18 Burst results for "TRM"

"trm" Discussed on The Knife Junkie Podcast

The Knife Junkie Podcast

04:12 min | 4 months ago

"trm" Discussed on The Knife Junkie Podcast

"On the PODCAST shoot, bob any email bob at the knife chucky dot com bobby. Dot Com. All right. I didn't quite understand this when bob a brother-in-law James Birthday knife does that mean you got your brother in law James Birthday knife for that mean the brother in law got you a knife? No, my brother-in-law. Got Me. So this is the first last night worse. Last. Night was the first time I've seen him since since my birthday and yeah, I mean, I have a playlist on my youtube channel knives my brother gave me and knives my brother-in-law gave me because they always both give me cool gifts But yesterday they came over and he gave me this. This is the new Gerber. This part of their new kind of like how saga has been rebranding garber has been doing a bit of this in the past five or so years, and this is their new knife quadrant. The quadrant and to me, my immediate reaction is it looks like a small production version of. The wheel wheeling slash I don't know if you. Jim I know you don't know what that means I don't I'm not sure if the listeners are familiar with that knife, but it's it's a custom knife I've only seen it a few times, but it looks it's like this but a lot bigger. It's like a big rectangle. It's like a big straight razor and So he gave me this I was very excited because this is one of the knives that gerbers come out with in the past. Two years we've talked about this on supplemental show before when it came out and It's one of the one of the Gerbers I've been excited to check out and So you've got this. Really Cool. Thinly ground hollow ground straight razor. Blade. It's seven CR thirteen movie or seven CR V. I'm not sure what the what the I'm not sure exactly what it is. I. Know It seventy CR I'm not sure what the next number is is what I mean. So it's GonNa be softer steel, but it's going to sharpen up a really quickly and it's GonNa be it's GonNa Sharpen up razor-sharp.

bob Jim garber youtube Gerber
"trm" Discussed on The Knife Junkie Podcast

The Knife Junkie Podcast

04:52 min | 4 months ago

"trm" Discussed on The Knife Junkie Podcast

"All right. We are back on the knife jumpy podcast Hope you are enjoying this video addition if you're watching on Youtube, it's not the I was GonNa say Static Audio Graham, but it's a it's an audio. Graham which which means it's not static. Movie But the way forms are moving but just the picture. So hopefully, you're liking this better again let us know. We would like to hear some comments about this as well as. Kind of what you do like what you don't like any suggestions for improvement where all about trying to make the show is. Good as it can be. So we would love to hear from you just be gentle with me because I am video newbie. So take it easy on me I. appreciate that. All right. Let's Let's let Bob Talk. Let's let Bob bloviate state of the collection Bob you trade it in a knife or something you have been warning for a while I did traded in something that I wanted for a while had loved and then okay. So yeah, I'm I traded my Medford Slim. which was a beautiful knife and I got it from. Alex. from Alex Box, he gave me a screaming deal. And When I got that I got another night from him too. So ordinarily, this is the way I work ordinarily I'd say I, I can't get rid of that I bought that from Alex Alex is my buddy. It's almost kind of the gift thing can't get rid of a gift night In this case, I got two knives with that purchase and the other one The Emerson Iron Dragon means way more to me though I love this US limiting but So I, headed up on blade forms and someone came along and said. I'd love this limit. Can I trade you my new in box trm Adam? And Employment and I said yes and we did that and so sitting at my desk at work I think I think it came on Friday while I was hiking is the trm had him and you know I've been we've had Marianne Halpern show number of times says she was on the interview she's been on A Tory. Yeah to the knife town halls and she's awesome and and three rivers. Manufacturing makes incredible knives from from what we hear from everybody and the one that is really in my wheelhouse is the atom. It's got the three point six inch blade and and it just a beautiful profile and it looks like the perfect combination between total utility and and just simply beautiful as that accent that's right up my alley plus the the cool thing about most of these trm knives if not, all of them is that they make it easy to swap out the Scales and then they make a bunch of different scales available. So instead of having to disassemble the knife to change the scales he just. Remove a couple of tops screws take the scale of but a new scale on. So it's A..

Graham US Alex Alex Alex Box Youtube Bob Talk Bob bloviate Marianne Halpern Bob Alex. Adam
Could Genetics Grow a Square Tomato?

BrainStuff

06:08 min | 2 years ago

Could Genetics Grow a Square Tomato?

"Today's episode is brought to you by smart water twenty years ago. Smart water, reimagined, what water could be from thoughtful bottle designed to supporting smart people who are changing our world through fresh thinking. Like, you smart water has added electrolytes for taste and great tasting water helps you stay hydrated, feeling refreshed and ready to take on your day. Refresh yourself with smart water. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff. I'm Lauren vocal bomb. And if you wander the protas, I'll at your local grocery store, you'll find a dazzling variety of tomatoes from Charrier grape shaped to massive beef steaks and gnarly heirlooms same with squash potatoes, cucumbers and leafy greens. This bounty of diverse colors shapes and sizes isn't the result of natural selection. But rather human selection over millennia farmers and plant breeders have spotted useful mutations and fruits and vegetables, tastier fruit. Better yields novel shapes and preserved those traits through conventional breeding techniques the process is slow. But if you cross different strains enough times eventually you may create something new enough and marketable enough to be called its own variety. That's low and steady. Conventional breeding process is about to get a big boost from advances in genetic mapping with a tomato or cucumber genome in hand plant breeders, don't have to wait months for tomato plant to bear fruit to know, whether the tomatoes will be pear shaped or round. Instead, they can look for telltale markers and a seedlings DNA the code for specific fruit shape, size and color this technique of marker assisted selection promises to cut years off the traditional plant breeding process. One Esther vendor nap is at the forefront of genetic research into exactly how a plans DNA instructs fruit to grow long and lean like a hothouse cucumber or round and squat like a beefsteak tomato in her lab at the university of Georgia post, docs and undergraduates sliced tomatoes in half in place them on a flatbed scanner to measure the precise shapes and sizes produced by different genetic combinations. In a paper published in November of two thousand eighteen in the journal nature communications Vander nab announced the discovery of two. Families of genes that appear to play key roles and making fruits and vegetables, either round or long fruits and vegetables are technically plants edible organs and those organs grow and develop through cell division. She explained to make a certain shape like a long around shape, you need to have certain patterns of cell division. Either the cells divide horizontally, or they divide vertically, which makes sense the more Oregon cells divide horizontally by splitting down the middle. The more. They're going to build up tissue horizontally, creating a fatter rounder fruit. What Vander nap and her colleagues discovered in the tomato. Genome is a specific gene called ov- eight that appears to be responsible for creating proteins that tell cells to divide in a vertical pattern when more cells split side side, the growth pattern produces at en- long gated fruit. Ov- eight is the difference between a perfectly round cherry tomato and an oblong Plum tomato. Wild tomatoes, like the native varieties found in Peru. Ecuador and Mexico are invariably small and round says Vander nap which means pear shaped and other in long gated tomatoes are mutations that came along later as far back as the nineteen thirties. Plant biologists called the long Gatien mutation ov- eight but had no clue about the actual genetic mechanism behind it. But van nap and her team identified the ovation protein as well as another family of proteins called TRM's that interact with Lovie, and it provides another tool to plant breeders who are using marker assisted selection, if the ov- eight N, T R and markers are present. You can be sure the fruit will be in long gated if one or the other is missing. It's backed round evanger, nap says this will speed up the breeding process and let growers focus on trickier traits. Like yield and pest resistance that aren't as easily linked back to one or two specific genes. So now the question is do these advances in plant genetics mean that your produce Iowa soon include square tomatoes? Or pyramid-shaped pumpkins not likely says Vanja nap, but not because it's technically impossible. She says there are tons of bizarre mutations in the tomato. Genome that result in odds looking fruits and since those mutations are naturally occurring. They could be isolated and replicated in the lab, but the problem was square, tomatoes and other oddball. Shaped fruit is twofold. Internet says first there's the GMO problem if plant breeders use, gene editing to directly tweak or replace genes in food plants. Those strains are considered GMO and some people get freaked out by the GMO label, even though genetically modified organisms as category are no less or more safe than conventionally modified organisms. Second exciting new fruit and vegetable shapes may not shape up in other ways of Android apps said some mutations are so bizarre. That no grower would grow them because they have lots of other problems. They only have a few fruit per plant or they taste terrible. Because when you grow fruit in a really odd shape. You mess up the hormone balance, it may not be very juicy or tasty at all. If you really want to grow a square tomato says Vanja up just put a box round it like you may have seen done with other fruit. Like watermelons should those hit the scene at a premium price? You can always tried growing your own at home. There are plenty of instructions online for building your own square fruit boxes. Today's episode was written by Dave ruse and produced by Tyler claim for I heart media, and how stuff works for more on this and lots of other well rounded topics visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. Mating matters is why we do what we do. I'm Dr Wendy, Walsh, psychologist and relationship. Guru. And I've got a new podcast that explores the secret evolutionary motivation for human behavior. Mating matters listening. Subscribe at apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to your podcasts.

Vander Nap Vander Nab Vanja Peru Dr Wendy University Of Georgia Iheartradio Ecuador Oregon Apple Iowa TRM Lovie Dave Ruse Walsh
"trm" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

07:28 min | 2 years ago

"trm" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"So there was very much a gun culture in Mississippi rural gun culture, and this is commented upon in the sixties. When whites went down there to really for the first time and tried to help register blacks, and that kind of thing in Mississippi, and we're really unaware of this earlier tradition of Dr Howard, and they had to adapt to it. A lot of these people went down there really committed to didn't like guns nonviolence, and they would see everybody in the movement had them people like Fannie Lou Hamer used to sleep with a pistol next to her. Mega Evers always went around. Our Charles Evers always. And they. Not like they were initiating violence. But there was this provides protection, right? And we're going to deterrent. So Howard is an example, people are certainly aware of what he's doing. This is small world of black middle class upper class people. They know what each other's doing Howard's going all around the country, speaking people in Chicago and New York, a well, if you read the black press are Wella where Dr Howard. He's headline news. So what were some of the things that made Dr Howard and Washington and fuller. So successful in a time where it was so difficult. What do you think really sort of drove them to to make such large of an impact? Well, there's old nineteenth century expression. Luck and pluck. And yeah, there were certain people that did help Howard too long, but he made his made his way in the world. And we often forget that there's no such thing as a totally self made people, but the reverse is not true either. There's the combination so Howard. I've already talked about he's a very very resourceful guy when he's a student. He's out selling books. He's got various kinds of entre projects to make money in any situation. He'll find a way to get ahead. SP fuller is one of the wealthiest blacks in the country. Again starts in poverty. One of things fuller did during the great depression is he purchases businesses. Oh under they go bankrupt. Like, a soap manufacturer or somebody like that. He'll he'll buy their inventory. He'll put his name on it, and he'll sell and he becomes wealthy through that method. So that's about as resourceful as you can get. You get that kind of grit and determination, we're going to keep we're going to keep this thing rolling. We're gonna find success somehow in a very difficult environment. And not just many great examples like that. So we've touched on a little bit. Before of why why we don't hear more about people like Dr Howard and fuller, and some of these others. But they. We really don't hear about, you know, this is coming across your book was the first time I heard of Dr Howard. And so is there other explanations for why why they've sort of been pushed aside that are not so much ideological or do you think that that really is the key people are intentionally going out there and saying we've got to read crass knowledge of TRM Howard that everybody I've talked to let left-of-centre historians. None of them dispute. His importance none of them. So I mean, I can go off and spout off about how he's is critically important thing. I've never had any pushback from anybody. It's just that. They're not ideological. I guess it isn't a way he just isn't there kinda guy right there kinda guy is somebody who's. I don't know working as a. Worker somewhere laborer or somebody that has had this horrible. Background has gone out. And started organizing a kind of civil rights movement of some sort or or confronting the system and know that's completely legitimate. I mean, yeah, that's part of the story. But somebody who's like a guy that is an example of a self made man of a successful rags to riches entrepreneur, you know, then using that to promote civil rights and be a leader of civil rights. He's not just financing. He is a he is a hands on leader. It's just something know somebody who leads mutual aid organization that provides healthcare without any government aid. I think there's a sense they understand perhaps the implications. They don't like it, and they don't want to pursue it. That's maybe a uncharitable view. But I think that that's that's there. Now, maybe it's just I don't know. They don't like me or something. I mean, I think that's the sky is so many compelling qualities that it is surprising to me. He doesn't get more. Attention. So any other questions from the audience that we may have missed over here. All right. Well, then before we adjourn. I wanted to just ask. Is there anything that? We're overlooking or anything that you think the audience would like to know about Dr Howard that we haven't covered at this point yet. No. I mean, although again, I think his role in the Emmett till case is really quite amazing. And I didn't have a chance to talk about that. But it's in the book south, you wanna know more about it. Let me know. All right. And if I'm if I'm not mistaken, you're going to be around to sign books as well for those who might be interested. Yes. Over at the independent booth in the in the how there's one more a couple more questions. Actually, I think we have time to cover them as well. Hi, I I'm asking a question so bear with me. One of the things that you mentioned that the reason why the blacks were able to have civil rights movements in the sixties and seventies and fight for those writers because they will also able to own guns and any city, which is where I'm from. That's a huge fight right now. And they're taking away rights, more and more. I'm why not just blacks? But for all of us in New York, not just for the city, but for upstate do you believe that trying to fight for those rights to have guns back in the hands of individuals? Well, actually, increase the civil rights and get back some of the other rights that were taken from us. Well, it does certainly an examples. Many examples of it just helps people from being pushed around and Mississippi again is a great example. I think that that could be applied to any to any any context. So yeah, I agree with you. And we see this not only in Mississippi. We see it. Elsewhere. And whites understand this. There were there was gun control legislation in Mississippi and the rest of the Sal that was aimed against cheap handguns, in fact, the expression Saturday night special originated as cheap handgun as a racial slur. You can look it up, and we see that as understood that we want to prevent them from owning arms. And and that is the best argument at all of all I think of their importance in the modern the modern civil rights movement. I think that would be true today. Business people protecting themselves. Other people protecting themselves against harassment. It is a deterrent many many examples I can point to. More question in the back there. I.

Dr Howard Mississippi TRM Howard Charles Evers Fannie Lou Hamer New York harassment Washington Emmett Chicago
"trm" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

14:27 min | 2 years ago

"trm" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Free enterprise, please put your hands together for our folks from the independent institute. Right. Thank you for coming everyone. My name is Ben wiltered Inc. I'm research fellow and the editor in chief of the catalyst website at the independent institute. And I'm going to be introducing are are wonderful speaker today. Dr David beta was a research fellow at the independent institute and a professor of history at the university of Alabama. He received his PHD at the university of Wisconsin, and is the recipient of the Holly prize, professor Vado along with his wife. Linda, Linda, Royster Vado co authored the book TRM Howard, which we have a copy of up here. And we've got many more copies at the exhibit booth at the independent institute is well, doctor entrepreneur and civil rights pioneer. Dr betas also the author of taxpayers in revolt tax resistance during the great depression, and the author of from mutual aid to the welfare state fraternal societies and social services from eighteen ninety to nineteen sixty seven so just to get things kicked off. Thanks for being with us here. Dr beta so the title of the session sort of gives away what we're going to be talking about a lot. But can you just let laying the groundwork? And describe how entrepreneurs and particularly black entre preneurs helped move forward in the civil rights movement was an element of civil rights history. That doesn't get a lot of coverage for reasons you might expect a key figure here is not the only key figure, but a key figures Booker T, Washington. And if any of you familiar with the debate between Washington do boys and Alex Todd forget it. There's a very good book that's been written on that by Jeff morale. It looks at that Washington is the enabler of the modern civil rights movement is not often depicted in that way. And that was precisely as plan the turn of the century. Washington said someday, we're probably going to have a black president. He said that one thousand nine hundred what is one of the worst times in American history for African Americans. So Washington's idea is he's fighting Jim crow. He is fighting. Disfranchised he's bringing multiple court suits secretly. But at the same time very publicly he is pushing for self-help property rights entrepreneurship, and it is in great part because Washington that we are able to build up a black middle class black business class, and they are able to provide a foundation for civil rights. We also coming out of that middle class. We have all these mutual aid organizations, they provide leadership skills to act later activists. So without Washington building that economic structure that ultimately, really. Manifests itself in a civil rights movement in the fifties and sixties and even earlier, I don't think we would have had a modern civil rights movement. And Keith figuring that movement or key example of this of somebody that was an enabler of civil rights, but a very successful entrepreneur was AG Gaston from Alabama born in poverty, he was very resourceful. Man, he worked in a coal. Mine was really at the bottom of the ladder economically. And he's able to come up with ways to sell lunches to people there who need lunches they need. Good lunches. He loans the is fellow miners money, and he saves something like two-thirds of his income during the great depression. He's doing this. He starts using this money to invest in. Funeral homes and banks. He eventually becomes one of the wealthiest black men in the country in the nineteen fifties. And one of his prize investments is a hotel called the AG Gaston hotel in Birmingham, which provides first class service to African American travelers you'd have people like Little Richard entertaining, their future secretary State, Colin Powell stays there is this sort of the high class place, but he also has a room there called the war room. And this is in Birmingham, Alabama. This is used by civil rights activists like Martin Luther King. He is crucial in helping the first black student at the university of Alabama authoring Lucy. This is in the nineteen fifties. A lot of people don't know about her. He provides her all sorts of financial support. But anyway, his hotel the facade is blown off his hotel nearly sixty because racist whites are so upset. Set about what he is doing when he is a follower of Booker T, Washington. He has a philosophy called green power. He carries around Washington's books with him. So we see examples like that. And again, the main focus of my recent work has been Dr TRM Howard. He comes out of the larger context. Well, that leads nicely into my next question. I think that the next slide here. Got a few pictures on there. So Tarum Howard is one that you've spent a long time researching and putting together for the book. So I'll just ask why why have what what drew you to to write the book on Dr Howard while I was writing about mutual aid, an African Americans, and I found this amazing hospital in all black town of Mumbai you call the in hospital, and they were providing through mutual aid thirty days of hospital care in the nineteen forties for seven dollars and fifty cents a year, which would be about one hundred dollars in today's money, and they were providing a full menu of services. This is a very successful hospital. Not a not a dime of government aid went to it. Most of the members of the fraternal organization, the mutual aid organization that runs this hospital are under the poverty line, by any standards, sharecroppers, etc. Yet they're able to provide hospital care at these low prices. Membership in this group gets up to fifty thousand in Mississippi. Anyway Howard is their chief surgeon bring him in. And I guide Mumbai all black down. He says you got to write about Dr Howard. He did all this interesting stuff. I looked him up. I said this guy's amazing now for libertarians. What doesn't he have to offer? Really? I mean, the guy is born in poverty. He's gets a medical degree at Loma Linda university through various examples of kind of luck and pluck, I guess you could say and he becomes chief surgeon of this hospital. But then he becomes a very successful entrepreneur, Dr Howard establishes, a home construction company. He has an insurance company he has a thousand acre plantation in Mississippi the races hunting dogs and quail. He. Builds a small zoo. He's like, I call them the Pt Barnum of the civil rights movement. He's a snappy dresser. But then what he does in. You can see sort of people waiting in the middle there that top pitcher. That's a pitcher of people wavy patients to wait and see doctors at the debris in hospital in the middle down. There. You see where mound bayou is located. It is really in the heart of the Mississippi delta, and if any of, you know, anything about civil rights history. This is a battleground this is the belly of the beast of Jim crow. This is most hostile place, you can go if you're pressing for civil rights. Well, once Howard is a business success. He branches out starts his own civil rights movement. There you see him sitting in the middle bottom right of a board meeting of the regional council of negro leadership. And this group is pushing a message of self help self reliance savings thrift, but. But it's also pushing voting rights they're going out and registering people often forgotten very few people can blacks can vote Mississippi. You have an amazing increase from the very low level to still very low level in the early fifties that's largely because of Dr Howard, Dr Howard forms, this mass movement one of the people that he gives his start in civil rights to the people mega Evers gets his start working for Dr Howard selling insurance. Very successful becomes a key civil rights figure. Fannie Lou Hamer. Another key civil rights figure. It really comes is Howard is their mentor. Well, he warns us organization one of the first things they do. This is one thousand nine hundred fifty one is organize. A boycott of service stations that refuse to provide restrooms for African Americans. Very common Mississippi. Yeah, they'll let you buy gas. But you. They're not gonna let us the restroom. So they start putting these bumper stickers. They have fifty thousand of them. Howard distributes is organization. Don't buy gas where you can't use the restroom, and I people and they said, yeah, I used to go the have that bumper sticker. I'd go there to the service station, and they'd say to me I'd say I want to use the restroom here. He said, we don't have restroom for colored people. And I said just take that pomp right out. And I'm dry any drove they drove off. Well, it was a successful. Boycott by the time. It was over few months. Most service stations have are providing restrooms for African Americans. A lot of that has to do with the major suppliers started to put pressure. This is before Rosa Parks. A successful boycott in the worst place to run a boycott a violent place if you're an African American and I go on and on. But maybe more questions, I think clearly this is a good example of ways that that private organizations were able to come together in effect social change in in their individual in the community without without necessarily getting too involved in the political sphere there. But they Howard. Dr Howard was involved with some of the other civil rights leaders at the time as you mentioned a few of them. But we don't. There's not a lot of civil rights leaders that we had heard of that were more on the side. So can you talk a little bit about Dr house relationship with Rosa Parks, and how that sort of evolved? Very good question. I could do a whole whole talk on that. If you ain't heard of the Emmett till case, Dr Howard was a central player in this case of these young African American teenager who was brutally murdered when he was visiting the Mississippi delta stained with his uncle became a big national case. Dr Howard said there'll be hell to pay Mississippi unless Justice is done in this case, he saying this in the mid nineteen fifties he's saying inflammatory things. He's not afraid to do it. And he is crucial and finding witnesses and evidence in the Emmett till case at them shopping around a movie script at focuses on this. Anyway. Opportunities, and he is Emma Till's mother stays with Dr Howard when she comes to testify at the trial. So he's a very important figure in that case after Emmett till killers are acquitted Howard goes on a national speaking tour Baltimore, Pittsburgh is getting crowds. Like ten thousand people at these places one of the smaller. Stop was Montgomery, Alabama. November twenty seven thousand nine hundred fifty five his host was then nationally unknown minister named Martin Luther King. Junior's father was far better now. And in the audience was Rosa Parks. They got a sellout crowd at the Dexter avenue. Baptist church, or at least an overflow crowd and parks was in the audience listening to Howard park said this was the first event that they had had in Montgomery about the Emmett till case three days later, it was it four days later three or four days later. Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on among Mery bus. When the story was very much, fresh stolen the local newspapers. And she said she was thinking of Emmett till when she refused to give up her seat. So why can't one hundred percent prove that Howard was the guy? But she was there. This was the big the big speech on Emmett till and he also did also. Sorts of other things like criticize strongly Jaeger Hoover head of the FBI which in the mid nineteen fifties. You didn't do if you wanted to stay out of trouble. Actually. Yeah. That's that's something that a lot of people. Don't know. Can you talk a little bit about the way that J? Edgar Hoover was involved in putting pressure on some of these leaders at the time and specifically Dr Howard well J. Edgar Hoover Howard's complaint was that there was a conspiracy. And it really was one in the Emmett till case that more than two people were involved, including some black employees of the two whites that were put on trial, and otherwise any press this, and he said, look, we have evidence to the sheriff is hiding witnesses hiding crucial witnesses we have all this evidence here, and he's going to the FBI. This is after the trial is over with and say you need to reopen. This case federal government needs to get involved in this case is more going on here. And he really makes a pest of himself and people with supporters like buttonholing Hoover and say, why aren't you taking action on this Hoover? So upset that he writes a letter to Howard. He dignifies him who didn't like doing that dignifying. Some critic that he releases to the press it is universally praised and white newspapers the who was letter and criticized in black newspapers, and he's saying Howard is responsible. You know, he's making things up. The FBI is doing this. Great job. Why is he criticizing us and Howard fires back again?.

J. Edgar Hoover Howard Mississippi Dr Howard Washington Alabama Tarum Howard Emmett Booker T university of Alabama Rosa Parks Dr David beta Martin Luther King Jim crow Mississippi delta AG Gaston
"trm" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"trm" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

"To set apart and observe the last Thursday of November next as a day of thanksgiving in October eighteen sixty three while the nation was busy fighting a civil war, president ABRAHAM LINCOLN issued that thanksgiving proclamation asking the country to come together and take stock to be thankful and hopeful in a time marked by conflict and war, and it is because of that Malysz Lewis and profound piece of writing from our sixteenth president that we celebrate thanksgiving today as a national holiday now, if you track the mashed potatoes on your thanksgiving table through the winding path of history, you wind up here at that front page of the paper with that presidential proclamation are American landscape, obviously looks a little different these days instead of dispatches from the battlefields in American states and casualty reports in the tens of thousands and wrenching debates over freedom versus enslavement our newspapers today filled with wildfires and troops at the border in wondering when the next indict. Will come down. But even in times of national strife and times of national division. We still do set apart the day to take in the fruitful fields in healthful skies with one heart one voice as a whole American people. And it's probably the understatement of the decade to say that's not often an easy lift, but here's to the attempt. And here's wishing you a happy peaceful and hopeful day of thanksgiving. We'll be right back. Programming note last week in MSNBC premiered, a new project hosted by the great, Rachel Maddow. Oh, it's a documentary about Richard Nixon called the trail. If you missed it, do not worry betrayal tells a fascinating story about Richard Nixon. But it's not about Watergate. This is something that Nixon did on his way to the presidency back during the election of nineteen sixty eight. Nixon leads in the polls, but his White House. Dreams are haunted by LBJ's progress toward ending the war. Bixente worries about that the prospect of an October surprise the piece is being negotiated that it's in hand. And that it boosts the prospects of Hubert Humphrey, mid October Lyndon Johnson, fuels, Nixon's, worst, fear. Speaking addicted that you. In a conference. Call LBJ updates the presidential candidates confidentially on a big breakthrough in the negotiations. North Vietnam at last is willing to talk with South Vietnam. Absolute. Comment to the substance of these matters being juries to your country after all this work all year Johnson finally had a package that the north yet AMIS would accept and he was selling to the South Vietnamese. Nixon gets a top secret briefing from the commander in chief on his progress toward peace, and what does Nixon do he betrays the president and the nation. What Nixon did with that information? How he got away with what president Johnson called treason, and what is actions cost thousands of Americans. And Vietnamese are the subject of TRM's special report called betrayal. You can catch. It this Friday at nine pm eastern on MSNBC definitely watch N DVR watch it again that does it for us tonight. We'll see you again tomorrow the way chill Madame show nine. Nine on MSNBC. The fact of the matter was he was this is a story that is not well known stuck in my mind about it was this was in the white, but it really should be especially maybe now. Oh my God. MSNBC present bagman. Search bag man to subscribe now..

Richard Nixon Lyndon Johnson president MSNBC Rachel Maddow Malysz Lewis ABRAHAM LINCOLN Watergate Hubert Humphrey Bixente North Vietnam White House South Vietnam TRM
"trm" Discussed on The Read

The Read

03:25 min | 2 years ago

"trm" Discussed on The Read

"None in them niggers involved with my music. Thanks so much. Appreciate it. Goodbye. Oh, no. So she gets off of the album, but allegedly sensitive funk flakes to play, and I'm assuming it's because now Zonta that she was really excited which would explain why she was so pressed to get the she cleared in the first one. Okay. Don't understand why it's actually say like it had like a feature from like one of the most iconic like she was hyping the song. I mean. Yes. But that I still can't believe funk. Flex will play that on hot ninety seven like Donald buddy listened to. Nobody. But I'm trying to understand why after being told that no you can't right? I mean what he anyway, this is he played it poor decisions. Obviously a ten year old today knows how to rib audio from the radio and position on tumbler. So it made its around somehow. I'm sure if you want to go and find it at the moment somewhere, and so MS Tracy wants her things. Suing for copyright and Frenchman, when are you then filed in US district court in calif- TRM? Like monetary damages and they're also blocking Nicki Menaj from doing anything further with this. I mean, I'm sure she wishes the song never even existed this point. I'm sure also that at some point. This will all go away. Because if you will settle right what she has to. I'm just confused like couldn't this have just gone up on soundcloud or something some free platform like hits you sample. I feel like the issue with sampling has always been you need to get clearance. If you wanted then turn around and make any money off that try. No, no, not that simple. Okay. No, no, copyright infringement is just girl. I don't want you to use my things. Oh, well, never mind. It isn't just like you're making money off of it. It's it really can be very complicated. Okay. You know what I'm saying? And I'm assuming because she had to do while I'm going to say she had to, but because Nikki did that whole thing with like, oh, I'm trying to find trades jet. We're trying to get in touch with threes Chapman, and Tracy actually saying no and making shortest sue on top of that this lady for whatever reason was completely decided in the fact that she did not want her music affiliated with Nicki Menaj as she has a right. The same way if in the future somebody wants to have a wanna Nikki songs and says bitch. I don't want you use them. I shit it on matter if they put on their album or not they can't just stand the rate the song to whoever and let people listened to it. Anyway, because that means that anybody can then take that song and put it on their device elicited whenever they want. Somebody else can take it in sampling somebody you know, what I mean like, I don't want you use them. I should either. I want anybody hearing you attempting to sing you. Okay here. You got you. You know? You know? I mean, I don't know the difference in in money. What it could look like in terms of the lawsuit. Since she didn't actually make any money from it. But I know that a lawsuit is very much. Reasonable and she will more than likely win cry. So if I was thinking it'll be calling flex and hot in any seven leg y'all putting in on this. I'm putting y'all paying at least sixty percent of this..

Nicki Menaj Zonta MS Tracy Donald buddy Nikki US calif- TRM Chapman sixty percent ten year
"trm" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

Talk 650 KSTE

09:13 min | 2 years ago

"trm" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

"Marathon fueling the American spirit Welcome back to Jim, Bohannon show with our guest David veto a research fellow at the independent institute and professor of history. At, the university, of Alabama Tuscaloosa Abby co, author, of TRM Howard. Doctor. Entrepreneur and civil rights pioneer we're talking about a reopening of the Emmett till murder case yes of the sixty three years ago now Clearly as you note witnesses potential, defendants in, the like in many cases, dead, this is a. Test. Of the Justice department charge of investigating long ago burgers that are thought to have been racially motivated. And The. Justice department in, the, last ten, years it's efforts led to five, successful prosecutions glue that of, Edgar Ray Killen involved in the murders of the three. Civil rights workers in the Mississippi who died in prison this past year, that. Of course was the subject of the movie Mississippi burning starring Gene Hackman which some of you may have seen over the years So the last. Successful prosecution came eight years ago when a former Alabama, state trooper was convicted of manslaughter for the killing of one Jimmy Lee Jackson or protesters debt led to the Selma to Montgomery March again to the extent that that. That the law, still applies that's fine and good in the case, of murder I don't suppose, that there is ever a statute of limitations is there Now I'm not a lawyer but no I don't I don't believe there then again there's also the the other. Notion that there are federal civil rights laws involved here that. In fact it would be quite possible to be tried twice in one of these cases once for the state law of committing murder and once, for the federal law involving the violation of someone's civil rights. And, I believe the courts have held that such trials are. For two different crimes. And therefore do not constitute. Double jeopardy that's as I recall my memory of the reading. Of this So in other words it's not an academic exercise, our actor things that presumably. Can be done in the in these cases there would potentially be a, lot of cases out there of course we're talking like, you said, about a sixty, three year, old case in in that particular case only know, one person that could, be prosecuted, all the. Law enforcement people are. Gone and, again there was a cover up you know there were there were employees black employees of milem and, Brian who were involved in the crime they were pretty much compelled to participate my wife and I interviewed one of them before he died but they're all gone now and you know the people. That covered up are pretty much all gone but there are many sort of read more recent cases you know in the. Sixties for example where a lot of people still are around So the so this evidence continuing and again the the pickings, as you might expect are so much slim but nonetheless, have been, some cases Mitch, factor there, have been a successful reopening the Justice department Had this new inquiry first reported by the Associated. Press last began a significant rule of the review of the till case fourteen years ago prosecutors audibly determined, that the statute of limitations let, them without. Any charges they could pursue in, a federal court Be FBI still conducted an inquiry which included an exclamation, of the emit immortals body from an Illinois cemetery for about two years to settle whether there were any state crimes that could still. Be prosecuted I I'm, not sure other than than murder I'm not sure what crimes we could be talking about. Here and it was interesting that prosecutors determined that. The statute of limitations had left without any charges they could pursue in a federal court if I'm not mistaken anybody involved in this had. Already been tried for murder in a state court and acquitted and of course any retrial would be double jeopardy If there's no federal Charge that that is, still around since obviously then statutes of limitations apply to the the civil rights laws that that we discussed a second ago while I find. This of academic interest I'm not quite sure where the FBI is looking. Into this at all, you do have, Caroline like, I said Brian Dunham and. She. Was never tried okay so that would be a? Case you, could bring I I unless we get a confession from her. Or something like that I think, that that extremely unlikely but I suppose it's a possibility and it's probably the main reason they reopened, this investigation I would I would guess, in, that particular case again this is a case of of Justice delayed beyond the point of of of reasonably getting, anything done and well I suppose it makes. Us all feel better the. Something is being, investigated, I must say frankly given the, circumstances we've discussed tonight I'm not sure that I find this to be Particularly efficient use of limited federal resources your thoughts I, tend to agree with you I think there are a lot of cases that are you know where you do have some you know you, you do have some potential I just don't see it here I think. It may be was, a spur of, the moment, decision maybe somebody read Timothy. Tyson's. Which again now questions have been called about what? He but, he found in that book and said oh okay we have. A confession here let's go after, this case well turns out they really did so I think somebody maybe didn't think to think this, through I understand why they're doing it, I, just think that that's the target is not the best target it this late day are there any state investigations, that that go back this far in any. Any part of the country. That that try, to, look at at circumstances that were, improperly handled at the time or is this strictly As far as you? Know a federal effort I. Don't know then he stayed investigations going on, certainly there, are cases going back even further but, you you, have to look at examples, like you, know holocaust guy now that's being you know ninety five year old that's. Being sent back, to Germany to, be tried so you know it does happen. But I can't think of any state investigations go to go, back that far The the circumstances of course of the. The, till, case I suppose we're we're instrumental given that it was nineteen fifty five and of course I I don't recall if this was before or after the. Montgomery Alabama bus boycott which really vaulted, Dr Martin Luther King junior to national prominence. Do you recall there two are linked together, Dr TRM Howard, we talked about last, time was a prominent civil rights bigger in Mississippi well anyway he went on. A national speaking tour only. Three days after the jury's acquittal he predicted. That, it, was going to. Be an acquittal in ROY Wilkins. The n. w. c. p. basically said I, want you, to go around the country he was, getting crowds, and cities like Baltimore Madison, Square Garden, ten twenty thousand people bigger crowds than anyone really had gotten in recent. Memory for a, civil rights 'cause, it was building up a lot of pressure. Was attacking the FBI well anyway A lesser known part of it tour was. In November twenty, seventh nineteen fifty five in Montgomery Alabama, and his host, was Martin Luther King then unknown nationally Rosa Parks. Was in the, audience, and three days later Rosa Parks refused to her seat she, made quite clear, that the reason she refused to give up her seat was. She was thinking of? Emmett till well Howard speech. Only three days before that had been the focus that had been the first event. Montgomerie, to, really focus on that issue so they the the issues you know the till case I think you can find it pretty clear link to the Montgomery. Bus boycott and of course then the, decision was to organize a movement around Rosa. Parks action and king was chosen to head, that we're going, to come back and, talk more about that with our guest David Beethoven again he's the author of. TRM Howard will reintroduce you. To him as well and be back in a, moment If you have freedom of speech My concern is sucker minnows talks.

murder Justice department Montgomery Alabama Dr TRM Howard Alabama FBI TRM Howard Mississippi Emmett David Beethoven Martin Luther King Brian Dunham professor of history Edgar Ray Killen Be FBI Rosa Parks Gene Hackman Jimmy Lee Jackson
"trm" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

Talk 650 KSTE

09:47 min | 2 years ago

"trm" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

"Says tonight we're going to be talking about the Justice department reopening an inquiry into the murder of Emmett, till that investigation to be discussed with us tonight by David Beethoven research fellow at the independent institute a professor, of history at the university of Alabama, Tuscaloosa. Because other of TRM Howard. Doctor entrepreneur and civil rights pioneer good evening Mr. Beethoven's good evening Tell US. F for those who, are not the imminently familiar. That, most of us can remember the name of immaterial and it had to do with terrible racial injustice, and frankly that's probably about as far as most of us get in terms of. Of just. Exactly what. The name implies well it's a long story so, I'll give, you, the bare bones version Emmett till, was, a fourteen year, old, boy, from, Chicago this. Was one thousand nine hundred fifty five. And every summer or so he would come to, Mississippi to visit his great uncle lived on a cotton, plantation and was picking cotton and he helped them out it was hard work but he came every year well one year he he came and, until and a bunch of friends went to a store crossroads store and there was a, beautiful white woman behind, the counter and we don't know exactly What happened but, I think the friends sorta. Dared him to go in. There and talk to her we don't know what he said it wasn't anything you know might have been something as simple as he you know he ended money tour directly rather than put. It you, know put it on the counter who knows exactly what happened some people say that he gave a wolf whistle. When, he left but yeah, he he left well word got around someone. Passed the message to the husband of this woman behind. The counter he he was offended by it he went by to his. Brother who was a real tough mean character and said you know what do I do and his brothers, had you gotta get revenge. And so they kidnap, till the middle of the. Night, and he apparently did not satisfy them they they you know they were going to beat him up, maybe but he didn't satisfy them so they took them, around they beat him severely And then eventually, they killed, him they dumped him in. The Tallahassee river but just. Through some fate basically there was it snagged on a vine underneath. He was, tied to a. Cotton, gin old cotton. Gibb big big things hope was to conceal their crime to get into. The, bottom of the river but. It snagged like I said a fisherman sought the body was horribly horribly disfigured the, two brothers, admitted that they take? Until they claim they let him go but. They were charged with murder put on trial and acquitted in less than an hour and the. Jury joked, member of, the jury joke that we would have taken, we wouldn't have taken that. Long we haven't gone out, to get some pop So that's. The a rough version, of the story but there's a, lot more to it than that of course there's a reason why it isn't in the immediate familiarity with most Americans in that it. Took place sixty three years ago. This was nineteen fifty-five that this took place Yes correct It was and it was on the eve of the civil. Rights, movement well they're always have been civil rights movement was on the eve of. The movement we associate with Martin Luther King and played a big role. In spurring that? Movement, on In in any event certainly a lot. Of time has passed I'm not even sure how many of the defendants are still alive Just for the record the only. One that I know of and they were it was a conspiracy there were more than, two people involved that has been shown the, only possible, person to charge that I. Know of is the wife that you. Know pretty lady that was behind the counter Juanita Juanita Bryant Donna Was in her eighties. I frankly don't think that will happen but that is the only person that could possibly be charged at this point is still alive was involved will they say of course the Justice delayed. Is Justice deferred this particular case while I certainly find it a of academic interest to find out what actually took place I'm not sure. What the purpose of this particular investigation is given as you say that the wheels of, Justice apparently don't have a lot of targets, to turn, toward Well I had a little bit of, an idea on that she was interviewed by. Historian named Timothy Tyson. Who did extensive interviews with her and actually you know, had some interesting things to say about black French it added a, child and, various things like that but. One of the things she said to, him was sort of admitted that she was knew about the crime and so forth had some, involvement in. It but then, when that, was they've looked at that, now and it is historian has hours of interview with her on tape but he didn't get that part on. Tape so just his word so I just don't see her being prosecuted because it you know if she did say he didn't get it and he you know he You know and he needs evidence the, FBI needs evidence but I think that's why the case was reopened, because of, that One eight six six, five zero JIMBO is our number one. Eight six six five zero five four, six two six it it did of course staggered the the nation. At the time if you were around at that time you may recall that the the boy had an open coffin funeral I think that was, at the insistence of. The mother if I'm not mistaken to to let, the world see what they did to my, boy something of that nature and although the. The the photographs got widespread publication but they're they're out there and They got a lot of play in the, black, oppressed, on, the. Cover of jet magazine and, Chicago defender, so, people like Mohammed, Ali, if, you're, a young. Black person at that, time you good chance who saw those. Photos and it had a big impact, I I have seen the photos they they're pretty gruesome okay I. Mean there's no no no getting around that fact and the the open cashier was probably something that was was worth doing not just to quote, for the shock value. As much I guess, as to to make manifest, what it, actually happened to immaterial Now. The. Justice department, has not, commented, on. All of this but, it appears that the government chose to devote new attention to the case after the central with us as you mentioned Carolyn Bryant, Donham recanted, part of her account of what actually happened at that time Again I think the facts at the time pretty much spoke for themselves when when the the person on the jury said that we wouldn't have taken a whole hour to. Acquit we haven't gone out for a soda. Pop so, again I'm not exactly sure quite what Is I guess to be to be accomplished here baby I grant we should not, forget part of our, our terrible past. But there aren't a whole lot of of lynchings cross burnings in the. Like taking place these days Mississippi the state in which this happened today has the. The highest number of elected officials of, color in the entire country not just per capita the highest number so perhaps this might have had greater importance that had been brought. Forward let's say in, nineteen sixty, five or nineteen seventy five than in. Two. Thousand eighteen you're nineteen fifty-five when people, like Howard you know. Written about and others were pointing out that the evidence was that there were more than two people involved and so forth and I think they're you know that was the. Time to do it now I will say. This several, years ago the FBI did real Hilton. The investigation uncovered a lot of material, and we have a pretty good idea what happened pretty good idea who was involved so that is been incredibly useful now that we. Have a bigger picture, of what, actually happened there and the cover up. The. Did occur at the time sheriff local, law enforcement and others Yeah Eight six, six five zero JIMBO our number one eight six, six five zero, five, four, six, two. Six we're talking with David beta is a research fellow at the independent, institute a professor of history of the university of Alabama. Tuscaloosa the is the co author of the book TRM Howard doctor, entrepreneur and the civil rights pioneer and we'll come back and talk some more of the Bohannon show in just a. Moment the national debt is now over twenty trillion. Dollars what happens next rising inflation drops in the dollar's. Value some experts say another crashes. Coming you can fight this not with stocks.

university of Alabama Emmett Justice department murder Justice Mississippi Chicago Tuscaloosa research fellow David Beethoven TRM Howard Juanita Juanita Bryant Donna professor of history US Howard Martin Luther King Timothy Tyson Tallahassee river FBI
"trm" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

Talk 650 KSTE

09:15 min | 2 years ago

"trm" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

"Welcome back to Jim, Bohannon show with our guest David veto a research fellow at the independent institute and a professor of history. At, the university, of Alabama Tuscaloosa Abby co, author, of TRM Howard. Doctor. Entrepreneur and civil rights pioneer we're talking about a reopening of. The Emmett till murder case yes of the sixty three years ago Now Clearly as you note witnesses potential defendants in the like in many, cases, dead this is a test of the Justice department charge of investigating long ago burgers that are thought to have been racially motivated and the Justice. Department in the last ten, years it's efforts that led to five successful prosecutions glue that of Edgar Ray killing involved in the murders of the three civil rights workers in Mississippi who died in. Prison this past, year, that of, course was the subject of the, movie Mississippi burning starring Gene, Hackman which some of you may have seen over the. Years so the last successful prosecution came eight years ago when a former Alabama state trooper was convicted of manslaughter for the killing of one Jimmy, Lee Jackson protesters debt led to the Selma to Montgomery March again to the Extent that that that the, law. Still applies that's fine and good in the case of murder I don't suppose that there is ever a statute of limitations is there now I'm. Not a lawyer but no, I don't I don't believe there is then again there's also the the other notion that there are federal civil rights laws involved here that in fact it would be. Quite possible to, be, tried twice, in one of these cases once, for the state law of, committing murder and once for the federal law involving the. Violation of someone's civil rights and I believe the courts have held that such trials are for two different crimes and therefore do not constitute double, jeopardy that's as I recall my my memory of the reading of this So in other words it's not an academic, exercise are, accurate things that presumably can be done in the Emmys case and there would potentially be. A lot of cases. Out there of course we're, talking like you said about a sixty three year old case and in that particular case I only, know one, person that. Could be prosecuted all the. Law enforcement, people are gone and again there was a cover up you know there were there were employees black, employees of milem and Brian who were involved in the crime they were pretty much compelled to participate my wife and I interviewed wanted them before he died but they're all gone now and you. Know the people that covered up are pretty much all gone but there are many read more recent cases you know in. The sixties for example where a lot of people still are around So this evidence continuing and again the the pickings as, you might expect so much slim but nonetheless have been some cases which, in fact, there've been a successful reopening the Justice department Had this new inquiry first. Reported by the Associated Press last began, a significant rule of the review of the till case forty years ago prosecutors audibly determined that the statute of limitations let them, with Emily charges they could pursue in a federal court be. FBI, conducted an inquiry which included an exclamation. Of the immortals body from an Illinois cemetery for about two, years to settle whether there were any state crimes that could still be prosecuted I I'm not. Sure other than than murder I'm. Not sure what crimes we could be talking about here and it was interesting that prosecutors, determined that the statute of limitations had left without, any charges they could pursue a federal court If I'm not mistaken anybody involved, in this had already been tried for murder in a state court and acquitted and of course. Any retrial would be double jeopardy If there's no federal Charge that that is, still around since obviously then statutes of limitations apply to the the civil rights laws that we discussed a second ago while I five. This of academic interest I'm not quite sure where the FBI is looking. Into this at all Well you do have Caroline like I said Brian Dunham and she was never tried, that would be a case you could, bring, high I unless we get a confession from her or something like that I think that that extremely unlikely, but I suppose there's a possibility and it's probably the main reason they. Reopened this investigation, I, would I would guess in that, particular case again this is a case of of Justice delayed beyond the point of of reasonably, getting anything done and well I suppose it. Makes us all feel better that something is being investigated I must say frankly given the circumstances we've, discussed tonight, I'm not sure that I find this to be a particularly efficient use, of limited federal resources your thoughts I tend to agree with you I think there are a lot of cases that are that you, know where you do have some you know you do have some potential I just. Don't see it here I think it may be was a spur. Of the moment decision maybe somebody, read Timothy Tyson sports which again now questions have been called about what he but he found in. That book and said oh okay we, have, a confession here let's go after this case well turns out they really did so I think somebody maybe, didn't think to think this through I understand why they're doing it I. Just think that, that's, the target is not the best, target at this late day are there any state investigations that that go back this far in, any any part of the country that that. Try to look at at circumstances that were improperly handled at the time or is this strictly as, far as, you know a federal effort I don't know of any? State investigations going on certainly there are cases going, back even further But you have to look at examples like know holocaust. Guy now that's, being ninety five, year old that's being sent back to Germany. To be tried so you. Know it does happen but I can't think of. Any state investigations go go back that far The the circumstances of. Course of the the? Till case I suppose we're. We're instrumental given that it was nineteen fifty five and of course I don't recall. If, this was before or after the Montgomery Alabama bus boycott which really vaulted Dr. Martin Luther King junior to national prominence do you recall there two are. Linked together Dr TRM, Howard we talked about last time was a. Prominent civil rights bigger in Mississippi anyway he, went on a, national speaking, tour only three days after the jury's acquittal he predicted that it was going to be an acquittal. In ROY Wilkins the NWC. Basically said I want you to go around the, country, he was getting crowds in cities like Baltimore Madison, Square Garden. You know ten twenty thousand people bigger crowds than anyone really had gotten in recent memory. For a civil rights 'cause it, was building up a lot of pressure was. Attacking the FBI well anyway A lesser known part of it tour was in November twenty. Seven nineteen fifty, five in Montgomery Alabama and his host, was Martin Luther, King then unknown nationally Rosa Parks was in the. Audience and three, days later Rosa Parks refused to grow up her seat she, made quite clear, that the reason she refused to give up her seat was. She was thinking of? Emmett till well Howard speech. Only. Three days before that had been the focus bad had been the first event. Montgomerie, to really focus on that issue so they the issues you know the till. Case I think you can find a pretty clear link to the Montgomery. Bus boycott and of, course then the decision was to organize a. Movement around Rosa Parks action and king was, chosen to head, that we're, gonna come back and talk more about that with our guest David beta again he's the author of. TRM Howard will reintroduce you. To him as well and be back in a, moment Your place to talk you have freedom of speech My concern is Sacremento Chechen talk, six, fifty higher, like say open. Ideas Sacramento's talk station Looking for a, Bank that.

murder Montgomery Alabama FBI Mississippi Alabama Howard Justice department professor of history TRM Howard David Brian Dunham Rosa Parks Edgar Ray Timothy Tyson Associated Press Dr. Martin Luther King
"trm" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

08:44 min | 2 years ago

"trm" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Welcome back to Jim Bohannon, show with our guest David veto a research fellow at the dependent institute and professor of history at. The, university of, Alabama Tuscaloosa Abby co author, of, TRM Howard doctor. Entrepreneur. And civil rights pioneer we're talking about a reopening of the Emmett till murder case yes of, sixty three years ago Now Clearly as you note witnesses potential defendants in the like in many, cases dead this is A test of the Justice department charge of. Investigating long ago murders that, are thought to have been racially motivated and the Justice department in the last ten years it's efforts have led to five successful prosecutions glue that of Edgar Ray killing. Involved in the, murders of the, three civil rights workers Nimitz sippy, who died in prison this, past year that of course was the subject of the. Movie Mississippi burning starring Gene Hackman which some of you may have seen over the years so the last successful prosecution came eight years ago when, a former Alabama state trooper was convicted of manslaughter for the. Killing, of one Jimmy Lee Jackson or protesters debt led to. The Selma to Montgomery. March again to the extent, that that that the law still applies that's fine and good in the case of murder I don't suppose that there is ever a statute of, limitations. Is there Now I'm not a lawyer. But no I, don't I don't, believe there is then again there's, also the the other notion, that there are federal civil rights laws involved here that. In fact it would be quite possible to be tried twice in one of these cases once for the state law of committing murder and once, for the federal law involving the violation of someone's civil rights. And, I believe the courts have held that such trials are. For two different crimes. And therefore do not constitute. Double jeopardy that's as I recall my memory of the reading. Of this So in other words it's not an academic exercise our act, your things that presumably can. Be done in the in these cases there would potentially be a lot, of cases out there of course we're talking like you said about a, sixty three, year old case and in that particular case I, only know one person, that could, be prosecuted. All the law enforcement people. Are gone, and again there was a cover up you know there were there were employees black employees of milem, and Brian who were involved in the crime they were pretty much compelled to participate and my wife and I interviewed one of them before he died but they're all gone now and you know. The people that covered up are pretty much all gone but there are many read more recent cases you know in the. Sixties for example where a lot of people still are around So this this evidence continuing and again the the pickings as you, might expect are so much slim but nonetheless been some cases which in, fact there, have been a successful reopening the Justice department Had this new inquiry first reported by the Associated Press. Last began a significant rule of the review of the till case fourteen years ago prosecutors ultimately determined, that the statute of limitations let them without, any charges they could pursue in a federal court The FBI still conducted an inquiry which included an, exclamation of the immortals body from an Illinois cemetery for about two years to settle whether there. Were any state crimes that could. Still be prosecuted I. I'm not sure other than than murder I'm not sure what crimes we could be talking about here and it was. Interesting that prosecutors determined that the statute of limitations had left without any charges they could pursue a federal court If I'm not mistaken anybody involved in this had already, been tried for murder in a state court and acquitted and of course any retrial would be. Double jeopardy if there's no federal Charge that that's still around since obviously then statutes of limitations apply. To the the civil, rights laws that that we discussed a second ago while I find this of academic interest. I'm not quite sure whether the FBI is looking. Into this at all Well you do have Caroline like I said Brian Dunham and she was never tried, that would be a case you could, bring, high I unless we get a confession from her or something like that I think that that extremely. Unlikely but I suppose it's a possibility and it's probably, the main reason they. Reopened this investigation, I, would I would guess in that, particular case again this is a case of of Justice delayed beyond the point of of of, reasonably getting anything done and while I suppose. It makes us all feel better something is being investigated I must say frankly given the circumstances we've, discussed tonight I'm not sure that I find this to be a, particularly efficient use of limited federal resources your thoughts I tend to agree with you I think there are a lot of cases that are. Where you do have some you know you you do have some potential I just don't see it. Here I think it may be was a spur of the moment. Decision maybe somebody read Timothy Tyson's, sport which again now questions have been called about what he but he found in that book and. Said oh okay we have a confession, here, let's go after this case well turns out they really did so I think somebody maybe didn't think. To think this through I understand why they're doing it, I just think that. That's the target, is, not the best target at this, late day are there any state investigations that they'd go back this far in any any part, of the country that that tried to look. At at circumstances that were improperly handled at the time or is this strictly as, far as you, know a a federal effort I don't know of any state. Investigations going on certainly there are cases going back even further but you you have to. Look at examples like you know holocaust guy now that's being you know ninety five year old that's being sent back to Germany to be tried so you know it does happen but? I can't think of any state investigations go to, go back that far The the circumstances of course of the the till case I suppose we're we're instrumental given that it was nineteen fifty five and of course I I don't recall if this was before or after. The Montgomery Alabama bus, boycott which really vaulted Dr Martin Luther King. Junior to national prominence do you recall there, are two are, linked together, Dr TRM Howard we talked about last time was a prominent civil rights figuring Mississippi way he went. On a national speaking tour only three days after. The jury's acquittal he predicted that, it, was going to be an acquittal in ROY Wilkins. The NWPP basically said I want you to, go around, the country he was getting crowds and, cities like, Baltimore Madison Square Garden you, know ten, twenty thousand people bigger crowds than anyone really had gotten in recent memory. For a civil, rights 'cause it, was building up a lot of pressure he. Was attacking the FBI well anyway A lesser known part of it tour was in November twenty seventh, nineteen fifty five, in Montgomery Alabama and his host was. Martin Luther King, then unknown nationally Rosa Parks was in the audience. And three days, later, Rosa Parks refused to up her seat she made quite clear, that the reason, she refused to give up her seat was she was thinking. Of Emmett till well Howard speech only three days before. That had been the focus dad had been the first event Montgomerie to really focus on that issue so they the issues you know the till case I think. You can find it pretty clear link to the Montgomery bus boycott and. Of course then the, decision was to organize a movement around Rosa. Parks action and king was chosen to head, that we're going, to come, back and talk more about that with our guest David Beethoven again he's the author of TRM Howard. Will reintroduce you to him as.

murder FBI Justice department Alabama Montgomery Alabama Dr Martin Luther King Montgomery professor of history Howard Emmett David Beethoven Brian Dunham Rosa Parks Jim Bohannon Dr TRM Howard Mississippi Jimmy Lee Jackson TRM Howard Nimitz sippy
"trm" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

09:35 min | 2 years ago

"trm" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"To be talking about the Justice department reopening an inquiry into the murder of, Emmett till that investigation to be discussed with us, tonight by, David Beethoven research fellow at, the, independent institute a. Professor of history at the university of. Alabama Tuscaloosa. Co author of TRM Howard doctor entrepreneur and civil rights pioneer good. Evening Mr. Beethoven's good evening Tell us if for those who are not the imminently familiar that, most of us can remember the name of, of immaterial and it had. To, do with a terrible racial injustice and frankly that's probably about as far as most of us, get in terms of of just exactly what the name implies well it's a long story, so I'll give you the, bare, bones, version Emmett till, was, a, fourteen, year old. Boy from Chicago this is a nineteen fifty. Five and every summer or so he would come, to Mississippi to visit his great uncle who lived on, a cotton plantation and was picking cotton and he helped them out was hard work but he came every year well one year he he came, until and a bunch of friends went to a, store crossroads, store and there was a, beautiful, white woman behind. The counter and we don't know exactly What happened but I think, the friends sorta dared him. To go in there and, and talk tour we don't know what he said it wasn't anything you know might have been something as simple as he you know he ended money tour directly rather than put it put it on. The counter, who knows exactly what happened some people say that he gave a wolf whistle when he left but yeah we. P, p e left well, word got around someone passed the message to. The husband of this woman behind the counter he he. Was offended by it he went by to his brother who. Was a real tough me character and said you know what do I do and his brothers said you got, to get revenge and so they kidnap till, the middle of the night. And, he apparently did not satisfy them they they you know they were going to beat him up, maybe but he didn't satisfy them so they took them, around they beat him severely And then eventually they killed him they, dumped him, in Tallahassee river but just through some fate basically, there was it snagged on. A vine underneath he was. Tied to a cotton gin old cotton big big things hope was. To conceal, their crime to get them. Into, the bottom of the river but it's snag like I said a fisherman sought the body. Was, horribly horribly disfigured the two. Brothers admitted that they take until they claim they let him go but they were, charged with, murder put on trial? And acquitted in less, than an hour and the. Jury joked member of the jury joke that we would have taken we wouldn't have taken that. Long we, haven't gone, out to get some pop so that's the, a rougher you the story. But there's a lot more, to it than that Of course. There's a reason why it isn't. In the immediate familiarity with most Americans in. That it took place sixty three years ago, this was nineteen fifty five that this took place Yes It, was and it was on the eve of the civil rights. Movement, well they're always have been civil rights more was on the eve of the. Movement we associate with Martin Luther King in played big role in spurring that movement, on In in any event certainly a lot of. Time has passed I'm not even sure how many of the defendants are still alive The only one that I know of now were it was a conspiracy there were more, than two people involved that has been shown, only possible, person to charge that I. Know of is the wife that you. Know pretty lady that was behind the counter Juanita Juanita Bryant Donna Was in her eighties I frankly don't think, that will, happen But that is the only person that could. Possibly be, charged at, this point who's still alive, was involved they say of course the Justice delayed is Justice deferred this particular case while I. Certainly of academic interest to find out what actually took place I'm not sure what the purpose of this particular investigation is given as you say that the wheels of Justice apparently don't have. A lot of targets to turn toward Well. I had a little bit of, an idea on that she was interviewed by historian named Timothy Tyson who did extensive interviews with, her and actually you know had some interesting. Things to say about black. Friends she had ad is child and various things like, that but one of the things she said to him was sort, of admitted that, she was knew about the crime and so forth had some involvement in it but then when that was. They've they've, looked at, that now and it is, historian has hours of interview with her on tape but he did get that part on tape. So it's just his word so I just don't see her being prosecuted because it you know if she did say he didn't get it and he you know he You know in the evenings evidence the, FBI needs evidence but I think that's why the case was reopened, because of, that One eight six six, five o. JIMBO is our number one, eight six, six five zero five, four six two six. It it did of course staggered the the nation at the time If you were, around, that time. You may recall that, the the boy had an open coffin Funeral I think that was at the insistence of the, mother if I'm not. Mistaken to to let, the world see what they, did to, my boy something of that nature and although the the the photographs got widespread publication but they're they're out there and they got. A lot of play in, the black oppress on the cover of jet magazine, and Chicago defender so people like Mohammed Ali if you're a young black. Person at that time you good chance you saw. Those. Photos in, it at, a, big. Impact I have seen, the photos they they're pretty gruesome okay I mean there's no no no, getting around that fact and the the open cashier was probably Something that. Was was worth doing not just to quote for. The. Shock value, as much, I, guess. As to to make. Manifest what it actually happened to immaterial Now. The Justice, department has not commented on all of this but it appears that the government chose to devote new. Attention to the case after the, central with us you know as you mentioned Carolyn Bryant, Donham recanted, part of her account of what actually happened at that time Again I think the facts at the time pretty much spoke for themselves when when the the person on the jury said that we wouldn't have taken a whole hour to. Acquit we hadn't gone out for soda. Pop so, again I'm not exactly sure quite what Is. I guess, to be to be accomplished here Baby I grant we, should not forget part of our our terrible past but there aren't a whole lot of of lynchings cross burnings in the like taking place these days Mississippi the the state at which this happened today has the highest number, of elected officials have, color in the entire country not. Just per capita but the the the highest number so perhaps this might. Have had greater importance that had been brought forward let's. Say in nineteen sixty five or nineteen seventy five then in two thousand eighteen you're nineteen fifty five when people like Howard written about and others were pointing out that the evidence was that there. Were more than two, people involved, and so forth and I think they're. You. Know that was the time to do, it now I will. Say this several. Years ago the FBI did reopen the, investigation uncovered a lot of material we ever Pretty pretty good idea what happened pretty good idea who was involved so. That is been incredible, useful now, that we have a bigger picture of. What. Actually happened there and the cover up, that did occur at the time the sheriff local law enforcement and others One eight six six five zero JIMBO, our number one eight six six five zero five four six two six we're talking with David Beethoven he's a research. Fellow at the independent institute a professor of history of the university. Of Alabama Tuscaloosa the Izzy co author of the book TRM Howard doctor entrepreneur and the civil. Rights pioneer and we'll come back and talk some more.

Professor of history David Beethoven Tuscaloosa Chicago Mississippi murder Emmett Howard TRM Howard Alabama Juanita Juanita Bryant Donna Justice department FBI Martin Luther King Timothy Tyson Tallahassee river research fellow jet magazine
"trm" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

09:03 min | 2 years ago

"trm" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Welcome back to Jim Bohannon show with our guest David Beethoven research fellow at. The, dependent institute and a professor of history at the university of Alabama. Tuscaloosa Abby co author of TRM Howard doctor entrepreneur and civil rights pioneer we're talking about a reopening of, the Emmett. Till murder case. Yes, of, the, sixty three, years, ago Now Clearly as you note witnesses potential defendants in the like in many, cases dead this is A test of the Justice department charge of investigating long ago murders that are thought to have been, racially, motivated and The Justice department, in the last ten years it's efforts led to five successful prosecutions glued that. Of Edgar Ray, Killen involved in me murders of the three civil, rights workers in the Mississippi, who died in prison this past year that of course, was the subject of the movie Mississippi burning starring Gene Hackman, which some of you may have seen over the years So the last. Successful prosecution came eight years ago when a former Alabama, state trooper was convicted of manslaughter for the killing of one Jimmy Lee Jackson a protesters, death led to the Selma to Montgomery March again to the extent that that. That the law, still applies that's fine and good in the case, of murder I don't suppose, that there is ever a statute of limitations is there Now I'm not a lawyer but no I don't I don't believe there then again there's also the the other. Notion that there are federal civil rights laws involved here that in. Fact it would be quite possible to be tried twice in one of these cases once for the state law of committing murder and once for, the, federal law involving the violation of someone's civil rights and. I, believe the courts have held that such trials are for. Two different crimes and. Therefore do not constitute double. Jeopardy that's as I recall my my memory of the reading. Of this So in other words it's, not an academic exercise our actor things that presumably can be done in the in these cases there would potentially be a lot of cases out there of course we're talking like you said about. A sixty three year old case and in that particular case I only know one person that potentially could be all the. Law enforcement people are gone and again there was a cover up You know there were. There were employees black, employees of milem and Brian. Who were involved in the crime they were pretty much compelled to participate, my wife and I interviewed one before he died but. They're all, gone now, and you know the people are covered up are pretty. Much all gone but there, are many sort of read more recent cases you know in the sixties for example where. A lot, of people still are around So the evidence continuing and again the the picking, as you might expect are somewhat slim but nonetheless have, been some, cases Mitch in, fact there, have been a successful reopening the Justice department Had this new inquiry first reported by the Associated Press last. Began a significant rule of the review of the till case forty years ago prosecutors ultimately, determined that the statute of limitations, let. Them with, any charges they could pursue in a federal court Be FBI conducted an inquiry which included an, exclamation of the immortals body from an Illinois cemetery for about two years to settle whether there were any state crimes that could still. Be prosecuted I I'm. Not sure other than than murder I'm not sure what crimes we could be talking about here and it was interesting. That prosecutors determined that the statute of limitations had left without any charges they could pursue in a federal court If I'm not mistaken anybody involved, in this had already been tried for murder in a state court and acquitted and of course in the retrial would be double jeopardy If there's no federal Charge that that is, still around since obviously the statute of limitations apply to the the civil rights laws that that we discussed second ago while I find, this of academic interest I'm not quite sure why the FBI is looking. Into this at all Well you do have Caroline like I said Brian Dunham and she was never, tried that would be case you could bring I I unless we get a confession, from her or something like that I think that that extremely unlikely but I suppose it's a possibility and it's probably the main reason, they reopened this investigation I would I would guess in that particular case Again this. Is a case of Justice delayed beyond the point of of of reasonably getting anything done and, while I suppose, it makes us all feel. Better that something is being investigated. I must say frankly given the circumstances we've discussed tonight I'm not. Sure that I find this to, be a, particularly efficient use of limited federal resources your thoughts I tend to agree with you I, think, there, are a lot of cases. That are. You know where you do have some you know. You you do have some potential I just don't see. It here I think it may. Be, was a spur of, the moment decision, maybe somebody, read Timothy Tyson sports which. Again now questions have been called about. What he, but he found in that book and said oh okay we. Have a confession here let's go, after this case Lau turns out they really did I think somebody maybe didn't think to think this, through I understand why they're doing it I just think. That that's the target is not, the best, target at this late day are there any state investigations that go back this far in, any, any, part of the country that. That tried. To look at at circumstances that were improperly handled. At the time or is this strictly as far as. You know a a federal effort I don't know of? Any state investigations going on certainly there are cases, going back even further You know but you you have to look at examples like you know holocaust. Guy now that's, being ninety five, year old that's being sent back to Germany. To be tried so you know. It does happen but I can't think of any. State investigations go to go back that far The the circumstances of course of the? Till. Case I suppose we're we're instrumental given that it was nineteen fifty five and of, course I I don't recall if this was before or after the Montgomery Alabama bus boycott which really vaulted Dr Martin Luther King junior to national prominence. Do you recall the two are linked, together Dr TRM Howard we talked about last. Time was a prominent civil rights figuring Mississippi, anyway he went, on a, national speaking tour only three days after the jury's acquittal he predicted that it was going to be. An acquittal in ROY Wilkins. The n. w. c. p. who said I want, you, to go, around the, country he was getting crowds and cities, like Baltimore, Madison Square Garden you know ten twenty thousand people bigger crowds than anyone really had gotten in recent. Memory for a civil rights 'cause, it was building up a lot of pressure. Was attacking the FBI well anyway A lesser known part of it tour was. In November twenty, seventh nineteen fifty five in Montgomery. Alabama and his, host was Martin Luther King then unknown nationally Rosa. Parks was in, the, audience and three days later Rosa Parks refused to per seat, she made quite, clear that the reason she refused to give up her seat. Was she was thinking of Emmett till well? Howard. Speech only three days before that had been the focus dad had been the first, event Montgomerie to really focus on that issue so they the issues you know. The till case I think you can find a pretty clear link to. The Montgomery bus boycott and of course, then the decision was to organize a move. Around Rosa Parks action and king was chosen, to head that, we're going, to come back and talk more about that with our guest David beta again he's the author of. TRM Howard will reintroduce you. To him as well and be back in a, moment Laura Ingram idea of, apologizing apologize say something incorrect on the other side is trying to racial is something they should issue the apology I. Would demand. That, Andrew gillum and all these people should apologize Laura Ingram until two on news and information five.

murder Montgomery Justice department university of Alabama professor of history Alabama Mississippi Dr Martin Luther King FBI Emmett David Beethoven TRM Howard Dr TRM Howard Jim Bohannon Brian Dunham Laura Ingram Be FBI Howard Gene Hackman
"trm" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

09:41 min | 2 years ago

"trm" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Jimbohannonshow, dot com you can follow me on Twitter at, jimbotalks says tonight we're gonna be talking about the Justice department reopening an inquiry into the murder of Emmett till let investigate should be discussed with, us tonight by David Beethoven research fellow at the independent. Institute a professor of history at the, university of Alabama. Tuscaloosa Biko author of TRM Howard doctor. Entrepreneur and civil rights pioneer good evening Mr. Beethoven's good evening, tell us if for those who are not the imminently familiar I think most of us can remember the name of of. Immaterial and, it had to do with a terrible racial injustice and frankly that's probably about as far as most of us. Get in. Terms of of just exactly what the name implies Well it's a. Long story so I'll give you the bare bones, version Emmett till was a fourteen, year, old boy from, Chicago, this, was, a nineteen. Fifty five and every summer or. So he would come to Mississippi to visit his, great uncle who lived on a cotton plantation and, was picking cotton and he'd help them out was hard work but he came every year well one year he he came and until a bunch, of friends went to a store crossroads store and there, was a beautiful white woman behind the, counter and we. Don't know exactly what happened but I. Think the friends sorta dared him to go in there and, talk to her we don't know what he said it wasn't anything you know might have been something as simple as he. You know, he handed money tour directly rather than put it you know put it on the counter who knows exactly what Happened some. People say that he gave a wolf whistle when he. Left but yeah well he he left well word got around. Someone passed the message to the husband of this woman behind the counter he he was offended by he went, by to his brother who was a real, tough me character and said. You, know what I do and his brothers said you got to get revenge and so they kidnap, till the middle of the night and he apparently did, not satisfy them they they you know. They were going to beat him up maybe but he didn't satisfy them so they took. Them around they beat him severely. And then eventually they killed him they dumped him in the Tallahassee river, but just, through some fate basically there was a it snagged, on a, vine underneath he was tied, to a cotton gin Old cotton big big things, hope was to conceal, their crime to get him. Into the bottom of the river but it snagged like I said a fishermen sought the body. Was horribly, horribly disfigured, the two brothers admitted that they take until, they claim they let him. Go but they were charged, with murder put on trial and acquitted in less than. An hour and the jury joked member, of the jury joke that, we, would've taken we wouldn't have taken that long we. Hadn't gone out to get some. Pop So that's the. Rough version of the story but. There's a lot more to it than that Of course there's a reason why. It isn't the immediate familiarity with most Americans. In that it took place sixty three years. Ago this was nineteen fifty-five that this took place Yes correct It was and it was on the eve of the civil. Rights, movement well they're always have been civil rights was on the eve of. The movement we associate with Martin Luther King and played a big role. In spurring that? Movement, on In in any event certainly a lot. Of time has passed I'm not even sure how many of the defendants are still alive The only. One that I know of and there were it was a conspiracy there were more than, two people involved that has been shown the, only possible, person to charge that I. Know of is the wife that you. Know pretty lady that was behind the counter Juanita Juanita Bryant Donna Was in her eighties I frankly don't think, that will, happen But that is the only person that. Could possibly be, charged at, this point is still alive, involved will they say of course the Justice. Delayed is Justice deferred is particular case While I certainly find it of economic interest to find out what actually, took place I'm not sure what the purpose of this particular investigation is given as you say that. The wheels of, Justice apparently, don't have a lot of, targets to turn toward Well I. Had a little bit of an idea that she was interviewed by story in named Timothy Tyson who did extensive interviews with her, and actually you know had. Some interesting things to say about, black French she added a child and various things like that but one of the things she, said to him was sort of admitted that she was knew. About the crime and so forth had some involvement in, it but then when that was they've they've looked at that now, and it, is historian has hours of interview with her on tape but he didn't get that part. On tape just his word so I just don't see her being prosecuted because it you know if she did say he didn't get it and he you know he You know, and he, needs The FBI needs evidence but I think that's why the case, was reopened, because of that All right one eight six six five o.. JIMBO is our number one eight six six five zero five four six two six. It it did of course staggered the the nation at the time If you were around that time. You may recall that, the the boy had an open coffin Funeral I think that, was at the insistence of the mother if I'm not mistaken To. To let the world, see what they did to, my boy, something of that nature and. Although the the the photographs got widespread publication but they're they're out there and They got a, lot of play, in the black oppressed on the cover of jet magazine. And, the Chicago defender so people like Mohammed Ali if. You're. A young, black person at. That time you good chance you saw those photos and it had a big impact I I have seen the photos they they're pretty gruesome okay I, mean there's, no no getting around that fact and the the open cashier was probably something that was was worth doing not just to quote, for the shock value. As much I guess, as to to make manifest, what had, actually happened to immaterial Now the. Justice. Department has, not commented on. All of this but, it appears that the government chose to devote new attention to the case after the central with us as you mentioned Carolyn Bryant, Donham recanted, part of her account of what actually happened at that time Again I think the facts at the time pretty much spoke for themselves when when the the person on the jury said that we wouldn't have taken a whole hour to. Acquit we had gone out for a soda. Pop so, again I'm not exactly sure quite what Is. I guess, to be to be accomplished here Baby grant we, should not forget part of our our terrible past but there aren't a whole lot of of lynchings cross. Burnings in the like taking place these days Mississippi the state in which this happened today has the the highest number, of elected officials of, color in the entire country not. Just per capita but the the the highest number so perhaps this might. Have had greater importance that had been brought forward let's. Say in nineteen sixty five or nineteen seventy five then in two thousand eighteen you're nineteen fifty five when people like Howard written about and others were pointing out that the evidence was that there. Were more than two people involved and so forth and I think. You. Know that was the time to do, it now I will. Say this several years ago the FBI did reopen the investigation uncovered a lot of material And we have a pretty pretty good idea what happened pretty good idea who was involved so that is. Been incredibly useful now that, we have a bigger picture of what. Actually. Happened there and the cover up the, did occur at the time sheriff local law enforcement and others Yep Eight six six five o. JIMBO our number one eight six six five zero five four six two. Six we're talking with David. Beethoven he's a research fellow at the independent, institute a professor of history of the university of. Alabama. Tuscaloosa the is co author of the book TRM Howard doctor entrepreneur and the civil rights pioneer and we'll come back and talk some more.

David Beethoven professor of history Emmett FBI murder Chicago JIMBO Mississippi university of Alabama research fellow TRM Howard Howard Justice Juanita Juanita Bryant Donna Twitter Justice department Martin Luther King Tallahassee river jet magazine
"trm" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

08:37 min | 2 years ago

"trm" Discussed on KGO 810

"John John Batchelor show August nineteen fifty five the time is endless because the crime the murder of Emmett till. A very young man from Chicago who was visiting for the summer that murder has now recently, been, reopened by. The United. States government by the federal authorities new information and also this long long trail of feeling that Justice, was not done the murder of. Till and the murder of other African Americans during this period of civil rights conflict to help. Me understand this, story I welcome David Biteau David is the author with Linda Royster by, to- of TRM Howard, Dr entrepreneur, civil rights pioneer Dr Howard got intimately involved scarily involved in the denial of Justice after, the murder of Emmett till, David a very good evening to. You congratulations for your biography of Dr Howard and to understand the, scale, of his. Heroism we. Need to understand why Justice is reopening the till case the the murder the horrible murder of a, young man good evening to you. David why did they reopen Well that's a little bit of. A mystery because there wasn't FBI investigation about twelve years ago that you know, that turned up some I think what why they reopened the case at this, time was a historian a lot of respect for named Timothy Tyson did. He, a book about the case interviewed Amatil or the. Caroline Dunham Bryant who was a key figure in the. Case and she a according to Tyson. Basically admitted that she was involved in the crime now she's still alive well. Turns out that Tyson didn't have that on tape she said that to me, didn't get it on tape he had hours of interviews with her so I'm skeptical on, that revelation that this is actually gonna lead to anything now there were a, number of people involved in the murder, of Emmett till but, as. Far as I can Determine, all of them have passed away The reopening of the case though points us. All to, a time in America's history a very very grim time when civil rights was extremely scary for people living, anywhere in the country Chicago to Mississippi but especially, for people who spoke up, about injustice the all white jury acquitted the two men who were. Involved in, in the murder right away in fact they made the made jokes about it. About why it took him so long. 'cause they pause to drink, soda pop that was laughter. And Mississippi but it was a bro there were broken hearts in Chicago. And Dr Howard faced? Up to it what did he do who was who was TRM Howard and how did? You, get involved in the till case well Dr Howard. Was probably the wealthiest person. In Mississippi he'd been born in poverty he came there to be cheap surgeon of hospital, black-owned hospital that provided cooperative medical care thousands, of, people he branched out into civil Oh rights and hit it a very large group called the regional council of, negro leadership and they had thousands of, numbers and they would have annual rallies and Mississippi but. They get, ten thousand people to hear people like Thurgood Marshall and singers like Mahalia Jackson they did a successful boycott, of service stations refuse to provide restrooms for blacks, this was in nineteen fifty, two so he was a well known civil rights figure he was. On a, visit to Chicago at the time that Emmett till disappear kidnapping of Emmett till. Wasn't even knowing that it was a. Murderer yet and Howard said, if this boy is harmed. And it was a boy is fourteen years old if he is harmed. Bill be hell to? Pay Mississippi I got a lot of coverage and then they actually brought charges against these? Two, brothers half brothers who were who had kidnapped till. They claimed they'd let him. Go but the body turned up in the in the river and the Tallahassee river just, sort of a fluke dot cook got snagged On some some you know underwater grow and the body was horribly disfigured, and a charges were brought against the two brothers which was actually something remarkable. Because usually white person killed the. Black person there weren't even charges and there was. A trial less than a month after the murder in some in the small town of Sumner Mississippi Dr Howard was involved in trying to find evidence. That not only, against the two brothers but indicating that other people other whites and implacable -ployees. Of the defendants were involved, in the crime and Emmett. Till mothers stayed with them and, he provided or an armed escort every day of the, trial and his home was a refuge for black reporters for witnesses and he. Conducted his own sort of underground investigation working in cooperation with prosecutors trying to prod them off and at the time. Was he He under constant threat were there because I've read about the period. After about ten years, later there were bomb threats routinely cars driving by in the middle of the night did that sort of thing happened to. Dr Howard it did and he was heavily armed and he had the advantage of, living in a town and, all black town amount by which was unique because blacks there could boat they had a sheriff they had the, mayor and that's where tells mothers state to all black so if, you were white you showed up in that community you would, stick out like a sore thumb also all the members of Howard's organization including Howard himself were heavily armed yeah the Thompson submachine gun and White person wanted to make trouble there would have, to get in close 'cause they'd stick out and they and and and people. There were more than ready to fire back and we're heavily on that was part of the issue but I think also that one Howard ventured out he had a heavy heavy armed protection but certainly his, life was threatened. People see used to. Say the shortest life expectancy of any person in Mississippi at the time. This is the Eisenhower administration, nineteen fifty five and coming up. To the the second term was there a. Nationalization, of this story did the did the White House comment was Dr. Howard, in contact with the president He was crowding the Eisenhower administration at at this point Dr Howard is on the verge of, becoming a, Republican, 'cause if anything the Democrats far far less willing to get involved in. Civil rights issues at that at that time so he was. Trying to get the Justice department to look into the case this was after the acquittal of the defendant saying what door other people involved he was presenting evidence to the FBI pushing that that. That line it was nationalized in that sense because, after the acquittal defendants Howard went on, a national speaking tour would get. Crowds of ten thousand people twenty thousand people Madison Square Garden in Baltimore in Los Angeles and. Focused on the case in other unsolved cases in the manner that j. Edgar Hoover getting. Involved he said look you can solve? A crime based. On wreckage of a plane right there the I would boast about Why can't you ever seem to solve. A crime where. A black man or a black. Person is killed and eat hammered on so it was, nationalized. And one of the places he spoke was November. Twenty seven nineteen, fifty five in Montgomery Mississippi is host of Martin Luther King than a nationally unknown figure Rosa Parks. Was in the audience hammered the Emmett till case forty three days later Rosa. Parks when she refused to give up her seat said that she was thinking. Of Emmett till when she refused to go up or see the, book is TRM Howard Dr entrepreneurs civil rights pioneer David Baido and his off and as the author with Linda Royster Bida as a new, book about a very brave man lived a long time ago who I'm sure is listening from heaven right now as the Justice department looks again at the murder, the hate, crime, against Emmett till in August of nineteen fifty five I'm John bachelor this. Is the John Batchelor.

TRM Howard murder Emmett Mississippi Chicago Dr Howard John John Batchelor TRM Howard Dr David Biteau David Justice Timothy Tyson Justice department FBI Linda Royster Montgomery Mississippi Caroline Dunham Bryant Rosa Parks
"trm" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

08:36 min | 2 years ago

"trm" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"John Batchelor show August, nineteen fifty. Five the time is endless because the, crime the murder of Emmett till a very young man from Chicago who was visiting for the summer that murder has now recently been reopened by the United States government by the federal, authorities new, information and also this, long long trail of feeling that Justice was not done the murder of till and the murder of other African Americans during this period of civil rights conflict to help me understand the. Story I welcome David Biteau David is the author with Linda Royster by to- of TRM Howard doctor on Trump for Noor civil. Rights pioneer Dr Howard got intimately involved scarily involved in the denial of Justice after the murder of Emmett till, David a very good evening to. You congratulations for your biography of. Judd Dr Howard and to understand the scale of. His heroism we need to understand why Justice is reopening the till case the the murder the horrible murder of, a young man good evening to. You David why did they reopen Well that's, a little bit of a mystery because, there wasn't an FBI, investigation. About twelve years ago That you know that, turned up some material I think what why. They reopened the case at this time was a historian a lot, of respect for named, Timothy Tyson did a a book about the case interviewed? Amatil, or the the the Caroline Dunham Bryant who was a key figure in the case and she According to, Tyson basically mid that, she was involved in the crime now she's, still alive Well turns out that Tyson. Didn't have that on tape she had. Said that to me didn't get it on tape he had hours of interviews with. Her so I'm skeptical on that revelation that this is actually going to lead, to anything now there were a number, of people involved in the murder of Emmett till, but, as far as I can determine all of. Them have passed away the reopening of the case though points us all to a time in america's history a very very grim time when civil rights was extremely scary for people living anywhere in the country chicago to mississippi but especially for people who spoke up about injustice the all white jury acquitted the two men who were involved in the in the murder right away in fact they made they made jokes about it about why it took him so long 'cause they pause to drink soda pop that was laughter in mississippi but it was a bro there were broken hearts in chicago and dr howard faced up to it what did he do who was who is t._r._m. howard and how did you get involved in the till case well dr howard was probably the wealthiest person in mississippi he'd been born in poverty he came there to be cheap surgeon of a hospital black-owned hospital that provided cooperative medical care to thousands of people he branched out into civil rights and headed a very large group called the regional council of negro leadership and they add thousands of embers and they would have annual rallies and mississippi but they get ten thousand people to hear people like thurgood marshall and singers like mahalia jackson they did a successful boycott of service stations that refused to provide restrooms for blacks this was nineteen fifty two so he was a well known civil rights figure he was on a visit to chicago at the time that emmett till disappear kidnapping of emmett till wasn't even knowing that it was a murderer yet and howard said this boy is harmed and he was a boy sporting years old it's us harm they'll be held to pay mississippi i got a lot of coverage and then they actually brought charges against these two brothers half brothers who were who would kidnap till they claimed they let him go but the body turned up in the in the river and the tallahassee river just sort of a fluke got got snagged On some some you know underwater grow and the body was horribly disfigured and a, charges were brought against the two brothers which was actually something remarkable because usually a. White person killed the black. Person that weren't even charges and there was a. Trial less than a month after the murder in some in the small town of Sumner Mississippi Dr Howard was involved in trying to find evidence not. Only against the, two brothers but indicating that other people other whites and implacable -ployees. Of the defendants, were involved in the crime and. Emmett till mothers stayed with them, and he provided or armed escort every day of the, trial and his home was refuge for black reporters for. Witnesses and he conducted, his own sort of underground investigation working in cooperation with prosecutors trying to prod the mob and at the. Time was he Under constant threat were there because I've read about the period after about ten years. Later there were bomb threats routinely cars driving by in the middle of the night did that sort of thing happened Dr. Howard it did and he was heavily armed and he had the advantage of, living in a town and, all black town amount by which was unique because blacks there could boat they added sheriff they had the mayor, and that's where Mattel's mothers St Paul black so if you, were white new showed up in that community you would, stick out like a sore thumb also all the members of Howard's organization including Howard himself were heavily armed yeah the Thompson submachine gun and A white person wanted to make trouble there would have to, get in close because they'd stick out and they and and people there were. More than ready to fire back and? We're heavily on that was part of the issue but I think also that one Howard ventured out yet heavy heavy armed protection it certainly is life was threatened, people see is to say the. Shortest life expectancy of any person in Mississippi at the. Time this. Is the Eisenhower administration nineteen fifty five and coming up to, the the second term was there a nationalization. Of, this story did the key to the White House comment was Dr. Howard, in contact with the president He was crowding the. Eisenhower administration at this point Dr Howard is on the verge. Of becoming, a, Republican because if anything the Democrats were far far less willing to get. Involved in civil rights issues at that at that time so he. Was trying to get the Justice department to look into the case this was after the acquittal the defendant saying look or other people involved he was presenting evidence to the FBI pushing that. That that line it was nationalized in that sense because after the acquittal defendants. Howard went on a national speaking. Tour would get crowds of ten thousand people twenty thousand people Madison Square Garden in Baltimore in. Los Angeles and focused on the case and other unsolved cases demanded the chair or Hoover. Get involved he said look you can? Solve a crime based on wreckage of a plane right there the I would boast about That why can't you ever seem to solve a crime where. A black man. Or a black person is killed. And eat hammered on so it was national launch. And. One of the places he spoke was twenty seven nineteen fifty five, in Montgomery Mississippi is host of Martin Luther King than nationally unknown figure Rosa Parks was in the audience. He hammered the Emmett till case forty three days later Rosa Parks when she. Refused to give up her seat said that, she was thinking of Emmett. Till when she refused to go up, or see the book is, TRM Howard Dr entrepreneurs civil rights pioneer David Baido and his an as the author with Linda Royster Baido as a new book about a, very brave man who lived a long time ago who I'm sure is listening for heaven. Right now as the Justice department looks again at the murder. The hate, crime, against Emmett till in August of nineteen fifty five I'm John bachelor this. Is the John Batchelor show.

Dr. Howard murder Emmett mississippi TRM Howard TRM Howard Dr dr howard David Biteau David John Batchelor Justice Chicago Timothy Tyson Justice department howard FBI Rosa Parks Linda Royster United States Sumner Mississippi
"trm" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

04:50 min | 2 years ago

"trm" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"The university of alabama dr david beethoven co author with his wife linda of trm howard dr entrepreneur civil rights pioneer published by independent institute the emmett till murder case i guess really propelled dr howard considerable nationwide prominence yes it did he was at the center of that and and just about everywhere you can imagine and trying to find witnesses i go through the story of emmett till if you want yes please unfortunately it is probably true that a fair percentage of the audience has never heard of him until either well you know that's surprising to me not surprising to me given you know i've given talks people whose name or beggar evers very few people often anyway what happened was immaterial was a fourteen year old boy from chicago he would come every summer to mississippi delta to to sort of work for his his great uncle mos right and helping pick cotton and sort of a combination vacations mother things well anyway he goes into a store in a town called money mississippi just a crossroads store and there's a white woman behind the counter and it's very unclear what happened he might have wolf whistled adder he might have said something he might have not respectfully done something that could have been very minor nobody really knows for sure contradictory or whatever he did it wasn't you know wasn't some horrible thing anyway he the husband of of the this wife found out about it someone told him and he was kind of a wink guy and he wasn't to do anything but his brother said you've got to you got to do something about this and they found emmett till one o'clock in the morning staying with his great uncle they kidnap them they they they tried to get him to say was sorry and he didn't sufficiently do that and they beat him up savagely beat him up and then killed him and tied him to a gin fan an old gin fan dumped him in the tallahassee river and just what is what is it jen fan for those who don't know oh it's just too is part of the machine machinery for cotton gin okay gotcha and it was an old you know just a big hunk of metal big fan basically is what it was and they tied it to them thinking way down but he's snagged in snacks somewhere the river and a fisherman saw you days by later in the body was just horribly disfigured well howard found out about this he was in chicago at the time and he went to the press and he really played it up in a major way emmett till mother lived in chicago she came and saw the by the by ship and she insisted on open casket funeral and you had this horribly disfigured body all the signs of the beating and people lined around the block and it was a big deal the two white men were or put on trial which is something that did not happen very often the mississippi and dr howard did not think there was a chance he said you'd have a better chance of you know getting a fine for killing that deer out of you know a season then you know they're they're going to get convicted words to that effect but anyway he went into he he he is home was he he brought in emmett till mother she stayed with them black reporter stayed with them and witnesses because he was going around he had this whole underground network they called it the mississippi underground were they tried to find evidence they found i witness people eyewitnesses to the beating and you know they went all over the state and plantations and back roads and the trial was held one of these witnesses did testify but in the end the jury wasn't gonna convict these two brothers for doing it they pleaded not guilty but they weren't gonna convict them and in twenty minutes or so went by and they acquitted them later one of the brothers spoke to look magazine and for money and admitted his guilt because well what does he have to fear at that point and a lot of people were very much outraged when that came out but dr howard has had symbol of a lot of evidence and believe it was more than two people were involved in fact now the fbi in about ten years ago completed that there were more than two people involved but you.

linda university of alabama dr david beethoven trm howard dr twenty minutes fourteen year ten years
"trm" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"trm" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Leger with us on the jim bohannon show with dr david beethoven he's a professor of history of the university of alabama co author with his wife of t r m howard theodore roosevelt mason howard dr entrepreneur civil rights pioneer and as we will learn here in a moment to a man who did not mince words exactly this wasn't exactly a step and fetch it in terms of his language have a call from vicinity in cedar rapids iowa who calls in tonight and good evening welcome thank you jim before taking my call david english for the show and i have a very different question i i am trying to put together the reason why blacks in america from ats sixty into mid nineteen sixties they voted republican and i was just wondering what's mr howard's i i feel the asian what political affiliation was mr howard's dr howard's political affiliation was he was a republican his mentor was manny will mason a white doctor in murray kentucky mason's wife actually ran as a republican for congress and she was sort of howard's a mentor as well he ended up after he moved to chicago he ended up running as the republican candidate for congress and he lost badly he was her challenging the daley machine during that period the black representative of the daley machine but he but he remainder republican although you right here and i'll just quote again from the book trm howard he backed president franklin roosevelt but only conditionally once the economy improved the onus was on the president to quote to say this far and no farther to mob violence and other injustices which are forced up on black americans and if always simplifying a bit because he did have an interlude there where he was a republican in fact he campaigned i think he campaigned for hoover and then he he sort of had a time there where he was floating around and in mississippi for a brief time he was with the black democrats 'cause that was the only game in town and then he kind of return to the republican party after that and supported eisenhower he had here and i quote again from your book he had no time for the various quote boneheaded pussyfooting grafting.

republican party daley chicago kentucky dr howard david english theodore roosevelt university of alabama professor of history dr david beethoven jim bohannon eisenhower Leger mississippi hoover president franklin roosevelt representative congress