in one type of light so I so excellent Abo Goto gave it really well an optical battleground taste except for occasions when I actually making hobble Hubble data but the radio so that would be apopka in Australia this Acopia catcher Scott and I it of Mir cater just published a while we just the process of getting a paper out appear to view journal article out about the latest escapade Eskimo is the Australian equivalent of yet they to precursor telescopes escaped opportu vase radio telescopes suddenly in the Southern Hemisphere possibly in the world at the Americans will have something to say about that because they have the video auditing well-served ideal date that now I have based Chandan expedited that's publicly available went to us and then there's just lots and lots of optical down this particular galaxies that I'm interested in they nearby so Say so what is what's so interesting about these about these these x Ray Binary to you I mean what made you choose that Okay so that's a good question end when if I give a sign talk at a university where the conference I always have one slide kind of explaining like an elevator retry about these so up until the petitional wave detections at sought it in twenty fifty gene x ray by only kind of binary stellar system that you can see outside what we call the local groups local group is a group of galaxies containing attitude Milky Way band together about the other smaller galaxies and they got so they elected loose group of galaxies and if you want to study by the stars or by me set a systems outlay full grow and change over time how they shape the vitamin an order that kind of stuff you need to study exit bag musicals the other kind Viollis just luminous enough to be able to see to be seen absolved at greater distances than its order one makeup Pasig one made the plastic is one million process exciting but three million Mike gives if you want to study Further than that distance they need to study exit by reason magazine Until Twenty fifteen that those are the doubt that was really the only so you could study by me Senator Systems Okay so so why do you need to see that far away as they are likely to be different so is it yet because they old it'll yes a what we have is in the local group we have got exceeds like Aleksey near Dominic Galaxy so flattened disk galaxies Speidel oskoui spiral galaxies and other smaller wolf galaxies lodgings clouds and that'll back different types of galaxies have properties they have different amounts of Chemical abundances with elements like oxygen silicone all those kinds of things I n etc we know that they cra populations stars in in different types of styles him so if you want to get an accurate understanding of how stars evolve in change what makes what somebody says they could how these exit via these instance a change the environment because they one of the stars like sat's Neutron Star or blackout which means it must have undergone a supernova explosion and Supernova Yaw gateways distribute inmates in two Gabia elements into the environment and once you have heavy elements in vitamin you've changed the kind of stars that can fall so they are any change kind of what the galaxy looks like etc and if you only studied these data systems in spiral galaxies or galaxies you only get part of the picture need is to be able to study Stoffel nation in stock and Bindi Binary Systems in galaxies elliptical galaxies and you can giant uptick guarantees winding particular that I studied for my phd school injuries for four seven two when you build up when you study these findings indoctrination vitamins is you build up.

University of Cape Town South African Astronomical Obs Cape Town University of Southampton Mazda UK Donna Joseph Tom six months
"tana" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

05:26 min | 1 year ago

"tana" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"I their Tana Hey caminar you could pronounce your name correctly if enacted that okay welcome I'm sorry about that I'm very close very close so what's going on I was wondering someone informed me today that they did a Google search and had my name my internet relatives my phone number I can get information on a Google search and I was wondering if there is any way possible that I could have that information removed are how can I protect myself all information being right on the internet like that is there a way to do that it's pretty crazy isn't it yeah Gary it's very frightening because you're like okay who who who needs his information and what could they went that aeration which will do is find out which site that it was that was supplying that sometimes what's happening now is with the Google search is that they know that if people just search somebody's name right figure out who they are or what's going on with them and that those those search results will appear as a sponsored ad okay so one can figure out where what and is coming in then you know that's the site to go to to opt out and have them remove you from the database so there are so many different sites out there that's the problem right I mean it's kind of crazy you have all these people search sites and you know we're if you're just looking for something suddenly it's like they want money for this or for that a monthly subscription fee yeah it's kind of crazy but there's one side in particular is if you haven't gone to the site yet you definitely want to opt out it's called family tree now have you gone there I have a case just do me a favor type your name into the air and I think you'll be shocked at everything that pops up family train now Hey it's it'll be you will pop up with your your age addresses that maybe for the last fifteen years okay all of your relatives your husband you partner your kids your payroll and and so it's guys as a family tree website with all this personal data that if you click the wrong spot suddenly they're gonna say are you looking for the dirt on this person because now we're going to charge you oh my god so but you can opt out okay and sometimes yes sometimes you have to opt out by this particular site it's by a form there are other sites where you actually have to I know hold your breath for going to fax them something near like little are like what it would weigh facts how do I do that again or you have to mail a letter or you have to look at their terms and conditions but what we did is over a commanded a calm we have one tap that covers most of the bigger people search sites okay and include like white pages you know nothing not and do not that we even use the yellow or white pages anymore but it's a website and you've got lexis nexis you got axiom I mean and you've got PKU dot com that used to be a great site but now it's the turn into that site where you type in somebody's name they just want to charge you are there other Spokane yo there's sob a search and see what happens is that yeah all these different sites they're buying the data from one company so if you opt out of a side doesn't mean that you're not gonna be available on the other side so that's why I want you to also opt out from like Intelius an axiom because though those are the big data broker sites so let me do this we put a link to this particular tap are that will walk you through how to opt out and unfortunately it's not something you can do in five minutes when I budget like say thirty minutes take me to go through each site and then also keep tabs because some of the sites well what happens after say twelve months as they go okay well you know if it's only good for two months so you're gonna have to pop in back in there and so that's why you want to put something on your calendar that a year from now I know it's crazy year from now you want to opt out again so that this way all your personal information is not available on the internet it is discerning because if you are trying to live a private life for semi private life I know so many people say well you know we don't have privacy anymore because of everything that's happening in social media not to a certain extent you kinda still do and if you want to keep certain information private you should be able to do it but yet these companies are making money off of our data and they're doing it so many ways it's been said that Facebook right now has something like fifty three thousand data points on every single person in America or at least who has joined up with them if you're not a Facebook member they still have a couple of thousand data points about you anyway I'll put a link to that particular tip over a commando dot com that's K. O. M. A. N. D. O. dot com and once again had that show pics button right on the homepage again thank you for your call go right back we've got some games to tell you about online than in challenging you so that you can figure out whether or not you know the difference between real news and fake news here on the camp commander show.

Google thirty minutes fifteen years twelve months five minutes two months
"tana" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"tana" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Oh, we have a call. Right. La where from Tana's from where a now she's in. Where's Sheila you ready to talk you go? She's from Florida, but she's in Mississippi, shiny, Ohio tan is from here in Winterpark. But she's actually betting Mississippi Liam talked to her in a while. We know who she can. Certainly here. Happy anniversary to the show. Thank you. To hell. Thank you for your participation and support this Lou. Hello, Sheila, and Gary. The whole game. Where where are you calling from today? I'm calling from Mississippi. What am I came up here to have some out on my back, and I had to have surgery on it looked like I'll be having surgery later in the week. Oh. They you guys let you know. And try to stay with. Teela on your surgery praying for you. Canyon. At that very much, and I wanna to Gary belated birthday. Okay. Thank you for taking me birthday. Thank you. I love all you guys truly. You're just no. And I hope that being all talk fan. Tickets. I love you. Oh, by the way, before I go any further. I wanna wish someone right now. A get. Well, right now, we just found out. Kyle Richards.

Sheila Mississippi Gary Tana Kyle Richards Lou Liam Winterpark Florida Ohio
"tana" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"tana" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"Sylvia Tana had had her last drink and her last heartache Mark stood guard over the body while my Wisconsin, I flew back to the ranch house to call the authorities. There wasn't much to be done. So I went to the cottage to tune in. Dongo and race. Nice night. Rocky again, but this time he wasn't playing it on the physical side because using science the science of a deadly automatic. It produced the desired chemical reaction it dispelled inclination to ignore him. A good. We might take a little walk down the road. Could take spend the night air who knows might give you the money or lead poisoning ability since the catcher fatal disease like Sylvia Tana. I theory about her race. I think you killed it. I think I can play myself. You and Sylvia headquarter beef today you were trying to get romantic in broad daylight scratch up a bit. Borstal you spend quite a young gets more interesting. Go ahead. She rides. You wasn't around on afternoon. So it figures you I was in my cottage with the cops will know that you follow this. You was mad about them scratches on your pretty push room. You blew your attacked and killed. You ought to change your brand, whatever, you're smoking. You can't sell that to the police. I ain't finished. I'm coming to the best. But goody you went for a plane Ryden who spread the buddy you had his guy. Always does the cover up only after the call for the bulls goes, how do you get nervous? Yes. So you hop into your rented car, which I have done by the road. You drive up to lonely spot. Then you take this automatic. Which also happens to be yours. I just lifted and you blow your brains out. They're in it. But there's one weak point. What you're? Missed again, come on. Let it go into the bushes. Rocky. What is somebody with a long-range rifle try to get into the act kilo gun back? So I can blast who's back mind keep blowing stay happy. Whatever it is took a product and wouldn't stay around. Lights are going on the other cottages right now, you can get lost rocky and don't come back..

Sylvia Tana bulls Rocky Wisconsin Mark Ryden
"tana" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"tana" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Sylvia Tana had had her last drink and her last heartache Mark stood guard over the body while my Wisconsin, I flew back to the ranch house to call the authorities. There wasn't much to be done. So I went to the cottage to turn in. Van Gogh and race. Nice night was rocky again. But this time he wasn't playing it on the physical side because using science the science of a deadly automatic. It produced the desired chemical reaction dispelled my inclination to ignore him. Again. We might take a little walk down the road. It could take spend the night here. Who knows might give you the money or lead poisoning ability since the catcher fatal disease like Sylvia Tana. I get a theory about her race. I think you I think I can clear myself. You and Sylvia headquarter beef today, you were trying to get romantic in broad daylight day Mattis Gretch a bit borstal, you spend quite a young gets more interesting. Go ahead. She rides. You wasn't Ronald afternoon. So it figures you Finally I was in my cottage. But the cops will know that you follow this. You was mad about them scratches on your pretty pushing womb. Killed. You ought to change your brand, whatever, you're smoking. You can't sell that to the police. I ain't finished. I'm coming to the best. But goody you went through a plane Ryden who spread the buddy you always does the cover up only after the call for the bulls. Goes you get nerves. Yes. So you hop into your rented clan, which I have done by the road. You drive up to lonely spot. Then you take this automatic. Which also happens to be yours. I just lifted and you blow your brains out there in it. But there's one week point. What you're? Gun missiles.

Sylvia Tana Van Gogh Mattis Gretch Wisconsin Mark Ryden bulls one week
"tana" Discussed on Keith and the Girl Comedy Talk Show

Keith and the Girl Comedy Talk Show

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"tana" Discussed on Keith and the Girl Comedy Talk Show

"All right. Andrew you can follow us Twitter account at his name, Andrew Cassar Tana. There's some here some injuries. I wanna make the world come on. It's nice. If you stare at a blood moon for too long, it'll make you come. Watch the porn. You're watching try not to rush into sex establish your first. I think I'm becoming a hunk. I have no one to talk to what are we supposed to do by the way, when we see somebody that we know rates have no one to talk to. And then you see it gets no heart surgery tweets. What are we a tough one hoping and lease when you expose? If you're gonna expose your I was hoping for some love there. But it was like this is weird. You know? It's funny. We printed it out. We still didn't hit the like button. Prince. Imprint. Anybody like your tweet? No. But Keith mcgurk printed. I go to reprint sometimes I wish I made money. No re tweets on that you ever hear that phrase act as if. My body feels like a prison. Sometimes wish I was a boyfriend hard emojis. Just matched with a Turkey on Tinder, quite some sort. I have no self self worth send. I will not give up this year. We're still in January. But how's it going? I'm trying man. Okay. Let me put you on the spot. I didn't mean for these words to mean, something I want someone to love me. I get turned on by humiliation. I see that. I have an okay body. So we went from Hong. To acceptance ever come so loud you wake up. Every mom weeks. Antidepressants are starting to work. I think when you lived with your parents, would your mom respect you had your own room. When I was at my brother's house recently for Christmas.

Andrew Cassar Tana Twitter Keith mcgurk Hong
"tana" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"tana" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"So you feel people a lot of threads that go into the idea that as we grow into the best and richest and you know deepest that we can be were spreading ourselves out to embrace large, larger concerns that have less and less to do with. All right. All right now in the skin. So it's beautiful to see that those data that Tana developed or published because the come from within a good long tradition, meaning research of trying to get beyond just is your like me for one to seven client get into the sources, like what's the richness was the fabric with the texture of people's lives as pertains the meaning is lost about that. Says, people who are more all twisted people more spiritual on other skills. Look more meaning build. I'm if people who are materialist again oriented towards beauty and well, you know, they. Look like lives less meaningful, but it was really cool to see that when you even when you frame it. So pointedly in terms of meanings. These people, I'm getting meaning from this, they still we still see the same thing and actually saw something kinda similar research done over the years as well where people who are wanting to say, they want to invest in certain types of ways of trying to find meeting trying to find well-being, you know. So little bit of a of a old saw at this point. Like if you just constantly chasing the thing that makes you feel good next you just concentrating right? And that's not purpose is not very. Purpose different. Cool. Hey, stop you from yourself because our else you know your, I'm sure you have a life outside of the psychology podcast. I know you. So thank you so much for spending. I can't thank you for being so generous with your time. This might be one of the longest psychology bycatch I've ever had, but I found it immensely stimulating and I'm deeply appreciative of the work you do for field. Thank you. Thanks carpet that they could turn to test material your your curiosity, ravenous intellect. So I appreciate being here and having a chance to talk about this topic. Have ravenous curiosity isn't. Thank.

Tana
"tana" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"tana" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"Those many markle jackson songs bad is a great album for that because like every song has that lift and that moving moment be uptempo down tempo see these are these are concrete things that you say oh i noticed these songs kind of have this i want my songs to have this absolute like what like what i mean what you wanna do make a comparison between someone else's song one of my own no i'm think i'm just wondering like did you notice that a middle aged like a bridge should have eight bars did you notice that the good sauce starts fast do that the greatest songs have a great mid late great a great bridge like if you know you can have a great song without great bridge but it's better if the bridge is great and i'm trying to think of i mean the middle of the bridge it can do all sorts of different things thinking about the best by tina tana it's right right right incredible course i don't even know what the bridges that's on well played on the codes could check it out but i just the point let's check it out yeah it's kind of about the journey that it takes you to get you back to the course i've no idea for even get right so but if the song is so that's us so simply yeah oh anyone anyone i've ever met anyone guys base time on something.

tina tana jackson eight bars
"tana" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"tana" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"It's something that a lot of people's tana's like wall wiser a notch in my phone in a lot of people hate it but it it does points a point the way that it might be a more common feature among android phones moving forward um the ability to kind of up a centrally block access to a lot of the oas or android peace functions on background application that are idling are is also huge because we've had issues with before of apps listening in the people while they were not necessarily being run but were in the background and that's caused a lot of people uh some anguish over potential privacy air sri multi camera api that'd be great because now you know there's certainly going to be a speed especially with iron franz multiple camera lake steer scott were you have to lenses or or in some cases to sensors i don't mean the front the back uh so that could that be that'd be pretty neat span dumb while it's what's interesting is currently limited to only google pixel and up phones right pixel one surfing osce of old nexus five four you're out you're out you're after upgrade as as definitely a push for people who have been uprooted they're a phone hardware while you now i'd say uh i less but you know we're in this after several reports from users of amazon's voice assistant you knew who i'm talking about i'm not going to say her name on the voices this enable devices said that she was randomly laughing in at them without being prompted to wake mind you randomly laughing out of nowhere the company amazon has responded in a statement to the verge saying we're aware of this and working to fix it multiple post on twitter and read it reported that they thought it was an actual person laughing near them in the same room and why wouldn't they since smart speakers are not supposed to randomly laugh at you.

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