34 Burst results for "Tala"

Business Insights You Should Take Away from 2020

The $100 MBA Show

06:00 min | Last month

Business Insights You Should Take Away from 2020

"Powerful insights. You should take away from twenty twenty here. We go number one and this might sound obvious. But we're going to go down a deeper level and that's you can't control everything that's probably the biggest thing we saw in our face every day is that you cannot control everything around you okay. You're on a coffee shop. You can't control a global pandemic right if you're on a software company you can't control if some of your staff members are infected with covid nineteen and you're down manpower. These are things out of your realm of influence. You cannot control it so you might be singled kilmore ghetto. But what's the point. The point is is that you have to recognize come to terms of the fact that in business those things you cannot control and you have to be ready for that. You have to be ready for the inevitable. There's a great book called the black swan by necessity nicklaus talip- the subtitle is the impact of the highly inflammable. If you don't know the author to lab is an investor and he's made all his wealth off the fact that bad things will happen. We assume being sometimes ignore the fact that the disastrous things like the covid nineteen pandemic is bound to happen in our lifetime. Now i know. Tala specifically considers cova to be something we could have avoided rather than an unpredictable disaster but for business owners. The principle still applies for those you in your thirties or forties. You have a pretty good actually We've had a pretty good run without any disasters. Most people go through a lifetime where they've seen multiple wars. They've had to serve pandemics disasters huge national disasters or even environmental disasters but the human brain is not wired to always anticipate this. If you really want to understand how the pandemic really affected economies has really affected your own business and how you could have benefited. If you haven't already read the book black swan it will allow you to put everything in perspective and allow you to utilize this experience so in the future when this happens again because it will happen again. It's just a matter of time when another thing like this happens again. How can you make sure that it doesn't affect your business your personal life but in fact you'll be prepared and you'll be ready and that leads me to number two. You can't control everything but you can control how you prepare and react a lot of people when this pandemic hit they kinda just put their hands up in the air and said you know what There's nothing i can do. No there's plenty can do. Let me give you an example. Many businesses actually saw an uptick during the covid nineteen pandemic because they prepared and they react properly nicole founder and wife has a personal trainer. Her name is amy mitchell and she runs goddess fitness shrines. He's outdoor boot camps for women and anybody who's in any business that is a physical business in person business that has people congregating. You would think kovic would just totally anomaly that business. No amy had the foresight and said hey. I got a pivot. I gotta change. I gotta have other offerings on my site. And she offered online training people training with her Via calls shows the helps them with their nutrition and diet plan and recently Amy shared with nicole that twenty one of her best years for business because she made that change because she had the revenue stream from online clients and when restrictions. Ease a little bit in australia. And things got back on track. She still had her physical boot camps and the line clients didn't leave. They still kept on going. This is a perfect example of being prepared and reacting properly understanding. That things are changing. Something happened something is different now in the world. I can't just do the same things i got change. I gotta react got adapt number three those who make it when it's tough. They thrive on the other end and this became very apparent in countries where the vid pandemic was under control and things started to open up and economies started to kind of go back to normal. There are many businesses. That just threw in the towel. Just didn't adapt didn't change the people that survived that rough patch. The actually now are market leaders are now really thriving because there's a whole lot less competition. There's a whole lot less noise and people who made it. When it's tough can really go on and succeed when things are back to normal when things are easier for the business owner going through something like this is like going through a war. People can't just be business as normal when bombs are falling from the sky. It's a rough time but those who survived and its peacetime again. They're going to become the market leaders for the next foreseeable future. So people that do the first to really benefit those who know they can't control everything so therefore they prepare and they adapt and react properly. The survived that rough patch and they come out superstrong so even if you're in a country where things are still locked down. Things are tough and covert hang in there trying to lower your expenses as much as possible servive because you wanna see daylight. You wanna be there when this is all over you want to still be in business because then it's going to be a whole lot easier for you not only because you know. The challenges are over from the pandemic but because it weeds out the weak. It's like what phil knight says in his autobiography shoe dog. And i'm paraphrasing here. The cowards and never tried the week died along the way that leaves us

Nicklaus Talip Amy Mitchell Kovic Tala Cova Nicole AMY Australia Phil Knight
Laid Off More, Hired Less: Black Workers in the COVID-19

WSJ What's News

04:02 min | Last month

Laid Off More, Hired Less: Black Workers in the COVID-19

"Let's start with black workers. What do the employment numbers tell us. Yeah the numbers tala that while we saw some progress towards narrowing the gaps in unemployment rates between black and white workers during the last decade. We've seen a pretty significant reversal in the last few months. Since the pandemic has taken hold and that means black workers are likely to have a slower and longer economic recovery than their peers. And one thing that really stands out is this is true across education levels in fact the data that i looked at showed that a black worker have about the same job prospects as a white worker needs to have one level of education higher. So for example. A black worker. With a bachelor's degree has the same unemployment as a white worker with an associate's degree. And what does your reporting reveal as far as the reason behind this. I mean economists said that there's a number of different factors ranging from quality of schools to the propensity to end up in the criminal justice system even when controlling for a number of different things. Economists i spoke to said still an unexplained gap and they say that boils down to discrimination eric. At the beginning of the pandemic we saw women dropping out of the workforce to stay at home with their children as job. Losses became permanent. Are women getting disproportionately harmed in this. Yes so women have really narrow the unemployment rate gap a certainly not. The wage gap forgot employment rate gap with men during the past decade. That reflects that we had this growth in the service sector where women were employed. Unfortunately the pandemic has reversed a lot of that. The job losses have occurred in the service sector places like restaurants hotels even schools. And that's disproportionately hurt women on top of that as you said women have dropped out of the workforce because their children are not attending school and that can have long term effects that are concerning We know that once. You're out of the workforce especially for more than six months. It's harder to get a job and you have a permanent Impact on your earnings going forward and in the case of black women. I'm assuming it's exacerbated even further. Yeah black woman have a particular challenge because unlike other racial groups. They're often the breadwinners. Black women have the highest rate of employment among any group of women so they're often look towards to support the families and of course losing a job to the breadwinners even that much more damaging to the household looking ahead. We'll hear from the fed share and the treasury secretary. Today about stimulus programs does stimulus factor into these issues of inequality at all. Oh certainly it does. I mean you can just look at sort of a debate around whether there should be direct aid to people who are unemployed and the numbers would tell us that those are disproportionately women and people of color or you can look at do. We need to give aid to small. Businesses give aid to entire industries. And of course that's going to help business owners who tend to be disproportionately white men would help stockholders things of this nature whether the aid goes directly to the unemployed people or whether it kind of trickles down from the top and big picture. Eric what do we know about the broader economic impact of these kinds of racial and gender disparities. Yeah economist street talked to really set. It takes two forms one. Is we know communities that experience more unemployment and can experience persistently lower income tend to need more support than from the government. Things like food stamps medicaid and that costs taxpayers dollars the other factor and i think this is more important in the long run is this data. Shows us. That black workers in particular. Maybe doing a job that they're overqualified for or they might not have gotten the background and training. They need to do as well at the job. They have that hurts. Productivity and ultimately slows the pace of economic growth

Eric Treasury FED Government
Carbon dioxide levels hit new record; COVID impact 'a tiny blip'

UN News

01:23 min | 2 months ago

Carbon dioxide levels hit new record; COVID impact 'a tiny blip'

"Levels of carbon dioxide co two in the atmosphere hit a new record of four hundred and ten point five parts per million in two thousand nineteen the world meteorological organization wmo has said in its annual greenhouse gas bulletin the un agency announced the concentrations of co two are expected to keep rising this year. This is despite a slight reduction in emissions. Owing to the covid nineteen pandemic carbon dioxide is the most important of several greenhouse gases that trap heat in the atmosphere and contribute to climate change. Its levels have risen by forty eight percent since pre industrial times. Wmo said in a press conference. Here's oxana tarassova. Wmo chief of atmospheric and environment research division speaking to a news conference in geneva which we have now in the atmosphere is accumulated scenes. Seventeen fifty so it's every single beat which would put in the atmosphere since that time. Actually foods the current concentration. It's not what happened today or yesterday. That's a whole history or the human economic and human development which actually lead us to this global four hundred tiem. Wmo secretary-general petrie. Talas said that. Caveat nineteen related lockdowns were expected to reduce this year's carbon dioxide emissions by between four and seven percent. This was despite the fact that pandemic lockdowns limited people's mobility but not their consumption of energy the un agency

WMO Carbon Dioxide Co Oxana Tarassova UN Geneva General Petrie Talas
Pennsylvania National Guard Remains In Philadelphia Following Days Of Unrest

KYW 24 Hour News

01:21 min | 2 months ago

Pennsylvania National Guard Remains In Philadelphia Following Days Of Unrest

"Tala. Here's what's happening. For the second of five nights following the deadly police shooting of a black man in Cobbs Creek. Philadelphia is under a citywide curfew, traffic closures as well in center city. The Pennsylvania National Guard deploys to Philadelphia to protect people and property after city leader's request the assistance and and the city and the family of Walter Wallace Jr decide to delay until the day after the election next Wednesday, the release of the body cam video of police shooting and killing him. In West Philly more on that now from K Y W. City Hall bureau chief Pattillo Mayor Jim Kenney says he, the district attorney, the police commissioner and the family have agreed that the delay is in the best interest of the city and its residents. As you know, Philadelphians were experiencing an immense amount of pain. A significant unrest persist throughout the entire city. The collective hope of our local government in the Wallace family. Is that releasing the recordings on November 4th. We provide enough time to calm tensions and for the recordings to be released in the most constructive manner possible, he says. The video and the tape of the 911 call that brought the officers to Wallace's home will be released at the close of business Wednesday. He declined further explanation of the timing. The Fraternal Order of Police would like the video and 9 11 tape to be released immediately. Union President John MCM SB says he's reviewed it and says it shows officers following department training and protocols. He says it's

Walter Wallace Jr Union President John Mcm Sb Fraternal Order Of Police Philadelphia Wallace Family Cobbs Creek Y W. City Hall Jim Kenney Pennsylvania National Guard West Philly Bureau Chief Tala.
Here are the key moments from the final Trump-Biden presidential debate

Forum

03:22 min | 3 months ago

Here are the key moments from the final Trump-Biden presidential debate

"Well. Polls show an extremely tight race between Donald Trump and Joe Biden in some key states, including Florida Maryellen classes, the Tallahassee Beauty for the Miami held and gave me her assessment of the debate from Tallahassee. It was remarkably different from the first debate We had a few weeks ago, they were more calm. They didn't talk over each other. The president was so much more restrained, and it was more of a debate. It was, ah, remarkable difference. And were there any moments that really stood out for you? There were a number of moments they began with. Vice President Joe Biden really made an effort at the start of the debate to try and bring the focus back at every opportunity to President Trump's handling of the pandemic. And I have to say that the president was pretty assertive in being able to Get an answer out. I think he was pretty effective at criticizing Joe Biden for having record and not accomplishing certain things during that time. I think Vice President Biden was also very effective in being critical of the president. You're in Tallahassee and this year where we are, it seems, is in Florida there. Percentage of of support in terms of registered voters seems almost neck and make their our dynamics This time around. That seemed to be changing. That is that Trump has lost senior voters. There seemed to be more young voters that are turning out to vote when traditionally they don't show up in very large numbers. There's also a lot of emphasis being placed on Hispanic voters to make sure that they show up and vote. And there's also work on getting black voters who are very reliable Democratic voters to show up so the ground efforts to get people out to vote made really be the thing that puts the candidates That winds over the edge on the beach of health care. I know you in terms of demographics, Floyd, it is it not have a very high rate off retirees. When they spoke about him on thrashed it out about health care. Is this something that may change the mind of a certain age is all that is the key issue for many voters in your state. Yes, it's very interesting because even though Florida has not expanded Medicaid to cover more people There are many more Floridians, especially in the Miami Dade area that are registered under the provision under Obama care, then are in other states, so there's a very large percentage of people that depend on Obama care for their health care. And so the threat of eliminating that is something that is important concern for many people, And while the president continues to say they're going to come up with an alternative They have had four years and they still haven't put a plan in front of the American people. So it's really sort of again. It's a vote over what we know or a promise of something we don't And she's Mary Ann and Class. The Tala Holly Tallahassee Bureau chief for the Miami

Joe Biden President Trump Vice President Tallahassee Florida Tala Holly Tallahassee Bureau Miami Barack Obama Floyd Mary Ann Medicaid
"tala" Discussed on HOHOL: an FSAT podcast

HOHOL: an FSAT podcast

01:34 min | 3 months ago

"tala" Discussed on HOHOL: an FSAT podcast

"At the end of the day. I was like, I need to see something that is like simple and you know, it doesn't have to be understood by everybody but it could be like a story that you could tell people and I could see how like happy it brought people to Tri chod. Hi guys, this is Ian. This is Sophia and I'm Marie. This is all welcome back everyone and Thursday. We're very excited to have a guest on here. And I think we can all say that we're very very excited because yeah, What she is she and what she does holds a very special place for Filipino students and where we eat. So I'd like to introduce Ashley Ortega. Hi Sasha. How are you? Hi, how are you guys? Good. Good. Good. Well the begin thanks for coming along. I'm sorry. Well, I'm sorry if this is imposing on your course, but we're very excited to have you know, please impose as much as you want. I guess we should explain what whole whole means. Well, I guess we it was in the document but it means hang out hang out loud. I don't know if you've ever heard the term but love it. Yeah, it's like mobile but the most different yeah, yeah. Yeah,.

Tri chod Ashley Ortega Sophia Sasha
AI Tries to Save the Whales

WSJ The Future of Everything

09:11 min | 5 months ago

AI Tries to Save the Whales

"We head to the Pacific northwest to understand the obstacles that confront these endangered orcas and how researchers are using artificial intelligence to help orcas and humans to coexist. WHAT HAPPENED TO J thirty five or Tala wasn't an anomaly the southern resident cavs have been struggling to survive for some time they've been listed as endangered in both the US and Canada since the mid arts. But their numbers continue to fall in two, thousand five there were eight. Now there are just seventy two in the wild one lives in captivity. Their home waters in the sailor, see an elaborate network of channels that span the coasts of Seattle Vancouver from Olympia Washington in the south to the middle of Vancouver Island British Columbia in the north. The see encompasses puget sound the Strait of Georgia and the Strait of Juan De. FUCA. Much of it is rich in natural beauty and teeming with wildlife with rural shorelines backlit by tall evergreens and craggy. Hills. It's a magnet for nature lovers who crave inactive lifestyle, but the Pacific northwest has been getting crowded these paths few decades with people competing for space with the local wildlife as of two thousand twenty. Washington's population was nearly eight million and Vancouver's topped out at about two and a half million and is projected to grow. It's become a busy place. So you see things like Bald Eagles nesting next to satellite dishes in busy parking lots. Big. Ravens Beg for food next to cold press coffeeshops commuters hop on ferry boats here like people in other towns take the train or the car. On these trips they can sometimes spot the southern resident orcas milling about but a lot of the time the orchestra framed by ferry boats or container ships. The area's ports are growing along with the population. In twenty eighteen Porta Vancouver ship activity reached a record high and the port is undergoing numerous expansions. Increased. Commercial ship traffic on top of recreational boat activity is one of the biggest threats facing the whales that live here. This traffic causes numerous problems ships pollute the water, and they're loud under the waves. As we're about to find out the ocean is getting crowded and noisy, and it's negatively impacting the whales. Dr Lance Barrett Lennard is the director of the Marine Mammal Research Program at the Vancouver Aquarium. There's also a lot of heavy vessel traffic that comes in some of the going to the port of Vancouver some of the going to the port of Seattle unfortunately both both major west coast ports. have their roots running through. Southern Resident Critical Habitat. But the obvious problem he says is that more boats increase the chances that Wales will get hit. especially, if the boats are going fast. Whale is far less likely to be hit by ship that's running slow, and if it's running less than ten knots, a good chance to survive even if it is hit, that's just the facts. So regulators started issuing slowdown directives, it few areas these slowdowns are mandatory, but in the Pacific northwest or the orcas live, they remain mostly voluntary. Mariner say they want to avoid the ORCAS but there are business conflicts John? Berg. Is With Pacific, Merchant Shipping Association a Trade Group that represents about thirty shipping lines that do business along the Pacific coast. For a lot of ships. Schedule Integrity. Is. Paramount. and. So they need to be at a certain port at a certain day in a certain time. And so planning is essential especially since coming in late can mean higher fees and lost revenue. Mariners go back and forth about how quiet ships they talk about things like reducing noise by finding optimum speed or by retrofitting or upgrading vessels with more efficient quieter parts. They even say that in some cases slower vessels. Moore of Iraq. Now to researchers, this is a settled question, the faster ship the louder the ship. And it's the noise that is even more detrimental to the ORCAS than ship. Strikes. The underwater cacophony is mostly generated by ship's propeller. It releases vapor filled bubbles. ORCAS like all CETACEANS rely on echo location to communicate, made and find food. For ORCAS, it's how they find salmon as the ORCAS chase salmon they make clicking sounds that they send out into the ocean. The click then bounces off of the salmon and creates an echo, and that's how they know where the salmon are underwater noise pollution specialist. Dr Lindy Wildcard is an adjunct research associate at Dalhousie University in Halifax Nova Scotia Canada. CETACEANS are particularly vocal of the US sounds to find their prey actively using bio sonar. And the various noise sources that humans put into the ocean can affect. Wales and that they are masked, that is the sounds of interests are obliterated by by US adding this sort of acoustics smog of of noise so they can't hear as well. You can actually hear the masking that wildcard is talking about listen to this underwater recording of northern resident orcas who have different dialects from their neighbors, the southern resident or is this recording was provided by Orca lab a nonprofit research center based on Hanson Island near British. Columbia. Canada. Those. SQUEALS ARE ORCA calls. Here's what happens if you overlay their calls with recording of the ship underwater. It drowns out the ORCAS squeals. All you hear is ship noise. That's because the sound created by the ship is at the same high frequency ranges the ORCAS. It's kind of like being at a dinner party where people are talking over each other. But for the ORCAS, the increased sound means they'll lose their seat at the table. If the ORCAS can't hear themselves they can't hear the seminar and so they can't find food. And that can have far reaching impacts that affect the entire population. Their stress hormones can increase. with, noise with the seismic Airgun sounds they also reduce their vocalisations to the point of sometimes falling outright silent, which means they can't communicate with each other and that probably affects mating. If mayors could know where the ORCAS are. They could try to avoid that part of the ocean or at least slow down. So their engine noise doesn't drown the ORCAS OUT Ideally. They'd only have to go slow when the orcas were in the area, but it can be hard for ship captains to confirm where the whales are in fog rain or even under normal circumstances ship captains can't always see them they often miss them. So some conservationists along with the Canadian government installed underwater hydrophones in the Salish Sea along the coast of British Columbia near known ORCA HABITAT, they wanted to be able to track the ORCAS through their echo location calls. But remember how it works. Sound was drowned out by the ship's well, it's not just hard for the orchestra here. It's hard for the humans to. It can take people a long time to listen to all those recordings figuring out what is well sound, and what is this ship fish or other marine life sounds the orcas make noise at all hours of the day and night, and all of that sound even that record overnight has to be listened to by someone. Up. Next. How artificial intelligence can help speed this process up? And maybe find a solution for both the ships and the whales.

Orcas Vancouver Pacific Northwest United States Pacific Seattle Canada Vancouver Island British Colum Wales Southern Resident Critical Hab Strait Of Georgia Cavs Porta Vancouver Vancouver Aquarium Tala Puget Juan De Sound Columbia
Google AI Tries to Save the Whales

WSJ The Future of Everything

04:53 min | 5 months ago

Google AI Tries to Save the Whales

"Washington state and southern Vancouver Island are home to a distinct population of killer whales called the southern resident orcas. Black. On top with contrasting white I and saddle patches each has its own distinctive markings. From may through October tourists flock to this region to see the southern residents revered for their social nature and strong family ties offspring remain with their mothers for all of their adult lives. But, lately, those lives are being cut short. cavs are dying before they're born or shortly afterwards. The plight of one mother Orca and her calf captured global media attention a few summers ago. Marine biologists are keeping a close eye on an endangered Orca off the waters around the southern Gulf islands. Named Talla J. Thirty five to researchers her calf lived only about thirty minutes but instead of letting it fall to the ocean floor Tala carried the dead calf pushing it around with her nose for an unprecedented amount of time and hundreds of miles researchers say the whales are known to grieve, but never for this many days Orca known as j thirty five is still carrying her baby seventeen days. Later, the mother is going through a deep grieving process, but since then the mother has been getting weaker and weaker as choice to carry, it's dead offspring above the water assigned, she may be experiencing difficult and complex emotions not so unlike our own. Scientists believe calf died of starvation. The incident was well documented by researchers like Paul Cotterell with the Department of fisheries and Oceans Canada. I was out for the whole two weeks and it was very very emotional to see. Just, that bond and hell mum was just so they're reluctant to to let go of the calf. Cattrall knows these whales well, he and other researchers have been closely documenting all three southern resident family pods known as J K and L. The DFO for twenty, three years these animals are photographed in did. All of them every year. So we know. All the animals and we also know. When calves are born and went animals die. So this population is a very well studied in very well understood. Researchers know that the ORCA food supply Chinook salmon is becoming smaller in size and there are fewer salmon being born mostly because of overfishing. And the wheels are having more trouble finding the salmon that is still around because of a dramatic increase in ship traffic in this area. Perhaps, the biggest challenge, these marine mammals face. From The Wall Street? Journal. This is the future of everything. I'm Janet. Baben today on the podcast. We head to the Pacific northwest to understand the obstacles that confront these endangered orcas and how researchers are using artificial intelligence to help orcas and humans to coexist. WHAT HAPPENED TO J thirty five or Tala wasn't an anomaly the southern resident cavs have been struggling to survive for some time they've been listed as endangered in both the US and Canada since the mid arts. But their numbers continue to fall in two, thousand five there were eight. Now there are just seventy two in the wild one lives in captivity. Their home waters in the sailor, see an elaborate network of channels that span the coasts of Seattle Vancouver from Olympia Washington in the south to the middle of Vancouver Island British Columbia in the north. The see encompasses puget sound the Strait of Georgia and the Strait of Juan De. FUCA. Much of it is rich in natural beauty and teeming with wildlife with rural shorelines backlit by tall evergreens and craggy. Hills. It's a magnet for nature lovers who crave inactive lifestyle, but the Pacific northwest has been getting crowded these paths few decades with people competing for space with the local wildlife as of two thousand twenty. Washington's population was nearly eight million and Vancouver's topped out at about two and a half million and is projected to grow. It's become a busy place.

Washington Vancouver Island Cavs Orca Vancouver Pacific Northwest Cattrall Talla J. Vancouver Island British Colum Paul Cotterell Strait Of Georgia Oceans Canada Tala Pacific Department Of Fisheries Seattle J K
"tala" Discussed on Fake the Nation

Fake the Nation

04:21 min | 6 months ago

"tala" Discussed on Fake the Nation

"Entertaining because this week we're going to talk about relief bills. We'll check in on federal troops and we'll also talk about the yard and the DNC conventions and last but not least white fragility a new take. Today I'm really excited. And To. Continue that tradition we have with us. In actor Paul you've seen on the legends of tomorrow. One of the DC comics she is by the way the first Muslim Superhero. So. Exciting. Oh, she's also producer of the podcast. That's what she said. You guys. That's todd live. Also joining us on the panel is you heard him here before it's been a while since he's been with us. So we're so happy to have him back. He's a writer and a producer. You've seen his handiwork on the daily show and on full-frontal he even has an emmy for the things that he's done. Because he's say it is Trayvon Free Trayvon. How are you going? Just, spit doing your introduction. Like a classically trained stage actor. So. That's Right. FIDDLE WAS All right. Are you guys ready for us to get into it? Short. Here we go with the topic number one. Friday Friday Friday. It's the last day of pandemic pay if you have filed for unemployment, which is a shit ton of you out there in. America So I guess my first question is where are we with the Senate bill and actually doing something Side Note, they've had months to do something, and here we are at the last minute right before pandemic paige runs out on Friday and they still haven't done the thing. So my question to you is yeah. Where are we? What are your thoughts Trayvon I? Think we're in the middle of nowhere. And I don't think. Seem to have. A grass on the fact that. We are in the middle of a pandemic in that forty percent of Americans, can't pay their rent didn't pay their rent. And I don't think our government. gives us yet. I mean I see I see there were they were talking about reducing the payments to two hundred dollars which I mean. Come on just just send me an envelope with a fist in it that punches me in the face when I. Best you'RE GONNA do. Kinda ridiculous that even when the country is at its most vulnerable and people are hurting. You, you get to see exactly what it looks like when you have the most incompetent leadership when people say, what's the worst that could happen in twenty saying? Well, you're living at. Trayvon the we already did get an envelope with a fist punches us in the face because the last emulates checks were on delay because they had to have Donnie signature on Matt. Okay well, here's the thing. Okay. So tell the Democrats want to spend. So trayvon mention they WANNA cut the pandemic nature, two hundred dollars they also want to do tax cuts. And liability protection for businesses the dams. So they want to spend a total of one trillion dollars the dams on the other hand WANNA spend three trillion dollars they wanNA keep pandemic pay at six hundred dollars a week. For those of you don't know if you don't I feel like there isn't a person in America who doesn't know someone who at least is filed for unemployment. Right now but for those of you who just crazily might not know there's a weekly six, hundred dollar pandemic pay on top of what you're normally would normally get for unemployment. Tyler what do you think of these? The difference in these bills? I mean it's not surprising right but I guess what? What is been amusing to me is how obsessed the Republicans seem to be with.

America producer Trayvon Paul writer DC comics DNC Tyler todd paige Senate Donnie Matt
Orca who carried her dead calf for 1,000 miles is pregnant

Tom and Curley

00:25 sec | 6 months ago

Orca who carried her dead calf for 1,000 miles is pregnant

"The Southern resident orca who carried her dead calf with her for 17 days is pregnant again. Tala Kwan made headlines around the world two years ago when she was seen near the San Juan Islands Day after day with the body. Seattle Times reports. The killer whale lost a calf before that one. So orca experts are not terribly hopeful about this pregnancy and orcas. Gestation period is 17 months so it could be a year or more until we know what

Tala Kwan San Juan Islands Seattle Times
The Myth of Quarterback Hand Size

ESPN Daily

11:11 min | 11 months ago

The Myth of Quarterback Hand Size

"So let's talk some measurements. That's what went down today. The consensus number one overall pick Joe. Pearls hand sized came in at nine inches. Listen to this. The last quarterback that man that small drafted first overall was jared. Goff BACK IN TWO THOUSAND SIXTEEN GUYS. So that's some comparison it's annual. Nfl tradition every year were introduced to the incoming class of rookie quarterbacks. And we're told that a single measurement matters hand size but what if the metric is totally meaningless as the NFL combine unfolds in Indianapolis we investigate the connection between big hands and big production and ask whether Scouts are chasing a myth. I mean it's Tuesday February twenty fifth this is espn daily presented by ADT. Dave I was very self-conscious reading this piece because I don't know if you know this about me but I have tiny tiny hands. I have gigantic cans. Do you See come on tiny baby hands. Dave Flemming is a senior writer for. Espn his report on the NFL's obsession with quarterback hand size publishes ESPN DOT com today. So Dave yesterday was a big day for the quarterback prospects at this year's combine the annual release of the hand size measurements and the annual freak out about said measurements. Well I mean. It's like a national scouting holiday when the the QB hand size measurements. Come out because there is the belief that the distance between a potential NFL quarterbacks tip of his pinky and the tip of his thumb directly correlates to their success in the NFL. That's why we care just to give people sort of a framework here. What what is the big hand? And what is this small hand in football world red flags and NFL SCOUTING? Go up if your hand is smaller than nine and a half inches. But the guys who are said to have hands the size of Catcher's Mitts are. That's generally anything above ten inches. The normal size of adult humans hand is like eight and a half inches eight eight eight point seven five inches right now. Everyone is listening to this. Podcast is looking at their hands if they're under STEERING WHEEL WONDERING DO. I have two small hands. I've never thought about it until this very moment. Well Yeah and I think that is also part of it right that it's a myth or a theory or a legend that are virility is directly connected to the size of our hands that basically goes back to the beginning of time so in that sense. It seems logical that that we care about. How big a quarterback's hands are. What is the origin of the belief in the NFL world? That big hands equals good quarterback as far as I could tell were really took off with with Brett farve scouts and just people in general trying to quantify any way they could why this guy who was sort of a washout in Atlanta would go to the freezing cold and ice elements inside Lambeau field and become a three time. Mvp I mean. I think that's just human nature and scouting in general right that it's like whoa something weird like this happens. We want to be able to quantify it honestly. I think the there were some packers personnel. Who sort of wanted to claim credit for basically knowing in advance that he would be great because of his hand size and then what happens is human nature takes over right and people are like well. That's that's gotta be true. Look at Brett Farr for Lou peyton manning or look at Russell Wilson drew brees. I mean their hands are huge. So therefore air go right. All good quarterbacks have to have big hands breezing. Wilson are interesting examples. Because those were quarterbacks who were not universally seen as being sure things? Yeah in cases like that especially with Russell Wilson. You've got a really influential scouting and personnel department in Seattle right. That is sort of the envy of the rest of the League. And what happens is they. They can't decide. They're worried about picking him so high mainly because of his height and then one of the things that pushes him over the edge in their minds is the fact that he's got huge hands. I think the bigger the hands the easier it is to grip the football and let it rip so for me this this pointer finger right near the tip of the football and let spent basically he should be like seven foot seven if you go proportionately of for how big his hands are so the seahawks based on this data get pushed over the edge. They're like okay. We're GonNa Take Russell Wilson and then retrospectively. It's like Oh look at that. How genius that was that. We went by his hand size. And then that sort of proliferates the myth through all these other kind of envious scouting department's and the same thing for debris. I mean he's a short guy but he's got huge hands data on S. U. Y. When did you as a reporter? Who's been covering football for a long time? I start to doubt the correlation between hand size and being good quarterback I was at years ago at Jamarcus Russell's pro day at at Lsu and it was not good and as he finished up his workout. I walked out with a GM and a coach that I respected and I was like what did you guys think. That was very good and they both were like. Yeah but did you see his hands? They were huge. I think the coach even said it's like he's got an extra knuckle and I was like what that doesn't make any sense right. He could barely connect with his wide receivers on these on routes where there was no defense and they walked out of there going. Yeah but his hands are so huge. He's a can't miss prospect and ever since then really it was kind of like we need to look into this because it doesn't make any sense there have been exhaustive studies including one we did at ESPN. That went back over the last ten graphs and compared quarterback hand size to fumble rate per game and then Qbr overall there is zero correlation between the size of a quarterback's hand and their performance in the NFL. Zero correlation if anything it was in reverse the GUYS WITH QUOTE UNQUOTE SMALLER. Hands fumbled at the same rate and had a higher qbr than quarterbacks with bigger hands. It's like I don't understand. It takes two seconds to look this up to see if there's any correlation and what happens is you look at the data and you go. Well what's going on it's laughable coaches say? Oh hand size is more important than how Tala quarterback is I've read quote unquote draft experts. Who are saying you know in some situations. The size of a quarterback's hand is more important than his arm strength. What and Yes yes. It's never ending. You make a really important point story beyond questioning you know. The connection hand size measurements themselves are not very reliable. This the more you look into this it just gets sillier and Sillier and the fact that between the senior bowl and the combine and then pro day workouts on college campuses. There's no universally accepted way to measure a hand so you could go to the combine and where there's a ruler tape to a desktop and you have to put your hand down and they measure the distance between your thumb and your pinky and that's your hand size and three weeks later at your pro day. They might ask you to just hold your hand up in the air and they would spread a tape measure between your pinky and your psalm. And and that's your hand size one. You can lean into and spread your hands out on a desk. The only thing wrong with the theory of quarterback hand size is that it's fundamentally flawed on every single level if grip strength is more important. Sounds like you think it is. Why don't teams measure that? I honestly that's the million dollar question right. I think that they think that. There's a correlation between size and strength of a grip that's like measuring a kickers foot size to try and predict how long his field goals will be. I think that they think they're measuring for hand strength. And they're not they're measuring hand size and those are two completely different things. There's an entire cottage industry in the draft process of preparing these quarterbacks for you know the combine drills the interviews. Is there any preparation they can do? I can't believe I'm asking a question to make. Their hands seem larger. Yes absolutely there are players because they have no choice. That will hire your hand. Masseuses to loosen up the connective tissue in their hand just so that they can get that measurement over nine inches and sort of. Check that box off Brandon Allen. Who's now a backup in? Denver is a perfect example of that right. He went into the senior bowl. Didn't even realize hand measurement was a thing and just sorta held his hand up and they were like oh eight and a half inches. And everyone's like Oh my God his career's over and so between the senior bowl and the combine the masseuse that he was already working with spend a little extra time massaging his hand and then when he got to the combine he really concentrated on the measurement spread his hand out as far as he could and I think he got just under nine inches and again like the talk of the combine. Was this guy's magical hand masseuse. And he told me right that other quarterbacks with tiny hands we're blowing up his phone asking him what his secret was and and could they get the number of his masseuse coming up. How our brains allow this and other faulty? Nfl Scouting Practices to persist

NFL Russell Wilson Espn Football Dave Flemming ADT Dave I Indianapolis Goff Jared JOE Jamarcus Russell Brett Farve Lambeau Field Packers Brandon Allen Dave Seattle Denver League
Atmospheric greenhouse gas levels reached record high in 2018

KCBS Radio Afternoon News

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

Atmospheric greenhouse gas levels reached record high in 2018

"The United Nations says a greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere are climbing despite an international agreement to curb emissions CBS news foreign affairs analyst Pamela Falk says the report finds carbon dioxide concentrations at a record level and steadily rising levels of methane and nitrous oxide as well the weather agency chief world meteorological organization secretary general Terry tala said that there is no sign of a slow down let alone a decline in greenhouse gases concentration in the atmosphere CBS is Pamela

United Nations Pamela Falk Nitrous Oxide Terry Tala CBS Analyst
The Security Token Ecosystem w/ Vertalo CEO Dave Hendricks

CRYPTO 101

09:14 min | 1 year ago

The Security Token Ecosystem w/ Vertalo CEO Dave Hendricks

"Dave so so tell us about your background catch us up what were you doing before you were tokenism assets advert also so my career goes back pretty far especially with regard securitisation I started my career at a little money accounting for Arthur Andersen did that out of college and I specialized in technology and databases Arthur Andersen. it was an accounting firm so I got involved in a lot of assets securitisations and this is like back when all the toys were made out of Wood the nineteen ninety s when I left three Anderson I went to work for a Goldman Sachs j Robert Joint Venture and we helped big the savings and loan crisis out of the ground and and securitized all of these real estate assets? I built databases to do that. then ended up going to Oracle or go corporations you know database company and I ran the worldwide relationship between Oracle and Arthur Andersen and it was after that that I met Baxter my co-founder and he and I were principals at what became the world's largest email markets the platform something called Chiel we learned there a lot about building massive scaling systems that could house the data of competitor I on the same system logically separated providing are basically big data and data delivery sir services to retailers and publishers who were getting an email and we were really really early in the email kind of like as early as emails people we're in Bitcoin in two thousand eleven or twelve and after that I went on to co found a company called Live intent that was in two thousand nine we invented programmatic advertising in email meeting we place ads in emails rendered when you open the no so and it was some stuff that happened in our series d. round of funding two thousand fifteen that provided some of the inspiration to war for Taller and William and our other co founder couch on Gujaral who's a former FCC attorney a securities lawyer and I got together on boat two thousand sixteen in Berlin and in Tala was fascinating I I kinda picked up on a little something that you mentioned that we I haven't really had discussed on the show so the savings and loans crisis of the late eighties nineties on can you talk a little bit about that because I think that comes to bear you know principally on why crypto exists you know one of the reasons so talk about that experience in what for those of those those of us that haven't heard savings loan crisis maybe a defined that and then talk about what it was like digging out of that yeah so starting in the eighties extending into the very early in the ninety s the savings and loan industry in the United States was pretty much deregulated and a lot of the savings and loans we're getting big by enabling unsecured loans the originated and USA purchase real estate in secured loan is basically hey you know me lonely some money I'm GonNa go buy this thing well this happened on a mass scale it was it was really something similar to the real estate Christ though your mortgage crisis that kicked off the two thousand eight recession and what ended up happening was that when when the recession happened in in the early nineties in the people couldn't pay for all the real estate that they had bought with these SNL loans and so the SNL started calling all these loans in and there was no one by the properties so people just basically either went bankrupt or just you know for the or they just said I'm going to stop paying this this saga loan on this property and so they're they're became a just a deluge of nonperforming underperforming loans on the books of the S. and L.'s and this had a ripple effect through the economy and so the the George W Bush original og Bush president key he set up something he called the Resolution Trust Corporation to clean this up and basically the process of cleaning up the the SNL crisis was taking these underperforming loans repackaging them and then selling them to new investors or to reach or other other parties that have the cash to buy them in often these properties were being sold at fire sale prices in real quick like an underperforming the loan like is that meaning somebody was loaning out money an nobody was paying the interest on that loan so is just sitting there okay doc or so non-performing non-performing loan means that no payments are being made underperforming would mean either they're paying part of the payment or maybe there's paying the interest that they're not paying the principal with a lot of people would use the you know they were just they will just pay the interest on the loan with the hopes of getting restructured later or ending up in what's known as a workout and so what we did G Robert in Whitehall securitisation project was to build databases of all of these loans and then enable them to be purchased by other investors essentially we securitized all in this real estate sometimes it got packaged up into multiple properties sometimes it was just sold pretty by property but I was database in a network guy and so back in the days before you had the Internet the way it is today for aws before all this kind of distributed computing technology creating databases and then connecting them around the country you ask two different bank centers and billing databases of these loans that would them the then be -sposed off okay or or sold in some way to new investors and so I got I got some pretty Kinda early the hands on experience and what happens when when things go wrong in financial markets and specifically in real estate and securities it was pretty cool so but you know these are these are not financial events you want to happen very often because right now with as much elaborate there is in the system what if this happens again it's going to really have a pretty strong ripple effect and that has a lot to do with the fact that you know just developed financial products and strategies that are based on borrowing and lending rather than rather than actually valuable underlying assets. It's a big big argument for crip doctrine so if you came to me five years ago and I said Hi Dave what do you do you said token is assets. I would very very slowly back away before running for my life a lot of people listening to this podcast also feel that way right now like what is your doing what who what where why can you guess on what it means to token is an asset in crypto it's really it's really pretty simple Token is Dana asset means taking the ownership interest in a new or existing company meaning the list of holders of the securities or shares or tokens of that asset taking them from a spreadsheet or some kind of paper or other analog ledger and turn them into a pro rata distribution of smart card cracks basically it's very similar to take in a record like vinyl and then turning it into into the threes you take a whole album okay which consists of you know ten songs and you turn it into ten a friend different MP four files and you put them onto onto a thumb drive

Arthur Andersen Oracle Goldman Sachs Dave Arthur Andersen. Robert Joint Venture Wood Five Years
LabCorp data breach: 7.7 million consumers affected

KCBS 24 Hour News

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

LabCorp data breach: 7.7 million consumers affected

"Just days after learning the ten million patients of. Diagnostics, had their personal information. Compromised comes word of another medical testing company suffering data breach. Labcorp says the personal and financial data of nearly eight million patients may have been exposed the problem, apparently stemmed from a breach at collections agency. That serves both quest and Labcorp Laura tala of seen that says medical records are valuable to thieves. They can sell credit card numbers health insurance information, any piece of personal information can have a value that can range from less than a dollar to more than one hundred the billing company. The American Medical collection agencies in the process of notifying affected

American Medical Collection Laura Tala
Nuclear diffusion: Iran

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:07 min | 1 year ago

Nuclear diffusion: Iran

"Today marks a year since merica pulled out of the nuclear deal with Iran fair for I am announcing today that the United States will withdraw from the Iran nuclear deal. We will be instituting the highest level of economic sanction. The anniversary isn't passing without event. Iran has announced its own partial withdrawal from the nuclear deal today. Sean Joshi is economists defense editor that comes just days after the Americans moved an aircraft carrier into the Persian Gulf on the basis of intelligence of what they said were potential Iranian attacks on American forces, and Michael the US secretary of state has ten up on expectedly in Iraq, which is one of the main US Iran sites have competition the region, so it's all kicking off in the Middle East, and it's been a year since President Donald Trump withdrew America from the from the nuclear deal the. Me through again, why he chose to do that. And what the relations have been since the JCP was joint comprehensive plan of action. This was the fancy name given to the nuclear deal that Aram signed with six world powers back in two thousand fifteen to cap its nuclear program, which many people fit was racing towards a nuclear bomb in exchange for trade and economic relations with the west I've been doing deals for a long time. I've been making lots of wonderful deals. Great deals. That's what I do. Donald Trump said the Iran deal was the whist the will never ever ever in my life. Have I seen any transaction? So incompetently negotiated as our deal with Iran. And I mean, never he felt not only head given away too much to Iran. It allowed her on to keep the ability to enrich some uranium which is which is a potential pathway to a bomb it allowed Iran sanctions relief that Trump said it would spend on funding terrorism in the region. It didn't stop around from testing missiles, which could be used to cause havoc against the US in its Attallah is and ultimately the biggest complaint that Trump and his team had was that the deal didn't change Iran's approach to the region. It didn't change Iran's willingness to confront the United States confront Arab allies, the US and confront Israel. And for all of those reasons he decided I'm done with this deal. I'm gonna tear it up, and we're going to try bludgeoning rom into something more formidable something more constraining and exactly a year on ran has announced that it it self is going to start to ignore the deal which the significance of that. What exactly is undoing? Well, Sandra Hanni. Iran's president has said he will start doing two things on the real pressure from his hardliners who wanted to do this for a long time. One of them is that it will start building up stockpiles something called enriched uranium low enriched uranium, and that's one of the things that can ultimately help you make a bomb the nuclear deal capped, the amount that Iran could have and Rania saying, okay, we're going to break that cap. We're going to build up a little bit more beyond it. The second thing. He said he's doing is that he will start building up. Heavy water. Heavy water is a specific type of chemical that used in nuclear reactors that can ultimately make plutonium which is another way of building a bomb. So Ronnie is not saying we're gonna dash for a nuclear weapon, we're going to tear up the deal completely. He's being clever about this. He saying we'll break out of it. And reasonably limited ways challenging the Europeans to say, you really gonna tear up the deal for these steps. And so in in the context of there's also this movement of the aircraft carrier. You say it's it's all kind of kicking off. I mean is it. How much does this sort of stir the pot, and how much of this is just kind of sabre-rattling very hard to tell the US said, it has credible intelligence showing that Iran plan to attack US forces in US allies in the region using drones using proxy militia forces. Now, we don't know how good how solid that intelligence is some officials say they spotted wrong moving entire missiles on tops of boats, which perhaps they were preparing to use them. Happy will preparing to ready them. Other officials say, hey, look, it's not actually clear with this was preparation for an attack or just preparation for a contingency plan in case. Iran was attacked. I in other words, getting the stage ready for retaliation. So the intelligence is vague. And I think sent me in Europe among European diplomats and other parts of the world. There's a little bit of mistrust about American intentions, and the reliability of these American claims simply because America and the person who announced this movement of the carrier John Bolton is well known as a. Great hawk on Iran has been wanting to amplify pressure on Iran. So I think this some suspicion perhaps the administration may have played up the solidity of this intelligence in order to sort of rattler sabres, you say and false Iran to back down and couch into some kind of submission is is there a sense. Do you think that the the US is frustrated that even though it's pulled out of the deal? It's reimpose sanctions that around seems to be getting on. All right, the regime seem stable. I think it's the opposite. I think that they sniffing opportunity they see rom in economic crisis. They are convinced that the protests, they see even if the river economic issues are in fact, indications of seething discontent against the Talas. They see a region in which the Arab allies that Isreaeli allies role moving in lockstep all unified on the issue of confronting Iran. And I think they see opportunity to deliver lethal decisive blow to Iran force to it's knees force it to kind of give up everything it would not give up to Barrack Obama back in two thousand fifteen so. I think this is born of confidence some would say hubris not weakness, not not fair. How much of this is that America might want to change the terms find it difference Iran deal, and how much of it is just kind of the early stages of again regime change. Well, Joan Bolton has said when he announced the movement of Vinik carrier to the region, we don't want regime change and other officials have said that as well do people believe them, do you. No one knows. I'm not sure I do either. I think that the Americans said they don't want this. They said that it won't award but the conditions. They have demanded of your on Mike Pompeo, the secretary of state made a list of I think thirty also demands of Iran. This was kind of like a Austro-Hungarian ultimatum, right? It was a demand that people thought is. So extreme is so sweeping would necessitate such a dramatic change in everything that Iran does about its foreign policy and defence policy that it would never be accepted. And if American knows it's making demands it can't be. Accepted some people think is that just a pretext for justifying laying the groundwork for military action. No one really knows the answer to that. But I think the actions of the last few days the pathway, we're now on should make us all very worried about the prospect of military confrontation down the line. And so with that in mind, and this these these sabres being rattled, how do you think this will play out? I think we're looking at the end of the nuclear deal the rains have given Europe sixty days to say, look, you know, give us the economic benefits if this all will completely pull out in that. That's the end of it. I think Europeans have done the best. They can to try and protect their own trade with Iran from meddling American sanctions, they've tried to tell Iran you'll better off in this deal out, but has any is under pressure. From hotline is at home. He's he had his chumps the Americans shattered the deal in just the way that the supreme leader of Iran said they would. And so I don't think he has much political leeway to Lynn palm. I think the deal is going to die in sixty days. Once that happens. Iran will be under pressure to go back to where it was before. Twenty fifteen building up its nuclear infrastructure hinting that it's going to pursue its way to a bomb not at full speed. But but creeping its way there and challenging the Americans to do something about it. If if they if they we're going to be back in those very dunk troubling days of twenty eleven twenty twelve when the region looked like it was really on edge. Thank you very much for your time.

Iran United States Donald Trump America JCP Europe President Trump Persian Gulf Middle East Iraq Sean Joshi Aram Sandra Hanni
"tala" Discussed on Around the Rim

Around the Rim

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"tala" Discussed on Around the Rim

"I don't start throwing things at me. But I work in the pharmaceutical industry by day, and I do bracket tala G and women's college basketball on the weekends at night. I take my vacations from the day job to do this. Because I love it so much, and I wouldn't trade it for anything in the world. In fact, a little depression sets in for me the day after the championship game. 'cause I just go back to being a sales guy. And that's not as nearly as exciting as being here as going to NC double A tournament games. It's doing brackets every week and conversing with fans and doing interviews and talking about where teams are going to go that gets my blood pumping selling drugs pays the mortgage. Right. Valid. Oh, yeah. This muscles in selling drugs and all of this by way of saying don't be discouraged because in his hard go and find great website that you want to do and be prepared to work for almost free for a while and make deadlines and get to know players and make contacts and things and so all the spy way of saying don't get discouraged. But Charlie, and I will tell you that it's not easy out there right now. Especially in a sport that needs more coverage. Yeah, I gave a little spiel yesterday when I got my award cover women's basketball. Like, I want to implore sports editors at internet sites in newspapers whenever not to forget about covering women's basketball. But there are not a lot of fulltime jobs out there doing it. So just be prepared to be flexible be prepared to freelance and be prepared to get your experience where you can get it and don't worry about whether or not it's your job because for us. It's a passion, and we pay the bills and other way if you if you love the game, which I'm assuming you do. It's going to automatically. You're going to be prepared. I think you know, an embrace things that your your passion. So you're going to be prepared. And if you're prepared then you can do it. Michelle said, you can do anything you can zig if you need the zig zag if you have to you can pick up this this gig on the side, even maybe it's not quite in your wheelhouse. But if you're prepared because you know, the game so well, and you love the game so much you'll be able to do it. You'll be able to do it. Well, and then maybe somebody else notices that. And then you then you build on that building blocks when when I started doing bracket tala Judy back in two thousand and three it was a really small thing at ESPN. It was extra content. It was interesting. But it didn't have a lot of footing. And it didn't have a lot of backing will. Now, it's it's so much bigger. And it's I'd like to think it's helped generate some more interested in the game. And and I know it's given me an even greater passion for the game going the other way. So I just use that. Passion that love for the game. Two to always be ready and always be prepared to do whatever you can. And now Charlie's famous that's the part he left out. So that's been nice too. What were your brackets? What were you on your brackets this year, sixty four hundred sixty killed it this year, sixty four hundred sixty six people are teams. All right. So before I let you guys go really quickly. If you can help me real this off. We've got ESPN w obviously ESPN w dot com. Some other publications that are covering women's basketball high post who WNBA insider. Girls who who her who who stat? Oh, yeah. Who have a great website? If you really into the numbers yet, the analytics, her hoop stats awesome sight out, and then more and more, and I'll just put a plug in more and more places are providing their own content, which is where I'm finding a lot of my work.

basketball Charlie ESPN WNBA NC Michelle
High-Risk Pregnancy: What You Need To Know

Medical Frontiers

07:09 min | 2 years ago

High-Risk Pregnancy: What You Need To Know

"Today. We're gonna be talking about high risk pregnancies had postnatal care a very very important subject, especially if you're contemplating pregnancy or if you're pregnant, and we're very fortunate of to experts with us this evening on medical frontiers. They're both connected with the Allegheny health network, both at the west Penn hospital, a wonderful, physical facility for pregnancy and high risk pregnancy and prenatal care, and and also taking care of babies that are born prematurely or with other problems. It's a wonderful wonderful unit. And I I believe there's what sixty bits. They're down in the NICU, isn't right. The new facility. Clearly such quite a few. It's big unit, but Edward very very fortunate to have too paranoid technologist with us per se, but like to introduce Dr Marta, coal top and Dr called hav. Is. Ask her, you know, she's originally from upstate New York. But she finally landed in Pittsburgh. She said the weather here is a little better than it is upstate New York. But tell us a little bit about your background did welcome to medical frontiers. Thank you for having me. Just like you said I'm from upstate New York originally, but if lived here in Pittsburgh longer than anywhere else. So I consider myself a burger at this point. That's great. Tell us a little bit about the training of a tala tallest. And what does that term mean Perry Tyler Perry sort of beans around? Yeah. Around the care of pregnant women in their babies during pregnancy during the time of delivery, and even post-partum. Okay. And so you trained as an OB gunny person originally, right? Then you needed to have some extra training. How long did you? You went to medical school for four years after four years of college said how long in OB gyns so four years of OB guy need and then two years of fellowship. So six years after school, and then you have a special interest in maternal genetics. Right. That's correct. Tell us a little bit about that. So my interest is in reproductive genetics. And so helping families who have a known genetic disorder in the family perhaps have a prior child with diagnosed with a genetic disorder or are pregnant and just want general screening for genetic disease. Fees or taking care of those women whose pregnancies are complicated by fetal genetic issues. Okay. How about autism? Does not have a genetic component. Mel autism is a is a diagnosis that encompasses a lot of different things. So it's a very very broad term. There are some genetic conditions that are associated with autism. And some of those genetic disorders we can detect prenatally I just read not too long ago where there was a family that had five children. There were all autistic that probably has something to do with genetics. You have to have that much then much penetrates. Right. That's true. Okay. Well, it's great having you here. Great meeting you and your partner here. Dr Gordon night he has been in practice at west Penn for about a year now, but tell us a little bit about your background Dr night. Welcome to medical front. Thank you for having me as well. It's been I just moved here as you mentioned before just as Marta did. I did my OBGYN residency in four years. I did that in Columbus Ohio and did my fellowship in Indianapolis, Indiana. So I'm a Hoosier at heart in that sense and move to Pittsburgh for family reasons. And I really enjoyed the practice the diversity of our group where a large group, but it's we each have our own interests and we function well together. So in your basic day of Pennsylvania guy, you grew up in Yeary, right? Absolutely. I grew up in north west Pennsylvania part of the the snow belt. So it's nice to be back at areas wonderful city beside the league. It's not like Cleveland is mistake by the lake, you know, so. Worn on call anymore duck. I thought you retired never stops ringing important person. Okay. So what about say? A woman is hypertensive and she's a type two diabetic pregnant with her first child at the age of thirty five high-risk absolutely high risk, and it's really important to have those things under control coming into pregnancy. So ideally, we like to capture these patients conception of possible. Yeah. Regardless. It's our duty to when they do become pregnant to discuss risks both to to mom and baby. The specific ones that you mentioned high blood pressure and diabetes. Both put is at risk for pregnancy specific complications such as pre clamps. Yeah. And other pregnancy specific complications such as growth restriction. How about a thirty five year old woman with diabetes and hypertension? Are they at risk for even Getty pregnant is more difficult for that woman to get pregnant with those co morbidity there's dependent on the degree of their their diabetic Kerry. Yes, age all obviously, also as a risk for for patients to have more of an infertility background as is the metabolic syndrome. So those are things that from a counseling perspective are important to have under optimal control before you. Okay. Okay. Dr Colt off of. A maternal genital geneticist. I imagined that you sometimes come up with some problems that could be categorized as a medical legal ethic problems. No. You say you find genetically there is some defect that has a high chance of being passed on to the next generation their child. How how do you handle that do you work with medical ethicists? And so on or how do you handle that? So if we we need to we have a complex ethical issue. We can bring in the episode that the hospital it when when we are faced with medical ethics issues, especially when it comes to prenatal genetic disease or preconception genetic disease. The first and foremost is to be up front with the family, and let them let them know that this is what the genetic testing may show and make sure that there's informed consent regarding those issues and if they even want to go down that

Pittsburgh Dr Marta New York Autism West Penn Hospital Perry Tyler Perry Dr Colt Edward Dr Gordon Metabolic Syndrome Pennsylvania Cleveland Partner North West Pennsylvania MEL West Penn Indianapolis Getty Indiana
Diabetes, Perry Nate Tala And CEO discussed on The KDKA Radio Afternoon News with Robert Mangino

The KDKA Radio Afternoon News with Robert Mangino

02:05 min | 2 years ago

Diabetes, Perry Nate Tala And CEO discussed on The KDKA Radio Afternoon News with Robert Mangino

"So what would be considered a high risk pregnancy. Well, this would be any woman who has a problem getting pregnant, and perhaps his had to have. Okay. So those would be considered high risk pregnancies because there's some reason that the woman has not been able to get pregnant now they have used these artificial means to get pregnant so that would be a high risk pregnancy. A woman who has diabetes either type one or type two diabetes is a high risk pregnancy. Because of that a woman who has excessively high blood pressure would be a high risk for pregnancy and other things like CEO woman, who is is paralyzed a paraplegic that would be a high-risk. So it's it's anything that would interfere with the normal just station period of nine months. Or an abnormal thing, very small pelvis or something. So that you could not have a vaginal delivery would have to have a C section that type of thing. So all of those things would go into the category of high risk, pregnancies parent tolerance, you're going to have a pair of them on tonight doctors from the Allegheny health network, and we're going to be using that term could. So would you take a little time to explain what that means? Well, paranoid. Tala gist is taking care of the the mother of the baby during the pregnancy the delivery, and then the after care so that clothes all of that. Now, there are neonatologist who would take care of the baby per se, but Perry Nate tala just would take care of the of the woman. But if they had to have a C section, these these people are obstetrician gynecologist, and then they have taken special training in high risk.

Diabetes Perry Nate Tala CEO Allegheny Nine Months
Saudi sisters likely committed suicide in New York's Hudson River: police

ÂÂ…œIt's Your Money‚ by Premiere Retirement and Wealth Planning

00:49 sec | 2 years ago

Saudi sisters likely committed suicide in New York's Hudson River: police

"On their hands. What happened to two sisters whose bodies were found duct taped together face to face on the Hudson river shoreline, it's a complicated puzzle. They're trying to unravel. What's going on in in the two young ladies lives Twenty-two-year-old rotunda Faria enter a sixteen year old sister tala citizens of Saudi Arabia living with their mother in. Fairfax Virginia detectors have been down in Virginia. They've conducted a number of interviews in Virginia. Members of the immediate family detective Dermott shea the relationship with the mother reportedly with strained. She hadn't seen them in months, and they'd gone missing. Before. There are reports the sisters may have feared a return to Saudi Arabia and applied for asylum. But none of this is certain at first police suspected the sisters had committed suicide jumping from the George Washington Bridge. Now, they

Saudi Arabia Virginia Fairfax Virginia Dermott Shea Hudson River George Washington Bridge Faria Twenty-Two-Year Sixteen Year
Tala Faria, Rotana Faria And Hudson River discussed on Pat Farnack

Pat Farnack

00:25 sec | 2 years ago

Tala Faria, Rotana Faria And Hudson River discussed on Pat Farnack

"And three police investigating the mysterious steps of two Saudi sisters whose duct tape. Two bodies were found in the banks of the Hudson river were alive. It turns out when they fell in the water sixteen year old tala Faria and twenty two year old Rotana Faria were last seen September twenty fourth in Virginia where they lived hasn't been determined. How the sisters died yet? There are no obvious signs.

Tala Faria Rotana Faria Hudson River Virginia Twenty Two Year Sixteen Year
"tala" Discussed on StandUp SpeakUp by Tokii

StandUp SpeakUp by Tokii

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"tala" Discussed on StandUp SpeakUp by Tokii

"It's just policing in general because you have this paramilitary structure and those at the top think they're untouchable because they have been for so long. What is your opinion on how the police handled the public? Because a lot of your focus is police within police. The internal culture of policing it will. There's two two issues that you have to think about is there's the individual officer themselves, what kind of person they are. So then you can look at what kind of personal rehiring. I mean, things will get better. We're starting to only hire those that have a college or university education that never used to be the case. All you had to help high school. We're going to start to see better recruits coming through, but then you have the. Other aspect of the culture in how the culture changes people. So give you an example in this comes up, you know, I've attended enough review sessions around on -tario that Justice, Michael tala has put on his first one was all about police oversight, but now he's doing one about carting, but when you talk to people in the public, everybody seems to have a common understanding that when you have one officer on their own dealing with a member of the public, they're going to fall out mostly on the kind of person that they are. So if they act respectful courteous because that's who they are, if they're jerk than it's probably who they are, but when you get to three officers together, they'll behave differently even if it was that courteous, respectful officer when you put him with two or three of his colleagues that now he's, he's trying to impress. He wants to blend in. He wants to be one of the guys. That's when you start getting that whole thin blue line aspect where you know everybody's gonna have each other's back. If one person does something he's going to expect that his his buddies are gonna agree. With him and right there, nose accordingly, testify accordingly. So you you start to get this like group think mentality where everybody wants to keep everybody around them happy because if you piss off a guy, you're gonna have to work with the next shift. You know, you never know what's going to happen. You never know if he's the one responding to your emergency call. Is he gonna go there quickly or is he gonna slow down or is he going to step in and help you when you're getting beat up? Or is he gonna stand watch when you're talking about people being in a position where they can help you survive in a dangerous situation or not, you're going to start to change how you think about things. You know someone who might someone who might not tolerate certain conduct probably would if they know that that person is the one that's gonna have their back the next shift. So all of those things contribute to the culture, but you're definitely being treated differently by a police officer depending on whether that officers alone or whether they're with other people or how they're perceiving you is only as good as the caught that comes to your aid. Right? That's reality, right. Like if a good comes to my aid, I have a much better. Chance yet. So there's a lot of people, you know, you get a lot of people that say, I have no issues with cops. I've only ever dealt with the police officer once and he was great or she was greed, and that's fantastic. And, and that you need to hear more of those stories. But when you hear the stories of I was treated like, crap. This person didn't respect me..

officer Justice Michael tala
"tala" Discussed on This Week in Science

This Week in Science

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"tala" Discussed on This Week in Science

"Out how to subscribe to us on Google itunes and YouTube, and also through to our podcast other places if you use other outlets just look for this week in science. All right. I would love to introduce our guest this evening. Kaley, swift is a PHD candidate at the school of environmental enforced sciences at the university of Washington. She has been working to finish writing. Her dissertation should get, and she studies Thana tala g of crows very exciting stuff. Kaley welcome to the show. Thank you. Thank you so much for having me and yes, I'm in what I imagined probably be ultimately the most handful part of writing my and finishing my dissertation. So yes, we're very close. And it has been many really fun and interesting years leading up to this moment of really interesting birds doing really interesting things. It's it's, it was very, it's very exciting to get to that point of finely writing up and completing what is a many years, long endeavor to get the PHD degree, but it in no means. Is it everything there is so much more. There are many other ways to be a scientist then getting a PHD. Absolutely. But let's talk about you and your work. And can you tell us in our audience? What is Dan Atallah Judy? Yeah. So Santa tala g. is the scientific study of death. And when it comes to human beings, there's lots of different ways that feels can manifest. It can manifest as how care or forensic or medicine or all kinds of things. It's a very interdisciplinary field and my area research civically is what's called comparative Anataula g which is looking at how non human animals responded to death. Excuse me, sanitize itself is very, very big umbrella. And then I'm in the very, very narrow little corner of it. Just looking at non human animals, debt, responsive. How did you get interested in this? I mean, very, very morbid child. Not at all. I'm not a worthy person. I don't like scary, movies, I, it's it's a very unromantic anchor unfortunately. So when I started graduate school, I had my initial idea. I knew I wanted to city crows and got into a lab to be able to to do hero work with orbits particularly crows and my original idea actually revolved around reciprocal altruism and looking at crows shared and got my knees, but it was kind of studies. A lot of the really interesting sexy stuff that people are doing right now with orbit behavior really is contingent on having a large aviary and a hand, reared captured population. A lot of the stuff that some of your listeners may have heard of when it comes to things like their perception of cheating and their ability to. Learn people who are fun paired about them and equity, like all of those kinds of things. All those kinds of studies happen. I at instituted large captive population, right? And we didn't have the infrastructure for that at this at the university on that we can. We can keep rose in captivity for temporary amount of time, but you know, we don't have a stable population. So we're recall tourism kind of went out the door for that reason. So then it was like, okay, so what is interesting not expensive?.

Kaley Santa tala Dan Atallah Judy Google YouTube university of Washington scientist
"tala" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"tala" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Rob may you're the CEO of tala and bought chain. Welcome back to software engineering daily. Yeah, thanks for having me back on the last time you were on. We spoke about a I more broadly because you were curated the technically Sinti int- newsletter that since become inside AI, how have your broad perspectives on artificial intelligence changed in the last year or so, since we spoke at the just thing. I mean, one of the things that I've noticed from a sort of business side is that angel investor and a bunch of AI companies in they've been a little bit slower maybe than SAS companies were to build. So that's been interesting to watch, and I think it's due to a couple of reasons. I think one reason is that the market is still figuring out exactly what they want, how they want to apply their workflow behavior changes that I think not every company is ready to do. And then I think sometimes there's challenges in figuring out how to do the training, get the data, you know, make the make the models were. And and everything like that. And so I think it's a think that's been one big trend. And then on the market side, I think I think a lot of people started to talk about the limits of deep learning. What's next. You know, what are the opportunities to learn on new data sets, smaller sets of data, stuff like that that that wasn't talked about as much in in the last few years for the last three years, you have been working on a company called tala, which makes digital assistants for chat systems like slack describe what taller does? Yes, Atallah his move very much to a model where the chat assistant is only part of the system. Right? So much more of the system is now, you know, in the browser on the web and probably the best way to describe what we do today is that we have. We have a digital assistant that is sort of knowledge manager that hangs sits over top of a broader knowledge base that we call a knowledge base for active contents. We primarily sell it to sales and support teams and groups of people where. Where the information is changing rapidly. And so there are a whole bunch of workflows that are required to make sure that you have the right information that it's kept up to date that it's accurate, that the right people have access to it. And so we have a digital system that sits over that and automates a lot of those workflows for you to make the whole thing a lot easier. How do employees at a company like an assails type role or customer support type role? How do they interact with taller? How do they interact with the digital assistant or the knowledge base where we have a couple of different ways. I mean, you can use it like a traditional knowledge base where you go onto the web in your browser, and you search for what you're looking for. You.

tala Rob AI CEO three years
"tala" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"tala" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Rob may you're the CEO of tala and bought chain. Welcome back to software engineering daily. Yeah, thanks for having me back on the last time you were on. We spoke about a I more broadly because you were curated the technically Sinti int- newsletter that since become inside AI, how have your broad perspectives on artificial intelligence changed in the last year or so, since we spoke at the just thing. I mean, one of the things that I've noticed from a sort of business side is that angel investor and a bunch of AI companies in they've been a little bit slower maybe than SAS companies were to build. So that's been interesting to watch, and I think it's due to a couple of reasons. I think one reason is that the market is still figuring out exactly what they want, how they want to apply their workflow behavior changes that I think not every company is ready to do. And then I think sometimes there's challenges in figuring out how to do the training, get the data, you know, make the make the models were. And and everything like that. And so I think it's a think that's been one big trend. And then on the market side, I think I think a lot of people started to talk about the limits of deep learning. What's next. You know, what are the opportunities to learn on new data sets, smaller sets of data, stuff like that that that wasn't talked about as much in in the last few years for the last three years, you have been working on a company called tala, which makes digital assistants for chat systems like slack describe what taller does? Yes, Atallah his move very much to a model where the chat assistant is only part of the system. Right? So much more of the system is now, you know, in the browser on the web and probably the best way to describe what we do today is that we have. We have a digital assistant that is sort of knowledge manager that hangs sits over top of a broader knowledge base that we call a knowledge base for active contents. We primarily sell it to sales and support teams and groups of people where. Where the information is changing rapidly. And so there are a whole bunch of workflows that are required to make sure that you have the right information that it's kept up to date that it's accurate, that the right people have access to it. And so we have a digital system that sits over that and automates a lot of those workflows for you to make the whole thing a lot easier. How do employees at a company like an assails type role or customer support type role? How do they interact with taller? How do they interact with the digital assistant or the knowledge base where we have a couple of different ways. I mean, you can use it like a traditional knowledge base where you go onto the web in your browser, and you search for what you're looking for. You.

tala Rob AI CEO three years
"tala" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"tala" Discussed on EconTalk

"Seems to be getting a little bit warmer we can debate about how much a lukewarm but i i think there's some warming i don't know whether it's catastrophic but i'm worried about a little bit i think because you should always worry about the the downside risk that's could be catastrophic i learned that from now some tala commonsense and and so that's just a beautiful thing that we could recreate that use that same process to get the carbon that's in the her now back into the ground is kind of a cool thing the economics of it of course and by that i mean not the financial part but the big picture economics is this does strike me as a my favorite hayek quote the curious task of economics is to demonstrate to men how little they really know about what they imagine they can design so part of this your articles this really crazy idea that somehow we're going to reengineer the soil to solve this other problem got over here and we don't really understand the whole thing really that well there's we get glimpses of what's going on we run this one study wendy silvers done it looks courage ing this greg able reduction in carbon but we don't know if it's gonna scale we don't know what the other facts are we don't know if i spread compos it really wide range across all kinds of different terrains what could happen about them line is urged people to start thinking about one way to fight global warming and climate change is to change farming rather than say cars.

hayek wendy silvers
"tala" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

10 10 WINS

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"tala" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

"In brooklyn speaking to a donut tala gis john bridget you never heard of a donut tala gist well join the club but todd jones claims he is just that a doughnut tala gist donut colleges is that really a thing yes it is the person who's been making donors for forty four years who knows what he do cut me says jones and glaze will come out of my skin and some of that glazes quite potent jones infuses donuts with booze so watch how guys your wife says what were you at a bar now i had a couple of doughnut cousins doesn't that donuts for grownups and jones says when it comes to doughnuts size matters he makes the many to keep you skinny john monotone ten ten wins in brooklyn wins news time six thirty five light rain sixty sixty degrees in midtown on a friday morning police are investigating an attack on a seventy three year old man beaten in broad daylight near brooklyn college for no apparent reason yesterday afternoon the victim was taken a minor these hospital with injuries to his face and wrist no arrest has been made and in the bronx police are continuing to search for a man who assaulted a sixty five year old man in a robbery in the park chester section last saturday that victim remains in the hospital with spinal injuries will be posting photos of the suspects at ten ten wins.

todd jones john monotone brooklyn bronx police robbery sixty sixty degrees seventy three year forty four years sixty five year
"tala" Discussed on Pardon My Take

Pardon My Take

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"tala" Discussed on Pardon My Take

"But i mean when the tala came out it went like ballistic it went super smooth move it almost seems like you stumbled on something that might be a new innovation where like you said when you split them you felt kind of nice it felt a little bit cool like maybe designs some slacks vice little barn door in the back when you coaching your butt off you can literally just let it hang out a little bit when you coach your butt off you may rip your paying that's that's on to yeah sure absolutely has that ever happening before it happened to me as an assistant coach okay never happened as a head coach as an assistant coach we're playing ucla in west coast because we had a lot of west coast guys and i said oh my goodness i ripped my pants but as a coach you know what you just sit yeah so down as the head coach what like everybody watching listening understanding this the real me yes would it took my pants off coast in my troll yes that's a good breathing i bet you get a recruit because you you coach through your pants splitting guarantee at some point can be like oh you're the coach who split his pants because he coach so hard short short sea should probably do that all the time just pre rip your pants like wrestling yeah no i'm not doing that i'm not doing that.

ucla
"tala" Discussed on Pardon My Take

Pardon My Take

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"tala" Discussed on Pardon My Take

"But i mean when the tala came out it went like ballistic it went super smooth move it almost seems like you stumbled on something that might be a new innovation where like you said when you split them you felt kind of nice it felt a little bit cool like maybe designs some slacks vice little barn door in the back when you coaching your butt off you can literally just let it hang out a little bit when you coach your butt off you may rip your paying that's that's on to yeah sure absolutely has that ever happening before it happened to me as an assistant coach okay never happened as a head coach as an assistant coach we're playing ucla in west coast because we had a lot of west coast guys and i said oh my goodness i ripped my pants but as a coach you know what you just sit yeah so down as the head coach what like everybody watching listening understanding this the real me yes would it took my pants off coast in my troll yes that's a good breathing i bet you get a recruit because you you coach through your pants splitting guarantee at some point can be like oh you're the coach who split his pants because he coach so hard short short sea should probably do that all the time just pre rip your pants like wrestling yeah no i'm not doing that i'm not doing that.

ucla
"tala" Discussed on Around the Rim

Around the Rim

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"tala" Discussed on Around the Rim

"They think we have a bracket tala gised a women's basketball bracket tala gist that picks and selects the team that he thinks are going to be in the field of sixty four he actually puts them in the bracket with their seeds works really hard to kind of give us some insight into that entire process who knows the name of the espn don't yell it out you got to raise your hand of our espn u bracket tala gist raise your hand person i saw was right here charlie charlene come on monday charlie our next guest played on notre dame's two thousand one national championship team now there was a player our guest is started on that team but there was a player on that team that were a big white headband all the time bam right here was her signature headband or their her brown ponytail ruth riley ruth riley though ruth is not here but i wanted to i wanted to see if you knew the answer to that you are correct but we have another member of that starting group who was a national champion for month of mcgraw kelly welcome kelly i love that that's beautiful thank you for coming oh i can't wait i have lots of notre dame questions right because y'all had a really good night y'all had a really good round of applause i mean notre dame fans right now i'm just like this story this is arguably one of the best stories that we've seen in college women's basketball in a very long time notre dame got down to how many scholarship players seven.

espn ruth riley basketball charlie charlene
"tala" Discussed on True Crime Garage

True Crime Garage

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"tala" Discussed on True Crime Garage

"I don't think we are describing a person here the is somebody that is walking away from from a life i don't think we're describing somebody here that would have found themselves in a bad situation and not reached out to one of his parents or to hit or at the very least to his sister but the as the cast states there's very little details in this disappearance the other troubling thing here is that we have these three individuals possibly three individuals one that he was scheduled to meet may be accept the ride from too that he may have spoken with or had been with before he disappeared that's even more troubling to me that we don't have it appears to me like the investigators may not have followed up on some of these elites that they've not spoken to these people there seems to be to me like there should be a longer time line regarding his disappearance while on with us such a small town you'd think everybody knows everybody so it's harder to keep a secret now kayla would go on to marry her fiance and take the last name of tall avour this would all take place after her brother and best friend had disappeared the police in the investigation according to kayla tala ver edward sistrin best friends she had to stay on the case she was looking for her brother but she was also looking for answers kayla put up a missing posters everywhere the she could she pleaded for help while the police she said did almost nothing in her opinion she felt lake from very early on in the case that she had been ignored.

edward sistrin kayla tala
"tala" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"tala" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Now germanborn architects oleg sheeran has made a name for himself the designing a string of largescale projects in asia including the maha knockon tala in bangkok the awardwinning interlaced building in singapore at an upcoming vietnam skyscraper dubs sky forest monaco's design editor nolan giles sat down with sheeran to talk about the benefits and challenges of working in asia's developing nations and how he built his reputation in the region and we might experience with asia started some twenty five years ago when i travel to china for the first time and so a part of the world put back then were still nowhere near where it is today back them basically almost nobody spoke about china wasn't quite on the map yet but as you came to the country you could feel this incredible energy of of something that was going some way from that moment onwards i was very interested in asia anna kept going back and in terms of in a southeast asia even now will when you visit regional that you can still feel the energy bad what point did you kind of realized that there was potential to to really do architectural work on a grand scale there may be some ten years later the entire region in a way fuelled by china's emergence also and china's uh really enormous scale of movement of development of change that that started to take place the economy grew and and i think that effected the the whole region and with us still difficulties someone that was trains not not in the region to come over there were what were your first difficulties i guess getting into work there i think always when you and to a new context if to be willing to leave parts of yourself behind in order to to find an understanding you pleasant find yourself and then you'll place.

asia bangkok nolan giles china southeast asia oleg sheeran vietnam editor twenty five years ten years
"tala" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"tala" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Administration since the collapse of efforts to scrap barack obama's health care reforms the un says more than one hundred eighty thousand people in iraq have been forced from their homes amid high tension and scum machine between the army and kurdish fighters this report from alan johnston in recent weeks the iraqi militry his exerted its control over large swathes of northern iraq it's pushed kurdish forces out of areas of disputed control the region's balance of minitry tala shifted dramatically amid this upheaval many civilians have fled their homes and it seems the vast majority were kurds as the army moved in there was a particularly lodgings this from the city of cook cook many of these people soon returned that nearly eighty thousand have stayed away world news from the bbc britain's prime minister theresa may has told the israeli leader benjamin netanyahu of her grave concern at what she called his country's illegal settlement building in the occupied palestinian territories mr netanyahu is in london for the centenary of the balfour declaration when britain endorsed the establishment of a jewish homeland in palestine but palestinians say the balfour decaration robbed them of their land and they're demanding a british apology the exiled former attorney general of venezuela has accused president nicolas my door as government of illegally signing mining contracts to exploit the vast untouched area of the country stretching from guyana to the colombian border luiz ortego who fled in august offer she was sacked said mr maduro ignored the requirement for the opposition that now assembly to endorse the contracts a woman in zimbabwe has begun a legal campaign to abolish a customary practice under which brides abort priscilla venkatsai has filed papers with the constitutional court saying these centuriesold tradition violates women's rights she argues that couples should be allowed to live together without being compiled to pay la perla as the bride prices known president robert mugabe's soninlaw is reported.

guyana president attorney mr netanyahu benjamin netanyahu prime minister robert mugabe priscilla venkatsai zimbabwe mr maduro luiz ortego barack obama venezuela balfour decaration palestine london theresa britain iraq alan johnston army un
"tala" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"tala" Discussed on KGO 810

"Couple of we've been started clearing up he didn't now he had more energy he had a blow when about about that we've been using dino by for the last year and happy the wreckage dog happy the healthy doc i how all my friend have rescue to give their dog that chance at a new start with dino by is gonna pay off for you and your dog for years to come eight five nine four one eight five nine four eight went out d i n o v i t e dot com the kurdish northern iraq have started casting their ballots in a controversial independence referendum kurdish protesters attacked in the streets of washington dc last spring by the men working security protecting turkish president ray gyp air to one already turkey says a dozen recognize the iraqi kurds referendum on support for hundreds from baghdad insisting its results will be no and void both iran and turkey have sizeable kurdish minorities and fear a vote for independence in iraq my galvanized movements in their own countries the us united kingdom and the un have also warned the kurds regional government against holding the referendum citing fears it may disrupt the campaign against the isis the first results of the vote should be known within seventy two hours scott carr washington senator john mccain says doctors have given them a very poor prognosis as he battles brain cancer the same type of cancer who took the life of his former colleague senator ted kennedy in two thousand nine oil i'm evan haning ira this balanced kansas tala sign.

iraq un brain cancer kansas washington president ray gyp baghdad iran turkey scott carr senator john mccain senator ted kennedy evan haning seventy two hours
"tala" Discussed on American Fashion Podcast

American Fashion Podcast

04:19 min | 4 years ago

"tala" Discussed on American Fashion Podcast

"Joined in the studio today by tala Rossi who is a swimwear designer from Iran. Hi, thank you for having me and tally. You have been in the United States for since two thousand. Yes. And you had some trouble with being indefatigable, Iran, and you you came here, and kind of found expression, and you have a book what's the book and actually my book is called fascist freedom, which explains what kinda went down in Iran, I Iran as after revolution. It's not a very free place to specially for woman. You have to cover yourself when you're pub- public. So as a teenager growing up in there who also had so much love for fashion and wanted to showcase my individual. -ality through that. I kind of always found myself clashing with my family members or government officials which eventually put me a lot of trouble your book as some intense chapters in the beginning about how you interfaced with the government and the they did not like miniskirts. Makeup and not bikinis. Either very emotional story. Will you tell us a little bit about it? Yes. Absolutely. So to give you a little bit of background Iran over thirty years ago was such a modern country. And when we had the king people could wear whatever they desired in the street an alcohol was legal at parties where available, but after government changed all these were being and people catch a cover themselves when going out and Iranian women are some of the most stylish woman I've ever seen in my life. So to take that away from them it created such a culture clash between the people and the government. So when I was growing up there. I used to watch TV shows like they're really hills nine O two one hour babe on of course, illegal satellite TV. And then want to follow those trends that those kids were falling. I had one big problem, which was the Iranian government. I couldn't express. Itself. The way I wanted it. So I got arrested on my sixteenth birthday party in a house party that a friend of mine had thrown her ex boyfriend who wasn't invited called the government officials and thinking that they would just shut down to party, and they stormed into the house. They arrested about thirty of us took us to jail for five nights and our punishment. Was are better. Verdict was forty lashes for the girls and fifty lashes for guys which we served for a crime of wearing indecent clothing in a private house and listening to western music and being with the opposite sex and things that normal teenagers would be experimenting with anywhere in the world. And I do wanna know something's been in the news recently, the burkini, and that is you're not the designer behind that no fighting and some news outlets because I wrote an article about it for time magazine. Hopper. Qian's bikinis are about freedom. So some other news outlets took that. And then called me inventor, a breaking. Is I'm Mary, you know, cute little Bikini's design Burkina's, but I just wrote a article for time magazine talking about how. Seeing an image of for men in uniform with guns asking woman to take her clothing off is just as awful and disrespectful as the men who forced me to cover myself and put me in jail. So there's to me there's no difference between that and fashion is not about the amount of clothing you put on or take off. It's about having to choice to do. So so seeing how that is still happening in other parts of the world, and then looking at at this country, and how diversity is being embraced in so many different ways, especially in the fashion business, and I think that even just during fashion week there were there was a model who was from India who had been scarred, and then plus size models, and obviously. Gender was aknowledged on on the runways..

Iran Iranian government tala Rossi time magazine United States Qian Hopper India thirty years two one hour