35 Burst results for "Tamara Keith"

"tamara keith" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

04:29 min | Last week

"tamara keith" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"As NPR's Tamara Keith reports, the speech will declare that the country has come a long way since he took office. In excerpts of Biden's prepared remarks released by the White House. He discusses the crises he faced when he took office Cove it a recession and the aftermath of the January 6th insurrection. But he will say, now quote America is on the move again, turning peril into possibility Crisis into opportunity. Setback into strength. Biden will also argue this administration is out to prove that democracy still works and the government can deliver for people and he'll pitch to massive proposals to help in the Republican response, South Carolina Senator Tim Scott is expected to say quote This administration inherited a tide that had already turned and argue, more government. ISn't the answer. Tamara Keith NPR NEWS The White House in Manhattan, former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani's apartment and office have been raided by federal investigators executing search warrants for Electron IX. The probe appears to be connected to Giuliani's work related to Ukraine and the possible violation of foreign lobbying rules and a statement, Giuliani's attorney Bob Costello, said quote the search warrants involved one indication of an alleged incident of failure to register as a foreign agent. Julianne he's dealing with Ukraine were in the spotlight during former President Trump's first impeachment trial, He served as a personal lawyer for the former president. The Justice Department has released a new video that it says shows theater back on U. S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sick Nick. Federal prosecutors cite the videos as evidence against two men who took part in the January 6th riots. As NPR's Tim Mack reports. While the men are not charged in sick Nick's death, they have been charged in assault and conspiracy cases. Prosecutors alleged that the videos show Julian Cater and George 10 EOS working together to use chemicals Ray against law enforcement officers. In one video cater appears to be aiming a spray canister in the direction of officers sick, Nick can be seen backing away, rushing to find water for his eyes. Defense attorneys have argued that law enforcement may have actually been reacting to chemicals that officers themselves deployed. Sick. Nick died the following day. DC's chief medical officer has said that sick Nick's death was the result of two strokes and quote natural He has also allowed that the riots quote played a role in his condition. Videos were published as a result of legal motions filed by a coalition of media outlets, including NPR. Tim Mak. NPR NEWS Washington This is NPR news. The French government is proposing a new anti terrorism law following the stabbing of a police officer last week by a suspected Islamist radical. NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports. The bill was already in the works and is the ninth anti terrorism measure to be introduced within the last decade. Bluebell and not in a pretty speaking on television, French Interior Minister General Damn announce, said, even as we mourn a policewoman who will never be reunited with her husband into kids, where asked to protect people from the Islamist terrorist Hydra doorman on said the police need the proper tools to do so. He said all terrorist attacks in France since 2015 have been from the inside, not the outside and are being planned on the Internet. This law, he said, would provide the judicial framework for authorities to carry out surveillance and use algorithms to determine who is watching certain videos. And on certain websites. Eleanor Beardsley NPR NEWS PARIS Detroit is launching a plan to raise the incentive for people to help their fellow citizens get to vaccination sites. Drivers who take a city resident for a covert 19 shot can get $50. There's $150.3 person cap per vehicle, but there's no limit on the number of trips. Mayor Mike Duggan said There should be no barriers for Detroiters to get a covert vaccine. Currently, only 30% of Detroit residents, 16 and holders have received at least one shot. Here's how it works. Drivers register and schedule of first Dose appointment for a passenger. If they return with the same person for a second dose. They get paid again. I'm Louise Schiavone. NPR NEWS.

Eleanor Beardsley Tamara Keith Louise Schiavone Tim Mack $50 $150.3 Julian Cater Biden Nick Tim Mak Bob Costello France White House Giuliani Julianne 16 NPR Brian Sick Nick last week two men
CDC, FDA Urge Pause in Johnson and Johnson COVID Vaccine

1A

00:58 sec | 3 weeks ago

CDC, FDA Urge Pause in Johnson and Johnson COVID Vaccine

"And Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are calling for an immediate pause in the use of Kobe 19 vaccines made by Johnson and Johnson. There have been six cases a rare blood clots and people who received the vaccine. NPR's Tamara Keith reports. The White House insists this won't slow down vaccination efforts. In a statement. White House Covert response coordinator Jeff Science says the FDA and CDC announcement quote will not have a significant impact on our vaccination plan because of ongoing production delays. So far, Johnson and Johnson doses only represent about 5% of vaccines administered in the U. S. In addition, he says, the government has secured enough doses of Fizer and Moderna vaccines for 300 million Americans. Zion says they have enough of those vaccines to keep up the pace of three million shots and arms every day. And, he added, they're working to get anyone who had been scheduled for J and J quickly rescheduled with a Fizer or Madonna appointment.

Drug Administration Johnson Tamara Keith Centers For Disease Control An Jeff Science White House Kobe NPR Fizer FDA Zion Madonna
Mexico, Honduras, and Guatemala to Deploy Troops to Slow Migration

90.3 KAZU Programming

00:56 sec | 3 weeks ago

Mexico, Honduras, and Guatemala to Deploy Troops to Slow Migration

"The Bind Administration has secured agreements with Mexico and Central American countries to fortify their borders. As NPR's Tamara Keith explains. It's an effort to slow the tide of unaccompanied minors trying to come into the U. S. The number of unaccompanied minors showing up at the southern border of the U. S is on pace to set records, and the Biden administration is struggling to keep up. Tyler Moran, special assistant to the president for immigration set on MSNBC's morning Joe that the administration is working with Mexico and other countries. We've secured agreements for them support more troops on their own border. Mexico, Honduras and Guatemala have all agreed to do this. That not only was gonna prevent the traffickers and the smugglers and the cartels that are taking damage with the kids on their way here, but also to protect those Children, she said. The administration is also working to speed up its ability to process the Children and teenagers. And move them to safe places awaiting disposition of their

Bind Administration Tamara Keith Biden Administration U. Tyler Moran Mexico NPR Msnbc Honduras JOE Guatemala
"tamara keith" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

07:29 min | Last month

"tamara keith" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"Company will be brought in and will be deployed to continue parameter air monitoring around our facility, 24 7 until this situation is resolved, so check said the facility was storing oil spill containment pads and other materials used to support the petrochemical industry. A shelter in place order for surrounding communities has now been lifted. Houston's unemployment rate went up slightly in February. Florian Martin has the latest from the Bureau of Labor Statistics Houston area Unemployment was 8.4% in February. That's up slightly from January. The numbers are not seasonally adjusted, which makes it tricky to compare month to month. The rate is up from under 4% a year ago, just before the pandemic hit. Employment went down across all sectors here over a year with the biggest losses and construction, leisure and hospitality and oil and gas. Meanwhile, Houston homeless shelters are getting a boost of funding during the pandemic. News 88 Sevens Jen Rice tells us many people have lost their homes for reasons related to cove in 19. Houston Council members voted unanimously to provide $400,000 to Catholic charities to increase the city's housing for homeless populations. The funding comes from the federal cares Act around 15% of homeless people in the region say the pandemic is to blame for their loss of housing, and about half of those folks say it's their first time experiencing homelessness. That's according to the latest homeless count, an annual survey conducted by the Coalition for the Homeless of Houston. Harris County. Generous reporting. Houston Texans quarterback to Shawn Watson is losing at least two endorsement deals. News 88 Sevens Matt Harrop tells us it comes amid several sexual misconduct allegations. Nike says it is suspending its deal with Watson and ESPN is reporting that beats by Dre will end its relationship with the Pro Bowl QB in a statement to the athletic Reliant Energy says it plans no future contracts with Watson after the current one expires this spring. 22 women have filed civil lawsuits against Watson over the last month, accusing the quarterback of inappropriate behavior and sexual assault during massage appointments. One criminal complaint has been filed. In a statement, Nike said they're deeply concerned by the allegations, which Watson has denied. Both the NFL and the Houston Police Department are investigating the claims. Matt Harrold in Houston some patchy fog this morning but should be mostly sunny throughout the rest of the day with highs in the upper eighties. Right now it's a bit hazy and 64 here in the mire Land area. Clouds expected to roll in overnight with lows around 70. I'm Kyra Buckley News, 88 7. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include wobbly committed to helping self employed workers and small businesses Get their P P P loans application determines eligibility. Maura W. O M p l y dot com slash NPR. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm Rachel Martin. Good morning. President Biden today will announce several initial steps to confront gun violence. The measures include proposed regulations for types of firearms and accessories. And he plans to tap a gun safety advocate to lead a key federal agency. Of course, all this is happening is the country still comes to terms with to mass shootings in Georgia and Colorado. Both happened last month. NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith joins us this morning. Hi, Tam. Hi. Tell us more about what President Biden plans to announce. I think the most notable piece is that the Justice Department in 30 Days will issue a proposed rule to stop the proliferation of so called ghost guns, Thies air weapons kids that people can buy online to build their own guns, but because they aren't fully assembled. Aren't currently regulated as guns. I spoke last night with Chris Brown, who leads the advocacy group Brady, and she explained that they've become just a huge problem. They're being sold across this country and kids not subject to any background checks, not subject to serialization, and they're being used in crimes across this country and without a serial number. They're basically impossible to trace, but a note here It's a regulatory process, and these things take time There will be a proposed rule. Then there would be a comment period of final rule more waiting, and then when it's all done and put into place, it will inevitably face legal challenges. Yeah, Okay, So what else will President Biden outlined today? So within 60 days, the Justice Department is supposed to come out with a rule to regulate what are called stabilizing braces. They can be used to convert an A R style semiautomatic pistol in tow. What is functionally a rifle? There will also be model legislation released for states to use if they want to pass what are known as red flag laws, and these laws make it possible to temporarily remove guns from people who are deemed to be a danger to themselves or others. There also will be a new report commissioned on gun trafficking, and they intend to move money around to support community violence prevention efforts. Already there is opposition being voiced. House Republican leader Kevin McCarthy wrote on Twitter that President Biden is trampling over Second Amendment rights by executive Fiat. And the IRA, which is currently in bankruptcy proceedings, but still has an outsized influence says that they are ready to fight. We are also learning who the president plans to lead the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. Right. Who is this person? This is David Chipman. He's a senior adviser to the gun safety group Giffords. He was also an A T F agent for about 25 years and is well known and liked. By gun violence prevention groups, and they had been pushing for Biden to name someone and had gotten a little impatient because so much regulation and oversight of firearms is done by a T F. Shannon Watts, the founder of Moms Demand action, says Chipman would have been her first choice and now he's Biden's choice. A T F is really the key agency that enforces our nation's gun laws. And it has to have a confirmed director in order to do so. And in order to do the very best job that it can't but it hasn't had a confirmed director since 2015. Yeah, The 80 F director position is highly politicized, nearly impossible to confirm. But Democrats could potentially get Chipman confirmed with a simple majority. That is if Democrats all support his nomination. Okay, So Tam these changes to gun accessories. Thies weapons kids. I mean, is this enough to satisfy gun safety advocates who were pretty disappointed in President Biden not so long ago because he was pushing infrastructure, not action on guns. Yeah, they had been incredibly frustrated, but now they're elated. They do see these on Lee as first steps, and they're looking to President Biden to voice that to say this is just the start. NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith. Thanks You're welcome. The Republican led House in Missouri recently approved a measure that would impose stricter voter I d requirements. It's one of many voting restrictions favored by Republicans after losing the 2020 presidential election..

David Chipman Matt Harrold Florian Martin $400,000 Rachel Martin Steve Inskeep ESPN Chris Brown Shawn Watson January Matt Harrop February Jen Rice Tamara Keith Georgia Kevin McCarthy Colorado 8.4% NPR Bureau of Labor Statistics
Biden to Unveil Long-Awaited Executive Action on Guns

NEWS 88.7 Programming

00:43 sec | Last month

Biden to Unveil Long-Awaited Executive Action on Guns

"My from NPR news. I'm Korova Coleman. President Biden is expected to issue executive actions intended to reduce gun violence. One action will regulate certain weapons kids bought online that don't require background checks. Another would regulate certain equipment that effectively turns pistols into a kind of rifle. NPR's Tamara Keith says Biden will also today nominate a new leader for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. His choices. David Chipman, He's a senior adviser to the gun safety group Giffords. He was also an A T F agent for 25 years and a top choice for gun safety advocates. This role is important have filled because you need a Senate confirmed a T F

Npr News Korova Coleman President Biden Tamara Keith Bureau Of Alcohol, Tobacco, Fi David Chipman NPR Biden Giffords Senate
President Biden To Take Executive Action On Gun Violence Prevention

BBC World Service

00:56 sec | Last month

President Biden To Take Executive Action On Gun Violence Prevention

"Announce several administrative actions to reduce gun violence as NPR's Tamara Keith reports. Biden was under pressure to act after to mass shootings. Last month, Biden is expected to announce the Justice Department will begin the process of regulating so called ghost guns, weapons kids, They can be purchased without a background check and are hard to trace when used in a crime. President is also expected to nominate former A T F agent and gun safety advocate David Chipman to lead the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. Ah White House officials said These are first steps and Biden will continue to urge Congress to pass tougher gun laws. Gun Violence prevention advocates are praising the nomination and expected executive actions, while a top congressional Republican called it an attempt to trample Second Amendment rights by executive Fiat. Tamara Keith. NPR NEWS Federal health officials

Tamara Keith Biden David Chipman Bureau Of Alcohol, Tobacco, Fi NPR Justice Department White House Congress Npr News
Biden to Take Executive Actions to Reduce Gun Violence

BBC World Service

00:53 sec | Last month

Biden to Take Executive Actions to Reduce Gun Violence

"President, Biden said to announce several administrative actions to reduce gun violence as NPR's Tamara Keith reports. Biden was under pressure to act after to mass shootings. Last month, Biden is expected to announce the Justice Department will begin the process of regulating so called ghost guns, weapons kids, They can be purchased without a background check and are hard to trace when used in a crime. President is also expected to nominate former A T F agent and gun safety advocate David Chipman to lead the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. Ah White House officials said These are first steps and Biden will continue to urge Congress to pass tougher gun laws. Gun Violence prevention advocates are praising the nomination and expected executive actions, while a top congressional Republican called it an attempt to trample Second Amendment rights by executive

Biden Tamara Keith David Chipman NPR Bureau Of Alcohol, Tobacco, Fi Justice Department White House Congress
Biden to move COVID-19 vaccine eligibility date to April 19

WBUR Programming

01:06 min | Last month

Biden to move COVID-19 vaccine eligibility date to April 19

"With an average of three million covered 19 vaccine doses a day now being administered in the United States, President Joe Biden is set to announce an accelerated timeline for all adults to be eligible for vaccination. NPR's Tamara Keith reports. The president is visiting a vaccination site today. First president Biden set a goal of 100 million doses in his 1st 100 days in office. Then he said he thought 200 million was achievable. Now, 75 days in Biden is set to announce 150 million vaccine doses have been administered with millions more going in arms every day. The vast majority of states have already expanded eligibility toe all people over 16 years of age or will do so soon, and Biden is shifting another goal instead of all U. S adults being Eligible to make vaccine appointments. By May, 1st. Biden will move that toe April 19th. This is all part of what has been a consistent if unstated strategy of under promising and over, delivering in an effort to build confidence in the government's handling of the vaccine rollout. Camera. Keith NPR NEWS The White House.

Biden Tamara Keith Joe Biden NPR United States Keith Npr Government White House
Biden to unveil infrastructure plan, kicking off 2nd major legislative push

Morning Edition

00:53 sec | Last month

Biden to unveil infrastructure plan, kicking off 2nd major legislative push

"President Biden will make a pitch today in Pittsburgh for his enormous infrastructure spending plan. NPR's Tamara Keith reports it would provide more than $2 trillion for some of the nation's most vexing infrastructure challenges. With the economic suffering brought on by the Corona virus Pandemic Still raw President Biden is pushing forward with an infrastructure plan. It aims to create jobs and reach underserved urban and rural communities. The plan goes beyond roads and bridges and includes rural broadband, replacing lead pipes, upgrading the electric grid, enticing manufacturers to coal country and repairing damage done to neighborhoods cut off by past highway projects. White House proposes paying for it over time by raising the top corporate tax rate to 28% unwinding part of the tax cut pushed through by former president Trump and Republicans in

President Biden Tamara Keith NPR Pittsburgh Biden White House Donald Trump Republicans
Biden to unveil ambitious $2 trillion infrastructure plan

Morning Edition

01:26 min | Last month

Biden to unveil ambitious $2 trillion infrastructure plan

"Later today, President Biden will unveil his ambitious $2 trillion infrastructure plan. Make his pitch at a Pittsburgh facility where aspiring carpenters take on apprenticeships that often turn into union jobs. The plan is going to focus on physical infrastructure, bridges, roads, sewer systems and expanding broadband. Among other things, Biden characterizes it. As a jobs plan that he hopes will transform the economy. NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith is here with some details. Hate him. Good morning. So what's in this plan? What do we know? They're calling it. The American jobs plan is you guys said about $2? Trillion, You know the transit bridges, roads broadband into rural areas. Also big spinning on the electric grid and sewer and water systems. You know, think about what happened in Texas earlier this year or what happened in Flint, Michigan, trying to avoid those types of things. Upgrading housing, schools, hospitals, Ah, lot of focus on union jobs and helping underserved communities, both rural and urban. You know, it's specifically talks about trying to entice manufacturers to areas affected by a loss of coal jobs on Del Ping address racial inequities by reconnecting neighborhoods that were cut off by previous highway building. This sweeping proposal is only part one, though next month Biden is set to propose investments in health care, child care and

President Biden Tamara Keith Biden Pittsburgh NPR White House Flint Del Ping Michigan Texas
Gun Control Legislation May Have to Wait

Morning Edition

01:29 min | Last month

Gun Control Legislation May Have to Wait

"Biden's first official news conference, He made clear what his top priorities are the pandemic and infrastructure. And he said gun control legislation may have to wait despite Biden's outspoken history on the issue. NPR. White House correspondent Tamara Keith joins us now. Good morning, Tom. Good morning. What did the president say? And perhaps more significantly, What did he not say about gun control legislation yesterday? Yes. So this came about 45 minutes into the press conference when a reporter asked Biden about specific done related measures that he could pursue, So this was his chance to lay out what he wanted to do what he planned to do, but He didn't really do that. All the above. It's a matter of timing. He went on to say that sequencing is a key to a president's success. And he said his next major initiative is infrastructure, broadband roads, bridges. I imagine that caught some people off guard because it wasn't just a couple days ago he was talking about wanting to push new gun control measures. Yeah, I mean, I thought I had missed something in his remarks. It was such a contrast to what he had said just three days ago when he was delivering this passionate speech, saying Action on gun violence is needed now. Don't need to wait another minute. Alone an hour. To take common sense steps. Oh, save the lives in the future and the urge my colleagues in the House and Senate to act. We can't ban assault weapons and high capacity magazines in this country once again, But

Biden Tamara Keith NPR White House TOM Senate House
President Biden calls the situation at border facilities 'totally unacceptable'

BBC World Service

01:02 min | Last month

President Biden calls the situation at border facilities 'totally unacceptable'

"Conditions for unaccompanied minors showing up at the border. He made his comments during the first formal news conference of his presidency on Thursday, and they come as a surge of migrants has meant the Children and teenagers are being held in overcrowded facilities. NPR's Tamara Keith has more. Biden pushed back on the suggestion that his rhetoric and message about More humane approach to immigration was drawing parents to send their Children on the treacherous journey to the U. S. A nine year old I'm going to send him on 1000 mile journey across the desert and up to the United States. Because I know Joe Biden's a nice guy. And he'll take care of What a desperate act. Have to take Circumstances must be horrible. So we can do something about that That's the vice president's going to be doing. Biden has tasked Vice President Harris with working with Mexico and Central American governments, Biden said the current situation with overcrowded facilities is totally unacceptable. Tamer Keith NPR NEWS The University of Southern California has agreed to pay more than

Tamara Keith Biden Npr News U. Vice President Harris Joe Biden United States Tamer Keith Mexico University Of Southern Califor
Biden says he plans to run for reelection in 2024

Marketplace

01:05 min | Last month

Biden says he plans to run for reelection in 2024

"Toe Wayne Brown. In his first formal news conference today, President Biden defended his administration's handling of immigration challenges along the Southwest border. He announced a new 100 Day vaccination goal and said he expects to run for reelection in 2024. But as NPR's Tamara Keith tells us by an also left himself some wiggle room on the reelection question. President Biden hasn't declared that he's running for reelection or set up a campaign committee. And admittedly, it is quite early yet. But there has been a question about whether he ever intended to run for a second term, and his first press conference created an opportunity to ask and answer is yes, my plan is to run for re election. That's my expectation, and he said he expects Vice President Harris would be his running. Made on more pressing matters. Biden doubled the covert 19 vaccination goal, he said before his inauguration. He said his administration now aims to have 200 million vaccine doses administered by his 1/100 Day in office. At the current average of about 2.5 million doses a day. That goal

President Biden Tamara Keith Wayne Brown NPR Vice President Harris Biden
Merck to help produce rival J&J's vaccine

All Things Considered

01:00 min | 2 months ago

Merck to help produce rival J&J's vaccine

"The Defense production act to create a partnership between two vaccine makers As NPR's Tamara Keith reports, Merc will begin producing the Koven 19 vaccine developed by Johnson and Johnson. Johnson and Johnson, who's vaccine was given emergency use authorization this past weekend has experienced production delays. With this agreement, Mirkwood retool two of its facilities to begin making the one shot J and J Vaccine. White House press secretary Jen Psaki. These obviously our two companies that are historically been competitors s O. The fact that they're coming together, speaks to the ability of this administration broadly to bring them to the table and work together to address the pandemic in the country. The Defense production Act is being used to free up vaccine ingredients and help mark get set up to make the Johnson and Johnson vaccine. Sake also said the Defense Department will provide daily logistical support to strengthen Johnson and Johnson's efforts. Tamara Keith NPR NEWS The Biden administration is

Johnson Tamara Keith Mirkwood Jen Psaki Merc NPR White House Defense Department Npr News Biden Administration
Biden's $1.9 trillion COVID relief bill passes House, but faces Senate hurdle

Ask Me Another

00:56 sec | 2 months ago

Biden's $1.9 trillion COVID relief bill passes House, but faces Senate hurdle

"Of his covert relief package, and he's calling on the U. S Senate to act fast. As NPR's Tamara Keith reports. The measure passed the house in the early hours of this morning. The massive relief package passed with no Republican votes. All but two Democrats voted Yes, with their vote. We're one step closer to vaccinating the nation. We're one step closer to putting $1400 in the pockets of Americans. One step closer to extending unemployment benefits for millions of Americans are shortly going to lose him and as it heads to the Senate, where Democrats hold the narrowest possible majority. Biden had this message. We have no time to waste. The House bill would raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour, but the Senate parliamentarian has concluded that provision doesn't comply with Senate procedure. So it will have to come out. Biden didn't mention the minimum wage. In his brief remarks. Tamara Keith NPR NEWS. The

Tamara Keith Senate NPR U. Biden House Npr News
Biden Reopens Gateway For Green Cards, Work Visas Reversing Trump COVID-19 Freeze

Q

00:50 sec | 2 months ago

Biden Reopens Gateway For Green Cards, Work Visas Reversing Trump COVID-19 Freeze

"That President Donald Trump had placed a new work visas as NPR's Tamara Keith reports. Trump head cited the pandemic prompted argued that issuing new skilled labor and temporary work visas during the pandemic would hurt the U. S labor market. And so he ordered a dramatic clamp down on legal immigration. He temporarily halted issuance of green cards for new immigrants as well as visas for tech workers managers, Okay. Years and others in a proclamation revoking that policy. President Biden says it didn't advance the interests of the United States prevented certain family members from joining lawful permanent residents in the U. S and harms industries that rely on talent from around the world. Since taking office, biting his issued a flurry of executive actions reversing Trump era policies. Tamara Keith NPR

President Donald Trump Tamara Keith NPR President Biden U. Donald Trump United States
House to vote on $1.9 trillion COVID relief bill this week

Morning Edition

03:29 min | 2 months ago

House to vote on $1.9 trillion COVID relief bill this week

"Trillion coronavirus Relief bill will go to a vote this week. Republicans in Congress say it is too much money. Here's Congressman James Comber from Kentucky. Congress already appropriated $150 billion in the cares act for state and local governments. And not all this money's been spent. So the Biden administration is looking outside of Washington, D. C to build their case. Here's NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith. When Mesa Arizona Mayor John Giles looks out his window at City Hall, he can see the convention center. It's become a hub for those seeking help in the pandemic. And on alternating days it is people that are there too. Up there drunk and get £50 of food, putting their trump or its people. They're waiting in line to get the vaccine. So it's a pretty sobering view from the mayor's office. His city got $90 million in relief funds last spring spent it all and Giles says they easily could have filed receipts for double that. Sobering view from his office window explains why this Republican mayor is pushing hard for the $350 billion in funding for state and local governments in the bill. You know this is it's just too important to engage in silly partisan debates. Most cities and towns didn't get direct help, like Mesa did. They had to wait for it to trickle down through their states and counties. The deadline to spend it isn't until the end of this year, so some are trying to make it last as they manage strapped budgets. For months now, a bipartisan group of mayors has been pushing for more. In July. We called ourselves July or bust. That's Dayton, Ohio Mayor Nan Whaley, a Democrat. Her city's budget has been slammed by the pandemic so much so that she isn't sure they'll be able to train a new class of police officers or firefighters. This year. We're not like the federal government, we have to have a balanced budget. So if we don't get a federal money, no fire class Dayton is recruiting new firefighters and police officers but may not be able to bring them on board without more money. When it comes to the schools. It's a similar story. Congress has approved about $68 billion so far for K 12 schools. Well, not all of the funds have been spent. Education officials say the money is spoken for, and they need more. In Pennsylvania Palisades School District Superintendent Bridget O'Connell says they were able to reopen in the fall. And that meant hiring more teachers to reduce class sizes and to teach online So it is a staff intensive endeavor to educate kids during a pandemic Staff aren't paid up front, which is one reason why it may look like funds or unspent. And the bulk of the money Congress approved for schools last year is just now going out. Superintendent Sean Record from Pema, Arizona on Lee found out last week how much his district can expect to get. I have a list of all you know of things that we need in order to be able to You know, provide better social distancing more safety for teachers, more safety for students. They've been open nearly full time since the fall making do with the money. They have his message to critics who point to unspent funds and say schools don't need more. It isn't a light switch. The money doesn't get approved one day and spent the next And that's why President Biden and Democrats are pushing ahead with new funding and say they can't wait for Republicans in Congress to come around tomorrow. Keith NPR news

Congressman James Comber Biden Administration Tamara Keith Mayor John Giles Congress Mesa Mayor Nan Whaley Dayton NPR City Hall Arizona Kentucky White House Giles Pennsylvania Palisades School
White House Says Vaccine Supply Is Increasing

The Takeaway

00:54 sec | 2 months ago

White House Says Vaccine Supply Is Increasing

"19 vaccine supply in the United States is increasing again. As NPR's Tamara Keith explains, the White House announced today a doubling in doses headed to pharmacies. The White House says it is able to double the number of vaccine doses going toe local pharmacies this week from one million to two million, and press Secretary Jen Psaki said states will get 13.5 million doses. This is a 57% increase from the amount states received when the president was inaugurated. So since then, obviously we have announced a couple of increases over the course of time. Asked whether President Biden, now nearly a month into his administration, owns the pandemic sake said, Yes, he does. That's why it's the issue. He wakes up every morning and it's focused on because addressing it is what's on the minds of the American people, and he's the president. It's his responsibility to focus on it, though she added that the Trump administration left them with supply problems. And localities fending for themselves.

Tamara Keith Jen Psaki White House NPR President Biden United States Trump Administration
Biden to focus on nation's "crises" during first 10 days in office

Here & Now

03:08 min | 3 months ago

Biden to focus on nation's "crises" during first 10 days in office

"And now President Trump is said to be preparing a slew of pardons in his last days in office. It's not clear if you'll pardon himself, which would mean he can't be investigated and prosecuted for any federal crimes. Much of Washington, D. C is unlocked down for Wednesday's inauguration of Joe Biden and Camel Harris. Joining us is NPR. White House correspondent Tamara Keith. I town high Voice hands so chilling Thousands of National Guard troops stationed around D C. Streets and bridges near the capital in the White House closed. Tell us more about the security concerns right now. Certainly an inauguration is always a high security event. This is only amplified by the fact that there was an insurrection two weeks ago, you know, two weeks to the day before Joe Biden will take the oath of office on that west front of the Capitol, The West Front was swarmed with a pro trump mob that ultimately took the capital. For for several hours and and a zoo say there there is concern that they aren't done. Well, President Trump won't be there for the swearing and remind us where he'll be he. He is getting an early start on his trip to Florida. What we know is that in the morning he will have a send off ceremony at joint base. Andrews, where where Air Force one is based, and It is not unheard of to have a send off of some kind. We don't know how big it will be or what it will include. On Of American tradition of honoring a a peaceful transfer of power. But this transfer of power hasn't been peaceful or particularly cooperative. Yeah, And what have we learned about what President elect Joe Biden will do On his first day as President Biden in terms of policy, he has plans to sign a bunch of executive orders. Ron claim his incoming chief of staff, laid out in a memo 10 days of executive actions aimed at in part, reversing Ah lot of what President Trump did through executive action. And also going further than that. He cites four key crises facing the Biden administration, the economic crisis, the covert 19 crisis, the climate crisis and a racial equity crisis, as he puts it. On the first day, Biden will rejoin the Paris climate agreement, he will ask the Department of Education to extend the paws on student loan repayments. He will also reverse what's known as the Muslim ban that President Trump signed early on in his presidency that caused so much chaos and was thrown out in court multiple times and had to be signed multiple times on. Bees also going to issue a challenge asking people to wear masks and also mandating them on federal property and

President Trump Camel Harris Tamara Keith Joe Biden NPR National Guard President Elect Joe Biden President Biden White House Washington Biden Administration Andrews Air Force Florida RON Biden Department Of Education Paris
Rioting Trump Supporters Stage An Attempted Coup In Washington, DC, Breaching The Capitol And Inciting An Armed Standoff

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

05:02 min | 4 months ago

Rioting Trump Supporters Stage An Attempted Coup In Washington, DC, Breaching The Capitol And Inciting An Armed Standoff

"Of the U. S capitol building. We're seeing reports that protesters were NPR's Tom Bowman. In fact, is there on site watching right now? Is protesters really storm that building attempt to get inside? Tom Bowman Want to bring you back in here right now? Tell us more. Okay. We don't have Tom Bowman. We're gonna go to Claudia. Great solace. Again right now. And you know, you've been telling us some updates here. What's what? What are you seeing now? So it sounds like they're in these really worried moments of trying to get to a safe location. They're trying to move members. Reporters, staff members to a secure location. They're asking for that not to be publicized. This is how concerning it is That if that new location where they're being moved to is put out there. They're worried that the these protesters will seek them out. There is well so they're really in these moments of trying to secure the Capitol complex and ensure that lawmakers and staffers workers everyone else on that, um, complex, it remains safe. The notes. Can I ask you this legitimate question? Are we watching a coup? I'm asking this legitimately. I don't think that's what we're seeing. We're seeing protesters who have become violent and they're trying to send a message. Um, in this fashion, and they're endangering folks. In that way, but this is not that sort of situation. This is kind of a last gasp. If you will, for these folks who were trying to get this message across that they are protesting the election's results. It's It's not going to accomplish anything. In the end. This is this is just delaying the process and making this more difficult day than what we had planned already. And so in terms of a coup, I wouldn't go that far. I think it's just protesters who have gone awry who are threatening the safety of the people at the Capitol complex? Yes, it's an important one. Because as Americans watch this all unfold, we really have no context for this. We've never seen anything like this before. Is Tamara Keith still with us? I am camera. Yeah. If you're still yes. Let's go back a little bit. Let's talk about what we expected to happen today. What is happening today we had never actually seen a case where something that was a ceremonial situation where They're able to certify the electoral votes turn into something where Republicans were going toe. Basically call this not a fair election and vote in opposition of this kind of take us back for a little bit about about what we expected to happen today. Well, the day sort of played out like we were expecting until these protestors stormed the capital up until that point. What had happened is this ceremony that happens every four years was getting underway Where the vice president he presides as the as the president of the Senate. He presides over The tallying of the electoral college votes. It is purely ceremonial. As part of that there can be objections, and in fact, there were house and Senate members who, when they got to the count of the state of Arizona stood up and a jet and objected. That then went to debate in both chambers, and that's when the protesters reached the capital. Now, I should say that President Trump was holding a rally near the White House with these supporters and said, and we're going to go up to the capital. Now. The president himself didn't end up going to the capital, but his supporters did. On D. The result has been that they stormed past barricades. They pushed past Capitol police and and there is now this very chaotic and potentially dangerous and violent situation on D, and as at approximately the time that the vice president was being evacuated from the Senate chamber President Trump Tweeted his discussed That the vice president would not go against the Constitution saying my pent, huh? In fact him he's I'm sorry. I was just gonna say he said that he didn't have the courage to do what should have been done to protect our country and our constitution. I mean, I think you're getting to this, But is there a sense That the president himself will have to shoulder some responsibility for what's happening today. Well, I mean, he did say, and we're going to the capital. And then they did so in that respect and and for a month and a half the or I guess exactly No. Two months time flies. President Trump has been denying the results of the election, he has been feeding his supporters. Falsehoods lies, um, conspiracy theories about the election outcome, saying it was stolen from him. When it was a free and fair election that wasn't stolen from him. He simply lost

Tom Bowman Tamara Keith NPR Claudia U. President Trump Senate Trump Tweeted Arizona White House
"tamara keith" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:50 min | 4 months ago

"tamara keith" Discussed on KCRW

"The false rumor that somehow the election was stolen. Look, I lost in 2012. I know what it's like to lose. And there were people that said there are irregularities. I have people today we say, Hey, you know what you really want. But I didn't. I lost fair and square. Romney said that with a president who is refusing to concede Congress going through these motions that they know will lead nowhere. But raising doubts about the legitimacy of the election. Along the way is quote. Dangerous for democracy here and abroad. NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith, Thanks so much you're welcome. Within 20 million people have now been confirmed to be infected with the Corona virus in the United States. About 350,000 Americans have died of covert 19. Health officials have detected the new variant of the virus, first seen in the UK in California, Colorado and Florida because it is believed to be more contagious than previous versions. There are concerns This could mean even more infections across the country. NPR Global health correspondent Michael in Duke left joins us Now Thanks so much for being with us. Thank you. Scott. I understand this version of the virus has a set of mutations in its genes. Try and understand it. Where did those mutations come from? Yes. So this version has actually 17 mutations and mutations in viruses crop up all the time when the virus grows inside a person. Specifically when it reproduces and makes a bunch of copies of itself. I talked to Betty Steinberg. She's a virologist at the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research on Long Island. She says that to grow inside a person, the virus has to make copies of its genes. It's just like copying. Manuscript. Sometimes there's typos. The virus just makes random the stakes When it gets copied. In the vast majority of cases, these mistakes are harmless, or they even weaken the virus. But in rare instances, mutations can help the virus. They can give it this little boost or advantage over the other versions. So so what happened with this new variant? Have the mutations Can they tell so far given the virus? What amounts to an infectious advantage over the previous version? Yes. So scientists first detected this new variant like you said in the UK back in September. By December, it had become The dominant one in London, and it is responsible for the huge surge in cases there. Now, this variant has also spread to at least 32 other countries. And right now, here in the U. S. Scientists think it's still pretty uncommon, but they believe that could change pretty fast like in the next month or two. Because they estimate the variant is about 50% more transmissible than the previous ones. And how does that happen? Why would mutations make a virus more contagious? Yeah, so they're not quite sure yet, but they have some data that is pointing to two main hypotheses. Steven Goldstein studies virus evolution at the University of Utah. He says that there's some evidence that the new variant generates more virus particles inside a person's nose or respiratory track. Possibly a lot more when you expel virus When you talk or breathe. You're going to get more virus out than somebody who doesn't have this variant simply because you have more virus in you to begin with. The other hypothesis is that the new variant Binds to human cells more easily so people can get infected with lower doses of the virus. In this variant be stopped. Well, the good news here, Goldstein says, Is that all the measures that we've been doing so far to stop? The previous variants will stop this new one. It's not a new variant that can go through masks. Those things will work, but it requires a greater level of rigor in the adherence to those things, For example, right now, if say only 80% of people in a community are following these guidelines Then to stop this new variant. You would need something like 90 or 95% of people to follow the guidelines and all the scientists I've spoke to say the vaccine needs to roll out as quickly as possible. Because so far, scientists do believe that the vaccine will still be effective against this new version of the virus. MPR's global health correspondent Michael Ian, do, Cliff. Thanks so much for being with us. Thank you, Scott. A couple of years ago, the price of bread doubled in Sudan. This led to mass protests in the ouster of the longtime leader, Omar al Bashir. Sudan's now in the middle of a fragile transition. Is it navigates towards a civilian government of democratic elections and once again People are looking at the price of bread as NPR's ater Peralta reports. This'll neighborhood in her tomb was the epicenter of protests during the uprising in 2019 on a recent weekday. It's mostly quiet, but there are a couple dozen.

NPR Betty Steinberg Steven Goldstein Scott Sudan UK Michael Ian Omar al Bashir NPR Global health White House correspondent Tamara Keith United States London Feinstein Institute for Medica Congress Long Island Romney ater Peralta president California
"tamara keith" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:15 min | 4 months ago

"tamara keith" Discussed on KCRW

"News. I'm David Greene in Los Angeles. And I'm Noel King in Washington, D. C. Good morning, it took Congress seven months to pass a covert relief bill. It seemed like a done deal. It wasn't President Trump had problems with the bill. The biggest was he wanted people to get larger, direct payments $2000 instead of $600. Which is also what Democrats originally wanted. So yesterday they tried again to get it. NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith is with us to talk about what happened next. Good morning, temp. Good morning, So the president is currently at Mar a Lago in Florida. Has he said anything about the relief bill? No, he has not. As of last night, I was told the bill is in the paper Copy of the bill was in the process of being delivered to the president in Florida. This person who was familiar with the process did not indicate how it was getting there, though. I would like to imagine that Santa is just stashing all 5000 pages under a tree Mar A Lago. The president himself claims to be working tirelessly for the American people. His schedule says that he has many meetings and calls, though it doesn't outline what they are. He's been tweeting up a storm it and we have seen pictures of him golfing. In the tweets. He is talking about a lot of things, but not this covert bill, including really going after Republicans saying that you know everyone he had been talking to said that they should be up in arms fighting for him and that they aren't complained that you know he helped them win reelection, and they aren't helping him now. What is the Republican reaction to his demand for these $2000 payments, which Democrats have seized on like? Yeah, we love it. Yeah, they like, Thank you very much. Let's do this. Republicans say not so fast, You know, Democrats in the House brought up legislation yesterday through what is known as unanimous consent to try toe. Past these $2000 direct payments that the president wanted. But with unanimous consent, everyone has to agree to it. And if one person objects one member of Congress objects than it doesn't pass Republican did object. Therefore it didn't happen. House Democrats say they'll try again on Monday. But even if that bill passes in the House Republican leadership in the Senate are saying there's no way that could get 60 votes. There's no way it could pass. So messy are Republicans who typically are pretty timid when it comes to the president and his anger. Are they expressing any frustration or they just being quiet? They are being Morrell espresso sieve than usual. I will say that we haven't heard from Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, who President Trump has been tweeting about not sense. McConnell tweeted as celebratory note three days ago, saying that help was on the way immediately. Republican lawmakers have been expressing a combination of confusion, dismay, frustration. Complaining that the president's team was involved in these negotiations and knew exactly what was happening with legislation. Republican Senator Roy Blunt of Missouri is a member of the GOP leadership, he told reporters yesterday. He had no idea what the president would ultimately do whether he would sign or veto but he thinks the president should sign it. If you start opening part of the bill up Hard to defend, not opening the whole bill up. It took us a long time to get what we are. I think the real thing that bill would be a mistake. And he says that the president's unpredictability here is a distraction from what could be positive news about the covert 19 vaccine process. Instead, everybody's talking about this. I mean, at the end of the day this this remains about the fact that millions of Americans are still struggling. So what does happen next right? And this is also attached to a government funding bill to keep the government funded and open through the end of September. So if the president doesn't sign this by Monday night, there could be a government shutdown. In addition to all these benefits, not coming through for people NPR's Tamara Keith. Merry, Messy Christmas Tam. Indeed, you too. Right. So in a year when the distribution of vaccines is so important, the International police organization has a serious warning, also known as Interpol. They're cautioning people about the dangers of counterfeit vaccines. Stacey Vanek, Smith and Cardiff Garcia from our daily economics podcast. The indicator from Planet money, wanted to find out more about this, and so they took a trip into the dark Web. Covert crisis has created a whole universe of opportunity for criminals, fear and scarcity and high demand are very powerful market forces. Chad Anderson has been watching these forces play out for months. He's a senior security researcher at Domaine Tools were a cyber threat Intelligence data company. So we scanned the entire Internet as many times as we can every single day and give insights to customers based upon what we see. And part of the whole Internet is the so called dark Web. That's the unregulated part of the Web, where a lot of illegal activity happens. Like what is the dark Web like that There is many things when people talk about the dark Web, But most of the time what people are referring to is peace, Anonymous services and illegal forums or illegal marketplace is illegal market places where you can buy drugs or weapons or passports or Covert vaccines. So now we're starting to see some corona virus vaccines. You know, I'm looking at maybe 200 different ads here. So can you read us? Some of the ads that you've found? Yeah. Let me pull one up. I'm looking at here. So You know, the Asas 10 Cove in 19 vaccines. The price is €3276. That's about 4000. U. S dollars, so about $400 per vaccine, And for the record, Chad does not think that these vaccines are legit. For one thing, the Pfizer vaccine requires a very intense cold storage chain. The vaccines have to be kept at negative 70 F and also the covert vaccine ads are mixed in with ads for all kinds of other things and chances that tends to be a red flag. Since we're in the seas, you scroll up in there's cocaine, you know, scroll down. You've got your heroin and Um, you know, Molly Master, you name it A swell is, you know this site has firearms that says the global covert crisis has been a massive opportunity for cybercriminals. He says the online marketplaces are still a tiny part of it right now, and most of the criminal activity has involved ransomware chances because lives are at stake, and there's so much chaos and urgency right now. Criminal organizations know that if they hack into the system of the hospital, they can demand and probably get a lot of money. Back in October, 1 Hospital in New Jersey paid cybercriminals more than $650,000 after the criminals locked up their computer systems and threatened to publish all of their patient records. Chat expects that these kinds of attacks will become more frequent in coming months. Because, after all, the payoff for those kinds of attacks are much bigger than a couple of $1000 for the covert vaccines. Although Chad also expects the vaccine marketplace will continue to grow on the dark.

president President Trump Tamara Keith Congress Chad Anderson NPR bill Senate David Greene Noel King Los Angeles White House correspondent Washington Mitch McConnell Senator Roy Blunt New Jersey Mar Lago Florida Asas 10 Cove
"tamara keith" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:34 min | 5 months ago

"tamara keith" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Lulu Garcia Navarro and I'm Steve Inskeep. Ah popular Internet meme features signs showing President Trump running in 2020 and again in 2024 again four years after that. Now. Here we are. The president lost the 2020 election. He is still pushing allies to put their reputations on the line, backing his lie that he won one of his allies even called for a Republican to be killed for telling the truth about the election. Yet people around the president say he is moving on to 2024 NPR. White House correspondent Tamara Keith is here, Tam Good morning. Good morning. What are you hearing? My colleague Franco or Dona is and I spoke to three sources. They were not authorized to speak to reporters, So they spoke on condition of anonymity. But what they say is that President Trump is very seriously considering running again that he's going to dangle it out there and that he could announce it quickly. One of the sources said he could announce by the end of the year or shortly before inauguration Day. The thinking is that it would make him part of the conversation on Joe Biden's Big Day. But another source said that nothing that concrete has been discussed in the planning meetings that he's been a part of. Well, how does this 2024 planning match up with Trump making all of his political allies to base themselves by pretending that he hasn't lost 2020 yet? They're connected in a way. This fight that is being led now by his personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, is linked to his 2024 ambitions because among his supporters, at least it casts a shadow over Biden's presidency. Also, Trump is allergic to the idea of being a loser. Even if in reality, he lost fair and square, the campaign official. I spoke to told me that There had been a plan for legal challenges. If the results were close. It was a narrow path, he said. But after the the election, President Trump decided he wanted a different playbook. He brought in Giuliani to quote, go in there and knock over tables and stuff that alienated and pushed out more traditional professional lawyers with relevant experience. And now Giuliani is going around the country holding what this campaign official called fake hearings. Well, then what is the president himself saying about this as best you can determine. Well, he hinted at a holiday party at the White House a couple of nights ago about his 2024 ambitions. He told Republicans there that he'd like to be president another four years, even if that means returning in four years. Meanwhile, he posted a lengthy video on social media last night that was just chock full of falsehoods. Going over debunked claims that haven't been proven in court and haven't even been brought up in court because they couldn't stand up to it. And yet the president is going on toe. Think about 2024. But let me ask about that. Tam. There aren't a lot of ambitious Republicans. Who have accepted the president personally humiliating them and embarrassing them and been silent about a lot of things, presumably so they would get a chance to go next. What's it mean to them that now the president himself may want to go next. Our sources and basically the rules of politics. Tell us that it will freeze them out, and that is part of the point. President Trump remains very popular with his base, and he is very good at keeping the spotlight on himself. And that will hurt people like Nikki Haley, the former South Carolina governor, Maryland governor Larry Hogan, who were thought to have presidential ambitions, as well as senators like Tom Cotton and others who have been positioning themselves. To run in 2024 Vice President Mike Pence. Maybe Okay. One person tells me because he already has a brand and a high profile because of the office he holds. Okay. Camera. Thanks so much. You're welcome. That's NPR. White House correspondent Tamara Keith now to Iran. What actions have consequences. Last week, Iran's top nuclear arms scientist was assassinated. How will that affect Iran's nuclear arms program? NPR's Geoff Brumfield explores The scientists name was motion factories a day he was gunned down on the road outside of Tehran, according to Iranian press reports. He once led a covert program to research a nuclear weapon. But that ended years ago, says Arianna to Bata Bhai and Iran expert with the German Marshall Fund, according to the U. S intelligence community's assessments. Over the past decade, Iran has not been engaging in weapons related activities in its current form. Iran's nuclear program is supposed to be peaceful and factories holiday was not involved. He seems to not really have been playing a big role. But the killing could still change the course of the program. And here's how in 2015 Iran reached a deal to dial back its nuclear effort in exchange for relief from economic sanctions. The deal required Iran to give up tons of enriched uranium shutdown key facilities and remove equipment all under the watchful eye of international inspectors. Now the goal was to keep around from getting the nuclear material it would need for a weapon, should it ever decide to pursue one with the deal in place. Experts agree Iran would have needed about one year to get enough enriched uranium together to build a bomb. Then along came President Trump. The fact is, this was a horrible, one sided deal that should have never ever been made. Trump withdrew the U. S and blocked economic benefits going to Iran. Ron kept in the deal for a while, but slowly, it started re installing equipment and enriching more uranium. Today, it has roughly 12 times the amount of low enriched uranium permitted under the deal. But Deena is Fandy area of fellow at the Century Foundation, a think tank says that Iran is purposely moving ahead slowly and to be fair. That's pretty consistent with the way that Iran has behaved with its nuclear program throughout its history, its never moved fast. It's never made a dash for the bomb. It's always been about testing the waters, saying what it can get away with how far it can go. It's February also says Iran is building back its program in a way that is easy to reverse should the U. S and other kind. Trees granted some of the benefits it was promised. The purpose of this is just to build a bargaining chip leverage. The deal did work is designed, says David Albright, president of the Institute for Science and International Security, which closely tracks Iran's nuclear program. Room was about a year from getting the material it would need for a weapon. Should it go that route, But that was before Trump pulled out. Now we're looking at maybe a short of three months. That's much less than a year, but it's still not a crisis. Albright says. Panic usually sets in when it gets into the few weeks to a month, so we're not in a Place of anywhere close to a place of panic. President elect Joe Biden still has some time to re enter the deal is, he says he wants to and to get Iran back on board but our young to bottom by worries that the killing of the scientist could push Iran in another direction. Conservatives in the country have proposed more drastic actions like kicking out international inspectors overseeing the deal. But some question why Iran shouldn't build a nuclear weapon. There are individuals within Iran who say Listen, economic cost is worth it because otherwise Iran will continue to be a target. Those voices she worries will gain strength with each strike.

President Trump Iran president Joe Biden Trump Rudy Giuliani Tamara Keith Vice President White House correspondent NPR official Lulu Garcia Navarro Steve Inskeep scientist White House Nikki Haley
"tamara keith" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:06 min | 5 months ago

"tamara keith" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Head on morning edition. Iran is growing its nuclear program, though experts say it's deliberately moving slowly. There are concerns, however, that the killing last week of a top Iranian scientists may push Iran in a different direction. Closer. Look ahead on morning edition. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Lulu Garcia Navarro and I'm Steve Inskeep. Ah, Popular Internet Mean features signs showing President Trump running in 2020 and again in 2024 again four years after that. Now. Here we are. The president lost the 2020 election. He is still pushing allies to put their reputations on the line, backing his lie that he won one of his allies even called for a Republican to be killed for telling the truth about the election. Yet people around the president say he is moving on to 2024 NPR. White House correspondent Tamara Keith is here, Tam Good morning. Good morning. What are you hearing my colleague, Franco or genius, and I spoke to three sources. They were not authorized to speak to reporters, So they spoke on condition of anonymity. But what they say is that President Trump is very seriously considering running again that he's going to dangle it out there and that he could announce it quickly. One of the sources said he could announce by the end of the year or shortly before Inauguration Day. The thinking is that it would make him part of the conversation on Joe Biden's Big Day. But another source said that nothing that concrete has been discussed in the planning meetings that he's been a part of. Well, how does this 2024 planning match up with Trump making all of his political allies to base themselves by pretending that he hasn't lost 2020 yet? They're connected in a way. This fight that is being led now by his personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, is linked to his 2024 ambitions because among his supporters, at least it casts a shadow over Biden's presidency. Also, Trump is allergic to the idea of being a loser. Even if in reality, he lost fair and square, the campaign official. I spoke to told me that There had been a plan for legal challenges. If the results were close. It was a narrow path, he said. But after the the election, President Trump decided he wanted a different playbook. He brought in Giuliani to quote, go in there and knock over tables and stuff that alienated and pushed out more traditional professional lawyers with relevant experience. And now Giuliani is going around the country holding what this campaign official called fake hearings. Well, then what is the president himself saying about this as best you can determine. Well, he hinted at a holiday party at the White House a couple of nights ago about his 2024 ambitions. He told Republicans there that he'd like to be president another four years, even if that means returning in four years. Meanwhile, he posted a lengthy video on social media last night that was just chock full of falsehoods. Going over debunked claims that haven't been proven in court and haven't even been brought up in court because they couldn't stand up to it. And yet the president is going on toe. Think about 2024. But let me ask about that. Tam. There are a lot of ambitious Republicans. Who've accepted the president personally humiliating them and embarrassing them and been silent about a lot of things, presumably so they would get a chance to go next. What's it mean to them that now the president himself may want to go next. Our sources and basically the rules of politics. Tell us that it will freeze them out, and that is part of the point. President Trump remains very popular with his base, and he is very good at keeping the spotlight on himself. And that will hurt people like Nikki Haley, the former South Carolina governor, Maryland governor Larry Hogan, who were thought to have presidential ambitions, as well as senators like Tom Cotton and others who have been positioning themselves. To run in 2024 Vice President Mike Pence. Maybe Okay, One person tells me because he already has a brand and a high profile because of the office he holds. Okay. Camera. Thanks so much. You're welcome. That's NPR. White House correspondent Tamara Keith now to Iran, where actions have consequences. Last week, Iran's top nuclear arms scientist was assassinated. How will that affect Iran's nuclear arms program? NPR's Geoff Brumfield explores The scientists name was most in factories a day he was gunned down on the road outside of Tehran, according to Iranian press reports. He once led a covert program to research a nuclear weapon. But that ended years ago, says Arianna to Bata Bhai and Iran expert with the German Marshall Fund, according to the U. S intelligence community's assessments. Over the past decade, Iran has not been engaging in weapons related activities in its current form. Iran's nuclear program is supposed to be peaceful and factories all day was not involved. He seems to not really have been playing a big role, but the killing could still change the course of the program. And here's how In 2015, Iran reached a deal to dial back its nuclear effort in exchange for relief from economic sanctions. The deal required Iran to give up tons of enriched uranium shutdown key facilities and remove equipment all under the watchful eye of international inspectors. Now the goal was to keep Iran from getting the nuclear material it would need for a weapon, should it ever decide to pursue what with the deal in place. Experts agree Iran would have needed about one year to get enough enriched uranium together to build a bomb. Then along came President Trump. The fact is, this was a horrible, one sided deal that should have never ever been made. Trump withdrew the U. S and blocked the economic benefits going to Iran. Ron kept in the deal for a while, but slowly, it started re installing equipment and enriching more uranium. Today, it has roughly 12 times the amount of low enriched uranium permitted under the deal. But Deena is Fandy area of fellow at the Century Foundation, a think tank says that Iran is purposely moving ahead slowly and to be fair. That's pretty consistent with the way that Iran has behaved with its nuclear program throughout its history, its never moved fast. It's never made a dash for the bomb. It's always been about testing the waters, seeing what it can get away with how far it can go. It's February also says Iran is building back its program in a way that is easy to reverse should the U. S and other car Trees granted some of the benefits it was promised. The purpose of this is just to build a bargaining chip leverage. The deal did work is designed, says David Albright, president of the Institute for Science and International Security, which closely tracks arounds nuclear program. Room was about a year from getting the material it would need for a weapon. Should it go that route, But that was before Trump pulled out. Now we're looking at maybe a short of three months. That's much less than a year, but it's still not a crisis. Albright says. Panic usually sets in when it gets into the few weeks to a month, so we're not in a Place of anywhere close to a place of panic. President elect Joe Biden still has some time to re enter the deal is, he says he wants to and to get Iran back on board but our young to bottom by worries that the killing of the scientist could push Iran in another direction. Conservatives in the country have proposed more drastic actions like kicking out international inspectors overseeing the deal. But some question why Iran shouldn't build a nuclear weapon. There are individuals within Iran who say Listen, economic cough is worth it because otherwise Iran will continue to be a target. Those voices she worries will gain strength with each strike against Iran's nuclear program. Geoff Brumfield. NPR news.

Iran President Trump president NPR News Joe Biden Trump NPR Rudy Giuliani Vice President Tamara Keith White House correspondent Geoff Brumfield David Albright official Lulu Garcia Navarro scientist Steve Inskeep
"tamara keith" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:08 min | 6 months ago

"tamara keith" Discussed on KQED Radio

"At NPR dot or just got a little more blue in the past few minutes votes tallied in Pennsylvania and reported Gave Joe Biden a lead in Pennsylvania. Many votes remain to be counted in the state, mostly mail in ballots that are believed to favor Biden. Vote counting put Joe Biden slightly ahead in Georgia overnight, and so the vice president now has several passed to the presidency. He's leading in three different states, any one of which would get him to 270 electoral votes in the presidency, the other one being Nevada, along with Pennsylvania and Georgia. NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith is here to begin our coverage there, Tam. Hello. Can we just work through the numbers in Pennsylvania? What are they? And where did they come from? Right. So just in the last few minutes as you say the state has flipped from being in President Trump's column to being in Joe Biden's column in terms of having the most votes. Biden has a narrow lead now 5500 votes. Trump had been ahead with day of Election Day voting. But there were a lot of people who voted absentee and by mail. Those couldn't start being counted until election day. It's a long process and as those air starting to come in more and more are coming in, we're expecting Biden's lead in Pennsylvania to grow through the day. And since the president has spoken, so falsely about this, I guess we should be clear these votes that are being counted now our votes that were cast on Election Day. Or before election Day. For that matter. It's just taking time to count them because their mail ballots is that wrecked. That is correct these air, not new ballot, showing up in trucks or anything crazy that like what the president has said. These are ballots that were cast legally on or before Election Day. Now the president did make a televised statement Last night he made false claims of fraud. He offered no evidence to back up his false claims of fraud, and we've talked in detail earlier today. Camera about the president's statements. But let's talk about what other people in the Republican Party have been saying, because one key question in a circumstance like this Where the president is not acknowledging the reality of the council far and call in question without evidence on the count to come, is water his fellow Republicans doing especially what are you hearing from different officials? So Republicans had been relatively quiet. And then yesterday afternoon, the president's adult sons tweeted angrily that Republicans weren't speaking up that Republican stars weren't showing that they stood behind the president that they needed to grow some backbone. And then some Republican stars started tweeting. And then you had Lindsey Graham, the senator from South Carolina and Texas Senator Ted Cruz. Ted Cruz went on Fox News and essentially endorsed what the president had been saying. By clouding the vote county in a shroud of darkness. They're setting the stage to potentially steal an election not just from the president, but but from the the over 60 million people across this country who voted for him all across this country. It is lawless and they need to follow the law. To be clear. There's not a lot of darkness here. You can go online as I have and watched the ballots being counted in processed in Pennsylvania on a live stream, the Trump campaign and Republican Party have had poll watchers and canvass witnesses in all of these places, and various lawsuits about this matter of transparency have been thrown out because they haven't been able to prove that they didn't get the access that They seem tohave the access. I'm getting the impression that that false claim that live by Ted Cruz is not being universally endorsed that there are other Republicans taking a different approach. Right? You have Senator Pat Toomey, a Republican of Pennsylvania. He appeared on CBS this morning. President's speech last night was very disturbing to me because he made a very, very serious allegations without any evidence to support it. And you also had Chris Christie on ABC yesterday, saying that the president needs to back this up with evidence or stop talking like this. But you have allies of President Trump now circling and going after Christie and saying that, you know he's never been for the president anyway, even though he was part of the president's debate Prep team, Okay, NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith. Thank you. You're welcome. All right. We're going to turn out NPR's Alina sell you who was in Philadelphia covering this latest news. Good morning, Alina. Good morning, so to say again, according to data from The Associated Press, former Vice President Joe Biden has taken the lead in Pennsylvania this morning. We want to emphasize that the AP has not called this race. What more can you tell us at this point? Right. So as Tom was saying, it all came down today. Specifically, just this flip came down to a new batch of votes being processed in Philadelphia. There are still over 100,000 ballots left statewide. Thie Secretary of State Kathy Book of Our Yesterday Kind of hinted pretty heavily and she has been saying this A week that they were expecting to have sort of more clear winner by today, So that's something we're watching today in the past few days, which was going to say weeks, it's been only a few days in the past few days. The mail in ballots have been sort of in focus, and the mail in ballots have been in Joe Biden's favor in a ratio of 2 to 13 to one, and so, if that, maintains his lead is expected to grow in the next few hours. So let's talk about the challenge that the president is waging. I mean, we heard him last night. Make Several baseless claims last night about what he calls fraud in the vote. They have filed suit. President Trump and his lawyers have Filed suit to stop the counting in Pennsylvania, and to get more access for GOP election monitors. Can you just get us up to speed on what the legal challenges looked like in Pennsylvania right now?.

president Joe Biden President Trump Pennsylvania vice president Senator Ted Cruz Republican Party NPR Tamara Keith fraud White House correspondent Senator Pat Toomey Philadelphia Georgia Tam
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WNYC 93.9 FM

06:31 min | 6 months ago

"tamara keith" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Dot or GE Got a little more blue. Overnight. Vote counting put Joe Biden slightly ahead in the state of Georgia. That's a new development this morning. President Trump still leads the count in Pennsylvania. But narrowly now, with many ballots still to be tallied, Biden has slightly expanded his lead in Nevada. As we track all of this. It's important to keep one fact in mind here. The former vice president has several ways to the presidency. Any one of several states could give him victory. At this point, he could still win the presidency even if he loses Pennsylvania or Georgia. His advantage comes from a substantial and growing majority in the popular vote. NPR's Tamara Keith covers the White House and has been following all of this, of course. Hi there, Tam Good morning and let's just lead with the facts here. What are the numbers in some of the key states as you and I talk on this early morning? And let's just say that these numbers are a moving target. But as of this moment in Pennsylvania President Trump's lead has dwindled to about 17,000 votes and more ballots are still being counted in Nevada. Biden currently leads by about 11,000 votes, but they didn't announce any new numbers overnight in Georgia. In the 4 A.m. hour, the lead crossed over to Biden. He now leads Trump by 917 votes with More of a more vote counting to go, and in North Carolina President Trump's lead is a bit more durable. It seems there hasn't been much movement he leads by just shy of 77,000 votes. And as we said Biden is a 264 electoral votes by the NPR count, which is based on Associated Press numbers he needs 272 win. Nevada gives him that Pennsylvania alone would give him that. Georgia alone would give him that. So he's got several several past here, and I want to mention something else. I want to say something else out loud tomorrow because we're about to get into the partisan claims about this by the president. We are talking about votes that are being counted by Republicans as well as Democrats. There's secretaries of state overseeing elections from both parties in some of the contested states. So with that fact in front of us, how has the president been reacting to this news? Right and vote. Counting is not a partisan operation. Right, Drax? Okay. So what the president has been saying is he tweeted at 2 22 in the morning, making a bunch of false claims about the votes and saying the U. S Supreme Court should decide late yesterday he had delivered a statement in the White House that was defiant and Full of misinformation about how this whole process works. What is happening? What hasn't happened and also claimed fraud claimed that the election was being stolen from him, but did not present any evidence of that. However, there were numerous conspiracies that that he threw out there in the White House briefing room. I want to just mentioned he seemed unusually downcast. His eyes were downcast. He was reading from a piece of paper, which is Somewhat unusual for this president, and after making his false claims about the election, he moved onto complaining about polls which have nothing to do with with the vote count. He did not even appear to try to make a case for his own falsehoods. He did not. Hey, he did not. But Hiss sons did. His sons on Twitter complained that Republicans didn't have enough backbone that they weren't standing up for his father. They weren't standing with him and then lo and behold. Last night, Republican senators Lindsey Graham and Ted Cruz went out on Fox News to make evidence free claims of fraud and back the president up that said. Others have been more cautious and are sticking. The line seems to be that every legally cast vote should be counted. But there are divergent views on what legally cast means among Republicans. How is Joe Biden's talking and behaving in this circumstance? Yesterday he got another briefing on Corona virus and the economy. He delivered a very brief set of remarks in Wilmington, Delaware. He said he expects to win, but he did not declare victory. And he told people to stay calm and carry on and be patient. NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith really appreciate your coverage. You're welcome. And now let's hear the fax from the state of Georgia. That state has followed the pattern of several others. The walking votes from Tuesday's voting favored the president. Ballots sent by mail are still being counted. And they have now given Joe Biden the narrowest of Leeds. Stephen Fowler of Georgia Public Broadcasting has been watching this, Mr Fowler. Good morning. Morning, Steve, can you just talk us through the numbers as you understand them at this moment? So here is what we know. As of about 4 30 this morning. Joe Biden has the lead in Georgia by several 100 votes. That number is expected to grow as remaining absentee brought balance our process and counted. And the biggest biggest difference maker is from Clayton County. Ah, suburban Atlanta County that's heavily African American and heavily Democratic. That had enough votes in favor of Joe Biden to close that margin. And then, as the final ones were tabulated, put him over the top. There are still several ballots left to be counted from Clayton County. That should pad the numbers even Mohr before other counties start processing things at a more normal time this morning, So I just want a note. I mean, we're in the hundreds here where we've got a three digit numbers separating Biden from Trump. Biden is leading at the moment, but For everybody's confidence in comfort. You'd probably want a little larger number in one way or the other. Maybe with four digits or five digits, eyes there much of a possibility This number would shift further. It will shift but how much it shifts remains to be seen. There are about 10,000 or so absentee ballots that we know about from different counties that still need to be uploaded into the system. But there are still others that we can't yet know the amount we have provisional ballots. We have military and overseas balance that could come in before they're five PM Friday deadline. And ballots that need to be cured for something like a signature mismatch or other sort of idea issue that counties are still have to work through so of the known universe of ballots..

Joe Biden president Georgia Trump Pennsylvania NPR vice president White House Tamara Keith Nevada fraud Clayton County Dot GE Georgia Public Broadcasting Twitter
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KQED Radio

02:34 min | 7 months ago

"tamara keith" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From European sleep work. Support for comes from good eggs, offering a full assortment of holiday groceries from fall produce to seasonal meal kits to local baked goods. Their expanded delivery area and Mohr at good eggs dot com. Good eggs, absurdly fresh groceries, delivered NPR and Kiki BD news all ahead now at 7 30. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Dave Mattingly. Early voting begins today in Florida, one of the key states in this year's presidential election. The U. S elections project at the University of Florida estimates 28 million Americans have already cast their ballots in person or by mail. President. Trump has campaign events this afternoon in Arizona. They including airport rally in Tucson Democratic nominee Joe Biden has no events scheduled. NPR's Tamara Keith says Biden spent part of yesterday campaigning in North Carolina. Biden was in Durham, North Carolina, for a drive in rally, which is something he's been doing. A lot of there are no big close together, standing together rallies and that's on purpose criticizing President Trump's handling of Corona viruses. At Central Campaign message for Biden. The Corona virus is expected to be a major topic when Trump and Biden meat in their next debate Thursday night in Nashville. More than 30 states are reporting rising numbers of infections. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says tomorrow's the deadline for congressional Democrats and the White House to reach a deal on a new Corona virus relief bill if it's to be passed before the November election. Earlier today, White House chief of staff Mark Meadows told Fox News. He's optimistic. Later this week, the Senate Judiciary Committee is expected to vote on Judge Amy Cockney Barrettes nomination to the Supreme Court. This is NPR news. Live from Kkot News. I'm Raquel Maria Dylan. San Francisco Police plan to hold a virtual town hall this afternoon to provide updates on an investigation into the police shooting of Cesar Vargas. He's oddity, Bond, the moody reports. Vargas was killed on Saturday, October tent after officers responded to calls of Carjacking at knifepoint on market and golf streets. After chasing Vargas. Officers shot him and he later died at the scene. Francisco. Vera is an attorney who represented Vargas in the past, while the latest millions of young hip of color across the nation and I think.

Joe Biden Cesar Vargas President Trump NPR White House North Carolina House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Mohr Dave Mattingly Kiki BD Florida Raquel Maria Dylan Kkot News President Senate Judiciary Committee San Francisco Tamara Keith University of Florida
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KCRW

02:05 min | 7 months ago

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"From NPR news in Washington. I'm Dave Mattingly. President Trump is back at the White House, having been discharged by doctors at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. The president spent nearly 72 hours at Walter Reed outside Washington for treatment of covert 19. NPR's Tamara Keith says Upon his return to the White House yesterday, the president tweeted out of video urging Americans not to be afraid of the Corona virus. In a cinematic scene, Trump descended the stairs from the hospital. Walter Reed, as the sun was beginning to set thin flew to the White House in Marine one, the sky a pinkish orange. There, he walked up the staircase to the South portico entrance of the residents faced out toward the cameras and removed his mask. A few minutes later, he tweeted a video where again massless. He said he was feeling great. And now I'm better. And maybe I'm immune. I don't know. But don't let it dominate yur lives. Get out there. Be careful. We have the best medicines in the world trumps doctor said they will be cautiously optimistic and on guard for another week because Trump's condition could still change. Tamara Keith NPR news Vice president Pence and Democratic vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris are preparing for their debate. Tomorrow night. It's being held in Salt Lake City, Utah. This is NPR news from Washington. But it's 6 31. This is K C r. W News. I'm mad Guillem you silly scientist Andrea Ghez has won the Nobel Prize in physics Ghez and Reinhardt Ginzler, a German scientists were given one half of the prestigious prize for their work on black holes, specifically their discovery of a supermassive black hole at the center of our galaxy. Guez is the fourth woman to win the prize, in an interview with Quantum magazine a couple years ago, has explained that she and Denzel pioneered a new way of using the powerful Keck telescope to track the orbits of stars at the center of the Milky Way. And with that we have the ability to explore the physics of black.

President Trump White House Walter Reed Walter Reed National Military NPR Washington Tamara Keith president Nobel Prize Andrea Ghez Vice president Dave Mattingly Guez South portico Kamala Harris Salt Lake City
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WNYC 93.9 FM

03:34 min | 8 months ago

"tamara keith" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Plus students still are the largest number of students starting in person anywhere in the country. So it's important for us to get it right. And it's important for us to meet that everyone is safe and secure as they started personal Ernie in person. Classes in the city will be phased in by grade levels over the next two weeks. So by this presidential campaign, combined with the Democratic Party had Maurine the bank at the end of last month and President Trump's reelection effort. That's according to campaign finance filings. As NPR's Tamara Keith reports. It's a reversal of fortunes for the incumbent. Resident. Trump started raising money for his 2020 effort unusually early at the start of his presidency and maintained an advantage over Biden in terms of cash on hand through the early part of the summer, But Biden and Democrats have been gaining on him and then had a blockbuster fundraising month in August on Fox and friends. Trump downplayed the challenge His campaign now faces. We have a lot of money. I mean, how much money do you need? You need yourself. Trump's campaign both raised less and spent less than Biden in August. Take TV advertising, for instance, according to the tracking firm, Add analytics, Biden outspent Trump nearly 4 to 1 and Trump's campaign was largely off the air in several key swing states. Tamara Keith NPR news On Wall Street stocks took a dip today, the closed off earlier lows. The Dow was down 509 points a 27,147 that's down 1.8% the NASDAQ Down about 1/10 of a percent D S and P 500 down 1.1%. This is NPR news. And this is WNBC in New York. I'm showing Carlson Jews around the world ended their observance of the new year yesterday with the blowing of the shofar in Maplewood, New Jersey, Social Justice group blew the Ram's horn for the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Kihei. About 100. People gathered last night for a candlelight vigil, Political rally and shofar service for the Supreme Court Justice. The traditional mourner's prayer was also recited, but with the names of black Americans who have been killed by police The activists leading the service called on the crowd to spend an hour every day, helping to get out the vote in November. And as you've been hearing, the city's younger students are among those back of the classrooms today. Here in New York City for a staggered start in person school, Cheyenne Taylor's attending pre k at PS 2 62 in Brooklyn, she donned a kitty cat face mask, which she says she's usedto wearing. And even though she was a little nervous about the school day, she explained their mom that she was inspired by characters from a favorite TV show. Plastic case and sky school school like they are sun in my eyes. Special education students in district 75 schools are also back in person. Today, everyone else's learning online for the first official day of instruction in the public schools. Students in kindergarten through high school begin in person learning next week. Police have arrested a man who they say through construction debris on a subway track in Manhattan, causing a train to derail the NYPD is charged 30 year old Dimitrius Harvard with reckless endangerment, criminal mischief, assault and criminal trespass. Authorities say three passengers suffered minor injuries when a North bound a train hit the debris at the 14th Street station yesterday morning. It's unclear of Harvard has a lawyer who can speak on his behalf. Service on the D E and F lines were affected following the incident..

President Trump Biden Supreme Court Tamara Keith NPR NPR Tamara Keith Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Harvard Ernie sky school school New York City Cheyenne Taylor New Jersey New York Manhattan Democratic Party NYPD Maplewood
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KCRW

01:49 min | 8 months ago

"tamara keith" Discussed on KCRW

"Depot and lows of earnings reports, they are killing it this year now news Live from NPR NEWS. I'm Jack Spear. President Donald Trump says he would support an investigation into whether Postmaster General Lewis to joy violated campaign finance laws. NPR's Tamara Keith reports. It comes in response to a Washington Post article. The article described an arrangement from when two joy was in private business. Employees at his company were reportedly urged to make donations to Republican causes and candidates and then had the expenses offset with bonuses. If proven such a scheme would violate campaign finance law prohibiting the use of straw donors to circumvent individual donation limits. Trump says he's seen the article and is open to an investigation and we'll see how that goes. But no, I think he's a very honest guy. But we'll see. Trump also said that if it is proven to joy did something wrong, he should lose his job. A spokesperson told The Washington Post to Joy believes that he has always followed campaign fundraising laws and regulations. Tamara Keith NPR NEWS Democratic presidential hopeful Joe Biden traveled to the battleground state of Pennsylvania today where he spoke, the workers accepted a number of key union endorsements. Labor Day visit, kicking off what will be a flurry of travel the key states this week by both Biden and incumbent Republican President Donald Trump. Pick up in campaign activity comes with the election out less than two months away, and Poles beginning to show tightening in the race. Fine hopes to continue to paint Trump was an ineffectual leader during a period of racial and societal unrest and in the midst of a global pandemic. Some 22 miles outside of Portland, Oregon. Today, there's a caravan rally in support of President Trump. NPR's Nathan Rod is there the organizer's for this event.

President Donald Trump NPR Tamara Keith Joy The Washington Post Joe Biden Jack Spear Postmaster General Lewis President Portland Nathan Rod Oregon Pennsylvania
"tamara keith" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:07 min | 8 months ago

"tamara keith" Discussed on KQED Radio

"High risk health workers, older adults in nursing homes, among other groups. Teachers in school staff are included in the second phase as our people in prisons and homeless shelters. The third phase includes Children and young adults, and then everyone else. The draft is open for public comment until midnight Friday. Selina Simmons Duffin. NPR NEWS President. Trump Visits Wilmington, North Carolina today to tour the battleship North Carolina. It participated in every major American naval offensive in the Pacific in World War two. But as NPR's Tamara Keith tells us, that's not the only reason for Trump's trip. The official reason for this visit is to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the end of World War two. The unofficial reason for this visit, which will be President Trump's 12 to the state of North Carolina is that this is a key state battleground state in November and according to Trump's campaign All of his travel has potential campaign benefits in mind. NPR's Tamara Keith reporting and internal watchdog has found several concerns with the U. S Postal Service that includes its ability to process mail in ballots for the November presidential election. NPR's Alana Wise has this report. Problems include ballots mailed without proper bar code technology and outdated voter addresses. The report, which examined special and primary elections from this summer, says the agency needs to better collaborate with state and local governments. A watchdog also found the facilities did not always comply with election readiness procedures. The report comes as the nonpartisan Postal Service has found itself in the unwelcome position of being a foil to President Trump. The president and some of his allies have made a number of unsubstantiated claims about voting by mail, including ones now directly contradicted by the FBI. Alana Wise. NPR NEWS Washington You're listening to NPR news. A woman considered one of Lebanon's most renowned philanthropists, has died. Lady Yvonne Cochran died of injuries she gone from last month's gigantic explosion in Beirut. She was 98. Cochran led efforts to preserve Beirut's architectural heritage. The Barrett blast killed nearly 200 people. The trial of 14 alleged accomplices in the deadly Charlie Hebdo. Terror attacks opens today in Paris. NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports There have been five years of investigation and the delay due to the pandemic. 14 people are said to have helped the Kouachi brothers launched their assault on the newsroom of the satirical magazine on January 7th 2015. The trial also covers the hostage taking killings free at a kosher supermarket carried out by Amedy Coulibaly, a friend of the Karachi's the three day killing spree by the avowed Isis radicals claimed 17 lives, including some of France's leading cartoonists. Police led the defendant's into a packed courtroom They're accused of supplying weapons and financing to the terrorists. The 2.5 month trial will plunge France into a traumatic chapter of its history. Charlie Hebdo magazine marked the occasion by republishing many of the controversial Mohammed cartoons. It's headline read all that for this. Eleanor Beardsley. NPR NEWS PARIS Members of a State commission in Mississippi are making a final choice today for a new state flag. They've pared down thousands of choices to two designs. One features a magnolia. The other shows a shield. Mississippi State lawmakers retired the old state flag this year. It was controversial because it included the Confederate battle emblem. In Corvo Coleman. NPR news Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, supporting those working towards a day when no one has to choose between paying rants, putting food on the table and protecting their health and the health of others are w J f dot or GE. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm Rachel Martin. Good morning with just weeks left until the election, more evidence is coming out about how Russia is again interfering. Facebook has confirmed that it has removed accounts linked to Russian state actors who were trying to spread false stories. Those stories reined in influencing the outcome of the November vote. NPR's tech reporter Bobby Allen is covering this and joins us now. Good morning, Bobby here, Rachel So tell us more. What exactly did Facebook uncover? So this all started with a tip from the FBI. Federal authorities reached out to Facebook and said, Hey, we found the site piece data dot net and it says it's an international news site. But if you look very closely, it sure does look like a Russian propaganda tool. So Facebook looked into it and indeed discovered that it was linked to Russian operatives, and it was sharing hundreds off. Bogus news articles about everything from racial injustice to the Democratic campaign of Joe Biden and Kamala Harris. I talked to Ben Nimmo of research firm Grafica. They collaborated with Facebook on looking into this website, and Nemo told me that the Russian operatives who were running it, we're posting articles on Facebook to groups liked by progressives. I was very much a strongly left Lee named constituency that they were aiming at, but in among their they were indeed pieces, which is saying, Well, Biden and Harris, they're much too far to the right. So they were trying to make progressives less likely to be supportive of the Biden Harris ticket. How does that compare Bobby to what happened four years ago, researchers say. You know this operation both echoes to 2016 playbook and introduces some new elements. So Four years ago, Russian troll farms pushed false stories to suppress the progressive and minority vote to try to hurt Hillary Clinton. We're seeing that tactic again. It's a similar goal. What's new here is they duped Americans into helping them seem more credible. They Posted writing gigs on hiring boards in the U. S Telling, you know, young and inexperienced journalist that if you want to make some extra money, you could come right for peace data dot net Here's Nathaniel Glacier, he had cyber security policy at Facebook. They used that to reach out to unwitting freelancers to essentially trick them into writing for this fake organization and writing on topics that the Russian actors wanted them to write on. The thing is Rachel. It didn't quite work. Facebook and Twitter. Both caught this very early on, and these pages never really gathered to reach that the Russian operatives had hoped..

NPR Facebook NPR News President Trump North Carolina Alana Wise Eleanor Beardsley Bobby Allen Charlie Hebdo FBI Rachel Martin Paris Selina Simmons Duffin Tamara Keith Wilmington Lady Yvonne Cochran Beirut President
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KCRW

05:52 min | 9 months ago

"tamara keith" Discussed on KCRW

"It is 506 It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Audie Cornish in Washington, and I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles. It is the third night of the Republican National Convention. And tonight, viewers of the mostly virtual event will take a side trip to Baltimore. That is where Vice President Mike Pence will deliver his keynote speech. I'll be going to Fort McHenry, which was the very place that inspired our national anthem. Thie Trump campaign says Pence will be looking to draw a contrast between President Trump And his Democratic rival, Joe Biden, NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith joins us with more hate Tam. Hello. So what do you expect to hear from the vice president tonight, But, you know, vice President. Pence has led the Corona Virus task force since earlier this year, and you can expect him to talk about the actions that the administration has taken to address the pandemic. You know, this convention comes as about 1000. Americans a day are still dying from the virus, and people are grappling with job losses. There's this new school year that's happening online and elsewhere and It's just so much instability that declaring victory won't quite be possible. But you can expect the vice president will speak in very optimistic tones. Anyway. That's what the campaign is telling us. It's something we've heard throughout this week, the administration and Trump allies downplaying the severity of the problem with the pandemic and overselling the success of the response on DH. Also, I think we can probably anticipate that the president might make an appearance with his running mate tonight. There have been Trumpy surprises every night all week. So I'm curious because you know there's a lot going on right now. We have Hurricane Laura approaching. The president is sending federal law enforcement to Wisconsin after police there shot a black man who was not armed. How do you think these news events will figure into the convention today? It's a really open question where whether the president or other speakers at the convention will address this or make this part of the story tonight. President. Trump has repeatedly portrayed himself as a law and order president and slammed Democrats for failing to address the protests during their convention last week. Today, he said on Twitter, he will not stand for looting, arson, violence and lawlessness on America's streets. Meanwhile, former vice President Joe Biden put out a video today a little bit of counter programming. He said that he had spoken with the family of Jacob Blake and said Justice must be served. But he also addressed the looting and killing last night of two protestors. Protesting brutality is a right And absolutely necessary. But burning down communities is not protest. It's needless violence. The Kirk that that hurricane headed towards the Gulf Coast is also a big issue for the president. In the past, he's wanted to show that he has things under control. In fact, this storm risks over shadowing the convention with dire warnings of deadly storm surge and very strong winds. Okay, So besides the vice president, who else do we expect to hear from during the convention tonight? What we're going to hear from Kellyanne Conway. She led President Trump's campaign to victory in 2016, and she was the first woman to lead a winning presidential campaign. As counselor to the president at the White House. She has focused on the opioid epidemic. We are likely to hear some of that. And this will be a swan song for her. She announced that she is leaving the White House to focus on her family. There has been some drama because her husband, George Conway, has been a very public opponent of the president and one of her teenage daughters has also been quite active on social Media Speaking out against Trump, that is NPR's Tamara Keith. Thank you, Tam. You're welcome. For many immigrant Latino communities in the U. S fears of jeopardizing legal status, underlying health conditions and longstanding disparities in wealth and health care access. Complicate efforts to control the pandemic. As NPR's Erik Wester Veldt reports, one hard hit neighborhood in California's Marin County illustrates how that's playing out across the nation. Marin County just north of San Francisco, is best known as a picturesque gateway toe wine country. It's one of the wealthiest counties in America. But the people who scrubbed the hardwood floors, wash the Tesla's and care for the gardens in Mill Valley, Tiburon and Sandra fell are being devastated by the Corona virus. Latinos comprise 16% Marines population, but they make up 75 to 80% of covert 19 cases in the county. And many of those testing positive. Live here in the majority latte next Canal neighborhood, you know, high risk high poverty, essential workers facing Multiple challenges. The other groups are not. Omar Correra runs the Canal Alliance, a Sandra fell nonprofit that has supported Latin ex immigrant communities here for nearly 30 years. The canal neighborhood is a small, densely populated section of Sandra fell, packed with multi family apartment buildings. Loretta says Canal residents were in survival mode well before the pandemic. Then when it hit, he says, the neighborhood was decimated. Latinos having the sense your workers for this county before Kobe 19 during coming in thine So poverty inequities the jobs that they perform the housing conditions, Although that create the perfect environment for the virus to spread quickly overall about 3% of the county's Corona virus tests are coming back positive. But here in the canal, the positivity rate is averaging 20% and has spiked as high as 40%, says Dr Matt Willis, Bryn County's health director. The roots of this outbreak go so far beyond our healthcare interventions are really rooted in how we've organized our economy. People who live in a canal are three times more likely to live in poverty than the.

Vice President president President Trump Mike Pence NPR Sandra fell Joe Biden Tamara Keith White House Audie Cornish Baltimore Fort McHenry White House correspondent Marin County Los Angeles Washington Canal Alliance Hurricane Laura Elsa Chang
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02:58 min | 10 months ago

"tamara keith" Discussed on KCRW

"NPR news. I'm Laxmi, saying millions of Americans who are about to lose their unemployment benefits or waiting for Congress to throw them. Another lifeline is NPR's Kelsey Snell reports. Republican negotiators work through the weekend to resolve their differences on what should be in the next Corona virus relief package, and they plan to deliver their opening offer today. The $600 in additional federal unemployment payments are running out this week. Republicans have struggled to agree amongst themselves on how to replace those payments with a lower figure. White House chief of staff Mark Meadows told ABC that they now agree on a plan. We are going to be prepared on Monday to provide unemployment insurance extension That would be 70% of whatever the wages you were. Prior Tio being unemployed. NPR has reported that the Department of Labor worn back in May that it could be difficult, if not impossible for outdated state unemployment systems to implement such a change. White House officials called the plan a technical fix. Kelsey Snell NPR NEWS Washington President. Trump's National security Advisor has Cove in 19. Robert O'Brien is the most senior White House officials so far. To confirm positive for Corona virus in a statement, the White House says there is no risk of exposure to President Trump or vice president Pence. O'Brien is reported to be self isolating and working from a secure location off site. Miami Marlins home opener against Baltimore is being postponed to address a Corona virus outbreak. The Marlins they're staying in Pennsylvania. After they called off their trip from Philadelphia to Florida. The team was scheduled to host the Baltimore Orioles tonight. The world's largest corona virus vaccine study is underway. Shots created by the National Institutes of Health and Modern are being tested on the first set of volunteers who are among the 30,000 slated to take part. Turner says the first trial took place in Savannah, Georgia. Subsequent vaccinations will take place in other parts of the country mean while the president heads to North Carolina today to promote efforts to develop a Corona virus vaccine, NPR's Tamara Keith reports. Resident Trump has put an increasing focus on the pandemic is cases spike in the sun belt. Trump is set to tour a facility that's helping manufacturer a key component for one of the Corona virus vaccine candidates. The vaccine is currently in phase one clinical trials. The federal government is investing billions of dollars to produce millions of vaccine doses so that they would be ready to go if clinical trials prove them to be safe and effective. North Carolina also happens to be a swing state in the upcoming presidential election. In the absence of rallies, official visits like this do give President Trump a reason to be in states that he needs to win in November, and the speedy development of a vaccine is a central part of his reelection pitch. Tamara Keith NPR news at last check on Wall Street, The Dow was up 73 points. This is NPR news..

President Trump NPR White House Tamara Keith NPR Kelsey Snell Marlins vice president Robert O'Brien North Carolina Laxmi President Tamara Keith federal government Baltimore Orioles Congress Baltimore National Institutes of Health
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WNYC 93.9 FM

05:53 min | 10 months ago

"tamara keith" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noelle King and I'm Steve Inskeep. What was the purpose of the president's remarks yesterday? The answer is not immediately apparent. He gave a speech. And the scene is important. He was standing in the Rose Garden, the backyard of the White House, a place where presidents hold official announcements and official ceremonies and at the beginning, that's what this sounded like. The president announced measures against China as China cracks down on freedoms in Hong Kong. Hong Kong will now be treated the same as mainland China. No special privileges. No special economic treatment. And no export of sensitive technologies. That was the beginning. But even more than usual, the president veered off topic. Talking of crumbling highways. The Paris climate agreement he read a list of baseless allegations against his Democratic opponent, Joe Biden said Biden plans to quote abolished the suburbs and make office buildings to cold. This, according to the president. On the same day, the president gave an interview in which he pushed back on the fact that a black person is statistically more likely to be shot by police. NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith is following all of this high their town. Good morning. How unusual was yesterday? Well, this was certainly not a news conference as built. It was a rally speech disguised as an official announcement in the Rose Garden. He spent a lot of time talking about Joe Biden said. His name 31 times. And, as you say, was really all over the place of the times. It was hard to tell exactly what he was talking about. You know, a disciplined president of the United States who was truly trying to get re elected would come out. He would stay on message. He would talk about what he was there to talk about. Answer a few questions and leave. Instead, President Trump essentially did this rally thing in the Rose Garden? Because, well, his campaign can't do rallies right now, because of the Corona virus, he just had one canceled. Last weekend, and it is worth noting that Corona virus is now surging all over the country. And President Trump has had a really hard time getting any attacks on Biden to stick they've been trying for months. You know, it seems a tax of political attacks aren't really what Americans air looking to hear right now. Now. He also addressed question of race before this White House event. He's talking to a CBS reporter Catherine Marriage, and she asks why you're African Americans still dying at the hands of law enforcement in this country, and here's how the president responded, and so are white people. Some are white people. What a terrible question to ask. So are white people, more white people, by the way, more white people. Let's fact check that is that true? Well, it is true that more white people die at the hands of law enforcement. But there are a lot more white people in America is a share of the population. African Americans are far more likely to be killed by the police about twice as likely And this is about more than numbers. President Trump a cz. Many have been calling for police reform and racial justice has taken another attack and is moving toward law and order talking about law and order, which is something he comes back to AA lot. And, you know, he's really just trying to dismiss the black lives matter. Movement is he's still defending the Confederate flag. Indeed he is in that same interview, he said, quote. I know people that like the Confederate flag, and they're not thinking of slavery, he says. It's a free speech thing. This puts him out of line with the state of Mississippi and NASCAR. Yeah, and most people in the country which raises the question about what the politics are of doing all of this, But this is not strategic President Trump is saying what he thinks even if polling indicates that the majority of Americans disagree. So you know, he has once again in a place where he is setting off a conversation about trump and racism, and he's acting like someone who thinks his base Wants to hear this sort of pro white pro Confederate language, and he is running this re election for the base, not for the broader American public at the White House press conference yesterday, he was asked if he was worried about losing in November. I think that the enthusiasm now Is greater and may be far greater than it was in 2016. I think a lot of people don't want to talk about it. I think they're not going to Say, Hey, I'm for Trump on for Trump. They don't want to go through the process, and I fully understand that because the process is not fair. He's talking about what he calls the silent majority. But pollsters I talked to say it is unlikely that such a science silent majority really exists in the numbers that he needs on Daz evidence, President Trump pointed to Ah boat parades and yard signs and, ah Biker's motorcyclists. There was some kind of both the trades that there was some kind of boat parade, but not that many voters own boats. Tam Thanks You're welcome. NPR's White House correspondent Tamara Keith. It's three months late this year, but Tax day has arrived. You've got until midnight to file your returns. Here's NPR's Scott Horsefly. The government extended the tax deadline by three months because of the pandemic. But even with that extra time, it hasn't been easy for either taxpayers or the IRS. The Corona virus sideline. Many of the volunteers who ordinarily help people with tax preparation. The AARP Foundation typically run some 5000 help centers in public libraries and like Foundation President Lisa Marsh. Ryerson says they reluctantly suspended that service earlier this spring. Obviously given covert 19 we were most concerned about the safety of the taxpayers and also of our volunteers, many of whom are of.

president President Trump White House Joe Biden White House correspondent Rose Garden NPR News Trump NPR Tamara Keith official Hong Kong Steve Inskeep Noelle King China Mississippi United States
"tamara keith" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:02 min | 10 months ago

"tamara keith" Discussed on KQED Radio

"News. I'm Laxmi saying the U. S. Supreme Court sat with a mixed decision today over President Donald Trump's attempt to shield his tax returns and other financial documents from investigators. In one major ruling, nearly all the justices clear the way for the documents to eventually be handed over to a New York grand jury in a criminal probe into hush money payments. But the justices also ruled 72 that congressional Democrats would have to wait. So that a lower court can reexamine separation of powers issues Since both cases will take time. The public is unlikely to see Trump's returns before the presidential election in November. On a day when legal battles over access to the president's financial records are at center stage. Another key piece of the president's financial picture remains out of you. NPR's Tamara Keith reports Trump Has gotten a second extension on his annual financial disclosure filing. Financial disclosure forms were due May 15th. But because of Corona virus, federal officials got a 45 day extension. Vice president. Pence filed his disclosure form on the new deadline, but President Trump got another extension, a White House official told NPR. The president has a complicated report, and he's been focused on the corona virus crisis and other matters. Official ads that while he has an additional 45 days to file Trump intends to file as soon as possible. Pence is relatively simple filing revealed nearly half a $1,000,000 paid from a legal defense fund to his attorney in the Mueller investigation. Tamara Keith NPR NEWS It was a big day for Native American tribes, writes the Supreme Court ruled 5 to 4. To reverse Oklahoma's prosecution oven enroll member of the Creek tribe for crimes committed within the historical creek boundaries. The majority opinion is that the tribe, not the state, has the power to prosecute crimes committed within the tribes historical boundaries. A new report counts 64 terrorist attacks in the United States. Last year. Nearly a dozen of those attacks were deadly, claiming 51 lives. The numbers come from the global terrorism database maintained by researchers at the University of Maryland. We have more from NPR's Hannah alarm. The latest count from the global terrorism database covers 2019 for the United States. The numbers confirm what analysts have said for months that attacks are increasingly motivated by a blend of ideologies, especially far right extremism such as white nationalism and xenophobia. And there's a quote sharp increase in the deadliness of racially motivated violence. One attack on the white supremacist category was the mass killing of Latino shoppers at a WalMart in Texas last summer. As for the global picture, the Taliban in Afghanistan was responsible for more terrorist attacks in 2019 than any other group by a wide margin. As for Isis, the report says attacks declined in Iraq, but the group's influence expanded elsewhere. An alum. NPR NEWS. This's NPR live from Katie. We D news on Brian Watt, California's attorney general, is recommending the Sacramento Police Department revised its use of force policy, among other reforms. As a result of a review prompted by the police killing of Stefan Clark in 2018. Cupid's Julie Chang reports. The report released by Attorney General Have yearbook, Sara found that Sacramento police officers frequently misused corroded restraints, Tasers and other so called less lethal types of fourth. Sara also want a comprehensive study on apparent racial disparities in stops, arrests and use of force. Black Americans were involved in 43% of SAC P D s use of force incidents between 2013 and 2018 but only made up 30% of sack menace population during that same period. The report also suggests better de escalation, training and improved hiring practices. It follows previous recommendations. The State Department of Justice issued 18 months ago and concludes the state's review of the Sacramento police. I'm Julie Chang calculating youth they area transportation officials are giving the green light to distribute a second round of emergency federal aid to more than two dozen transit systems, the $1.3 billion in relief funding. Is intended to help. The agency survived the catastrophic loss of revenue they've suffered during the pandemic. The biggest recipients include Bart and San Francisco's Mu NI, which are both getting about $375 million. Under the plan approved by the Metropolitan Transportation Panel yesterday, local transit agencies say that continued deep service cuts will be necessary and major layoffs are possible. Unless the federal government provides another major infusion of aid on Brian. What news Support for NPR this morning comes from see three c three dot Ai ai software enables organizations to use artificial intelligence and enterprise scale. Solving previously unsolvable business problems. Learn Maurizi three. Dottie, I And by the listeners and members of.

President Trump NPR Vice president Tamara Keith attorney NPR NEWS Julie Chang United States U. S. Supreme Court Taliban Brian Watt President Sacramento Pence New York federal government Sacramento Police Department University of Maryland Oklahoma