8 Burst results for "Takestan"

"takestan" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

03:23 min | 1 year ago

"takestan" Discussed on KGO 810

"On the fringes of society it has its own culture right some of it mandated is a man in a culture right and we have to be able to equip people to make the transition back into society we can function dividing you win in at sixteen you came out at twenty eight yeah our our life I agree with everything so we just sat at home it's you yeah you have to prepare people for that the change the adjustment it's it's a completely different world and for someone like myself who kind of grew up in there it was a really different world life I used to have anxiety trying to cross the street it would be no car coming to U. K. tell me I was going to get hit by a car fighting way for that light you know and it's something psychologically restricting about that like I have to wait for the light no cars come but I have to wait for the light in this that the briefing you're right that that transitioning from operating in this really small microcosmic world to this larger world with more expansive rules and now you have access to but you don't really know how to utilize I don't know how to manage my checkbook right I got it which I didn't how to pay rent I do not to pay a bill these are things that I needed to learn but no one taught me before I came home and I was just like blood teach yourself and I think that you know there's a lot of support the people do need transitioning from being incarcerated to being you know released being out here and society I want to go back to the room the question of rules and how rigid life can be even some of the running afoul of the rules that you get at in the documentary is is is there something in place to protect an incarcerated student from the kind of misunderstanding that might get you thrown into the box something like what I don't know I I'm just you know I'm thinking about your scariest thing in the world I mean this is very scary the fact when you when you get the point right he said is my word against the person we'll take his word and that person that he was a lot of when that person comes inclusion I'm able reacted if he didn't come to the conclusion that thing stands as the only fact that matters and there's no voice Takestan a variety to say no you got this role the only wish they could do to is the person who decided that it was wrong right it doesn't scare is a scary fat you said you said you said misunderstandings misunderstandings become grounds for new punitive measures is this is this is a very scary thing and we're talking about if the stream implication that is in the very of maximum two years extra in prison right you little of World War II decide in in addition to losing job twenty be in college news actually being college in in you did you get hit at the board in India in for two more years and you come home even less prepared when Simon Cowell so I mean there's so many application behind rules in if it is a CBC scary movies the scariest movie ever had was when I was living in he was a guy who is all about being in situations where you can't get your outcome in danger is imminent there's always a woman in minutes of dangerous says you're not guaranteed you tomorrow in which you know what today in does not up to you how that happens.

two years
"takestan" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

14:07 min | 1 year ago

"takestan" Discussed on KGO 810

"Then this is a very very different kind of film from the kinds that you have become famous for in your critical acclaim it's these historical pieces lot of beautiful still images in we've seen this is real cinema veritate what has it been like for you all to kind of change formats to be honest it was quite daunting and really exciting at the same time so to know that we were gonna have a narrator and that the story would be told to the voices and the stories of the people who were generous enough to let us point cameras and just follow them around and trying to figure out how much should we choose us the servicing sort of filming a scene how much should be be interviewing people should we have any experts what's the structure now with our four hundred hours as you mentioned that's a lot of material and it didn't have any shape leave but we did know that the film would begin with students starting the program it would end with graduation or we helps and in between there we originally were gonna make a ninety minute feature send material was so rich that when we sort of picked the the most interesting moments it was eight hours long so we thought okay this is going to be a ninety minute feature would have been such a superficial look at this very complicated and nuanced story so it was just learning as we went along and then working with our editor Trish everyday and her assistant to understand how to shape scenes had a shapes episodes how to create narratives that made sense and through lines it was just really really hard I would imagine that upon seeing this film people are going to say if this kind of program could just be scaled up so that more people could participate take advantage of an opportunity like this that you know would be great are their efforts in other places in other states because this is not a lot of men and women to try to use this as a model five I imagine all of you can answer but Sally you might yeah so first in me they're definitely of efforts going all host country BPI has some call it you know the consortium for liberal arts right in prison which basically partners with other institutions across the country to help them build the foundation they need to go in a status programs was similar programs as BPI and I think that you know the question of scale it's a very complicated quest question skills very complicated question in particular BPI what makes us so unique and we make this work so well is this kind of like human touch is able to happen because of you know of course a past the usually anywhere from twelve to fifteen sixteen students in size at any given class in with that gives a very good opportunity to have professors and students really engage each other and we used we DO seminar style classes also is we is this is not like the teacher the blackboard although it is with math like the math is different like a teacher at the black one I just just sitting there just right stuff and you sort of professor louder than what he was it what you eat it was a conversation happening almost finished was a student of cells you know the worst thing that can happen is as we get this you know this as a model in terms of making sure that higher education is really in the conversation in in terms of how we move for do stuff like reduce recidivism and reduce you know the circumstance the conditions the cost of the combat which appeared on the go out stay out but it is important we do that in a way that doesn't just reproduce where you have which is Phyllis school systems in filling our systems we had occasion it's all about head count in not saying take on a portent do we approach that can't be this kind of cookie cutter we need to have bodies animal into institutions and does what is our problem the quality of institutions have has to matter well in in again it goes back to that conversation and Max had women about you can't come here and do a classes about just killing time well you know just as you can see to get credits has to be meaningful rigorously to walk away with something that matters to them they can keep with them they can go on our front so it is it is it is not is not as simple as everybody's problem unknown is doing college in prison in the wake housing prisoners gun has to be thoughtful I think the one of the things that really changed over the course of making the film was as you said we sort of got into this in two thousand and twelve and in two thousand and fourteen we first started filming governor Cuomo dipped his toe in the water of kind of seeking new ways about finding the higher education in prison and then in twenty sixteen Obama re introduce the idea of making incarcerated individuals eligible for Pell grants and right now we are criminal justice reform and what we're doing in the country is such a national conversation I think at the center of it should be and is higher education and there's legislation on the hill about that right now so I think our country is is for the first time since nineteen ninety four really thinking about how to create a better working structure for higher education to be imprisoned I mean when things I've heard Max center say so many times is that we should have the same range of opportunities of education inside prison as out here so if it's you know very and programs like BPI and everything from that to a community college and everything in between people should have the same opportunities there that everybody else has I want to ask I think folks want to know what you two gentlemen do now at you know you speak very knowledge should be about this program and its benefits but what what are you up to now in your lives so currently my day job a case manager from the largest nonprofit bell phone in the country so what we do is we bill people out of jail who fit arrested for misdemeanors and whose bows are two thousand on the last for free we do nothing back it up there for you know and we find that the majority of our clients return to core and have really positive outcomes you know no one should be inside no one should be kept inside because they can't afford their mail because they're poor being for should not be a crime and that means you know had a code yeah not a cold I sense is that the kids I also work with I used to work for bell phone for up I work for the office of the Amazon offers as release also going to be three years and my first job was as a data analyst for the bell phone and then I see differently here and I joined the BPI team as it was the directors to do stuff like most amazing Michael college in Brooklyn which is a tuition free college for men and women at the noble Canaria it back which is out of the library in a bank and now I am for Tom iPhone force that programmer that basically bills database solutions in mobile application API's and also more medication themselves in a slide right now and then most recently I joined I had this project because we're social which is I disord available on and it was so what it was like this I want you to come with the deal I'm like own alone alone be locked into it early but they convince me and I joined them in a is this is a start up so this would also soon she was about someone in the audience would like to know if you all go back to your neighborhoods to encourage non incarcerated teens to stay focused on higher education to challenge themselves I'm a transplant of was born originally said in Jersey and I live in New York but you know a mission Michael college part with them and how they did was one of my main job was a student attaining a recruitment which means I went to all these programs around the city of New York City in achieving program but will you drop into our city trying to encourage people to come into giving his attitude it we were given at the bottom of the library which is basically a liberal arts education from Bard College I mean when he graduated on a local station and they'll like so I mean in just encouraging people to make them understand it is up to is here for you and it's not just went up on his warehouse was a student in which it was so meaningful for me would be PI it was I one of my first interaction with the education institution where I didn't feel like an object of prey I felt like someone that was in power with agency an agency with respect and part of what I'm trying to curse people to do is is the plate we see understand that there are issues like that out there they're they're you know does that you have one bad experience we think it's schools wasn't inclined to eat this not that Mr the case for every school is out there and you can still pursue education I would say just to to pay back on that number of the students that we follow to were released over the course of making the film did go back into the neighborhoods where they came from and tutored young students and really were very very involved and whatever else they were doing what they were volunteering or working doing that work and I I think they took a lot of pride in that and it's really exciting to see them doing that work here's another question from the audience what other than a college education would be useful for someone re entering society after being incarcerated I and I mean I would be interested in all of your answers like what could help not just from personal but from observations that does first of all was it now isn't affected everybody's different detecting may be different for every single person that is released a circumstance that debt physically create the toughest refer people to wind up in prison I sometimes unique is sometimes general and I think one is mental health is like critical you know in transition and is prepared as I was you know in terms of about education about a degree I'm I'm I'm pretty good in terms of thinking on my feet employable what how might want to manage you know just the briefing from being in a place where I was allowed to think in ways I want a lot of stress myself in certain ways I how do I transition to being able to do those type of things right how do I transition to actually Dana might is he back in a way that I had and utilize in a twenty years in prison right how do I like in my EDC bag was it mean to be a father I have children with me to be a father you need to be a husband in the same light in which a ghostly from granite in people struggle with just like finding themselves can be a woman at times in you know so for the forms I was the anything that basically helps returning individuals in terms of mental health just like debriefing with over soldiers right people people who come back from not being in society we give them the resources to become productive in society in prison is no different right prison is is on the fringes of society it has its own culture right some of it mandated is a man in a culture right and we have to be able to equip people to make the transition back into society we can function dividing you win and if sixteen you came out at twenty eight yeah our our life I agree with everything so he just said it's you yeah you have to prepare people for that the change the adjustment it's it's a completely different world and for someone like myself we kind of grew up in there it was a really different worldwide I used to have anxiety trying to cross the street it would be no car coming to U. K. tell me I was going to get hit by a car fighting way for that light you know and it's something psychologically restricting about that like I have to wait for the light no cars come but I have to wait for the light in this that the briefing you're right that that transitioning from operating in this really small microcosmic world to this larger world with more expansive rules and now you have access to but you don't really know how to utilize I don't know how to manage my checkbook right like I do if I didn't have to pay rent I do not to pay a bill these are things that I needed to learn but no one told me before I came home and I was just like yourself and I think that you know there's a lot of support the people do need transitioning from being incarcerated to being you know released being out here and society I want to go back to the room the question of rules how rigid life can be even some of the running afoul of the rules that you get at in the documentary is is is there something in place to tax and incarcerated student from the kind of misunderstanding that might get you thrown into the box something like what I don't know I I'm just you know I'm thinking about you know the scariest thing in the world I mean this is very scary the fact when you when you get the point what he said is my word against a person will take his word and that person that he was a lot of when that person comes inclusion I'm able reacted if he didn't come to the conclusion that thing stands as the only fact that matters and there's no voice Takestan a variety to say no you got this role no it was a good as the person who decided that it was wrong right it does this there is a scary fact you say you say you said misunderstandings misunderstandings become grounds for new punitive measures is this is this is a very scary thing and we're talking about it didn't extreme application that is in the very of maximum two years extra imprisoned right which would offer a warning decide in in addition to losing jobs really be in college news actually being college in in you did you get hit at the board in India in for two more years and you come home even less prepared with Simon Cowell so I mean there's so many application behind rules in if it is a CBC scary movies discourage we're gonna have was when I was living in it was a game is all about being the situations where you can't get your outcome.

ninety minute four hundred hours twenty years eight hours three years two years
"takestan" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

12:00 min | 1 year ago

"takestan" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Is no different right prison is is on the fringes of society it has its own culture right some of it mandated is a man in a culture right and we have to be able to equip people to make the transition back into society we can function dividing the win in at sixteen you came out at twenty eight yeah our our life I agree with everything so he just said you yeah you have to prepare people for that the change the adjustment it's it's a completely different world and for someone like myself who kind of grew up in there it was a really different world wide I used to have anxiety trying to cross the street it would be no car coming for you can tell me I was going to get hit by a car fighting way for that light you know and it's something psychologically restricting about that like I have to wait for the light no cars come but I have to wait for the light in this that the briefing you're right that that transitioning from operating in this really small microcosmic world to this larger world with more expansive rules and now you have access to but you don't really know how to utilize I don't know how to manage my checkbook right like I do if I didn't have to pay rent I do not to pay a bill these are things that I needed to learn but no one taught me before I came home and I was just like blood teach yourself and I think that you know there's a lot of support to people do need transitioning from being incarcerated to being you know released being out here and society again I want to go back to the room the question of rules how rigid life can be even some of the running afoul of the rules that you get at in the documentary is is is there something in place to tax and incarcerated student from the kind of misunderstanding that might get you thrown into the box something like what I don't know I I'm just you know I'm thinking about you know the scariest thing in the world I mean this is very scary the fact when you when you get the point what he said is my word against the person we'll take his word and that person that he was a lot of when that person comes inclusion I'm able reacted if he didn't come to the conclusion that thing stands as the only fact that matters and there's no voice Takestan a variety to say no you got this role the only wish they could do to is the person who decided that it was wrong right it doesn't scare there's a scary fat you say you say you said misunderstandings misunderstandings become grounds for new punitive measures is this is this is a very scary thing and we're talking about it didn't extreme application that is in a very of maximum two years extra imprisoned right you will sort of World War II decide in in addition to losing jobs really be in college news actually be college in in you did you get the more immediate in for two more years and you come home even less prepared with Simon Cowell so I mean there's so many applications behind rules in if it is a CBC scary movies discourage movie ever had was when I was living in he was a guy who is all about being in situations where you can't get your outcome in danger is imminent there's always this old woman in minutes of dangerous says you're not guaranteed you tomorrow in which you know what today in does not up to you how that happens what are you hoping this documentary will change about the way people think of people who are incarcerated well we like to say that the film raises two questions what is present for and who in America has access or should have access to education and you know I think the first thing is to put through with remind our audience that to humanize the people that are incarcerated in a world where the media so often just stereotypes and demonized as people so that's the first thing there's so much room for that narrative to evolve and change and that is happening already but we think that's extraordinarily important and then as you were suggesting earlier it's untapped potential and the fact that the chair in the low expectations that the cap the catastrophic effect us out on screen is especially communities of color where expectations are that people are potentially not capable not worthy nearly every single day that we were in the class and can into the students' prove that completely wrong service those two things would be a good start do you ever get pushed back about the kinds of crimes that many of the students were in for you know violent crimes due do we need to rethink the way we she is the way we think about all who have committed violent crimes I think I think the phone hasn't come out yet so we we don't know what kind of reaction the country's going to have to that question but I think philosophically for us it was very important to get to know the students and get to know their families and you'll each case in each story is different as the film unfolds and I think we have spent a lot of time talking about innocence and non violent drug offenders as a safe way to thinking about prison and for us we wanted to explode that a little bit and I think on a deeper level as Roddy so eloquently says of how we think about what anyone's life is over the course of what you do that's good and what you do that's bad and what you remembered for and what you can change from and apologize for and that is a we hope the conversation around those things will be maybe a little bit different I would add to that the other side to twenty years in prison twenty to forty is my sentence and I was gonna give a monochrome the reality is I came home like ninety five percent of the people they represent only come home for me the only question is from raises is in a question what is present for understand the fact the ninety five the people come home what do we want to come home the reality is that the crime I committed is never going to go away I can never erase that well it was it was you know it was basically something that I wish I could take back that I can't in in light of that I was still come home with gone this is some point this is the reality this is not the speech wars victims or me or the reality was that the way my sins were structured I was going to come home intraday acidic talking to you and if you didn't know what I would commit a violent crime you wouldn't know but you know when I go in if you lose for tech jobs I'm not any good at I don't touch anything before deciding what I was gonna do none of them knew what that was for me because a person so that told management so I mean that's one of them in it the key was even they don't harm me sometimes I have with them before I told him I wanted to know if the next person comes in here if they might tell you that first you can hear him out because obviously based on a county which had you admire me as a person as a colder before you knew when you tell you something if you don't know about and I think that that is the question for me in terms of this question of crime in with people doing what they did is the fact that those people are coming home and how do you want them to come home do you want to be particle still be productive or is it that you know we don't care what happens while they're there we want to punish them when you come home to come home no one has to say that right now one of you voting for somebody get like lose even people or gets we do not want to see that the my city rather interesting college within not want to see what the commotion was saying we will be when it in if you could you can give you what now is the fact that everyone is different the things that work for people of different in higher education is a viable option for a lot of men when they will present they want to put in a position to come home they could be the people that you need to be when a whole what actually I got another question from the audience asking how how respected the BPI degree yes really yeah I mean it is someone wants to know like had happened I just wanna say is is actually not a bee bee I agree the bard college degree degree all right view real story I was on a train when I first came along and I live in a box nobody knows what meal but New York is like the Bronx is far as you know no fishing going in in in the city in and you come down on a train and go to Manhattan or Brooklyn and as you go down things change on a train so when I don't have five o'clock in the morning it's like you know kids going to school in the Bronx people want to work in the Bronx you need to get the Manhattan I was going to get off and now he was going to wash begin with any and all the damage so I got it have got good what's what I'm actually some sometimes the answer and I just came home suffered this which is why the look so so so I'm sitting down in a moment to train in this older guy gets one he has like this is worn beaten you know cachet brief case in this one I guess she's like he's older is like maybe sixty she's young and she's with a book on a train court just mercy I'm a sad I had bridges machine at the time when the rounds with you I I had her for about the office in a minute before I heard about all the the head and read a book yet and I was really quite sure that he was reading in the that the the man asks are all we we she sent me a book about the death penalty in a threatening I mean I'm sitting there hanging over me right he says old are you a lawyer she says yes she has allowed the corporate law he said almost I'm I'm I'm a financial analyst a manager some is that when you get your court I'm I need you one day and he says when you go to school since with the embers right now with the dot my office right so he says would you go to grad school I went to Columbia twenty two if she gets on the train is manning he was he was a white man he says to me yes with Amherst which we know anything about that who says the and I said I would the body so okay okay Boggs school goes that is how much a board agrees worth okay right now all right all right this is actually another great question when you talk about the rigor another great question from the audience at what point in the middle of the rigor did your thoughts shift from I'm just trying to get through I'm just trying to get through to you know this is my future my future is important to me now I have a good start for that one yeah okay this question thank you it's like the end of my really like my first or second semester and I'm like great I can just sit down to read a magazine and nothing I I was like I'm tired of everything Hey Sir soon to read I want to relax tired and I pick up this magazine I begin to read it's this article and as how may be a paragraph and I'm like this writer socks grammar is horrible like I don't want to continue to read this article because the writing was bad you know what I mean like that's when I realized that the way I thought was different Reno I was operating on a different level of just like weather I mean I within a school when I did and.

ninety five percent twenty years two years one day
"takestan" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

03:34 min | 1 year ago

"takestan" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"On the fringes of society it has its own culture right some of it mandated is a man in a culture right and we have to be able to equip people to make the transition back into society we can function dividing the win in at sixteen you came out at twenty eight yeah our our life I agree with everything so he just sat on the aids you yeah you have to prepare people for that the change the adjustment it's it's a completely different world and for someone like myself who kind of grew up in there it was a really different worldwide I used to have anxiety trying to cross the street it would be no car coming for you can tell me I was going to get hit by a car fighting way for that light you know and it's something psychologically restricting about that like I have to wait for the light no cars come but I have to wait for the light in this that the briefing you're right that that transitioning from operating in this really small microcosmic world to this larger world was more expansive rules and now you have access to but you don't really know how to utilize I don't know how to manage my checkbook right like I do I do not to pay rent I do not to pay a bill I did things that I needed to learn it but no one taught me before I came home and I was just like blood teach yourself and I think that you know there's a lot of support the people do need transitioning from being incarcerated to being in a release to being out here and society I want to go back to the room the question of rules and how rigid life can be even some of the running afoul of the rules that you get at in the documentary these is is there something in place to protect and incarcerated student from the kind of misunderstanding that might get you thrown into the box something like what I don't know I I'm just you know I'm thinking about you know the scariest thing in the world I mean it is very scary the fact when you when you get the point what he said is my word against a person will take his word and that person had a good day he was a lot of when that person comes inclusion I'm able reacted if he didn't come to the conclusion that thing stands as the only fact that matters and there is no voice Takestan a variety to say no you got this role the only wish they could do to is the person who decided that liberty did was wrong right it doesn't scare there's a scary fat you say you say you said misunderstandings misunderstandings become grounds for new punitive measures is is is is a is a very scary thing and we're talking about the big three medication that is in a very a maximum two years extra imprisoned right which would offer a warning this site in in addition to losing jobs really be in college news that maybe a college in in you did you get hit at the board in India in for two more years and you come home even less prepare myself so I mean there's so many application behind rules in if it is actually pretty scary movies discourage movie ever had was when I was living in it was a game is all about being in situations where you can't get your outcome in danger is imminent there's always this old woman in minutes of dangerous says you're not guaranteed you tomorrow in which you know what today in does not up to you how that happens.

two years
"takestan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"takestan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I was only locked up in juvenile hall for short time but honestly it changed my whole perspective on life when I walked in the show me to my cell it was a small room with a bed in toilet right next to each other I was let out for quick showers Rick time in males the food wasn't good at all I didn't want to eat in other kids in there were hard I kept my head down to avoid any problems before I was locked up everything was going downhill I was sleeping in a truck I was in school so behind bars I had a lot of time to think I told myself this is not the life you want to live I realized I needed to be my own person and alone in that cell I found myself juvenile whole when hit the reset button on life when I came out they placed me in school from the first day when the teacher said this is Erin he's the new student things are right I mean friends my personality changed I became open and more positive I realized all those years when I didn't have stable housing and was out of school I was isolated from my peers several months after I was let out of juvenile hall I moved to a group home I know a lot of people have bad experiences in group homes but for me it's been great this shows on my first real home in a long time their staff members I can talk to every night I sit down for dinner with other residents there are some guys in here a comma brothers I know I got back into school and in the housing in part because I was incarcerated but Xin Takestan in juvie for someone like me to get the services in place to thrive now I'm on track to graduate from high school and I feel very hopeful about my future I know I'm going to go for what the perspective on Aaron Jackson Aaron Jackson is eighteen lives in Oakland his perspective was.

juvenile hall Erin Xin Takestan juvie Aaron Jackson Oakland Rick
"takestan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"takestan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Area are considering juvenile justice reforms here's why are media's Erin Jackson on his brush with juvenile hall I was only locked up in juvenile hall for short time but honestly it changed my whole perspective on life when I walked in they show me to my cell it was a small room with a bed in toilet right next to each other I was let out for quick showers rec time in males the food wasn't good at all I didn't want to eat in other kids in there were hard I kept my head down to avoid any problems before I was locked up everything was going downhill I was sleeping in a truck I was in the school so behind bars I had a lot of time to think I told myself this is not the life you want to live I realized I needed to be my own person and alone in that cell I found myself juvenile whole when hit the reset button on life when I came out they placed me in school from the first day when the teacher said this is Erin he's the new student things are right I'm a friend's my personality changed I became open and more positive I realized all those years when I didn't have stable housing and was out of school I was isolated from my peers several months after I was laid out of juvenile hall I moved to a group home I know a lot of people have bad experiences in group homes but for me it's been great this shows on my first real home in a long time our staff members I can talk to every night I sit down for dinner with other residents there are some guys in here a comma brothers I'm not got back into school and in the housing in part because I was incarcerated but Xin Takestan in juvie for someone like me to get the services in place to thrive now I'm on track to graduate from high school and I feel very hopeful about my future I know I'm going to go for what the perspective on air injection Erin Jackson is eighteen and lives in Oakland his perspective was.

Erin Jackson juvenile hall Xin Takestan juvie Oakland
"takestan" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

AM 1350 WEZS

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"takestan" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

"Doing what works we have a three four my professional wrestling fans who are listeners of the so today we have dallas aides with us in his 14year pro wrestling career he became very wellknown hanging out with legends like hall kogan and making movies with people like david ar cat dallas you were telling us before the break that the outcome of any one particular wrestling match professional wrestling match is known but what happens on the way is not known so there's a lot of improv it's not like a movie where everything is scripted out in takestan over and over until you adhere to that script this is this is more the messy improv version of filmmaking on i'm a messy you know because the bottom lights you give him slowly and people get knocked out but you get knocked out in the movie set they call them that you get knocked out and especially roughly and your knocked out on your key well you probably gonna keep going and i know what happened to meet numerous times show but then when you have knocked out that sort of war consume comes in and uh again it's a brutal feeding your body's jakes of people to say what they wanted a professor leslie but the one thing that i think you will agree with you can't say gravity like impacts of the bodies are to really lay pd when your body just spoiled out once like one match food nina main event would be the equivalent of a normal person in five to six automobile accident so that's the kind of impact women war the crowd but um i'm not sure where ryan told you were matt today because what i do today kill people will help them yield the most of the programmes talking about only that how is that that your body is able to withstand what you says the equivalent of five car accidents when one with undue most of us forever will require city bass it's it's really crazy would you can get your body to endure now will you pay for that later on absolute lake gotta remember like people see us on tv on monday night sir thursday night's or paper view here and there but they don't realize that we actually russell to heart.

takestan leslie ryan dallas wrestling professor matt russell 14year
"takestan" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:43 min | 3 years ago

"takestan" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"That it was it was wellexecuted but brady dropped the ball call a blew it he below it now know there was a big discussion over in our house how how did he dropped that it was ryan win it was the only thing that i could think of 'cause you figure for every forever just about when when this guy's practicing for every throw there's a catch you know he's throwing balls and catching balls all day long right he he knows how to catch a football but in this particular instance this look at look like he forgot how to catch a football the only thing i can think of is that you know he did have that that cut hand no the lacerated hand right that have just healed up that's the only any had that weird like pad on the other i dunno stopped making excuses for him he just blew a just blow it i i have to make excuses because he just blow it so all right to your point here's nick falls basically the same play a little bit later in the game kevin harlem with a call cut a home with donald cigarettes it's an off to the target text gang the day today the town he did me no know i will call makes it so great all right so now we're continuing here less than three minutes ago he goes take the lead over the patriots thirty eight thirty three here again is kevin harlem with the call copy iv is on tim take stain dudes many being hidden takestan amic slant the to speak on the ground grilled it in in mccourty touchstone philadelphia they've taken the lead guards that pride of dan bell love this would absolutely love it he said it let it took forever for them to confirm that was a national touchdown he said was the longest six sixty seconds in his life as they almost didn't call it yeah longer than that they were reviewing that thing for like 10 minutes it feels it that way if i like i think it was i think it was six minutes six minutes six minutes now sixty seconds now yeah it was six minutes of just you know just total you know nailbiting nailbiter okay so then finally patriots have the ball okay patriots have the ball it's literally a last minute let i mean that.

brady football kevin harlem patriots philadelphia ryan nick donald mccourty dan bell six minutes six sixty seconds sixty seconds three minutes 10 minutes