35 Burst results for "Taft"

Tonio Liuzzi on His F1 Career

The Autosport Podcast

02:07 min | Last month

Tonio Liuzzi on His F1 Career

"Today i'm joined by two special guests. The first italian driver who started his home pre five times between two thousand six and two thousand eleven in three different teams for going onto rice in twelve endurance. Championship super-g t on formula e v antonio While concern you drank your mess You i'm the second-guessed jonathan. Oh boy who covered. Tony are in formula one at the time And i guess the first time you would have been counted him would be back in two thousand and two macau pre. Yeah i think so. I mean high high tiny macau macau. I've done we'll try to help with coach times but tried to just to kind of meet a lot of the the young rising hotshots coming up and remember much of two thousand and two i think. At the time tonio beat michael schumacher that karting world championship. Macau such a such a big race. Although it wasn't one of his one of his best we can in terms results is always a great great experience race. In macau isn't i think he's one of the race. You can never forget the management the once and it was really shocking experience. 'cause michael is a really unique circuit. I was coming from Wait betty seasoning from what the german former the and whenever after macau and they said the circuit as a while was reading. Grandma goes you can expected to dugan southie like that because there's no more nicole in comparison do my cow that can be For the ball goes. Mcconnell is really unique is really scanty when you're driving with a former foam tree that these much slower than a foam once by taft It wasn't incredible experiences. I was lucky that we can cause in for session. Also sabido many steak because they wanted to offer that acting the first session and Michael the the The the let me do it. Because i i guess the i manage blue there for station in this white or the remaining as was climbing up in terms of speed

Macau Macau Macau Michael Schumacher Jonathan Tony Dugan Sabido Michael Mcconnell Nicole Taft
"taft" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

02:03 min | 2 months ago

"taft" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

"The <Speech_Male> <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Advertisement> lack of the <Silence> underlying hand <Speech_Male> towards <Speech_Male> the end of the conversation. <Speech_Male> Michael shared <Speech_Male> some of the things that have <Speech_Male> been really meaningful <Speech_Male> for him <Speech_Male> and his process. <Speech_Male> Some of the recognitions <Speech_Male> of the world <Speech_Male> and the ways <Speech_Male> of seeing it <Speech_Male> helped him over <Speech_Male> time one <Speech_Male> of the really central ones <Speech_Male> resonated for <Speech_Male> me very <Speech_Male> strongly and it was <Speech_Male> asked for help <Speech_Male> and then another <Speech_Male> one recognize <Speech_Male> that you <Speech_Male> don't know <Speech_Male> and come <Speech_Male> into a <Speech_Male> increasing contact <Speech_Male> over die. <Speech_Male> With the <SpeakerChange> reality <Speech_Male> of our deep <Speech_Male> not knowingness <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> much as michael indicated. <Speech_Male> I'm <Speech_Male> kind of a recovering. <Speech_Male> No it all <Speech_Male> and that's <Speech_Male> part of my personality. <Speech_Male> That i know is <Speech_Male> really very present. <Speech_Male> I like to <Speech_Male> be the one who knows. <Speech_Male> I like to <Speech_Male> be the person who <Speech_Male> has a lot of confidence <Speech_Male> in their viewpoint. <Speech_Male> Who feels confident <Speech_Male> in their answer <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> who generally <Speech_Male> feels like. They've got a <Speech_Male> pretty strong sense <Speech_Male> of what's going on around <Speech_Male> them and <Speech_Male> i do think that <Speech_Male> there are ways in which <Speech_Male> that no wing <Speech_Male> has gotten in <Speech_Male> the way <Speech_Male> of my ability <Speech_Male> to truly <Speech_Male> take in <Speech_Male> new. Experience says <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> open <Speech_Male> up a greater <Speech_Male> kind of flexibility <Speech_Male> toward new ways <Speech_Male> of being new ways <Speech_Male> of holding the self <Speech_Male> even as time has <Speech_Male> gone on. And the <Speech_Male> more that. I've embraced <Speech_Male> not <Speech_Male> knowing the easier. <Speech_Male> Everything's gotten <Speech_Male> for me. <Speech_Male> So just selfishly. <Speech_Male> I was really <Speech_Male> glad that michael <Speech_Male> kind of mentioned that and <Speech_Male> pointed that out as <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> it was definitely very <Speech_Male> resident for me <Silence> in my personal process. <Silence> <Speech_Male> That's it for today's <Speech_Male> episode of being. <Speech_Male> Well if you've been enjoying <Speech_Male> the podcast really <Speech_Male> appreciate it if <Speech_Male> you take a moment to subscribe <Speech_Male> to it through the <Speech_Male> platform of your choice <Speech_Male> and maybe <Speech_Male> even leave a rating <Speech_Male> and a positive <Speech_Male> review. It really <Speech_Male> does help us out. <Speech_Male> If you like the content <Speech_Male> that we talk about on the podcast <Speech_Male> but you're <Speech_Male> also looking for <Speech_Male> a way to have <Speech_Male> a deeper relationship <Speech_Male> with rick's work. <Speech_Male> He has <Speech_Male> a whole bunch of <Speech_Male> online courses <Speech_Male> and paid offerings <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> listeners. Of the podcast <Speech_Male> can get twenty <Speech_Male> five percent <Speech_Male> off any <Speech_Male> of those online <Speech_Male> courses if <Speech_Male> they enter the code <Speech_Male> being well <Speech_Male> twenty-five <Speech_Male> at checkout <Speech_Male> i've also included <Speech_Male> a link to the course page <Speech_Male> in

michael Michael rick
"taft" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

04:36 min | 2 months ago

"taft" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

"Mind the possibilities are very few in in the beginner's mind everything is possible. He's just talking directly to that right. Yeah so we just go back to beginners wind over and over and over again the possibilities just opened up and it feels good. I've really enjoyed being with you as usual. Michael we always have a good time together. Yeah and i. I don't even know if you'd be willing to kind of fit. This question into your on frameworks. i'll ask it anyway. Which is i guess. I just imagine you as a ten year old kid in the environment that you've alluded to an known. I know a little bit more about personally chris. Things you've said. And i just kind of i know obviously it. It had to be the way it's been since it turned out to have been the way it's been in the unfolding of the universe right over the last thirty plus years since you were ten years old. I just wonder. Is there anything looking back word looking into that part of yourself right now that gosh would have been really helpful or would now even be really helpful for that part of you know or that part of you back down to the ten year old boy. Sure i mean I would like him to know a lot of things you know but mainly i would like him to know about being protected and being safe and feeling connection and feeling deeply understood and those kinds of things in oh yeah The fact that there's love. I was very loved so love wasn't an issue but safety protection and stability being seen things like that be really really important for him to know about my ten year old as well michael. Thanks so much for doing this with us. Today it's been really lovely to talk with you you to forest of you for having me so today..

Michael chris michael
"taft" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

04:41 min | 2 months ago

"taft" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

"Are a few. That come up has resting in that. Not knowing. always been very natural for you michael or was that something that came over time no. It's painful and scary. Yeah if in san shameful and all kinds of stuff. We're supposed to know. And i'm a. I'm a arrogant. Know at all to begin. With if i wanna be the one that knows and so it's really difficult but over time you just see you. It's like i remember being in chemistry class. And you know you gotta keep your lab bej clean and you gotta keep all the glassware clean or just fox of the experiment and it's the same thing if i come into all these interactions knowing it's like there's a bunch of chemicals left all over the bench in the glassware and it just messes up the experiment and so it's like you keep it as clean as possible and so over time with just like in in chemistry lab after the ninetieth time. You've messed up your experiment. You realize you gotta keep it clean and in the same way. It's like oh. I gotta come into this just not knowing or it's gonna go wrong but also when i do it. It actually really helps things start to go much better. Are there things you do inside of your mind to make it easier to get there to get to that place of entering with not knowing night. And i asked this in a very real lived away for me as a as a fellow arrogant know at all which is definitely my personal orientation i can find a really challenging sometimes to relax around that and i'm just wondering how that happened for you. Just organically over the years. I think psychedelics helped tremendously Especially multiple second because you really see your own mind again as from the outside. And you see that. Hot constructions are thought constructions. You get that thought. Construction's never equal reality. they're just like a gloss or some kind of very rudimentary map of over trying to do and so over time than a combination of that plus a lot of meditation on the deep emptiness of plus just a lot of embarrassing experiences thinking. I know just just totally being wrong eventually. Live that life. yeah eventually. There's this quality called humility that's decree in there and say hey arrogant know at all. If you want to. You know have a better experience. Why don't you just relax little bit open and let things be a little less constrained by that so. Those kinds of experiences have contributed to this. I would say if i were attempting to do it on purpose right now i would just go directly to the ground being type thing where it's like Being his fundamentally mysterious unknowable and that is actually a more pleasant experience than knowing and is also much. More alive with possibility and relational capacity. And so what do you mean my the ground of everything. Well what do you mean by it now. So but i would say let. Let's say a something close to it. Is that vast spacious of weirdos that is not located anywhere in his itself empty and yet is knowing and loving knowing that meaning knowing something but is is conscious and awake and his loving so that but it's fundamental fundamentally mystery right. There's no way to ever really know what that is and yet connecting with that so delicious and so over time you to start to get into. It feels better to be in the not knowing you know it starts to be more creative interactive relational loving possibilities opened up instead of possibilities closing down mega that quote from here. We are in the bay area. All of us suzuki From zen center way back in his mind beginner's mind book to says in the experts..

michael san suzuki From zen center bay area
"taft" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

03:54 min | 2 months ago

"taft" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

"I had to every single thing on my own and it turns out that asking for help is not only necessary. Supplies really helpful really actually fund brings you at least for me about me into. Let's say zones of discomfort that turned out to be really really generative positive and useful. You know so asking for help. You don't know at all another one and this is crucial. And you can't see it till you can see it and that is understand that everything's schema. I mean you are looking at world through lenses. That are highly skewed all the time. If you think. Lenses are clear and unscrewed. That's a problem and so it's very very important to understand what lenses you're looking through into really be able to see those all the time and like i say it's the sort of thing that you can't do until you can do. But once he can do it. You just realize that it was like you were completely operating inside. You're blind before not totally but it's just so important to be able to understand the scheme as you're working through even very very deep deeper than what that term usually means but the fact that there's always lenses and being able to see that in yourself and what's your buying for these lenses what's what emotions are holding them firm. What emotions are the are keeping them in place and so another thing is having a fearless commitment to letting go of those you know of the emotions that are holding stuff in place and being okay with the discomfort that comes up and the and the not knowing and willing to be wrong in other words. A huge part of this is wanting to be right wanting to be consistent wanting to all that kind of stuff and it's like total summary of everything i've seen. It is total fearlessness with inconsistent. The different parts of your experience don't have to blend together. In a seamless model of the world. The blend together as a story of your life. But it's just really to to see what's there right now authentically for you in this moment so and then i would say for me. It's always been about really deeply understanding that. I don't know like total respect for the fact that i don't know and because when we come into situations and come into experiences and coming to spirituality knowing a lot it just all gets in the way and it gets in the way in a fundamental way it blocks everything and furthermore it's not just some strategy like pretend not no so i had better outcomes after a while you realize you really don't know Like i don't know how the universe works. I mean we might know some stuff about some parts of it but deep deep yours i mean who knows. I definitely know that. I don't know that. And when i come into an experience pretending i know that all i'm doing is gang in the way and it's the same thing you don't know what other people's experiences are you don't even really know about a lot of your own deep experience. So there's i would just say this is a big one unhealthy abiding respect for your own not knowing.

"taft" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

02:15 min | 2 months ago

"taft" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

"We're gonna finish up pretty soon and i wanted to see if i could slip in. Maybe two questions before were down. That are kind of personal. One is when you look back on everything you've done on the one hand. I can really acknowledge the woven togetherness of it. The unification of at all on the one hand on the other hand are there some key elements that really stand out for you when you look back on your own journey that have been particularly important principles insides ways of being a. Maybe even ones that you might want to call out as a teacher that would be a value to others too. I can answer it a little personally as an example. And i'm not saying this would be for you a key headline for me along. The way was the fundamental notion that i could actually learn grow and help myself in those ways like that itself was really useful being able to step back from my own mind and witnesses and disengaged from it and decide identify from super fundamental. Most recently over the last. I'd say several decades concentration practices have been really helpful around steadying the mind and appreciating some of the possibilities in deep meditative. Absorption valuing emotionally positive experiences as aids to practice in a larger context that is fundamentally unattached to them but appreciating emotionally positive experiences as skillful means. And then i would say definitely Recently the value of love the fundamental of love and in some ways. Aided by you my call last. I'll just say an appreciation of the ground. Really the the ground of one's own being as the ground of all being so those would be things i might call out for myself as important in my own journey and i'm kind of asking you a question like that about your own. Yes so on thing. I would start out with is to And thank you for sharing that. That was very interesting and start out by saying ask for help. This is a huge principal. I'm one of those people that felt..

aids
"taft" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

04:57 min | 2 months ago

"taft" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

"You can also find both rick. And i pretty easily on facebook and you can also find me on youtube where we've started to post video. Versions of all the podcasts episodes. Now back to the show queuing off of that a little bit one of the things that we've been talking about here kind of unwittingly like. I didn't know that we were necessarily going to get into this when we started having. This conversation was about ego construction and ego. Disillusion when your your sense of the south becomes a little bit more firmly more versus less firmly more with that means what it implies for person. The challenges people can experience when going through that. And i don't know if this was a characteristic of your experience at all but we've had people on the podcast in the past Roger walsh who did some of the early research on psychedelics. Dr david data and he works at the johns hopkins center right now for psychedelic sciences and psychedelic studies. And you described early intense experiences with lsd. And how you had kind of an inflection point experience where from there. Nothing was the same in general in those experiences. Was there in ego aspect of it that that helped you with whether like seeing the filming of things or some sense of ego dissolution or was it something else that you got out of that all of that started out with some ability to see the ego as an object from the outside like just right away which is already a big deal all the way to like total ego dissolution in a way that never reconstructed. I mean there's there's just a tremendous range that can happen there but it certainly experienced. I think a lot of it outside of taking massive doses of lsd. Which you know is a way and of course but like are their that you've done with people to help them get a sense of the south as more constructed or seeing the south from the outside like. How do you help people into that if you will from different traditions. We have many different ways of digging into the deconstruction so for example. If we're doing terabyte type practices. We're gonna go in with pasta and look at you. Know four foundations of mindfulness. We're gonna look at the body sensations. We're gonna look at emotions. We're gonna look at the mind we can look at you know thinking and that's a kind of deconstruction and then of course even the whole idea of the five scon- does is a kind of deconstructed process. So the whole model is deconstructing. The south each level of that has a lot of practices. Were doing to facilitate that deconstruction. But notice it's systematic like okay star with what it feels like to be in your body then go toward feels like to have emotions.

Roger walsh Dr david data johns hopkins center rick youtube facebook
"taft" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

05:59 min | 2 months ago

"taft" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

"Don't wanna be melodramatic but kind of the classic dark night of the soul where it's like well. If there isn't even a me. Why should i care about improving me. Have you either gone through that. Experience yourself for people in that and do you have any thoughts on it or kind of commentary around. I've seen it very very commonly and in one way it's the natural stage. You know you've been believing yourself to be this concrete ego along when that fractures dissolves and there's just space there. There's a moment of extreme disorientation or just before it really dissolves a moment of extreme fear where it's like oh the thing that's me is dissolving. So there's existential fear which is acute. And that's where this all comes from even if the person is not aware of that existential fear that hang hanging on starts causing all the difficulties and there can be a for some people some of the time. It's important that people hear those qualifiers for some people some of the time once it really does dissolve all the way there can be a day or we months or maybe a couple years even where they're not as motivated because they can't find what to hang onto their they were used to hanging onto the sense of ego. Now that's dissolved. But what else is there. But you know this is a phase. And i think that with a good teacher that fees would be very short no way would it be years the best. It's like the end of the retreat. It goes on for a couple of weeks or something like that. And instead you start to realize that that's still coming from the ego little tiny bitten looking for that kind of motivation to grab onto and like instead it slightly. Further dissolving stuff's to starts arising out of the emptiness right it's always been just arising out of the genus and so we look to see those surges of energy or movement or whatever that are just coming out of the void and that that begins a whole new way of.

"taft" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

05:21 min | 2 months ago

"taft" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

"Of concepts right yup and and that tangle of concepts is attached to another tangle of reactive emotion in if that's in our way and it's invisible we just know that were having all these intense interactions and reactions and reactivity to stop when we see it. Clearly we begin to be able to deconstructed in. Get that tangle out of the way now you rick are master of reconstruction right like oh. Let's improve the tangle and that's necessary to cause. I don't think we can't walk around without models and of how to interact with people and stuff. So it's not like there's this mode where there's no models. Excessive kamei ornamentation cushion with. Your eyes closed for a minute. I would contend that. There's even some thin models but you know some deconstruction is not enough. We also have reconstructed so all your were positive. Psychology and all that is about Harboring happiness all those things. That's reconstruction right.

rick
"taft" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

05:17 min | 2 months ago

"taft" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

"Okay now it's coming back because again the whole spectrum of one's personality wants to be expressed. I don't think of these as different truths about the universe. I think of these as different models or mind states are ego states that i take on just like sometimes you're at work and you're performing a a role or sometimes you're at home in relationship. You're performing a different role and we don't find any problem with that. We can change roles. We can also change mind bottles eagle models about what's going on in order to just better get into certain experiences. I mean if i'm going to do something that Let's say is requiring more. Let's say materialist rationalists kind of perspective on enter that way of thinking. But if i'm doing some particular meditation ritual or something that's the wrong mood and so just move into this other mood and so i don't think of them as competing truths because no map is ever true. As far as i'm concerned it's always only partially true so they're not in competition rather they're just different maps. We take on for different expressions different appropriate facility and so on. I've come to questions connected to this affair open to talking about it. Because i'm just really curious in my own journey which has a certain similarity to yours. I think that i was raised in a fairly secular environment and leaned more and more and more into scientific materialism as time went on. And have as i've gotten a little older started to kind of fuss. The borders of it may be a little bit more. The first is that in the more spiritual aspects of your life. Is there a part of the secular brain that is bothered by the lack of evidence basis for some of fat. Or is that just like a big shrug and and it's all comfortable inside of you know it's more that in all those years of doing all those practices and and being in these other cultures and so on nive seen so much freaky that usually it's the other way around like yeah..

"taft" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

03:58 min | 2 months ago

"taft" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

"With my friend. Peter bowman also very secular in. We started just going to neuroscience conferences in talking to neuroscientists in for a while there. I just went full. Secular like maybe like seven years total. Let's just talk about the science. I don't wanna think about anything else but now these days it's backed way off where i is coming to a more balanced place. Where my sort of personal freakiness magical weirdo side. And the scientific materialist side can talk to each other really comfortably so both of those things are okay for me. I don't pretend that they blend because they don't but they're happy being separate individuals. That's really like exactly what. I kinda wanna ask you about here. Michael because as people who listened to the podcast probably now pretty well at this point. Identify as like a very secular agnostic type of person where i relate to all of the stuff that we talk about on the podcast very much in a kind of psychological perspective. I talk a lot about buddhist psychology and a lot less about like buddhist mysticism or things like that and rick also as you. Now although you know. He's very grounded in the brain captain neuroscience et cetera et cetera. There is a big part of my dad's hard that is very into the out there. Very to the like plausibly nods. Secular as maybe the way to put it out face with the astral projection and everything. There's part of him that just like loves that whole part of everything and i'm really curious like how that transition happened for you because you're talking about some really wild stuff in your background in terms of your family background with a very close relationship with the spiritual in the religious and then into more of a movement and kind of secular mindfulness and then maybe back to more of a healthy resting place and was there something about the more spiritual part of things that you were like pushing back against their something in that that you found really problematic relative to the more secular staff or vice versa. I'm just kind of wondering how that progression took place. There was several transitions. One was into the more scientific mainly because again. I do have a big background scientist. But i studied a lot of it at university more than most people aren't scientists and i really tend to think that way in some situations but especially going further and further into the hindu. Tantric were all especially living in india and doing that. Did you know year after year after year. I kind of gone. Let's say if one's personal personality and interests is a rainbow. I had gone more and more into just one color of that rainbow. Like just got more and more just the blue channel or whatever and so when i got around some people who are being more rational more scientific more linear more logical more evidence based it was like. Oh wow that really feels good because the red channel or whatever you know another part of my personality was really missing that and so it had been kind of neglected for so long that i just really went there. It was like water in the desert. I mean just really needed to kind of corral and everything in linear rationality and that was about the time. Where i was first meeting you rick and as you remember as kinda reactive about it like no there is no none of that crazy weird stuff. It's only scientists only chemicals in your brain. And i would be kind of pushy about that just because it's like that was the the balance that was required and so it's only been as i said in the past few years where it's like..

Peter bowman rick Michael india
"taft" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

03:12 min | 2 months ago

"taft" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

"Can you then give us a summary of the next thirty years of Stuff you've done. We one of the things that i really enjoyed About you and i've learned a lot from you is just the freaking breath of your own experience. Scholarly here deep meditative. There does the whole kit and caboodle. Can you give us a quick summary. A yeah basically boils down to a period of practically daily e large dose. Lsd us for like years however you them in college. But we're talking. You know massive amounts often for a long time and actually had some very very significant breakthroughs on that. Because i was using it partially recreationally. But also with a view to having a breakthrough and that So eventually i moved from out of college. I moved to japan and was doing a bunch of meditation and a had quite a major. Lsd experienced that really unlike all the other ones changed me but this one was like nothing has ever been remotely the same from that day. It was a big one. And i feel like it still was the most significant thing back. Then that was twenty. Four and i has already meditating a lab but that really really got me much deeper into meditation still in japan. Doing a bunch of meditation led to temples and so on but mainly on my own hardcore and then coming back to the states continuing to do that eventually. Got involved in a condo delaney yoga tradition not three at the turbans and so on but a hindu tantric collini tradition very very serious somewhere around the late nineties in. You have to picture that while. I'm doing all this. I'm reading a lot from every tradition. I got involved because of working at sounds true. I got involved with shinzan because you know it was interesting. All the teachers that came through. Sounds i was like. This is the one who's teaching all the stuff that i'm missing. Shinzan young yeah. Yes on young amazing guy. I love his work. I love him. He's an amazing being. What what a weird wonderful guy. He just had the scholarly breath in the linguistic background. And the multicultural background. And that to that. I was like that's the direction i've been going in not finding other people who really have that kind of mind so i started working with him and because of the sounds true connection the publishing connection between me and him which i haven't fully impact here but we had a connection is able to talk to him every single day for years. really really get in there with lots of questions lots of guidance and that because he quite secular that got me more and more secularized until somewhere in the early two thousands..

japan shinzan Shinzan
"taft" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

04:21 min | 2 months ago

"taft" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

"Hello and welcome to be well. I'm forrest can't if you're new to the podcast. This is where we explore the practical science of lasting wellbeing. And if you've listened before welcome back. i'm joined today as usual by dr rick hansen. So dad how are you doing today. I'm really good. And i'm particularly tickled. We have this chance to talk with my friend. Michael taft yeah so today's going to be a fun episode. I think as we're joined by both a longtime editor and a longtime friend of yours and mine as you said michael taft. Michael is a meditation teacher bestselling author and neuroscience junkie. He's been practicing meditation for over thirty five years and specializes in teaching secular mindfulness based practices. He's the author of several books including the mindful geek and non dulas them a brief history of a timeless concept and was also an early reader and editor of one of your book stat. Hard happiness michael's taught meditation at google. He's worked on curriculum development for the search inside yourself leadership institute and finally. He's the founding editor of the mindfulness meditation blog. And podcast. deconstructing yourself. So i'd like to start if you're okay with michael with a quick background on you for listeners. And particularly. I'm wondering why you were drawn into meditation practice particularly as a very secular person and having a very secular orientation in your own life. I wasn't always super secular person. I grew up with a lot of science and read a lot of science and did quite a bit of science in high school and university. And so on. So i do have a science background to a certain extent but In my family it was definitely very non secular both a lot christianity and a lot of really wild out there stuff right under the surface it wasn't like visible but you know my mom was really super interested in everything psychic powers and follows and so that was always being talked about in all that so i wouldn't say that my initial take on the world was just science if anything. It was the opposite in a huge part of my family. Back then was very engaged in christian spirituality now even more so in my family. Some people were going through some very serious mental health issues while i was a very small child and that affected me in some pretty predictable and extremely unpleasant ways so that by the time i was in high school i was experiencing immobilizing anxiety attacks all the time which is really no fun. in that sort of nineteen seventies michigan like middle-class world. We weren't just going to therapists there. There'd be was crazy people and it just didn't exist. So i just on my own and and i was reading reading and eventually in some like magic book or something. I mean it was very non-secular reading llewellyn. But from the seventies talking about astral projection or something. They mentioned how to do this progressively lexington meditation. And so i was doing that and others other things like that and i noticed it helped me to overcome anxiety and i also started doing some of my own just working with my own head just out of my own creativity like why why i have anxiety. What's coming up and seeing that it was about imagining the future beyond twenty four hours from now and so i just started just saw that on my own and started restricting. Like if if i would feelings eighty coming up making sure i was only thinking about the next twenty four hours in that was amazingly powerful between doing these guided meditations and kind of working with my own head. I was able to overcome a lot of anxiety and then you know pain. Relief is a very big motivator. So i was hooked but hooked in super non-secular way. Let's do some astral projection talkers in prayer and as far as gets..

dr rick hansen Michael taft michael taft forrest michael Michael google llewellyn michigan lexington
Interview With Actor, Producer, Jason Blum

Awards Chatter

01:48 min | 5 months ago

Interview With Actor, Producer, Jason Blum

"Great to speak with you. Jason thank you for making the time. And i guess just to start at the very beginning. Can you share with our viewers. Where were you born and raised in. Did your folks do for a living sure. I was born actually in los angeles. I moved to new york when i was very young. My dad was an art dealer. Had a gallery in l. a. Actually called the ferris gallery. Which is my middle name gave warhol his first west coast show. Showed the soup cans there ferris gallery and my mother was not historian They're both still alive. My mom was a professor of art history. She taught different here in l. A. sheets sutter riverside and on the east coast. She spent most of her time teaching at a suny purchase. She's retired now But i definitely grew up with artists than in the arts and with two parents who were in the arts and had not had those parents. I probably would have been doing something else so i guess you know i know that you eventually went off to vassar but before that if you can think back to your adolescence and there may be people at that stage who are watching or listening or whatever. I'm just curious. Do you remember what your interests and passions were as as a kid. Sure i definitely do I've actually been thinking a lot about my adolescence. Because i just read this great book which i would highly recommend to all all of you Fellow zuma's out there called notes on silencing and it's By by a woman named lacey crawford i met her the other day and It's about her experience at saint. Paul's not a good experience. But it's it's it was it. May i've been thinking a lot about my adolescence. Because i went to boarding school as well. I went to go called taft before that went to public school outside of new york city. I grew up in a little town called dobbs ferry

Ferris Gallery Warhol Jason West Coast Los Angeles East Coast Vassar Fellow Zuma New York Lacey Crawford Paul Taft New York City Dobbs Ferry
"taft" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

04:06 min | 5 months ago

"taft" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

"Welcome this is risk profile. My name is mark. And my co host harrison i are highlighting the entrepreneurial journey through conversations with people who have lived the tagline. Be someone join us and one day we will tell your story well tech rhodia. We're really glad that we're here today. I'm sitting with two amazing entrepreneurs From from houston jason nelson the ceo of second md. Who's been building a kind of telemedicine tech company here in houston for the last ten years. And taft is high school student from kincaid. Who has started a mobile cova testing unit and during the pandemic obviously and has been learning a lot of lessons here in houston guys. I'm so glad that you're able to join us. Tech radio were were here at the cloud. Break office actually here on the west side of town and excited to explore what technologies been in your lives in businesses and jason's you've built your business over many years in tatters you're getting started How those things relate so appreciate you guys. Thank you for having me. I'm just glad to be here fortunate that y'all invited me on here. Taft starting with you. You're a high school student and i'm at finals are coming up. I what was And what was what was it like balancing school and and this and this new business. Well i'd be lying. If i were to say a work pretty difficult trying to find that balance between business and school to at the end of the day. I'm a student. I and a businessman second so when it comes down to it. I'm going to finish my schoolwork and then make sure everything's taken care of at the mobile site but It's it's pretty difficult but it's doable. As long as i have good time management and communicating with my teachers my staff and everybody that's involved. I'm sure there are rooting for you and excited to see you too. Good things.

harrison mark jason nelson jason today houston Taft last ten years taft second kincaid two amazing tech rhodia second md one day
What airlines, other industries got in $900B relief bill

Bloomberg Markets

07:06 min | 10 months ago

What airlines, other industries got in $900B relief bill

"Is help for the airline industry in the pandemic release build again hasn't been signed yet by the president but is out there. Our next guest points this out, taxpayers are putting up almost $500,000 for each laid off airline worker to have three months of employment while cooks and waiters get nothing. In other words, airlines air outranking restaurants in relief money. Jonah Sarah Bloomberg opinion columnist joins us Now Joe did thought, go into this. Or was it a simple matter of the airline lobby being more powerful than the restaurant lobby? Well, they're barely is a restaurant lobby. Let's start there. Whereas airlines have been, um Taft up. You might want to say for many decades because airlines have had dealings with the federal government from that many decades between the FAA and, um You know, various various airline regulations and so on and so forth. So so you know you start there. I mean, restaurants are just is just defused. Organization. They're not large companies and even you know, restaurant chains. I mean, putting McDonald's aside, you know, in a city like New York, you know Danny Meyer. It was probably the best known restaurant tour in the city. You know, he has maybe 20 restaurants. And that just doesn't give them the clout that the airline industry has, even though they employ more people. And even though their people are really, really hurting, So, so this is a searing column by you kind of comparing and contrasting the airline industry with the restaurant business. So the restaurant's obviously it is a you know it, Z. It's a diffuse industry. Lots of independent operators historically has had not been a push to kind of organize better this industry that it's so important to many people's daily lives. Where there is a restaurant lobby of sorts, the National Restaurant Association, but it doesn't seem to have a lot of clout for whatever reason, um after the pandemic. After the first round of stimulus, the P P p program, there are a bunch of independent restaurant towards tried to start an organization called the Independent Restaurant Coalition. And they had a lot of success. They got they have they have a bill that would cost $120 billion, which is a lot of money, And the idea is that instead of trying to do it, like the P P p You know, the restaurant industry would get money based on last year's revenues, pre pre pandemic revenues. And believe it or not. The bill passed the house in October. Actually, by quite a quite a large margin, it had more than 50. Sponsors in the Senate, bipartisan But, you know The Senate is run by one guy, and his name is Mitch McConnell, and he was more interested in that three martini martini lunch tax break with he claims will help restaurants. But no one in the restaurant industry seems to think it'll make much difference, at least not in the short term. I mean, at the very least of people start flying again, they will need to go out restaurants at their destination. But it's really a long time before people really start flying in numbers again, Joe, particularly since you know the vaccines are into out there yet so You know what is the thinking behind this? It was thinking there's there's two things. There's two things going on here. Um, uh, The first is that airlines Um You know they will be bringing people back to work. It's easier to give money to a large company that could do one thing that can bring 15,000 people back to work thing. Bring 20,000 people back to work. It's easier, whereas you know, giving money to restaurants is that is a kind of a messier proposition because they're all so many of them and they're so small and it will be. You know, there's that, But the thing you have to remember about restaurants, it's not just a place to eat. Every major city in the United States. Restaurants are at the core. Of their vibrancy and their downtown area. And you know, if you're gonna build a new suburban area, it's going to be built in large part around restaurants. They player hugely important role. In the life of cities. And so ignoring restaurant is really a damn damaging America's cities, and that's what breaks my heart about this more than anything else. So, Joe. I mean, what's the guess? The fate of the U. S restaurant, if you will. I mean, you know these, I'm gonna call them individually owned Mama Pop if you will, but you know that the non chain owned Restaurants. The numbers were seeing and not just New York City, but a kind of across the country are staggering In terms of Harmony or likely have gone out of business are likely to go out of business. How bad is it? Gonna get right? 110,000 are estimated to have gone out of business in the U. S. That's a lot you walked. I mean, and look, I'm a New Yorker. So I walked down the streets in New York City, and you just see them closed up everywhere. Um, you know, some of them will survive. You know, there certainly were. There are restaurants. It'll survive. There's no question about that. Some of them have learned to shift to take out. Even even if the very high end I get I get notices from Daniel Balu, who is one of the great chefs in America. You know, get get our Christmas dinner for $75. We'll drop it off at your house. That kind of thing. So the you know, some restaurant restaurants will survive. But I think what you're gonna see Is that when the pandemic ends, and people can start going to restaurants again, um you'll see a lot fewer restaurants and it will take. I think a generation for restaurants to build up to where they were. This because they'll be so little capital left in the industry. Right? And and you know, as we've been saying all week if you've seen your restaurant closed down if you've had to lay off stuff If you've worked for years to build up a successful restaurant, do you really have the fortitude? Never mind the capital. Actually startle that whole process again. So, Joe, I was listening to Carl Drega Donna speaking with the guys a little earlier on today, and he was talking about his better stake a scattergun approach than a rifle approach. And I'm paraphrasing. But in a sense, this is a rifle approach. Right? As you said, you could re employ a lot of people. If you target just even one airline, where is targeting restaurants is more scattered on. It's definitely a lot more difficult to put together. Absolutely that 100% And I think that the P p p p p experience. Excuse me. The P T P experience has not Been all that satisfactory for Congress. I mean, so many so many, uh, cos got left left out. Somebody felt like you know, larger companies got money that didn't really need it and so on and so forth. So it's really hard to put together a program that would work. I mean, I do think that the program the restaurant industry put together would have worked if had if it had been tried, But of course, we'll never know because it didn't get tried.

Jonah Sarah Bloomberg Now Joe Um Taft Independent Restaurant Coaliti Danny Meyer National Restaurant Associatio Senate FAA Mitch Mcconnell JOE Mcdonald Federal Government America Daniel Balu New York City New York U.
How to Work with a Professional Tiny House Mover: Pricing, Timing, and Logistics with Taylor Tefft

Tiny House Lifestyle Podcast

05:30 min | 1 year ago

How to Work with a Professional Tiny House Mover: Pricing, Timing, and Logistics with Taylor Tefft

"Tell Taft. Welcome to the show. Great. Thank you so much for having me. You're very welcome I was hoping we could just start by maybe you could tell us how how you got into this moving tiny houses and and how long you've been doing it. Yeah. Absolutely. So in two, thousand, eighteen My father and dumb a good close friend. had. Stated that you know they wanted to get into the logistics business and really just start moving. Cars and trailers in different units all over. And You know I I wanted to work and do it. You know and help them. So when I first started out, I did a lot of research and obviously you know instagram facebook user big time in I started seeing these tiny houses that people were building and then I saw you know sometimes people moving them I was like, wow, that'd be really super interesting to help people move these generate. Deliveries to people. All over the world. and. You know about I'd say about six months in I really started getting in touch with tiny house builders on liberation top a top line of ours I reached out to them and just told him a little bit about our. You know our our company in really it just took off from there. That's awesome. So The company has been around for a super long time, but it sounds like you kind of specifically decided to focus on on tiny houses, which which is awesome. We need tie the tiny house movement needs companies to focus on US and provide solutions. Yeah absolutely we could see there was a need for there was definitely a demand and you have to make sure you have the. The right movers move your tiny home. You know that's your. That's what you're going to be living in. You know. Yeah absolutely. Yeah making sure you have the right trucks in. Took practice runs and learning the INS and outs of different homes but eventually you know you. You start to learn it. Awesome to maybe you could walk me through. What the process is like forgetting a tiny house moved I mean. We could almost pretend that that I'm your client. My tiny houses is ear inn in Burlington Vermont and and I want to get it moved to another state. Yup. Absolutely on so it really starts off just like that. Most people either call or email they find us on you know online on Google or they are recommended to us which we get a lot of those. So the first thing I would ask for is you know he'll built the tiny home and All the dimensions of the tiny home itself. You know what's the length of the unit is at standard legal with? In is it standard legal height and transport it? Would also ask for the weight. So. Does it matter if it's self built versus professionally bill? Though it really depends We generally ask for a photo of the unit just because we have experienced obviously some tiny houses are self felt. That may need a little bit more tension and you know than others, but ultimately we try and you know stay. Open minded and still generate a inefficient WHOA for them. Got It. So it's about evaluating the do. So what? Yeah. Actually what, what do you look at in those photos? What are what are the things that you're kind of looking at? As a transportation specialist to to decide you know. What you can do? Yeah. Good, question. So I asked to send you know as many photos as they can. So I can generally kind of take a look at you know the silent trailer that they use them. Only notice a lie on sell built trailers is still. Alive people, purchase old mobile trailers, which they don't realize you know a lot of times. They don't have breaks out they don't have lights. And Mobile home tires are not the same as like sander tiny house trailers that had entered tires on them. There's a large difference dot it. Yeah. Well, if if they're listeners to this show or have read any of my books or resources, then hopefully they're not buying a used mobile home trailer 'cause that that I agree is is not usually a great idea to take a plastic and aluminum mobile home and then build a stick framed tiny house on that foundation. I agree yeah. I know a lot of people they don't realize that or you know sometimes we do have people who contract with like self builders and just wanted me on my late builders in building their backyard which again, that's totally fine. But you know with that being said, we have to think about how many tires are gonNA blow when we're pulling a mobile home trailer across the entry in. and getting magnetic lights to attach to the trailer and. All kinds of sorts of different things. But ultimately, we'll still move the unit as long as we feel it's safe and You know still do everything we can.

Taft United States Instagram Burlington Vermont Google Sander
"taft" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

05:02 min | 1 year ago

"taft" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"All right. We're back on good. By the way. This is not a show all about singing of you. Just tuning in to the first just happens to be a serious house singing campaign songs had been around for a long time, Tom. I found one that you might like. This is William F. Tavis Taft. Ah, who, by the way, you should know who weighed about three at this present weight about £350 and listen to the song. Some. What they're trying to do here is get in the way of getting a wrap or tapped. I think the first thing you said the country shore boys from Brian, her stunt driver so all join in. We're sure to win. Get on with the devil by the one president. You probably wouldn't want to get in a raft with lightning £350. But that was the one and then that Frank Sinatra did. Hi ho. Everyone is voting for Jack. Yeah, He's gonna want a little rest. Everyone wants to back Jack is on the right bank. And now finally, I hoped you cut off the core. You know what? You were really quick to cut off. Barry Manilow's Mandy part two. I didn't even touch it. I was I was warming up for happiness. Every Canady go, girl. There goes the operas. Opposition cur plop, Actually. Okay, let's get to the store is the best one so they decided they'd come up with a song for Joe just to capture the enthusiasm and the energy of a 77 year old. I love Ugo because this is all about you know, the future. It seems like us is just a thing called Joe. He's got a smart alecks. He's got away makes when then knows Preston Jos Sing it share. What is the driver there? Quick top with tears. Joe. That's all we know. You know what this is from right? Happened in the sky 1943 Ethel Waters. John. Happiness is just a thing, Jake. Is just the thing called Joe. Like better Abbey Lincoln. Yeah, he got a smile that makes that fits in with the sleepy Joe thing. Lilacs. Don't be afraid of chopped down by his big fake teeth. He's got away. All right. This is going to vote for that Makes It makes you want to vote for share. Voting for him has that work? I love the fact it's so over the top. It's so old fashioned romantic. It's an old classic that she's revived. It seems it seems like the very kind of thing that stick in the craw of people that don't like it, But that's what I laughed about it when I heard it, but somebody coming up with the ideas like Let's get that we have about that. Remember that song? Somebody finds that song Let's get a chair to sing it Shares and then it's going to get All right. We'll share it sound like it came from share share. Met him. Endorsed him back in February. She wanted do something. This was on some big. I don't have a fundraiser. Something all the big news last Saturday. They had a bunch of questions about their singing. Yeah, Yeah. All right. Let's check in with you. We're watching it via wrecked on north.

Joe Ethel Waters Jack William F. Tavis Taft Barry Manilow Frank Sinatra Tom president Abbey Lincoln Brian Ugo Preston Jos Jake John
The relationship between Justice Scalia and RBG

Fox News Rundown

10:42 min | 1 year ago

The relationship between Justice Scalia and RBG

"Lies in state in the Capitol today, the first woman ever given that honor in the first Supreme Court justice since William Howard Taft and he'd also been the president. Justice. Ginsburg's casket was at the court for two days for people to pay their respects, including President Trump, and the first lady booed when they got there. The president has had nice things to say about Justice Ginsburg since her death, you may agree. You may not disagree with her, but he was an inspiration to a tremendous number of people. I say all Americans, and now, he says, it's his job to fill that seat on the court. I think it's very important that we have nine justices. And I think the system is going to go very quickly. The president plans to announce his nominee tomorrow. Joe Biden, and a lot of other Democrats say he should fill that seat if he wins the election in light of Republicans blocking President Obama from filling a seat in an election year, the seat President Obama would have filled incident. Scalia's went to Neil Gorsuch instead of Merrick Garland. For all the fighting. There's been over Justices Scalia and Ginsburg in life. They were very good friends. People always find it surprising that they were such good friends, Christopher Scully's the Eighth of Incident. Scalia's nine Children. There's a new collection published of his father's writing called The Essential Scalia. Their friendship went back. Really to the early eighties, when they were judges together on the D C circuit Court of Appeals, which is kind of like the second most important court in the country, and they they had a good working relationship that which really started back then they would help each other revised their drafts and their opinions. Apparently, the other judges on that court really didn't like getting advice about their writing and how to improve the clarity of what they're writing in the force of their arguments. But Justice Ginsburg liked getting and receiving that kind of advice, and so did my dad, and they formed what he called a mutual improvement society during their time on the court there. And And they had other things in common. They were they had similar backgrounds and that they were both New Yorkers grew up in New York around the same time, different boroughs but around the same time and shared a love of opera. Good wine eating good food. Both of their thousands were excellent cooks. Marty Ginsburg, in particular, is kind of a legendary cook, who would put together wonderful meals every New Year's Eve and they would celebrate New Year's Every every year is well. So you know, despite all their differences, and all the many things they disagreed about, including a number of opinions in this collection. They had a wonderful friendship were able to kind of focus on the things they had in common. Your dad in Justice Ginsburg, I don't know the statistics on how often they concurred or dissented on cases. But I imagine that they disagreed. Maybe as much as any two Recent justices have my right. Yeah, I think that that sounds right. I don't know the statistics, either. I think people would be surprised by how often they agreed with each other. But on the real hot button cultural cases, they often disagreed one of her most important, most famous opinions. Was Virginia Military Institute case from the mid nineties. And my My father wrote a dissent to that case, which is in this collection, the essentials, Scalia and it was hey actually gave her the draft of that descent a little bit earlier than one usually does just so that she would have more time to kind of Deal with it and grapple grapple with his arguments. And and, yeah, some of his most staying the sense we're in response to opinions. She didn't necessarily right but but joined, And I think that's probably true. Vice versa. Tell us very about the big bouquet of roses she got from him. My dad would get her roses for her birthday and I guess the Ah, I think the last time he did that. So the year before he died, one of the editors of the Essential Scalia Judge Jeffrey Sutton was visiting my father in chambers on on Justice Ginsburg's birthday. And he saw that my dad had two dozen roses for Justice Ginsburg and Judge Sutton started teasing Dad saying, You know, I haven't even gotten my wife two dozen roses over the course of our entire marriage. Why would you do this? And besides, When was the last time she cited with you on a really important 54 decision? You know, he's poking fun, You know, not not really being serious, but My dad gave a serious answer, which was some things are more important than votes. As I think I just kind of a great encapsulation of their of their relationship of their friendship they had they had Very different opinions of politics and of their jobs as a zoo judges and of what laws, men and with the Constitution, man. But, uh, how they voted wasn't the biggest factor in their relationship. It wasn't that those opinions didn't matter. And it wasn't that they compromised their beliefs for each other. But they didn't let those very strongly held beliefs undermine their very deep friendship collection of Supreme Court. Justice Antonin Scalia is writing sort of like a greatest hits album. It's opinions and other writing about the law and the Constitution again called the Essential Scalia. This is really just a collection of his greatest Legal writings, opinions, speeches, essays and they collected together give a really good sense of white. Exactly. He was such a significant Supreme Court justice on it. They're having in one collection really makes it tangible for anybody understand that we'll just as a legal reference work. You've got to think it's going to end up being bought by or four A lot of lawyers and judges know absolutely in law students. I hope you know that he he wrote. Clearly, he wrote, Hey, had so many memorable phrases and his opinions. His logic was so strong and convincing that people just kind of they often went to his opinions first. And so it's good for people to kind of have that as a resource to keep going to those opinions. Even you know, even after His passing is also besides the legal community. It's also like you said. It's very readable, even for non lawyers for just a general interest audience who might, but he was just simply a very, very good writer. Yeah, it's exactly right. He hey, wrote. For? I guess we would now call it out of transparency. You know, Even when he was writing Supreme court opinions, he understood that they should be understood themselves by everyday citizens, not just legal eagles and people with legal degrees. He kind of a recurring theme of his opinions. Is that people should know what the court courts are doing and people that the court should not usurp power that properly belongs to the people. And I think that kind of reverence for the Democratic order is is kind of manifest in his in the clarity of his writing a lot of times if he had a vote, a personal vote on how a case would turn out it may or may not a lot of times did a line with how he ruled, But sometimes it probably wouldn't have right. Yeah, I think that's true. And that's especially true in one example is when he sided with the majority in a flag burning case. The majority ruled that, um, it was constitutional sorry from burning the flag was constitutionally protected speech under the First Amendment so prohibiting that in the state law was unconstitutional. My father often explained that he did not like Three idea of flag burning. If he were a king, he would ban it. But clearly to him falls under the protection of the protection of the First Amendment, and a lot of conservatives to this day do not like that opinion. My father thought the Constitution was clear about that. There are many examples in this collection, the essential Scalia of instances in which he stands up for the rights of the accused defendant's rights. There's a famous case in here where search and seizure cases as well there a couple of those in here where he just thought, you know the police do not have authority, for example, to use Scans of houses, Tio identify Marilou who was growing marijuana without that was an illegal search examples like that s so if he could just pass a law That was one thing, but actually sorry, there couldn't be even be lost for that because they so clearly violated the Constitution, even though obviously he wouldn't have approved of those particular actions. Sure. Hey, was also notice the talker during oral arguments. He has asked a lot of questions and clearly sometimes, though, they weren't really questions. They were just arguments he was making to his fellow justices. Do you think he went into most cases with his mind made up based on the briefs, and the president is a bad thing, but not usually the case. I think that the justices, you know, I can't say for certain, but my hunch is that they often have to go in with a pretty good idea, but I think for the most part, they do ask questions, not just Not just to be heard or not just to make arguments, but because they want to really engage with the arguments that the lawyers are making in the forward to this collection, Justice Kegan first of all, very happy that she agreed to write this beautiful forward, But she she says that she says just that, you know, Dad would ask these questions because he loved argument and kind of loved mixing it up. It wasn't just kind of wasn't just for show though he did. I think you're right. He was very kind of an engaging speaker and There was some study years ago that that found he was. He was the funniest justice by the standards of he drew the most laughter from the courtroom during oral arguments, which obviously isn't the most important thing to do, but just shows how much he he enjoyed that process that love for debate. Did it? Was it a two way street was? Was he persuadable? Absolutely. That's something justice Kagan mentions in her forward. She doesn't say when she ever changed his mind, but says They change each other's minds at times. Well, Christopher Scalia, It was great to talk, Teo, The book is called The Essential Scalia on the Constitution, the courts and the rule of law. Chris Scalia. Really good to talk to you. Thanks so much, Thanks so much appreciate your time.

Justice Antonin Scalia Justice Ginsburg Supreme Court President Trump Christopher Scalia Chris Scalia Marty Ginsburg Scalia D C Circuit Court Of Appeals Barack Obama William Howard Taft Joe Biden Ginsburg Justice Kegan Virginia Military Institute Merrick Garland Christopher Scully Neil Gorsuch
Thousands expected to honor Ginsburg at Supreme Court

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

Thousands expected to honor Ginsburg at Supreme Court

"Thousands of people are expected to pay their respects to the late justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg at the Supreme Court where she will lie in repose for two days her casket arrives today for a private ceremony inside the great hall with their Supreme Court colleagues family and others close to her then it will be moved outside for public mourners in line with coronavirus guidelines on Friday Ginsburg will lie in state at the capitol the first woman to do so and only the second Supreme Court justice after William Howard Taft who'd also been president Rosa Parks a private citizen was lain in honor at the capitol next weekend's Berg will be buried beside her husband Martin in a private ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery the feminist icon and leader of the court's liberal bloc died last week from cancer I'm Julie Walker

Supreme Court William Howard Taft Rosa Parks Berg Martin Arlington National Cemetery Cancer Julie Walker Ruth Bader Ginsburg President Trump
Republican wins special congressional election in California

Glenn Beck

00:18 sec | 1 year ago

Republican wins special congressional election in California

"It looks like Republicans win two special elections for house seats one in California's replace Katie hill she resigned Democrat Christy Smith looks to be losing Republican Mike Garcia Republican state legislator Tom Taft defeated democratic law school professor Trish is encore in Wisconsin's seventh congressional

California Christy Smith Tom Taft Professor Trish Wisconsin Katie Hill Mike Garcia
Man throws dogs over apartment balcony in Arlington, Washington D.C.

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

Man throws dogs over apartment balcony in Arlington, Washington D.C.

"A twenty six year old Arlington man has been arrested after police say he tossed two dogs to their deaths from his apartment balcony after about two thirty yesterday afternoon in an apartment building on north Taft street police received a call about the dogs being thrown off a fifth floor apartment balcony at the meridian building Zachary Hanson has been charged with animal cruelty is being held without

Zachary Hanson Arlington
"taft" Discussed on Uncommon

Uncommon

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"taft" Discussed on Uncommon

"Of process with the LOCK DANCE. He's lived through it twice Aware of it. We'll kind of aware of it in January every this thing and then in terms of it being a strike. My mother-in-law to credit I I was very like every action not going to happen to you and I feel bad about that now. But she's telling us in in January tip she's like you guys need to stop buying up lying on buying up get until not not holding but like make sure you have enough of everything we ought to have enough formula. Have enough by going. Amanda just something like a strike is going to be fine. She's again she's Waugh's Credit for she's going trust me. There's GonNa be things at the super bock without the Bony Led a certain amount of people in. And you'll have to have credit so coupons on guy all night so it's it's incredible that was even we had that now. Ah So used to it but that mindset of like even two months ago she said to someone by the. Y You won't be able to go into calls Yeah if they've got a set amount of people every shot in your country or city will have a plastic shield over the person working behind the counter. The only stuff that's life I it was. Yeah it was that wake. I know. I woulda grade with your mother-in-law if I'd not going through that typhoon in Japan. Remember that so vividly where we basically did a podcast interview in Turkey and then it was like five. Pm and we get on the train back to Shabila. We were staying in sort of the center of Taika and Lauren's like fuck like this is more packed than usual and papal alike freaking. Let have these freaked out. Lookin' they face him zoeller would bags of.

Amanda Taika zoeller Waugh Japan Turkey Lauren Shabila
China sees 242 coronavirus deaths, nearly 15,000 new cases in one day

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:58 sec | 1 year ago

China sees 242 coronavirus deaths, nearly 15,000 new cases in one day

"The fight against the novel coronavirus took a turn for the worse Wednesday night as Chinese L. officials and who a province reported two hundred forty two new deaths and fourteen thousand eight hundred forty new cases of the flu like virus Bruce Taft is struggling to get back to the United States after traveling around Asia right now we know for a fact that we're gonna get physical assessments before we get on the plane to the Philippines worldwide there are more than forty five thousand cases the BBC's Nick beak is in Hong Kong it seems that many more people have been getting the corona virus than we thought send the explanation we're getting from the Chinese state media and also the officials is that what then now doing is there including the number of people who have called corona virus at school without an official test so in other words they bring to see the dog to the doctor's done an X. ray he'll look to that Simpson's and say yes this is coronavirus all those cases and now being included CBS news update on that

FLU Bruce Taft United States Asia Philippines BBC Nick Beak Hong Kong Simpson Official CBS
"taft" Discussed on Uncommon

Uncommon

10:40 min | 1 year ago

"taft" Discussed on Uncommon

"That's your dad's night. Tim Team will be on team like one on. Ross April but he loves He he needs to he. He's problem is he's nine for going for ten minutes. Tenets which is a good thing rapid fire questions ready to get you out of here onto the tennis Who the leaders? The you must respect as has interviews hustle and says well I mean as a heist was always really drawn towards Jeff. PROBST WHO's the host of survivor and thirty more than thirty seasons of. That's incredibly. He's he's all conic you can tell. He's invested in the show. He a lot of stuff does Reacting reacting to characters. That's my favorite part of presenting. He's doing is letting them all. Because I was dealing with people and I was like paypal but the same way that I deal with people in in wakes I love into personal on the sort of person who talks to the person in line in front of them at the bank or whatever. Dad's side yeah because every person I talk to every driver every tax jar every personal because everyone we talk about stories I mean we could go on forever is meant to be read before taking tangible. I think that is beautiful. And I'm Auburn. I get a five minute or ten minutes story of this Eritrean refugee. WHO's sending money home to his four year old kid he's never met? That's incredible store. Yeah I love with that to a few months of New York Lauren. Heizer talked to my wife. She's like they don't WanNa talk to you. We'll for the ones that dude we'd like. We have one guy who was who came on a boat from Sherlock Anchor and came up to Christmas Island. The story Yeah like the store he had getting ear and how almost nearly all of them died but then like six hours later in Australian worship pick them up and why he listened shine shine for the mobile DINU. Because that's how you understand you can easily shut your eyes and say what's going on on Crisanto. Whatever is just it's out of my world but when you make people who've been through it who are so thankful to be it changes your perspective and we're not gonNA get politically but in terms of that? What what was the original question? emcees interviewer Jeff. Survival so jeff. PROBST Savar Guy in terms of interviews. I mean I I I really like I'm not going I'll just completely if you're GONNA Tan. He's an English comic. Who does his own chat show? He's always on now. I mean Look Denton pockets and these guys have forever done it. A bright and they'll always be taught an expert in their field. I love that but I wish I could remains. That's going to annoy me boys. He's good with first and last names in interviews for some reason they really screw me out. I can say he's funny. He's guy he gets all the best on Graham Norton. Yeah Grind unknown. He lets on the I think Cheltenham Shelton and is also he's he's he's exceptional brings huma tune. An interview. Subject is the best. Yeah now I've always Laki threw tennis to do a series for Kia we're driving around plies like Rafael Don and and you know joy Wolford song and Maron shows all these guys and you realize that if you can get someone and I get to being. Yeah you know what's coming you WANNA slightly out of the conference on a little bit of humor. So they're not you know they're not caught off guard. You're GonNa get the best answers yet and Graham the feel like does that really really well with the comedic elements little. Yeah grime Naughton clips on Youtube. One of my favorite things. What's to the frigid Everything what's everything on the on the shopper. And the Cook in the House so I control what's in there's always dips big dip guard Top three dips. I'm Tara Muscle Lotteries here too. So far above anything else getting proper term like what Thomma will pinkston love Ouattara above but But I if I'm in a rush getting creases I can deal with it but propaganda is is just out of this world so I'm going to go into a good homeless And probably just behind it is I mean. Suzuki is good with things I wouldn't have. Yeah I think so. I think he probably throwing above a garage spinach dip. I'm sorry sorry. Sorry all of my third the for me I would say the same. I like a actually really. I've had the differences now. Pool Powell did did this really well is all of old dice. Hamas did not not to Haney is not well. It's stupid to Haney and pain. But the oil they use vegetable oil and it's distinctly different people. My Grandmother's home at home is is completely different stuff. Zeki time I can never have that as a dip a bit Bob Waggin nor is it for me. Baba's good look I think off in a household where it was all about you Kinda sm small good so we we love cheese. They'll always be commenting my fridge. His arm a condiment Gar. Yeah and I mean mine is tomato sauce as some form of Chili hot sauce. Swayed Chilli Chutney. If I'm making a sandwich there's often for sources on that so that's pretty much. My lunch is like this is Sweden mix of Mediterranean with sort of northern European. I'm going to school lunches amazing. I've told Til Ninety this. I used to get my mom to make extra extra sandwiches like Salami and Mozzarell- Finish and I'd sell them to these kids because I wanted to buy fucking talk talk. Show this you're take a role on this beautiful. Allow my God. I can't believe that enhanced. Five Bucks ten bucks. Typical very typical store. I've I've had many like break in Italian kids. Tell the same story. which is the third? We saw that in everyday. That didn't want it. Yeah we're going talk and Cheney what's bastard fucking Yeah why lunch literally for the last month or two his bain like small goods Lots of Salmon Sublime Christmas well PSA Gouda Buddha. Johnnesberg Leftover Two Zeki that I make like every few nights. And whatever deepen whatever's leftover base. I love nothing but the Quad Cinema. Yeah last question for you if you can have a billboard anywhere in Victoria from album. Let's say where would it be first of all and then what would say because I have been on a bill but before you know what it was every this expedia did many many guy as quite as this. It's quite a funny story was daddy ago and then we broke up and it was that Cremona is time and then She go to wops it. And whatever and I remember her telling the story she said at the bus stop and the Bosman boy my lunch she turned around. And the tram bought that had my fights and that she looked up and there was a and she's like these kills me. There was a period of time when always like every billboard on the way I to the airport. If you drive from say Marvan on ceiling. He'd say three of my faces. That was a status surreal experience. In fact I had one time sitting at the junction of Brunton avenues and from he and punt road and my car and I get to my car. Look up and there I am on the on the billboard straight ahead as you sit on punt right and I looked to my left. The car was GONNA go in the condit's in the tool king and the woman sort of looking at this bill and she looks up on the bill wounds. She still looks at me and she looks back and she goes and and I got was that like and then they were just thinking about. We should go to New York advertising. Funny Experience fucking fucking. Hell doesn't answer your question. But if in terms of way with the Billboard Bay Hard pressed to go pass on the knowledge sawn. Yeah in prominent Metal Melbourne and in terms of what it would It would be something along the lawns of this love. Everyone yeah I just feel the world right now is so scary sad and fractured. You know we we live in a time where I you know I grew up in a household certainly left leaning. But you're allowed to have your own thoughts what's now feels like you're either left or you thought and if you do that you know if you do that within you'll left wing right wing conservative kind of middle ground around anymore. Yeah wants to fractured. So I'd love something. That was a message that would just you not table. That's the thing we need the mice rotten. Yeah going back to that book with Viktor Frankl. That was the thing that he spoke talk about. The one thing that makes the everyone can focus on them and be there North San life. What human that makes a human human? He'd delays delays is Is through love and in love being in love with something and showing love through something is sort of decay thing in life he I believe and those are the people that survived the camps. The ones who had that N- also no doubt I've seen that day and I think I think having children really gives you a different perspective on that. Yeah Yeah because you want the best for your child and you start to see things out there that you don't like she narrative a little bit so yeah I think I think that would be just right now. The world's awesome really funny. We apply anything we can do to bring people to give as a good thing sure. Are they coming in joy. Can people find you on the into webs CBS. Well they can find sure dot com that I want to get married shoe remarries. You Dot com the radio. There's also you know have you just celebrate 'em say and and I've just started as a as you mentioned this paid media so PAID MEDIA DOT COM the way offering ourselves media training development presentation skills. All those things the interviews techniques. That's up and running. They can follow me often in a cafe having an magic coffee. Somewhere in Melvin war on a golf course. That's what my wife would say. What's your instagram? Handle again at. Taft hatcher tough. Yeah all right. Thanks Company.

Jeff Graham Norton tennis New York Haney paypal Ross April Tim Team Christmas Island Hamas Suzuki Heizer Viktor Frankl Tara Muscle Lotteries Billboard Bay Hard Sherlock Anchor Crisanto Auburn Cheltenham Shelton
Satellites Track Status of Nation's Food Supply

PODSHIP EARTH

10:45 min | 1 year ago

Satellites Track Status of Nation's Food Supply

"Have you ever wondered. How much food is growing right now? Across the globe. Satellite data is for the first time giving us nearly real time data. Uh on which trump's are being planted which crops might fail because of climate impacts like drought or disease and how many because of rain for us to being cut down for grazing land. Using this information we can better path famines reduced price volatility and work out how to feed a planet of nine billion people by twenty fifty. That's a WHO small undertaking and it will have huge impacts on everything from water usage to soil health to help us. Navigate is fascinating new science. I sit down with Dr Inbound. Becca Russia the director of NASA's food security and agricultural programmes. Dr Becca Russia is also the CO director of the center of Global Global Agriculture Monitoring Research and the University of Maryland in bow was rented by the US State Department for her work on food security and Technologies winning being the US Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation Science Prize Innovation Research and education awarded by the White House's John Holdren the former assistant listen to president. Obama for Science and technology in bows background does in soil scientists in remote sensing and she received a PhD in Geographical Sciences. His from the University of Maryland in bows one of the world's leading experts on using remote sensing for global crop forecasting in addition to being achieved the balance. My cousin and one of my favorite people ever in Bell and her husband Dr Guido Portillo a molecular physicists. have to amazing daughters Natalie and I need it. I caught up with him about last week in Tel Aviv. which is where she was born? Yes born in Israel shortly after moved to the states until I was five and then came back from age five to eleven then moved to Kenya and then moved to the states in one sense cents. I feel very much like an outsider. In a very in another sense I feel very much home like I never left. And it's the first time I bring my two daughters here which is quite emotional for me for to have them here. Seeing where I grew up and a big part of my life and who I am so do you speak Hebrew with them in bow I do. I speak Hebrew with them and so for them. I think it's been An interesting experience to come to a country where everybody speaks what we speak at home and usually nobody else speak so kind of our secret language. So it's been fun to to see them connect and in some way feel very much also that this is part of of who they are two and what things you miss the most about Israel the sun in the winter having twenty degrees in January or end of December the familiarity of people and kind of the directness of people. Anything I missed that I also kind of get confronted with it and in other ways my friends really good friends. Family food vegetables fruit the so Tokyo food food in battle. One of your your light. One of the leading experts in the world on remote sensing in crop prediction. Why full you is is crop and food security such a big issue on a planet which currently has seven and a half billion people on it food security is probably one of the biggest challenges we face in this coming century today day? There's over eight hundred twenty million people food insecure around the world. That number is on the rise again. Due to several reasons one is increasing populations and increasing in demand on meet another big driver's been climate extremes and large droughts as we look forward and and different forecasts predict that we need to increase our food production fifty percent by twenty fifty and there's some variability around that number. But I think some of what's been driving that is one increasing populations to increasing middle middle classes in places like India and China which means there's a much bigger demand for meat. And if you think about the amount of food you need to produce meat versus Vegetarian anti at that obviously has big demands. It's quite an alarming trend and at the same time. Obviously there's a lot of technologies and changes in terms of our production. What we need to do is to be able to increase our food production on the same amount of land? There's not a lot more land that we can really bring into cultivation to meet that demand so that's pretty alarming like increasing food supply by fifty percent by two thousand fifty which is only now thirty years away with how growing the amount of land. How are we going to do that? Part of it is increasing increasing. The intensity of of our captivation of it has to do with the technology of seeds. And I think we're continuing to see increases in yields are low. Not as fast as that was in the past. Some of the big increases we're seeing today is from increasing the number of seasons since I think if you look at Brazil for example with two mays seasons. That's increased tremendously the amount of food. That's being being produced looking at different varieties and more whether it's drought resistant varieties. That's going to get as part of the way there at least to your specialty is helping countries knit together. Analyses of determining what the future food production season is going to look like. Why is that important to know a lot of what I do and try to understand what food production is GONNA be for this current season as it's developing and that's really important because today our world is it's very much globalized interconnected? So what's the quantity of of wheat that's going to be grown in. Russia has an impact not only in Russia but it really has a global impact. Let's really important taft. Transparent information to have global information of how much food is being produced at at any given time that has an impact on how a government decides to to plan their actions. I am policies. It has an impact on humanitarian organisations and trying to forecast where there might be food shortages. And how do you mobilize as soon as possible. and has obviously a big the impact on markets and international food prices given the importance of all that. How did we use to track? Whether it's a country that has a system of farmers. There's reporting everything that they grow in tracking it that way. Various statistical surveys to make sure that there's a statistical representation to that and obviously some countries do a better job at that in a better accuracy and timeliness than other countries. Do I mean the start of satellite monitoring for agriculture. Goes back nearly as early as satellite. Remote Sensing doesn't in general in the seventies and how the US got involved in. This was a big drought in Russia. One of the big wheat production next countries at the time of USSR the US wasn't aware of that drown in that impact and in what ended up happening is the US sold. We'd at subsidized prices. Essentially and then had to fight back in the international markets at much higher prices because there was was a shortage who was I did at Sparta Program at the time that Usda and NASA had together called Lacey and the objective of that really was to try to monitor what was going on outside of the US in the major food production especially we at the time we in corn production and the idea was that satellites were really the only way ah the US could look at other countries in the world getting a sense of what they were producing. And if you look today at what. The vision is for Satellite Remote Sensing and agriculture. It's not all that different. Then when it was over forty years ago. What is different? Today is our capability to finally reach that goal. So you had this vision forty years ago being able to know what another country's crop would yield like what change in satellite so that we now actually have that granular level detail to be able to know with better accuracy. So few do things. One is the quality of satellite data itself the frequency the resolution and resolution. If you think about it is what objects you can discern on the ground from a pixel which is how we look at the imagery. It's the satellite data being open and free at at multiple resolution. New satellites that have come into play both from the European side. Something called the sentinels which today imaging the world at ten meter resolution close to every three to five days which is looked along with land sat satellite for example from the. US giving US close to every three days view the world. So where would you say ten meters just to break it down to that. Means every pick cell is ten meters. That's right it's ten by ten meter resolution. So that means you can can discern quite a lot and if you think about looking at the whole world at ten meter resolution. That's a huge amount of information. And so we've had huge advances in terms of the satellite data also commercial satellite and a lot of cubesats that are going into space which are now giving us close to daily data three-meter resolution and then our compute power to be able to process that kind of imagery and advances in modeling and computational technologies to really be able to utilize that data has been a huge revolution in terms of what we're able to do so go all these lights. NEW ONES IS ACCU- ones. Those are like really teeny little satellites. That are going out. That's right. So they're often termed as shoebox size satellites. They have been sending up in in fleet so I think today. They're close to four hundred or more earth-observing satellites that are called cubesats so the data quality is not as high. They don't have as many spectral bands for example as as some of the other satellites but they're cheap to send up and they've also revolutionized the space of commercial satellite. So those aren't free. They're much more affordable than than they would have been in the past. What are you looking for right? So we're trying to basically look at signals us of crops so one of the things we're trying to understand is where are the crops of the world being grown and there's still huge certainty around that one would think that we would know that very well and And there's still a lot of room for us to improve that second of all is which crops are being grown wear and if you think about it every year that's changing so there's a lot lot of crop rotations and so what that really means you want to be able ideally to know what's being grown in each field during the growing season so that's one of the the big objectives is to be able to classify Within the season where things are being grown to be able to both discern how much of an area is being grown. That's one part of the production equation and the other side is what the yield is going to be and so what we WANNA do. It's really important to have time series of data to look at it through time to look at the volition of the development of crops. But but when you said earlier that we don't actually know where food is being grown. What does that mean if you think about it as a map of where the the world's croplands we have several of those maps but we're trying to continuously increase the accuracy of that? And if you think about crop expansion or changes in where croplands are for example title Brazil and and huge expansion of croplands. There is really important to be able to update that as frequently as possible in particular in in areas where there is a lot of change and we still need better information on where the global croplands are and then more specifically within season a crop type maps.

United States Dr Becca Russia Russia Israel Nasa Director Croplands Us State Department Brazil Us Asia Pacific Economic Coope University Of Maryland Dr Inbound Center Of Global Global Agricu Donald Trump
Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker Review

Q

10:13 min | 2 years ago

Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker Review

"Star Wars the rise of sky Walker opens in theaters tomorrow the third and final film in the latest Star Wars trilogy the end of the road in so many ways for Star Wars especially for this storyline involving Luke Skywalker which all started with the first Star Wars movie back in nineteen seventy seven which I guess in terms of the Star Wars story is actually the fourth chapter and if you find that a little bit confusing you probably still have absorb some of the famous lines from the movies like use the force or do or do not there is no try or Luke I am your father which I know I know the line is actually no I am your father you can tell I'm sort of like walking a tight rope today because I feel like I have two of the greatest Star Wars fans in front of me right now but outside of that JJ Abrams is the director of the rise of sky Walker and just imagine that kind of pressure he's got the tough job of bringing it all in for a landing as I mentioned chasing Garber and Kathleen Newman remaining they went to a special preview screening of Star Wars yesterday before virtually anybody else they're here live in the studio dying to tell you all about it hello my friends Hey how's it going I feel like I said I don't have any good Star Wars greetings is there a good star was greeting hi yeah Jason is wearing a full tee shirts and has the charger beings Baba bobble head well the characters where's your yak give anything Kathleen you know and it's all in my heart something deep down yeah the forces in me so let's talk about this you get a chance to go to the press screening for the new Star Wars yesterday you guys go to these things all the time dozens even a week Jason where even the jaded film critics of Toronto a little bit excited to see Star Wars I mean look everybody's little **** it only comes of this but I think this is actually pretty good to go into this film with a certain level of trepidation I think that if we go in sort of too excited him to sort of objectivity we should be open to its terms I think that a lot of the film critics don't Nestle do that all the time but I think that most people when I'm with the appropriate level of a mix of objectivity in slate excitement of their there for an event Kevin were you excited I was very excited I got there a little bit later than Jason and I felt a little bit of the excitement but once the movie started it was dead silent like this is not a spoiler but when Landau courtesy and gets on screen for the first time Billy Dee Williams I lost my mind and everyone else is like silent which is what it's about which is a huge advantage I mean that like obviously leasing again with public and this is very much I mean it's like man to man the phones at Taft if you see them press for him to kind of a miserable experience you just have to get used to that but a film like this if you're ever going to see this movie theater on the big screen the because you can with an audience to get in the indictment so let's do it I can tell you I can hear you yelling your radio right now Jason I'll start with you Star Wars the rise of sky Walker how was fine suddenly I called the crime you went on Twitter for those over and it look let's let's be one hundred percent clear this is kind of the second and a half ending we've had we had returned the jet I which ended everything and we had episode three which was supposed to end everything Lucas's and then kind of the last job I had a great ending it's like the work done that of those you should go see it I'm not going to worry about it was the last movie that the the universe was going to be bigger and that we weren't going to be focused on the small story and then within us there was the whole notion that the myth of Scott Walker would continue as you see the kids playing with action figure and the kid who picks up the broom with a force you realize that this is not something that's patcher or matrilineal that is going to be bigger than this one little family we did have a question that comes by way remember these characters you really left we're gonna bring those back and focus entirely on that I'll make the story in some ways smaller so it's galactic in scope and yet smaller narrative scope and that is it's doing what it's supposed to do he was hired to do a job which the cap off this saga and it does it and it's fine but that makes it a little bit less interesting a commitment let's get into that in a second Jason says fine Kathleen I mean I think shockingly Jason I kind of agree here I'm I liked it I was very entertained I had a good time even with the jaded critics who were not like matching my energy level I agree that it's not great there is a fine as to what I do think that there's there's a little bit of like a course correction and that they seem to be doing with the last chat I so yeah he JJ made the world a little smaller and really abandon some of the really interesting stuff that Ryan Johnson had set up in the last chat I which is frustrating and makes it not a great movie I think he was trying to please everybody and trying to please those fans that were so upset at the last I and in doing that the narrative suffered and it's also just trying to be a lot try to be a lot of things to a lot of people and then I think it is in any of those things to anybody for example are two foot to a deep in the weeds and lord knows I cut but the way the blade of grass scene six so when I saw the fact that was not mentioned I'm a little upset and the deal is that let people think that this was structured that they knew exactly we're gonna beat I mean they always talk about Lucas having these twelve movie idea sort of written out for some of these are complete stripped away from looks as vision bat that goes without saying but what happened was JJ wrote the the force awakens as an empty are there was no ending there's going to jail just fantastic to look at openings right everybody knows that what has what he's really good at is setting the stage not traded endings hi everyone also knows self admittedly I mean he got in all those interviews actually talks about how this was going to be real tons of room because then he never was supposed to direct the film right other directions where involved actually like a so the deal is that when he wrote the first film they didn't know where it was going to go and it was one of those hand off it's like I'm going to set up the stage hand it off to you and you're going to finish this the second verse of the song that's what Ryan Johnson does run Johnson took all these ingredients and did something for many of us super interesting in super a complex and did essentially ministry talked about what is it to be found the end of of the force awakens is ray handing a lightsaber Luke Skywalker legally saying let's go and the opening shot of last chat I is illuminated at one yeah the last film the film after that episode eight is Luke Skywalker take fully superimposed over shoulder in other words I've been handing off the story to you and Ryan's first thing he does like let's not worry about this story that's not the interesting thing the interesting thing is getting into the nature the metaphysics of the deeper stuff but the force this film goes okay I can't remember the last thing you said okay we're not going to worry as much about this stuff remember these characters you're like let's get him together with all gonna be the same ship they're all gonna gonna ventures together but I want to point out the Kathy when you say that JJ Abrams who has had the incredibly unenviable task of trying to finish Star Wars trying to and Star Wars I I want to really highlight there that is an unenviable task it's even if you're not great even if you're amazing endings try ending the greatest film franchise in history so how does it do Kathleen as an ending to the Star Wars story that we now I mean I thought it was satisfying it's an it's an ending and it answers a lot of questions and as we know Los fans I feel you like we know that change is not answering questions and doing and ray yam asset is flying in and I think that this is just whether you like this ending and the answers that they give you but they give you answers and they give you a very definitive ending and you know some people already have set hi stag JJ Abrams is over party was trending on Twitter yeah it's I mean no one's gonna be happy about anything but I think that he did a good enough job I was entertained and it is it like a nice wrapped up and is it is no one going to be happy with this look at there's always gonna be people upset about this because we care right through well for lots and lots of reasons to ours is pretty fundamental to popular culture and the people have a vested interest and they have in a typical fan communities not everybody but a very vocal minority believes they have ownership over these characters and when they want things to go at a certain way this feeling as for this film actually goes towards a certain direction of giving them what they want and then they end up not wanting what they will think that they wanted that's one thing but I will say that these two fundamental things about changing his his course one lens flares you dialed the heck down with one foot above is one thing I'm like okay I I love that you love letters was god bless you but there's a big thing is he's a red herring you talk about lost as he's a guy who like put a shark and have a logo on a shark and they only got this has to mean something smoke monster has to mean something that's just his step he's trying to trick you a little bit and this film would be much more interesting of those red herrings were not red herrings but actually things that happened so what happens is he consistently in this film gives you something and it's one of those moments the other two phones have moms like oh my god you can do that all my god you can shoot a laser blast haven't hang in the air that's kind of cool all my god you can take a ship and light speed through another ship I never thought you could do that and this film every moment but there was like oh my god that's don't know let's start back that isn't what you think it was ha ha ha I'd something I went I was gonna say second I was going to say that I thought that was but it was it was actually the opposite of this but it makes me really excited to watch it to figure out what the red hearings are and and or not yeah that's not as well as a good teams but I will say that some of those those on inspiring moments that you felt like we're missing I felt them I felt like I was a kid again watching some of this these action sequences and some of that the lights ever seen her so beautiful and big and yeah will transfer to transport you back to your child because I was going to ask if we what we talked a little bit I should stress to set this up by the way I'm I'm speaking which is a corporate Cathy Newman remaining ever talk about the new Star Wars movie rise of Scott Walker what to do right I think the cast is so strong and I think that Jason alluded to it but putting them together like you've got Oscar Isaac daisy Ridley and John by a guy as fan PO and ray and they're together for most of the film and that is a

Luke Skywalker Sky Walker One Hundred Percent One Foot Two Foot
White House Says Phase 1 Of Trade Deal With China Is A Big Win

NPR's Business Story of the Day

05:14 min | 2 years ago

White House Says Phase 1 Of Trade Deal With China Is A Big Win

"The trump administration says phase one of a trade deal with China is secured. It is done. We don't yet know everything that's in the deal but the president said China has agreed to make massive purchases says of US agricultural products US trade representative Robert Lighthizer told CBS's face the nation on Sunday. That the deal will nearly double. US exports to China over the next ext two years. Here's what's in writing. We have a list that will go manufacturing agriculture services energy. And the like there'll there'll be a total for each one of those overall. It's a minimum of two hundred billion dollars. Keep in mind. By the second year we will just about double exports exports of goods to China if if disagreement is in place so the administration is characterizing. This as a big win. But is it Robert. Daily of the Wills Wilson Center or is here in studio with me. He's a scholar on us. China relations and he also served as a US diplomatic Beijing. Good Morning Good Morning. Our president trump said from the beginning that he wanted China A to change the way it does business with the United States. He wanted big structural changes to the way it deals with a I P intellectual property technology transfer. Does this agreement do that. This agreement doesn't treat any of those big structural issues including intellectual property and the Chinese government support to state enterprises. We're not not there yet. So what does this. What does this deal do in this deal? China has agreed to buy more from the United States agricultural products but other other products as well the exact the numbers are somewhat in debate of the US administration saying forty to fifty billion annually total in agricultural products China is indicating. It's more like thirty two. So there's some disagreement there and in exchange for more purchases China. Get some Rollback of American tariffs. They're still tariffs in place. But about one hundred twenty billion in In Chinese exports. That were taft. In September the tariff on those will go from fifteen percent to seven point five percent then there was another tranche of tariffs that was to have gone into to affect over the weekend on one hundred sixty billion in Chinese imports. Those have been postponed. Why did this deal happen now? It happened I think largely usually for political reasons on the American side reasons that were well understood by China and therefore gave it more leverage on October. Eighth Larry cudlow Lawrence could low. Who is the director? The White House Economic Council had a meeting with President trump at which he brought in some outside economists who explained that going down the path of imposing all scheduled tariffs might be recessionary and it would also make the costs to American consumers undeniably clear in a way that could have an impact on his reelection chances in twenty twenty and it appears that from the time of that meeting early October the administration was Gogo. Wanted something that could be called a deal and it also worked out well such the last week it could be engineered to coincide with the passage of the US NCA NAFTA to deal between the United States Canada and Mexico so in the week in which Joie the articles of impeachment went forward president trump was also able to present himself as a great deal maker to two big wins as so to speak on trade. I mean a question. It seems worth asking given that economists came in and told the president like listen. This is hurting people. It's GonNa hurt people Could we have had the same deal with China twelve months ago. There's there's considerable evidence that we could have. China made an offer to purchase a comparable amount of agricultural products back in two thousand eighteen. So with this deal we have to ask what's in it. We don't really really know yet. And there's disagreement. Chinese leaders have announced in China that the United States has already agreed to gradually eliminate all tariffs. That came out as part of the trade war for ambassador. Lighthizer has said No. There's no such agreement so both sides are telling domestic audiences. What they want to hear? What's in it? What will China actually do you? And what would China have done anyway. Because China continues to reform its economy. We talked to Texas farm bureau President Russell Bain. And here's what he said about this trade deal. It should just help the price of commodities the jury's still out on how much roughly thirty percent of farm income is from exports in the United States so Anytime you have someone. As big players China that gets back in the market tariffs or or removed. It's just a good thing. It's just a good thing he says which which for him for agricultural producers is true but we should say this trade war cost this country a lot over the past two or so years? Will this deal make up up for that by the numbers. Well certainly not in the first year. Americans have already paid eighty eight billion dollars in tariffs and those were paid by American importers and in some cases passed onto American families to the tune of about an average of one thousand dollars per family in addition to eighty eight billion. We have paid American farmers twenty eight billion in subsidies subsidies to compensate for their losses. So this has been very costly and we don't know where it moves going forward. The United States and China are still an intent increasingly contentious relationship and decoupling on the tech side On some commodities and possibly on the financial side is still ongoing. So this is a pause at best pause at best Robert Daily of the Wilson Center. Thank you so much for being with us today thank you.

China United States President Trump Robert Lighthizer CBS Wills Wilson Center Chinese Government Beijing Robert Larry Cudlow Lawrence Representative Robert Daily Taft Gogo Wilson Center Director White House Economic Council
Booing The President, What Goes Around Comes Around Politics And   al-Baghdadi's death

MSNBC Morning Joe

14:24 min | 2 years ago

Booing The President, What Goes Around Comes Around Politics And al-Baghdadi's death

"Trump was at the game last night where he was greeted with boos when his attendance was announced during the game accord the Washington Post the crowds sustained booing hit almost one hundred decibels and was followed by chance of lock him up impeach trump when he was introduced after the third inning he good morning and welcome to morning Joe it is Monday October twenty eight and with us we have MSNBC contributor Mike Barnicle White House reporter for the Associated Press Jonathan Lemere president of the Council on Foreign Relations and author of the bulk a world in disarray Richard Haass columnist and Associate the Washington Post David Ignatius and former NATO Supreme Allied Commander Retired Four-star Navy Admiral James to Rita's he's chief international security and diplomacy analyst for NBC News and Msnbc it was sort of startling and sad to hear those chance of lock him up Saturday from the crowd I do no pleasure in that it really was there have been many traditions that have been brought about Donald trump and his supporters and people around that are UNAMERICAN of even fascist like a chance of lock her up the sent her back but the lock lock her up about Hillary Clinton repeatedly has become a centerpiece and that's what that's what dictators they take over and then they start talking about imprisoning others and it's un-american it's it's here here playing chant here aw that's that's unfortunately it's been fad to America's political system through Donald Trump and last night it was turned against him it but again it's it's it's un-american and the people in the stands that were doing it last night shouldn't have done it in fact they learned they have learned from Donald Trump that's what you do to political opponents I hope that Donald Trump after saying that he could be facing this entire campaign will cut it out we'll cut it up because this is I remember when Barack Obama was leaving office a lot of liberals wanted George W Bush tried by some international tribunal. I remember saying don't do it because it will be you on the other side of the presence he didn't have to worry about retribution from person that you follow yeah of course you don't you never think Mike Barnicle nobody everything's said anybody's ever going to follow them as president the United States when they first get in just like Donald Trump it's never he's never imagined it but live by the sword die by the sword and sure enough now you have donald trump having bar conduct an outrageous an outrageous investigation against Barack Obama and Donald Trump even calling the forty fourth president United States treasonous it's like this guy is just not smart enough to figure out that it goes around comes around and what he dishes out to others will be dished out to him that's why everybody has to tone it down stop chance stop with fat stop with fascists like tactics and the rhetoric it's just on I'm American and it's just not right yeah Joe and you know if you know this I mean most people know this what of people in this country just want the entire situation calmed down they want the country to come down they want candidates to come down be tough to have the crowd last night come down because really into it unfortunately but I think it's important going forward especially today as we talk about the events that occurred over the weekend that we take the time and the fought to separate it donald trump and whatever you feel about Donald trump to separate him and how he behaves in how he speaks from the actions of the Delta Force team the special operation now flew in and conducted that mission is to separate things and the best of the best of who we are and what we do around world's in why so much of the world still relies on this was in operation over the weekend Jonathan Lemaire you can speak to that but also last night yeah I mean it is certainly an American tradition to boo politicians who go to baseball games there's there's a rich history of the American president seeing the American pastime William Howard Taft was the first president throwing the first pitch I remember the Barco was there and every president since has at some point this accident has not yet not since taking office but he went last night I think the people around him we're hoping it could be part of the victory lap after announcing the death of album Dotty earlier in the day that of course was not the case but let's remember he's deeply deeply unpopular in the district of Columbia itself received about four percent of the vote there in two thousand sixteen obviously it's a little bit of a different crowd last night the world series it's more out-of-towners more corporate types still he was going to get booed and he was but certainly it comes at the end of what his administration feels like a a a significant watershed day for him to be able to make this announcement of the death as Mar Mike said you could separate the president and feelings towards him with what happened the day before in Syria this leader of Isis killed this is just gives president an image he thinks to put alongside President Obama's announcement of the death of Sama Bin Laden and it certainly comes at exactly the right time his people feel for it's an undeniable triumph to happen during the midst of the impeachment inquiry and it allows him to defend his Bryant C. and Syria just somebody Republican senators critical we know we're here we can we get we're GonNa get to that right now get Sewri obviously just follow pro Jonathan said there is a very long enrich fish presence it sporting events most of them do all different but now but again I speak to the lock him up chance again I it's just un-american it started with Donald trump in fact he's made it the centerpiece of his campaign rallies we find it sickening when it happened rallies Kinda sickening it's we we are Americans and we do not do that we do not want the world hearing has chant lock him up to that he created this president or any president that's all I'm saying let's hope is move forward maybe this one US fascist tactic he and his supporters us during chance that you were going to actually imprison your political opponents so let's evatt behind and just I don't we'll see we'll see if the astros possible going to finish it off in Houston I don't know if Max can pitch game seventy it's possible that's what she will tell me before we came but I said President Trump yesterday confirmed the death of Isis later Abu Baqer al-Baghdadi following a raid this weekend in northwestern Syria by US special operations forces president trump tease the announcement in the tweet on Saturday night writing quote something very big has happened God I know by the way they had not confirmed it happened at the time as the Washington clown show post points out the White House script on the death of brutal terrorist Abu Bakar Al Baghdadi was short but president trump turned a somber announcement into a vivid forty minute news conference that included bravado detailed descriptions of military option rations questionable statements and self promotion from the first day I came to office and now we're getting close to three years I would say doc where's al-Baghdadi I want al-Baghdadi and we would kill terrorist leaders but they were names I never heard of they would names it weren't recognizable and they weren't the big names some good won some important ones but they weren't the big name I kept saying where's Al Baghdadi and a couple of weeks ago they were able to scope amount you know these people are very smart than not into the use of cell phones more than not they're very technically brilliant you know they use the Internet better than almost anybody in the world perhaps other than Donald Trump but they use the Internet incredibly well and what they've done with the Internet through recruiting and everything and that's why he died like a dog he died like a coward he who is screaming and crying and frankly I think it's something that should be brought out so that his followers and all of these young kids WANNA leave various countries including the United States they should see how he died now Admiral S- Ravidas ah yeah we'll we'll see we'll get to the the strategic importance of what we get to but again just underlining un-american language and and the sound of tyrants again he died like a dog died like a coward upbringing screaming it's just can you please explain to maybe three of Donald Trump supporters who fist when they hear that the downside of that ny the forty four American presidents who preceded him did not talk about casualties on the ward even if they were the most heinous casualties like Osama bin Laden are are are you name it or Japanese opponents at war are not cease why we we didn't talk that way or Qaddafi in Libya for example In every case Joe the problem here is there's is that internal desire to kind of take victory lap but it's counterproductive it comes across as unprofessional it's spiking the ball in the end zone and here's the real problem it's motivational for the other side make an argument that it's a deterrent I don't think so I think that that tape will be played particularly that image of the dog in the Arab world is well known as as an extremely negative and that'll become a recruiting tool that the Islamic state uses on the Internet and for the record I'd say they're better than Donald Trump there managing apparently to conduct a global operations without owning a shred of territory in Easter after we took away the caliphate from them which was another good accomplishment they still conducted a massive attack in Sri Lanka using the Internet to recruit proselytizing conduct the operation they will use this footage to motivate their followers to recruit more. It's really not how we WANNA play the Yes it is it is actually a much smaller level it's what you call basically press clippings from from locker from for locker uh-huh where somebody on the other side said something you cut out the press clippings you put it up and you used to inspire other people in something we don't want here let's let's let's let's go Richard Haass go to and talk about the impact of the death and we'll we'll get into some of the other things I obviously I remember us being celebrating at least most Americans Saar cow was killed I believe it was in two thousand six two thousand seven thinking that the guy that really was the inspiration for Isis and of course that just lead to more silence splinter groups we of course all celebrated we had our on the deck of the Missouri moment a little bit when Osama bin Laden was killed and two thousand eleven we're all cheering but of course out of that came the rise of Isis and so I'm wondering it's we see very important death but do we make the same one man is going to end the movement that he was so successful in spreading the short answer is yes there's no such thing as decapitation when comes to dealing with terrorists because whether you call them networks of movements they're not narrow organizations that are highly structured we're getting rid of the leadership essentially Abel's all the fighters they'll they'll reform they may splinter and so forth decentralisation there in formality in some ways is is a degree of strain so I think we've got to keep the accomplishment as meaningful as it is in perspective and more important justice important you've got to take steps back and say are we putting ourselves in a position where we can do this sort of thing again and again as we will need to do and there I think the jury's out or you've got to say it's going to become much more difficult we're not gonNA have the forces on the ground collecting the intelligence we're not gonNA have partners like the Syrian Kurds and other Kurds doing so much there's still questions about the willingness of this administration to work closely with its own intelligence community so again yesterday was an important day but we shouldn't exaggerate it and I'm really worried about going forward whether we're going to be able to repeat this because we're going

Donald Trump President Trump Mike Barnicle Msnbc Richard Haass Washington Post Barack Obama Washington Osama Bin Laden Associated Press Hillary Clinton Council On Foreign Relations David Ignatius United States Isis George W Bush Jonathan Lemere Nbc News JOE Nato Supreme Allied
'Borderlands 3' voice actor turned down role because Gearbox ‘wouldn’t go union’

Kinda Funny Games Daily

07:05 min | 2 years ago

'Borderlands 3' voice actor turned down role because Gearbox ‘wouldn’t go union’

"One on the report why Troy Baker isn't in borderlands three this is Kirk Kirk mckean over vg twenty four seven. If you remember we're of course do this whole Brouhaha for months. Now Randy Pitchford was asked on twitter. Hey is going to be reese. Randy said no troy turned down in Troy. I didn't turn it down. You guys said No. There's been back and forth. It's been ugly here's Kirk at VGA twenty four seven. We recently got a chance to talk to Baker during a fan event for wrestler replay. Let's play series the actor host alongside the other Troy Baker Nolan north. I love that during our chat he was openly disappointed that he didn't get a chance to play reese again in Borderlands Orlands three quote so they came to me and they were like do you want to do this. Baker explained which I said absolutely and then they made it impossible for me to do the role. It had nothing to do with money money. It had nothing to do. It had nothing to do with money. It had nothing to do with money. They just simply would not go about doing it the way that we needed to be done so then it it was like I never said no gosh I I worry Detroit. No he was talking to a reporter. It sounds like he's had a retro replay thing with Guinness just sitting there talking we we asked Baker to clarify what he meant by this scheduling conflicts or something else quote no it was simply a matter that they wouldn't go union. He replied and I can't do a non union union GIG without getting too deep into the weeds of that we had long conversations about this. We always knew going into it that this was going to be the thing they're gonNa take these characters and put them from put them from the tales from the series from telltale into Borland's proper. I've been waiting for this call. They were like do you want to do this and I said yes. They never they never because they would never move from that position. I'm not mad is invariably a complicated different. I'm sorry it's invariably a completely different different character but it's still sings stings fuck. It's hard to read quotes that are like just talking yeah. When it's a prepared quote we all go this garbage quote or a written word in general but when Choi's they're they're doubling up sentences over jabbing now the fun little kind of funny thing that we can do that but I want? I was going to bring in Chad's question because I think there's interesting. relation dossier Chad wrote in to Patriot dot com slash Kinda Funny Games says morning folks with the reveal this morning that Baker as a sack after member couldn't minute reprise his role of reese in Borland's three because gearbox wouldn't go union. Do you think this is something we'll see more of. Do you think this now becoming such a high profile story will before the hands of publishers to allow voice actors to unionize. I also wonder how often this happens. Considering it took one of if not the most popular voice actors sorry known to to make a headline that said I love the solitary solidarity intrigue continues to demonstrate that he is one of the kindest humans lot also. Let Your Voice Actors Union is Randy what the fuck cheers so yes. I already know where you're going with. This is an interesting story. If you all remember we hear kind of funny didn't animated series called kind of funny the animated series in episode one principal Christopher Walken it was played by Donna Troy Baker and the idea of course is that that'd be reoccurring character throughout throughout the entire run of the animated series well on top of that he was going to play two characters. He was gonNA play the principal. He was also gonNA play Troy who was like the Guy Oh I do. Remember who was a character in the show that just doesn't ever have voice yeah and the reason he doesn't have a voice is he's a Wendy's boyfriend. I remember that yeah I'd beef with Troy and we we we did a he pulled favor. I totally which is a gal do fucking voice view. He ended up getting kind of in trouble for it. It was more of a slap on the wrist. If you can't be doing that Shit so dr like hey we want to do the whole like series a kind of social. Whatever the hell it was at that point we had to go through his people and he didn't want to be that way he was he's like dude? I want to do this. Let's make it work but us us especially back then be the people we were. We got maybe two steps into that process and we're oh man it's complicated and it's going to require not too much money but the way that the money had to go was too complicated for what we were set up for gearbox they can handle that shape this and nothing that's of course the argument to be made here right is that kind of funny in the spare bedroom at the kitchen table and nick riding on these scripts was not the same as gearbox however there's a lot of different stuff going on here. Remember that when the David eddings lawsuit stuff was happening right and he was saying he that when he got replaced as claptrap this is a similar thing right that he left left in some he he worked at gearbox did the voice of claptrap and didn't get paid extra because of it. That's not the payment thing. I don't know anything about that other than what eddings has talked about publicly but that's still seems to be the case with how they do the voices in general right after the troy thing happened. I wondered if it was this based on what had happened with us. We obviously we had never had that kind of sag work a conversation before because we never did something like that before so it'd been so much time between borderlands two boroughs three I wondered after this happened with Troy was a union thing and then on top of that. I wonder how that would affect one actually burch who of course tiny team in the game is in the game. It is actually on the economy com slash wrong if I'm wrong about that doing tiny Tina's voice like I was wondering how she got around it because that's the other thing within the union ship makes everything so complicated. No longer on unions do a lot of great. I'm good. I'm not saying they're bad but I know like when I go and do the Lego Games because I'm not union. I have to do Taft Hartley Agreement. That's something weird like I. There's like paperwork on top of paperwork that is like we're bringing this person in because he s voice because of x y and Z yeah and so you know it's this weird thing of also talking to an extent here but for a long time not forever a longtime telltale didn't use SAG after voice actors obviously towards the end the change we're talking about in the borderland right here troy's in that obviously laurabeets in that all that but I remember and I'd have to go look at it now. There's there's something different about the credits where if you look through the credits of a telltale game where they use both union and non union they get credited in different ways interesting. There's so many intricate streak. I can't even talk to complications to use voice sag person or a a union voice actress nonunion voice actor that I I do wonder what this means for. How gearbox does it? You know I think chat ask in general I don't think so because I don't think this is something that happens often in many ways we've talked about. I think it is automatic. I'd imagine this happening all the time. I mean if it happened to us. I'm sure it's happening all over the place that you just don't hear about it because most people don't have podcast that years later the randomly telling the story sure you know but I think were going just different uh-huh directions with this one I'm saying I wonder how much this happens in terms of AAA Games. That's what I'm

Troy Troy Baker Baker Reese Randy Pitchford Troy Baker Nolan Borland Kirk Kirk David Eddings Twitter Principal SAG Nonunion Chad Detroit Reporter Christopher Walken
"taft" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

KIIS 102.7

22:13 min | 2 years ago

"taft" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

"Taft. You right back on your face. Jacob. Notice nervous. Neil. Just watch. Tell me. Twenty two point seven FM. On a. Thomas. Still. Nice. Strike. Gene. Oh boy. No, exactly. Don. No. Ooh. Maybe. Who? Good. Oh. Strange. Sixty minutes of nonstop kiss music or two point seven kiss FM L as number one hit music station. Run around one around. Because he knew that. I knew that. I call you. Go around going around going around party in LA because he knew that I do that. Great. Now. Swath? Now now. This gone. Comb. Sixty minutes up on kiss. Give it. Give it to. Donald. Monday. Gandhi. Yeah. Have you? Five. Payment. Right. You can. This. Young nothing. Thank you. This is kids. Just don't. Just. The way. Sees. This always happens. Don't. Accident. Because I want them. You could call me. Never met Sam. Me. They play one or three point seven kiss FM on. Iheartradio. Alexa, play it like. Magic. Ben. Tease me. Jeff. Path. Tom whidden? See how Sunday Yoko. Celebrate. Way to weed out. That. Then. Tease me. Thanks. Let me demonstrate. Duck duck duck duck. What's up? Check. You bet. Thanks. Bekker's break there. One or two point seven. Oh. Hello. Jason. Why? Bye. Why not? New music.

alexa
Vishnu Viswanath, Taft And Rams discussed on This Morning With Gordon Deal

This Morning With Gordon Deal

00:17 sec | 3 years ago

Vishnu Viswanath, Taft And Rams discussed on This Morning With Gordon Deal

"Park last October were drunk when they died. Both Meenakshi more theater has been Vishnu Viswanath had alcohol in their systems. But it's not known. How intoxicated they were when they fell to their deaths from Taft point Greg's Orleans fifty seven yard field goal in overtime gave the Rams at twenty six to

Vishnu Viswanath Taft Rams Greg Fifty Seven Yard
4 killed in shooting at child's birthday party in Texas, police say

Glenn Beck

00:25 sec | 3 years ago

4 killed in shooting at child's birthday party in Texas, police say

"For people shot to death toddlers birthday party in Texas. Here's Jeff monosso police in Taft, Texas. A four men were killed another injured has to families gathered Saturday night for toddlers first birthday happened at a home in the town of about three thousand north of Corpus Christi police say the shooting stemmed from an argument between the families the haunt now. For two apparently known suspects who

Texas Corpus Christi Jeff Monosso Taft
Border Patrol agent questions U.S. citizens for speaking Spanish -

Orlando's News at Noon with Scott Anez

02:14 min | 3 years ago

Border Patrol agent questions U.S. citizens for speaking Spanish -

"For the latest developments in the trump white house news ninety six five wdbo twelve seventeen on orlando's news at noon good afternoon i'm gene wexler titusville police hit another dead end as they investigate a possible abduction reported last week several witnesses called titusville police last week to report seeing a black teenage girl being forced into an suv despite a possible link between a missing miami girl who resembled a girl who witnesses thought was being abducted investigators now say it was not seventeen year old dana bell guard and they are no longer in contact with detectives in miami about a possible link between the two cases darrell moody news ninety six point five wdbo a twenty five year old orlando man was killed when his car traveled through an intersection and collided with a semi tractor trailer making a uturn it happened around two this morning on john young parkway at taft vineland road the truck driver not heard says he had a left turn signal when the car driven by jeffrey brown smash into his cabin went under the trailer how about this no backpacks none the reminder for seminole county parents students will not be allowed to have any backpacks at seminole county the schools during the last three half days of the school year those days are this wednesday thursday and friday it follows a similar move in polk county where students can't have backpacks for the rest of the year in the aftermath of the santa fe high school shooting kevin rafe uses six point five wdbo not many people speak spanish in montana at least that's the reason given by customs and border patrol agent who detained two women there hear them speaking spanish in line at a gas station both women are us citizens a comment from custom says border agents have brought law enforcement authorities and can question individual i would say that's pretty broad pretty all right gene thank you twelve nineteen here at news ninety six point five wdbo got a problem i four eastbound at colonial reno's coming up right now five forecast meteorologist rusty mcranie scott we might be trading in our cars for boats it's going to be pretty rough out there heavy rain will continue throughout the week across central florida the tropical moisture going nowhere today some sponsored get one to two inches of rain plus which will lead to some localized flooding especially in low lying areas it's a ninety percent chance overall today with a high of just seventy nine so some scattered.

Orlando Miami Seminole County Polk County Montana Reno Gene Wexler Titusville Darrell Moody Jeffrey Brown Santa Fe High School Kevin Rafe Rusty Mcranie Twenty Five Year Ninety Percent Seventeen Year Two Inches
Van strikes pedestrians in Toronto, killing 10 and injuring 15 -- live updates

America's Truckin' Network

01:56 min | 3 years ago

Van strikes pedestrians in Toronto, killing 10 and injuring 15 -- live updates

"Toronto van attack this is the four thirty report i'm troy adams breaking now people were injured in farming and a few years back another individual was run over as well so all four people were victims and passed away toronto police say that at least ten people have died following a van attack on a busy street more in an update from abc news ten fifteen injured after a van barrel down pedestrians on the busiest street in toronto the van was going quite fast witnesses here have said and anyone in its path was mowed down why toronto police chief mark saunders still doesn't know there's nothing that we have on on on him right now though not previously known to police the van driver twenty five year old alex minassian of ontario appears to have deliberately toppled people one after the other canadian authorities said there's no apparent connection to terrorism it was all of twenty six minutes from the time it started to the time the driver was take taken into custody aaron katersky abc news toronto menasian will appear in court in the morning west mac leaves in his richmond hill neighbourhood of toronto this is our first great tragedy of this kind in the toronto area and try will never be the same again the white house issued a statement of sympathy and support candidates prime minister justin trudeau will discuss the attack in the morning sharon reed abc news now the latest traffic and weather together the on southbound seventy one the left lane is closed due to a roadwork between william howard taft road and the lytle tunnel other than that we're not seeing any major lazer accidents on tri state highways at this hour just a few wet roads out there if you see any issues give us a call for two one six three nine seven now forecast from the exergen temporal scanner weather center and iheartradio station tonight.

Troy Adams Ontario Toronto White House Justin Trudeau Sharon Reed Lytle Tunnel ABC Mark Saunders Alex Minassian Aaron Katersky Richmond Hill Prime Minister William Howard Taft Iheartradio Station Twenty Six Minutes Twenty Five Year