36 Burst results for "TED"

Fresh update on "ted" discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

00:49 sec | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "ted" discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"Hey everybody, today on the Charlie Kirk show, no advertisers at all. For my conversation with Steve smotherman and Albuquerque at legacy church, you're going to really enjoy it. You always can email me your thoughts is always freedom at Charlie Kirk dot com. It's brought to you by TP USA faith, TP faith dot com and also turning point USA. I hope to see all of you at our student action summit, TP USA dot com slash SAS that is TPUSA dot com slash SAS. We have the biggest speakers in the entire movement that will be there. It's incredible. You got to check it out. And so we have Kayleigh McEnany Ted Cruz Laura Ingram Josh hawley Greg gutfeld, Donald Trump Jr. Kimberly Guilfoyle, cat temp, Pete hegseth, Byron donalds, Ben Carson, Rick Scott, Lauren boebert, governor Kevin stitt, cat cammock Matt Gaetz, Jack posobiec Benny Johnson, Dave Rubin, Sean Foyt, and more, and.

Charlie Kirk Steve Smotherman Albuquerque USA Kayleigh Mcenany Ted Cruz Laura Ingram Josh Hawley Greg Gutfeld Donald Trump Jr. Kimberly Guil Pete Hegseth Byron Donalds Rick Scott Lauren Boebert Ben Carson Kevin Stitt Matt Gaetz Jack Posobiec Benny Johnson Dave Rubin
Elmo, 3, joins youngest Americans in getting vaccinated

AP News Radio

01:13 min | 2 d ago

Elmo, 3, joins youngest Americans in getting vaccinated

"Elmo was the latest Sesame Street character to roll up his fur to urge kids to get their COVID-19 vaccinations You were super duper today getting your COVID vaccine Elmo There was a little pinch but it was okay V is four vaccine following in the steps of big bird Elmo got the COVID shot to promote the new vaccines now available to children under 5 Almost creators pegged them up at characters eternal age at three and a half In a public service announcement Elmo's father Louis equally furry and red says he had questions but talked to a pediatrician I learned that Elmo getting vaccinated is the best way to keep himself our Friends neighbors and everyone else Healthy and enjoy them the things they love Have a question Can we have a hug Oh The CDC advises vaccination even for those who already had COVID-19 to protect against reinfection and says it's okay to get other vaccines at the same time Of course not everybody has liked the ad produced by the sesame workshop and the ad council when it featured big bird Republican senator Ted Cruz called it government propaganda I'm Ben Thomas

Elmo Louis CDC Ad Council Ted Cruz Ben Thomas
Washington Examiner Editorial: Trump Proven Unfit for Power Again

Mark Levin

01:18 min | 3 d ago

Washington Examiner Editorial: Trump Proven Unfit for Power Again

"Washington examiner obviously has some new executives And I'm not fond of these unsigned editorials These corporate editorials But here's the editorial that was put out a 1201 a.m. Trump proven unfit for power again Former White House say Cassidy hutchison's Tuesday testimony But a ring the death now for former president Donald Trump's political career Trump is unfit to be anywhere near power ever again This is what we get out of conservative newspaper Hutchison's resume alone should establish her credibility so again without any challenge she's credible Why wouldn't she be The 25 year old had already worked at the highest levels of conservative Republican politics Including in the offices of senator Ted Cruz and House minority whip Steve scalise Before becoming a top aide for former Trump chief of staff Mark Meadows So far none of this has anything to do with anything

Cassidy Hutchison Donald Trump Washington White House Hutchison Senator Ted Cruz Steve Scalise Mark Meadows House
Kimberley Johnson on Trump Hating Republicans

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

01:43 min | 3 d ago

Kimberley Johnson on Trump Hating Republicans

"Kimberly, you raise a really interesting point. I'll tell you why, because we just saw, you know, Liz Cheney was celebrating the roe V wade decision. Like, Liz Cheney hates Donald Trump. You're absolutely right. But she's not on our side. In fact, one of the reasons we were talking about, why is there this like, they're not going after Jenny Thomas. When I was hearing, is because Liz Cheney likes the Supreme Court the way it is. She doesn't want Ginny and clarence. She doesn't want any talk of clarence Thomas. Yes. Resigning or getting or you name it, right? And so and I thought this on cue, right this morning, Travis, a lawyer for Jenny Thomas, told the House select committee, he saw no reason for her to testify. Well, yeah, because they see how these hearings are going. Yeah. Exactly. So they came after it came after the committee has made a fresh request for her appearance, and we have the text messages to what Meadows and to eastman. She was right in the middle of this thing. And that her husband already was the one sole vote voting to keep her communications private. Kimberly, so beyond a conflict of interest, I don't even know what you call it. Do you? Yeah. No, I mean, I agree with you a 100%. This is clearly very upsetting coming because, you know, we love to Democrats are so fond of loving the Republicans that are going to go against Trump. But we always have to remember that I do think that at some point they want to break from him because they don't like him. You can see their true reactions to Trump in 2016. Lindsey Graham tweeted it, Ted Cruz was talking about how horrible he was, Marco Rubio, all of them. They don't like him. But now that he gave them everything that they wanted. And now this trial is going to give them a clean

Liz Cheney Jenny Thomas Roe V Wade Kimberly House Select Committee Donald Trump Clarence Thomas Ginny Clarence Supreme Court Travis Eastman Meadows Ted Cruz Lindsey Graham Marco Rubio
Congress passes historic bipartisan gun safety bill

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | Last week

Congress passes historic bipartisan gun safety bill

"A bipartisan gun violence bill is on the verge of winning final congressional passage It seemed unimaginable just a month ago The most significant gun safety legislation in decades Susan Collins was among 15 Senate Republicans joining all Democrats and passing a bill that will boost background checks for a younger gun buyers among other steps Richard blumenthal wanted a lot more But it marks meaningful progress Republican Ted Cruz says it's not The bill won't help keep people safe and it'll hurt gun owners That's the Democrat Bill that is currently on the floor And the house's number two Republican is urging members to reject the bill during a vote later today Sagar Meghani Washington

Susan Collins Ted Cruz Richard Blumenthal Senate House Sagar Meghani Washington
17-year sentence sticks for man who killed woman on porch

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | Last week

17-year sentence sticks for man who killed woman on porch

"A 17 year sentence sticks for a man near Detroit who killed a woman on his porch Ted wafer says he feared for his life when he shot and killed ranesh McBride She knocked on his door in 2013 a jury rejected his self defense claim a new hearing was ordered by the Michigan Supreme Court I took one of God's children Not as a crossover Kerry with me Wafer is white McBride was black Monica McBride says holidays are no longer holidays after her daughter's death You don't deserve happiness in doing your life while we are living on home or nightmare Listen to wake up Judge Dana Hathaway says wafer has been a model prisoner but he made the wrong choice You can not murder someone Or simply knocking on your door and the middle of the night Wafer will be eligible for parole in 2031 I'm Ed

Ted Wafer Ranesh Mcbride White Mcbride Monica Mcbride Michigan Supreme Court Detroit Judge Dana Hathaway Kerry Wafer
FBI Can't Tell Sen. Cruz if FBI Knew About Jan. 6 Informants or Not

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:23 min | 2 weeks ago

FBI Can't Tell Sen. Cruz if FBI Knew About Jan. 6 Informants or Not

"I want you to hear senator Ted Cruz getting right to the crux of this with a senior FBI official named Jill Sanborn on Capitol Hill this week. I want to turn to the FBI. How many FBI agents or confidential informants actively participated in the events of January 6th? Sir, I'm sure you can appreciate that I can't go into the specifics of sources and methods. Did any FBI agents or confidential informants actively participate in the events of January 6th? Yes. Sir, I can't, I can't answer that. Did any FBI agents are confidential informants commit crimes of violence on January 6th? I can't answer that, sir. Did any FBI agents or FBI informants actively encourage and incite crimes of violence on January 6th? I can't answer that. Miss sad burn. Who is raps? I'm aware of the individual, sir. I don't have the specific background to him. How does that not blow your mind? I'm serious. If you're sitting there saying, oh, Trump incited violence.

FBI Senator Ted Cruz Jill Sanborn SIR Capitol Hill Donald Trump
Why Republicans Really Want to Arm Teachers

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

01:40 min | 2 weeks ago

Why Republicans Really Want to Arm Teachers

"Thing. I think we're sometimes looking at this through the wrong lens, as far as arming teachers, bringing in more security guards, bringing more cops to schools, basically turning schools into military military installments. The reason they're pushing for this should be abundantly clear, but I think the idea that it's a school is kind of sidelining us. They want to sell as many firearms as they possibly can. And so if we're talking about arming whatever it is a 100,000 teachers, we're talking about bringing in security guards, talking about hiring more cops to patrol school campuses. That's a lot of firearms. They want to, yeah. The whole mission here and it's been this way, no matter what Strata of the conversation we're talking about, the whole mission is to sell as many guns as possible. That's the chief mission of the NRA, the gun lobby at large, the Republican Party, people like Ted Cruz and Rand Paul, gone down the line. They want to sell as many firearms as possible because more profits for the firearm industry, the for profit firearm industry. By the way, Second Amendment never says anything about making a profit on firearms. Maybe there's an angle there. But regardless, the whole idea is to make that profit as big as possible so that there's more money flowing around into Republican war chests. It certainly into the NRA and all the executives at the NRA. This is all intentional from a purely fiscal wealth building point of

Ted Cruz NRA Rand Paul Republican Party
Morgan Zegers Is a Lifestyle/Culture Person With a Political Spin

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:38 min | 2 weeks ago

Morgan Zegers Is a Lifestyle/Culture Person With a Political Spin

"You mentioned before we went live very fascinating things. So we're working here at America first to go down in the demographic talk radio has a certain demographic. We want to reach a younger generation. You're seeing a reverse phenomena you're getting more and more listeners to your podcast from who, what kind of demographic? Well, so my demographic has always been political. I mean, I run a nonprofit called young Americans against socialism, so when I first entered the movement, I don't know if you knew this. The Tea Party patriots invited me to speak in front of Capitol Hill, my first week. I don't know if they didn't realize, oh, she's never spoken before, but it was like, it was me, Mark Levin, Ted Cruz, all just standing in the green room, and I'm just going, it was very funny. And so that put me in the political space, but at the end of the day, I'm very much about lifestyle, culture, religion, and most importantly, homeschooling at homesteading. I'm very into that. I'm more of a country. You've got to stop putting these videos on Instagram of you at your latest homestead cabin because everybody thinks you've bought 12 of them already. These are just your fantasies, right? Well, I tore the country looking for my home center. And then you film it as if you own it. Yeah, I'm trying to inspire. Do you know my following? Is all young women? I'm trying to inspire them to want more than what the culture puts on to us these days in society. But my audience has always been political. I'm more of a lifestyle culture person. And so now that we have these educational resources with the survivors and with American values, trying to teach kids, it's really opened me up to very concerned mothers and educators and community focused people that weren't really interested in politics until the government lately over the last few years has started to encroach on us and our children.

Ted Cruz Tea Party Patriots Mark Levin Capitol Hill America
Ted McAllister: The New Elite Only Wants to Preserve Their Power

Mark Levin

01:57 min | Last month

Ted McAllister: The New Elite Only Wants to Preserve Their Power

"The reason we are where we are the reason the culture is where it is Is for the reasons I wrote about an American Marxism An emerita And I went back and looked Our ruling class I don't like calling them elites Self appointed elitists yes But our ruling class Is extremely hostile to our founding principles Incompetent does not share our values and power hungry It is not a ruling class that seeks to improve a lot of the country The spread the word of americanism It is a ruling class that is a very dangerous entity In American Marxism on the tenth page I cite Ted mcallister Because I thought in an essay he wrote he was quite articulate about it Professor public policy at pepperdine And he wrote an essay a year ago he said today we have a very different elite than America did as recently as the 1980s in terms of their nature gulls ambition style and ways of exercising power The deepest fact of our time is that America has had a bad elite In mendacious one whose skills values goals tastes and types of knowledge are hostile to our nation's inherited cultures and plural people The new elite that has emerged in the last generation or two has no interest in preserving anything Or perhaps their own power

Ted Mcallister America
Sen. Ted Cruz: Joe Biden's Solution Is to Disarm Law-Abiding Citizens

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:26 min | Last month

Sen. Ted Cruz: Joe Biden's Solution Is to Disarm Law-Abiding Citizens

"Senator Ted Cruz from the great state of Texas with the perfect proper response to the verbal diarrhea that came out of the president of the United States yesterday. Just about everybody agrees he's doing a terrible job, just about everybody agrees. This is a train wreck. And you know what's frustrating about it, Sean? Is he's not willing to change. He's not willing to change course. This speech tonight, once again, he chose to double down on hard left divisive politics. You know, when it comes to violent crime, listen, I was at, Yuval, the last week, the day after the shooting. I was there with the local officials and with law enforcement and with family members, what happened in Texas is horrific. And anyone with any heartbeat is horrified that 19 little boys and girls were murdered that two teachers were murdered. And what does Joe Biden and the Democrats do? They don't come back and say, let's unite behind law enforcement to stop criminals to keep our kids safe. No, they immediately demagogue and say the solution is to take away your weapons. The solution is to disarm law abiding citizens. He's so right. This could be, this should be a unifying event. Americans ought to be unified over this. We ought to be able to say, hey, it's us against them, meaning us against the bad guys. The monsters who would murder children.

Senator Ted Cruz Texas Diarrhea Yuval Sean United States Joe Biden
Sen. Ted Cruz: This Presidency Is a Train Wreck

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:10 min | Last month

Sen. Ted Cruz: This Presidency Is a Train Wreck

"It's called a train wreck. That's the way Ted Cruz put it. This presidency is a walking talking train wreck. No other way to describe it. Instead of trying to unify Americans after you've Aldi instead of trying to rally behind law enforcement, let's figure out ways to stop the bad guys and keep our kids safe. Never let a crisis go to waste. Let's take away your guns. That's the answer. Gosh. There's such a stark difference between Republicans and Democrats today. I've never seen it like this before. People talk about why we're so polarized. You know why we're so polarized? Because political parties are so different right now. In other words, if you're a registered Democrat, you're represented by a party. That believes that the immediate aftermath of a mass shooting of 19 children and two teachers should be to go around and disarm people. We have too many guns in America. It's the gun's problem. If you're a Republican, you do things like, well, armed teachers.

Ted Cruz America
Leadership Lessons From Ted Lasso: Humor Eases the Tension

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:00 min | Last month

Leadership Lessons From Ted Lasso: Humor Eases the Tension

Leadership Lessons From Ted Lasso: Tell the Truth

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:43 min | Last month

Leadership Lessons From Ted Lasso: Tell the Truth

"Next thing is just tell the truth. You know, this is hard, okay? And it may sound funny to you. And as I tell the truth, but just sometimes the situations that you're in just call for saying that we need to tell the truth. This is where we're at. This is situation we're in. And here's how we can fix it. I knew as a pastor and as a member of Congress, one of the first rules that I had from my staff was this. You know, what I ask you is just never surprise me. You know, if you have something that is going wrong or you have something in this man, just don't surprise me. Don't let it spring up because you're too scared to tell me the truth. That either I messed up or I didn't do what I was supposed to do or you didn't do what you're supposed to do, but don't surprise me. Folks in your businesses in your lives and your families. There is a great lesson to be learned is just don't surprise each other. That is when the most struggle come to someone who has been a counselor for years and dealing with this, what I find so many times whether it's business relationships or personal relationships or political relationships, however you want to put them. It is that surprise factor. Oh, well I didn't want to I didn't want to hurt your feelings. Folks, sometimes you just got to hurt people's feelings. Now that doesn't mean that you're out there, you know, going around intentionally being a jerk. That's not what I'm saying, but sometimes the honesty hurts. Some of the best lessons in my life have come from people that were able to tell me the truth. I've told this story many times in speaking engagements when I was pastoring a young pastor. I stood at the back of the church as a church was getting out, you know, parishioners would come by and the people who came that morning and most of them would come out past her, great job, love the sermon, great service, gloves Harmon. Thanks for sharing. And you know, as a pastor and for a pastor's after who might be listening to this, you know, that's sort of boost your ego up a little bit. You know what I mean? I'll say it. You know, you worked on your sermon. You want to get it up very good. And so you're looking for that affirmation and hey, we did it well. Well, a sweet lady came up in her name. She still laughs. She's over a hundred years old and Rosetta and I are. Came to me one morning and she looked at me and she this was about 25, 30 years ago, so she was she was going right along and she was just wonderful at being a sounding board for honesty. She came in and she said, preacher I enjoyed your sermon. Well, of course, I was feeling pretty good. Miss rose had a lot in my sermon. And then she looked at me and she held onto my hand for a second and he said, I like it better the first time this morning, but it was okay. And I sat there for a second, and I said, what? The first time, and what she reminded us was, is I had gotten to a point in my sermon and I thought I had to repeat myself because maybe I just didn't think people were understanding it. And I repeated part of my message and what she was telling me was is sort of a great life lesson is make your point and then

Congress Harmon Rosetta Miss Rose
Leadership Lessons From Ted Lasso: Don't Take It Personally

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:33 min | Last month

Leadership Lessons From Ted Lasso: Don't Take It Personally

"This one is the next one in looking at this, the friend who sent this to me. I like the way they put this. And they just should never take anything personally. Now, that's much easier said than done. For all of us listening to this podcast this morning. We all take things personal. I can tell you as a member of Congress, you're out there, you take things personally, if people say something that you're whatever. Look, I've been called everything in the world before. And if you take it all personally, then there's a tendency that you'll shy away from the truth. Maybe what they're saying is actually true. And you don't want to take personally because you're not being who you really are. And if you're never taking things personally, then that's the best way to have it. Now, do you take things and learn from them? Yes. But what I say too many people doing is they take it personal and then they won't grow from it. Things in life criticism in life, it can be your best friend failure in life is Thomas Edison and mini Avengers would tell you it is the very thing that you need in life. Failure is failing forward is the way you do it. Making mistakes, learning from that mistake and growing from that mistake. It is really, you know, what was said. I mean, when inventing things, you know, the inventor said, you know, he had failed, he finally got it right, and they said, well, wow, you got somebody said to him, you got this right. That was a great find. He said, yes, but I did not find this invention without all the mistakes before

Congress Thomas Edison
Dan Bongino: Sarah Palin Is the Real Deal

The Dan Bongino Show

01:54 min | Last month

Dan Bongino: Sarah Palin Is the Real Deal

"One of the things I always respected about you is early on when I was one big nobody you probably am nobody's other people still but whatever When no one knew who I was You got behind me And I never forget when your people reached out and said you know the governor wants to help and it's not just me You didn't get behind people who were fashionable candidates You got behind people who are conservatives I remember a candidate you endorsed in the Maryland governor's race who had candidly no chance of winning but he was a real conservative and you believed in him He was a friend of mine And he was so inspired by that and I just want people to know that you're not some act This is you're the real deal I saw it I meant it and I want everyone to understand that That did you backed me up and many others not just me You know when used your power and your social media and your voice to help those people And I think even though it's one congressional seat I think it means a lot if you are sitting at it I appreciate that And if nothing else I am thankful for the discernment that I have that I believe God has put in my spirit a discernment for it Who's good And who's fake and who's phony and who's not capable and who were the good guys and you definitely find your top top of the list of thank you These others whom I had the privilege of endorsing early early on like Rand Paul He endorsed me yesterday and he reminded me Siri you were there when nobody else would Be there for me You helped me when nobody else would People knew my dad but they didn't know me Ted Cruz is one that says I wouldn't be in the United States center if it worked for Sarah Palin but by the way he hasn't come out and endorsed me yet However you know it's not You better get on that Jimbo Governor we're on a lot of stations where I'm one of the biggest ones in Texas WB AP We love you senator You gotta get on that

Maryland Ted Cruz Rand Paul United States Center Siri Sarah Palin Jimbo Texas
Sen. Ted Cruz: Schools Should Have a Single Point of Entry

Mike Gallagher Podcast

00:52 sec | Last month

Sen. Ted Cruz: Schools Should Have a Single Point of Entry

"But here was what Ted Cruz said about a single point of entry in our schools, which makes all the sense in the world who could disagree with this. We also know that there are best practices at federal buildings and courthouses. Where for security reasons, they limit the means of entry to one entrance. Schools likewise should have a single point of entry. Fire exits should only open out. At that single point of entry, we should have multiple armed police officers. Or if need be military veterans trained to provide security and keep our children safe.

Ted Cruz
NRA speakers unshaken on gun rights after school massacre

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | Last month

NRA speakers unshaken on gun rights after school massacre

"Speakers at the National Rifle Association's convention in Houston lament the Yuval di school shooting while also call for more guns and tighter school security Former president Donald Trump calls a shooting in which 19 students in their two teachers died pure evil saying people bent on killing others need to be in mental hospitals and schools have to become security bastions From this day forward every school in America should have a police officer or an armed resource officer on duty at all times Texas Republican senator Ted Cruz dismisses the calls for banning semi-automatic weapons or initiating gun restrictions Taking guns away from these responsible Americans will not make them safer Nor will it make our nation more secure The NRA says attendees will also reflect on the shooting and pray for the victims I'm Tim

Yuval Di School National Rifle Association Donald Trump Senator Ted Cruz Houston America Texas NRA TIM
NRA says it is "committed to making schools secure" and Texas convention will still go on

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | Last month

NRA says it is "committed to making schools secure" and Texas convention will still go on

"Three days after the horrific school shooting and you've all been Texas former president Donald Trump will headline at the National Rifle Association's annual convention in Houston It's a memorial weekend event build as a Texas sized celebration of freedom firearms in the NRA with 14 acres of guns and gear Leaders say attendees will reflect on the school shooting and pledged to redouble their commitment to making schools secure Texas senator Ted Cruz and South Dakota governor Kristi Noem are expected to speak Texas governor Greg Abbott who was slated to attend will instead address the convention by pre recorded video Democrat beto o'rourke who's running for governor says he'll be attending protests outside the convention center Some speakers and performers have dropped out Texas senator John cornyn and congressman Dan Crenshaw are no longer attending and country singer Larry gatlin said he's come to believe background checks would be a step in the right direction NRA member Gary Francis traveled from Wisconsin to attend the meeting He said he opposes any gun control regulations in response to the shooting what happened there is obviously tragic

Texas NRA Senator Ted Cruz Kristi Noem Donald Trump Beto O'rourke Greg Abbott Senator John Cornyn Houston Dan Crenshaw South Dakota Larry Gatlin Gary Francis Wisconsin
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

02:40 min | 1 year ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"We don't know yet we don't know yet khloe but the you're twenty thirty four. I'm waiting for you. Dragonfly that talk okay so chloe. Let's say someone is listening and they're thinking you know what i i have a good idea for a talk. How will they know if their idea is good for the ted stage if they should even take the steps to submit a great question so i mean i think one thing that we tell people is to think about the difference between a topic and idea so a topic example might be something like we need to fix the opioid crisis. Like of course that's fascinating and most people would agree that. What's the idea within that. So an idea might take that step further like a specific angle that stems from the topic. with a unique message solution or insight so talk idea that actually became a talk from from that topic might be in the opioid crisis. Here's what it takes to save a life so we're actually hearing about you know the steps to potentially end this person by person. Okay got it. Now let's say a person has thought through all of that. They still think their ideas legit. What should they do. How can they get their idea to you and your team so please please spread the word if you know someone who has an idea we're spreading or if you are that person apply it's still open until the end of january so you can apply at go dot ted dot com slash idea. Search and winners will be invited to give. Ted talks either. Virtually person khloe. Sasha books is speaker. Development curator at ted khloe. Thank you so much for spending this hour with us. Thank you so much for having me. Thanks so much for listening to our show this week on ted's idea search and again for more information on how to submit your idea visit go dot ted dot com slash idea search and as always to learn more about the people who were on. Today's show go to ted dot. Npr dot org and to see hundreds more. ted talks. Checkout ted dot com or the ted app are ted radio production staff at. Npr includes jeff rodgers son as michigan. Poor rachel faulkner diba mohtashami james l. Tc howard katie monteleone. Maria paz gutierrez christina kala matthew ta and farah safari with help from daniel shchukin. Our intern is janet jong lee. Our theme music was written by rahm teen arab louis. Our partners at ted. Are chris anderson colin helms and a phelan and michelle quint. I'm a new summer odi. And you've been listening to the ted radio hour from npr..

janet jong lee jeff rodgers Maria paz gutierrez katie monteleone daniel shchukin chris anderson Sasha rachel faulkner end of january christina kala michelle quint Npr go dot ted dot com this week twenty thirty four ted radio Today ted james l. Ted
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

05:21 min | 1 year ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"On So because of the pandemic The disney parks have let go of tens of thousands of workers. Yeah twenty eight thousand. What are your thoughts on that. They have two hundred thousand employees. They let twenty eight thousand go laid him off. Twenty thousand two hundred thousand pretty significant by out of your workforce not one of those people was in management and they had also very quietly acted to make sure that the management structure could keep compensation packages intact. Now i understand. The revenues have been eviscerated but just know that from twenty seven to twenty thousand nine hundred eighty years. The company had made eleven and a half billion dollars in share buybacks. A share buyback is when a company buys shares of its own stock. They do that to drive the price up and to make shareholders happy it also has the nice ansari benefit of making the ceo and other people who are compensated in shares. Happy as well. No one could have seen the pandemic coming. No one could have said. We're gonna be hit by this thing. But anyone could have foreseen that something bad would have happened for which you should have cash so. This company went from historic profitability and the happiest shareholders on earth to less than a year later laying. Twenty eight thousand people and pleading poverty. Okay so let's talk about what you would like to see happen. I mean we started this episode. We see a crash course in the depression in the nineteen twenties and understanding what radical changes came out of that with the government with the way we think about money. And i just wanna ask you. We've had now a century of these lessons. Do you think we need another moment. Where we have a reckoning and say you know we need to fix the system. Let's set up a better way of doing this. So what i want to see happen is if i'm a ceo. And i know that some of my workers are on food stamps or going food pantries. I want to be ashamed of myself. i want other people to feel shame on my behalf. The fact that that's not happening says that the ceo considers himself to be of a class and even a species different and distinct from the people. Who do the hardest work at the company. The billionaires in this country have gotten much much much richer in the pandemic on the taken advantage of what people needed. I was hoping the pandemic would force us all to say. Oh my god now. I see it. Look at the way we're treating the people who do the essential work you know and the opposite kind of happens you know the bay zossen everyone else kinda double down on the old behaviors and and what do you. How do you respond. If one of them says well you know. I hear you about wanting to provide more of a safety net to are least well paid employees but abigail. I gotta run a company here and you just don't know what it takes to survive in this market. What do you say to that what i say. Is there humans working in your company human beings. They have all the same needs and desires that you have. You have to treat them with the dignity you would wanna be treated with yourself like. That's just the starting point. Then go make all the prophet. You wanna make. But if your business plan starts with exploitation and you can't make get to profitability without doing that then you need to go get another business plan if you really care about your employees jeff bezos. I'm talking to you right now. You should pay them well and maybe make less money and make sure everybody else is making more. They're your fellow human beings after all. All they want is licensed dignity. That's abigail disney by the way shortly after we tape this interview. Disney announced that they're laying off another four thousand workers. You can find abigail. Full-time at ted dot com. Thank you so much for listening to our show this week about a century of money to learn more about the people who were on it go to ted dot. Npr dot org and to see hundreds more. Ted talks checkout ted dot com or the ted app are ted radio production staff at. Npr includes jeff. Rodgers son is michigan. Poor retail faulkner diba mohtashami james de la hussey jc howard katie. Monta leon maria paz gutierrez christina kala and matthew kutai with help from daniel shchukin. Our intern is faira safari special. Thanks this week to williams snow for providing a voiceover. Our theme music was written by rahm teen arab louis. Our partners at ted chris anderson colin helms in a feeling and michelle. Quint newsom roti and you have been listening to the ted radio hour from npr. This message comes from npr sponsor. Three am who continues to expand production of the respirators frontline workers need globally and is on track to supply two billion by the end of twenty twenty more at three m dot com slash covid. Three m science applied to life..

abigail abigail disney depression jeff bezos ted dot james de la hussey howard katie Monta leon maria paz gutierrez matthew kutai daniel shchukin Disney ted chris anderson colin helms Rodgers Npr Ted Quint newsom roti jeff michigan
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

06:30 min | 1 year ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"I'm anew and for most kids around the country. School is officially out of session. But unlike other summers many kids and teens are stuck at home because of the coronavirus pandemic and so today we've got an episode for everyone. Kids adults parents teens. Go are all invited on this journey. Because we've invited a certain dad back on the show to share the coolest things he's learned over the years here on the ted radio hour topics to blow the minds of young and old and a mystery guest host. Can you please introduce yourself. It's the ted radio hour. Npr hello although guy welcome back thank you okay so guy not only were you the host of this show until you so graciously handed over the reins to me but you are also the host of rather podcast for kids right. Yeah it's called. wow on the world. It's a journey through real scientific research into sounds a little weird but It's like a cartoon for the ear. Where me and my co host. Mickey thomas go on journeys into space and back in time and Underwater and everywhere in between searching for incredible scientific discoveries. and it's this choi full wonderful experience for us and hopefully for the kids who listen to the show. Well that includes my kids and we sort of figured since you and i are both home with our children this summer. We thought it'd be the perfect person to come on and curate a special summer show for the entire ted radio hour family and you have so kindly brought four of your favorite segments that you did the years. How did you even begin to choose which segments you were going to bring to us. Well i think like you probably experienced their lot of ted talks that my kids love and on a really inspired by and then there's some that you know of course are sort of over their heads right but i really want to bring segments. That spoke to curiosity and the sort of the. Aw kids naturally have about the world and so that's how we kinda came up with this this collection and i will say i did feel that way About the first segment that you brought to us. This one is called. How do trees collaborate tell us about it. I love the segment so much So basically scientists for basically forever thought. That trees competed against each other for resources right for for water and son and nutrients and you know they figured that. The tallest trees in the forest were the strongest trees right and make sense. Might but suzanne simard the scientists that were about to hear from she totally changed the way that scientists. Now think about trees because it turns out they don't compete at all. In fact trees collaborate. They work together through this. This mysterious underground superhighway. There is an entire communication network happening under our feet. Let's listen forest ecologist. Suzanne simard had a hunch yes. That's right. She thought that trees could talk. Just imagine like when you're walking through the forest you. Might you hear the crunching of the twigs under your feet in the rustling of the but she thought what if there's more going on big chattering going on that. We can't hear the third attuned to each other now at the time. A team of scientists in england were wrapping up an experiment where they'd grown in the laboratory these pine seedlings together in little route boxes that you could see through. And the scientists took two of these pine seedlings. These baby trees that were in the same box in this aimed dirt and then they exposed one of these seedlings to a radioactive carbon dioxide gas carbon fourteen radioactive carbon. And what they found. Was that some of that radioactive gas. The carbon fourteen made its way into the second ceiling. You can visualize you could see. And so from this experiment. It seemed that somehow these two plants in the same dirt or connected. And i thought. Wow maybe this is what's going on in my forest. Maybe suzanne smart thought maybe all the trees in a forest or connected in a kind of network like our airport system or transportation system our social networks and maybe she thought all of this was happening underground when we walk through the forest what we see as human beings we just see these beautiful trees growing out of the ground but we don't see that they're actually completely linked underground in this superhighway. So suzanne decided to prove this underground network existed. She devised an experiment using some of the same radioactive gas geiger counter to measure it and a patch of birch and for trees. I figured the burcin effort would be connected below ground web. Suzanne pick up the story from the ted stage and i gathered my apparatus plastic bags and duct tape and shade cloth. A paper. suit a respirator. And then borrow some high-tech stuff from my university. The first day of the experiment. We got out to our plot and i pulled on my weight. Paper suit i put on my respirator. I put the plastic bags over my trees. I got my giant syringes and i injected carbon fourteen radioactive gas into the bag of birch. I waited an hour. I figured it would take this long for the trees to suck up the co two through photosynthesis senate down into their roots and maybe shuttle that carbon below ground to their neighbors. I went to my first bag with the birch. I pulled the bag off. Iran mike geiger counter over. Its leaves perfect. The birch had taken up the radioactive gas. Then the moment of truth i went over to the for tree. I pulled off its bay. I iran the geiger counter pits needles. And i heard the most beautiful sound.

Suzanne simard ted Npr mike geiger Mickey thomas Iran england
"ted" Discussed on The TED Interview

The TED Interview

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"ted" Discussed on The TED Interview

"Hello i'm chris addison to the ted interview. Today i'm re sharing with you. A conversation with christiana figueres from last december because it connects directly to an amazing event. That's happening this coming saturday. Ten ten twenty twenty. I really want ever understood into this to be part of that event. If you possibly can so cristiana has probably done more than anyone in the world to bring people together over the climate issue in harare the united nations. She was credited as the architect of the paris climate agreement which probably remains humanity's best roadmap into a hopeful future. And that's because she found ways to persuade people to change that assumptions about what was possible in this episode. We talk about this major new inish different ted which we just kicked off back then. When this conversation happened it's called countdown. it's global initiative to champion and accelerate solutions to the climate crisis. The goal is to build a better future by cutting greenhouse gas emissions in half by twenty thirty in the race to zero carbon world. a lot. safer tina faira. Frankly better for everyone. And now it's hard to believe it but despite a global pandemic and the most challenging year that many of us have seen in our lives. It's finally come together on ten ten twenty twenty saturday. We're kicking off with a virtual event that will be live streaming on. Youtube is going to be a global audience numbering in the millions. We've got some incredible speakers. Like prince william al gore and of course christiana figueres has self many others. Great artists use activists great scientists..

christiana figueres chris addison cristiana harare tina faira united nations paris ted prince william al gore Youtube
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Sometimes, simple act of kindness toward another person. A, thank you. Complement of vote of confidence can have a much bigger effect than we realize and can even change the way we look at ourselves. And for Jacobs that kind of appreciation turned into a journey of a thousand. Thank us all for just a cup of coffee. I decide to go backwards so started with the Barista at Joe Coffee, which is coffee chain in New York where I go? And I thanked her, and she thanked me for thanking her. Would you say to her? You said Hey I just WANNA extra. Thank you for making my cup of coffee this morning. That's it I just rest my gratitude and I think she was pleasantly surprised because he doesn't get thanked all that often. So you after thinking the Barista I, guess you decided to meet with a guy named Ed Kaufman, who who works for Joe Coffee, so yeah I met at Kaufman who is the guy who goes around the world testing the beans tasting them and I loved that because he was so passionate about this brown liquid, and he taught me how to differentiate the tastes, because he would take a sip, and his face would light up, and he would say sensing honey, Crisp Apple, and able syrup in pineapple, upside down cake, and I love that idea of of savoring and appreciating. It's so tied.

Joe Coffee Ed Kaufman Jacobs New York Apple
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

04:52 min | 2 years ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Writer professional lifestyle experimenter. self-described curmudgeon I talk about I think in every everyone has the two sides the Larry David side in the Mr Rogers side, so the grumpy pessimist and the optimistic grateful side so many people have helped me to come to this night and I believe. I was born with a very strong. Larry David Side I was very good at finding things to be annoyed about and I think a lot of us are, if you hear a hundred compliments and a single insult, what do you remember the insult? Would you just take along with me? Ten seconds to think of the people who have helped you. Become who you are I was. Aware here that I have this negative bias. This Larry David side, but I wanted to bulk up the Mr Rogers side. Ten seconds of silence. I'll watch the time. It's not something that comes naturally to me and to most people I don't think it comes naturally. You have to cultivate this idea of gratitude. Whomever you've been thinking about. How pleased they must speed to know the difference you feel they've made. What what happened to you to say? Wait a minute I'm not. Appreciate people not. Being grateful. was, a Piff Neil. What was it? Well I. Think it was partly intellectually I knew the power of gratitude. There are tons of studies about how good it is for you. How helps ward off depression? You recover more quickly. You sleep better better. You're more generous. So, intellectually I knew like I should be grateful. But how do you do that and that's when? I decided you know what I'm going to try? This ritual at home where I'm going to try to say thanks to all the people who helped make my meal a possibility so I would I would. Say you know I'd like to thank the farmer who grew the tomato? Cashier who rang the tomatoes up at the grocery store? And, that's when my son who is ten very perceptively said. You Know Dad that's fine, but it's also totally lame, because those people can't hear you. They're not in our apartment. So if you really are committed, then you should go and thank those people in person. Aj. Jacobs picks up the story. From the Ted Stage. Now I'm a writer and for my books. I like to go on adventures. Go on quests so I decided I'm going to take my son up on his challenge. It seems simple enough and to make it even simpler. I decided to focus on just one item my morning cup of coffee. Well, it turned out to be not so simple at all. This quest took me around the world. I discovered that my coffee would not be possible without hundreds of people I take for granted so I would thank the trucker who drove the coffee beans to the coffee shop, but he couldn't have done his job without the road, so I would think the people who pave the road. And then I would think the people who made the asphalt for the pavement. And he couldn't do his job without the folks who drew the yellow lines on the road because they kept my truck driver from smashing into oncoming traffic. Splitting an atom because you can think the people who mixed the paint for the lines on the road, and then the people who made the machines to enable the paints to be mixed and the people who mind the iron to make the machines to mix the paint then. You can. There's lots of people think. Oh, it's never incident. I could have spent the next fifty years of my life, thanking people and I could have given a Ted talk that was about four hundred hours long, because yeah, that's what it made me realize how interconnected! Everything is how many people it takes. It doesn't take a village to make a cup of coffee and takes.

Larry David Side Mr Rogers writer Ted Stage Piff Neil Jacobs
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

07:40 min | 2 years ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Different parts of the light spectrum that we simply can't see with our human is so imagine. There's a stone wall somewhere in Italy that dates to the Roman period so roughly two thousand years ago, and you'd walk over a field and you wouldn't see it. Yeah, well that stonewall. STONEWALL, which may be under a meter, or so of earth it affects the overlain topography so the roots going down. They couldn't go as deep because they'd be stopped by the stonewall and so processing the satellite data, you can actually map out and see those changes we'll start seeing straight lines, and those straight lines form structures, which definitely aren't natural, so just as an example We got a hold of new satellite imagery for most of the pyramid fields and. What I what I started processing. It feels like cheating. You can see everything. How many sites are have you guys? found using pictures from satellites I'm at the point where I've lost count It is in the many thousands, but I don't know anymore. I believe we have barely scratched the surface in terms of what's left to discover. In the Egyptian Delta alone we've excavated less than one thousandth of one percent of the total volume of Egyptian sites. When you add to that. The thousands of other sites team and I have discovered. What we thought we knew. Pales in comparison to what we have left to discover. When you look at the incredible work that my colleagues are doing all around the world and what they're finding. I believe that there are millions of undiscovered. Archaeological sites left to find. Discovering them will do nothing less than a mock the full potential of our existence. When we come back, we'll hear more from Sarah about how her work can help us. All discover more about the planet we call. I'm a new summer. Roti and you're listening to the Ted Radio Hour from NPR, stay with us. He everyone just a quick thanks to our sponsor. Virgo summer is here and vacation is just drive away. Search thousands of nearby vacation rentals on Verb Oh to find your family private home all to yourself you can spread out chill out and feel that vacation feeling again together book them that makes the vacation download the verb virgo. APP, that's V. RB OH. I'm Gregory Warner with NPR's rough translation, so there's a holiday in the Netherlands where every year thousands of white folks where black face some people trying in that tradition, but in very Dutch way you talk you talk you talk you talk you talk until you reach consensus. Can you fight racism in a way that brings the whole country with you? That's on NPR's rough translation. It's the Ted Radio hour from NPR News Zimmer Odi and today on the show ideas for the whole family with my predecessor guy rise in addition to previously hosting this show. He is the host of the kids science podcast. Wow, in the world. Hey, Guy Hello. Before the break we were hearing from you and Sarah Park the space archaeologist about how many ancient sites she has already begun to uncover using satellite imagery. Let's get back to your conversation with Sarah. All right. I mean what you're saying. is we only know a tiny bit about our past? Is that true I mean is most of our history hidden? I would say yes. Because history is always written by the winners and yeah, people are living in places where they've always lived for thousands of years look at places like Rome and his tunnel, and Cairo those cities layers upon layers. Paul layers of of history so I think we've taken a lot for granted about who we are and where we come from, we think living in this very modern age with smartphones and Internet, and and sort of this whole world of knowledge at our fingertips. We know everything the more and more we delve into the past. The more we realized that we don't and that it has a lot of lessons to teach us for today. I wish for us to discover. The millions of unknown archaeological sites around the world by creating a twenty. First Century Army of global explorers will find and protect the world's hidden heritage, which contains clues to humankind's collective resilience and creativity. So how are we going to do this? We are going to build an online crowd source citizen science platform to allow anyone in the world to engage with discovering archeological sites and protect them. By creating this platform, we will find the millions of places occupied by the billions of people that came before us. Acknowledging that the past is worth saving. Mean so much more. It means that we're worth saving two. And the greatest story ever told. Is, the story of our shared. Human Journey. But the only way that we're going to be able to write it. Is If. We do it together. Thank you. I love that line. Re she says means that we're worth it to so great, so I have to ask, it's you could go on an archaeological dig the ancient civilization of your choice. Where would you go? I think I would want to do something like way way way back like early humans or like our even our human predecessors they were. Like creatures at least seven or eight million years ago, and that's what we know of and we've only discovered. The remains of like a teeny number of human like species, and so there's there's very little doubt that we have so many more to discover like hundreds thousands of species, and that would be amazing to go on one of those digs I wanna call Sarah and ask her. If I can go visit one of those places in Peru. She could hook me. Oh my God right. So cool all right, so we have talked about trees, dolphins and ancient civilizations before our final segment I wanNA talk to you guys about two words that we say every day, or at least we should say every day. Thank you two very simple words. Yes, that are incredibly powerful and a j Jacobs wanted to show how powerful those words were, so he took us all on a journey with him through gratitude. Do you talk to your kids about saying? Thank you like. Please all the time because I. Worry that. My kids say it, but I'm not sure that they totally mean it. Yeah I. Think it's natural. We all touch kids about saying, please and thank you. Please and thank you, but It has to be more than just saying. Please and thank you. It's about actually internalizing gratitude, which which is what Aj kind of describes in this in this talk. To practice gratitude you really have to. Slow things down and notice. Age as a.

NPR Sarah STONEWALL Sarah Park Italy Egyptian Delta Cairo Netherlands Aj Gregory Warner Century Army of Paul Rome Peru j Jacobs
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

08:10 min | 2 years ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"The show today ideas for curious thinkers of all ages and our guide on this hour is my predecessor Guy Ross. Hello, okay, so we just heard Suzanne Simard to tell us about how trees cooperate with one another, and it really gets you thinking about how all kinds of other beings may be communicating, which brings us to the next topic that you brought us. Dolphins Oh man. KINK around with Dolphin. Can't go wrong dolphins. I I learned about and dolphins like communicate through clicks right learn about this from the prisoner about to hear denise hosing. She has spent her entire life studying a very specific pod of dolphins in the Bahamas, and I, remember Malaysia remember seeing this Ted Talk in person and twenty thirteen. And I was totally blown away at the idea that one day we might be able to talk to communicate with not just with dolphins, but with animals like Dr Doolittle. Right I was. Fascinated by that story as a kid never that. And we are closer to that possibility today than ever before. I've seen lots of pictures of if you under water holding a camera. When you're down there. Does it feel like. It's almost like A. Just a better place to I, don't I don't do you get that feeling while you know. It's an immersion into a three dimensional world. The tides and the currents and the salt and the waves, and I mean. It all feeds into your understanding of what their world is like. Usually when I'm down there I'm like trying to follow behavior in make cameras on. It's actually mostly work really right. Denise hosing has been doing that work every summer. With this same group of Dolphins in the Bahamas see is just calculated recently for thirty five years. Breath thousand encounters in the water with the dolphins. Each of those a counters is about twenty minutes long so over one thousand hours of footage and. Data so yeah, it's a lot of data certainly for dolphins and the point of all that data of all that work is to help denise answer one question. Do they have a language. And if so, what are they talking about? A here's denise hurting on the Ted. Stage, now I'm interested in dolphins because of their large brains, and we know they use of that brainpower for just living complicated lives. But what do we really know about Dolphin Intelligence? We know that their brain to body ratio, which is a physical measure of intelligence, is second only to humans. cognitively they can understand artificially created languages. And they pass self awareness tests in mirrors and some parts of the world. They use tools like sponges to hunt fish. Now Dolphins are natural acoustics. They make sounds ten times as high and here's sounds ten times as high as do, but they have other communications signals they use. They have good vision, so these body postures to communicate. They have taste, smell, and touch and sound can actually be felt in the water, because the acoustic impedance of tissue and water's about the same, so dolphins can buzz and tickle each other at a distance. So decades ago, not years ago. I set out to find a place in the world where I could observe dolphins underwater to try to crack the code of their communication system. I will how? How do dolphins communicate to each other? Well, you know we can actually hear fairmount Their whistles are fairly audible to us. They have plex. They have burst pulses which are also. Packets of clicks. So. They have all these different cues, and they use body postures in combination with sounds that will basically communicate certain things to each other. This is total anthropomorphic station, but When you think of like when you see a dolphin animated or drawn and a kids book. They seem be smiling, but we should not interpolate that that means that they're happy all the time. Right Oh definitely. No, yeah, that is just a physical. Physical Cigna they have, going How do you respond? When other researchers say you know? Push back and say hey, like let's not do that. Let's not. anthropomorphized these creatures. You know you just keep doing your work, I think I. don't even think it's a discussion anymore. Honestly most of us that work with social mammals I think kind of move beyond that and just say well. It's a valuable tool for thinking about how they might think. Let's do the work, is it? Is it even we're to talk about Dolphin language, or or is, is it? Should we be talking about Dolphin Communication Yeah. We don't really usually talk about language because we don't have it yet. but thinking out of the boxes. Boxes you know it's like intelligence are other different kinds and types of intelligence. Are there different kinds and types of language I mean? We know there's tons of kinds of language with humans right, but one of the big things about language is that you can communicate about a different time and space right? Are they talking about the food? They're chasing. Are the eating, or are they talking about? Hey, let's go to the reef and a couple of days and meet up with this other group. You know we don't know and that's where. ANTHROPOMORPHIC can be a tool for thinking about how animals might be thinking. which brings us back to the Bahamas and a pivotal moment in Denise Hers Ings Years of work with Atlantic spotted dolphins there. It happened one summer because in the mid nineties. The dolphins did something they had never done with denise before. We just started noticing the dolphins were just start doing things. This is completely a wild right but we knew the individuals and they would start doing things like. Our Body posture in some cases mimicking rhythm of our sounds in the water. We were doing anything vocally. And we just Kinda thought. Would it be cool to see what we empower them? To communicate back to us. In the key to unlocking that communication. Turned out to be, play. Dolphins just like humans love to play games. Mostly with toys, piece of Robe, a bit of seaweed, anything can pull around in the water. Correct! So what kind of games do they like to play well, it's mostly called. Keep away. That is if they get the toy, then the ideas they like to be chased they like to let you get almost close enough to grab the toy, but then they speed off and that's the game. That's what they play with each other actually. The only question was had to use that play to crack the code. The code that would unlock the meaning behind the dolphins noises now one way to crack the code is to interpret these signals and figure out what they mean, but it's a difficult job, and we actually don't have a Rosetta stone yet, but a second way to crack the code is to develop some technology, an interface to due to a communication, and that's what we've been trying to do in the Bahamas and in real time. So we built a portable keyboard that we get pushed through the water and we labeled four objects. They like to play with the scarf ropes, guests them, and also had a bow ride, which is fun activity for open. And that's the scarf whistle, and these artificially created whistles. They're outside the Dolphin's normal repertoire. But. They're easily mimicked by the dolphins and I. Spent Four Years With my colleagues. Adam pack and Fabienne dealt four a working out in the field with this keyboard, using it with each other to do requests for toys while the dolphins were watching, and the dolphins get in on the game, they could point at the visual object, or they could mimic.

Bahamas Denise hosing denise Suzanne Simard Ted Talk Guy Ross Dr Doolittle Denise Hers Ings Malaysia Adam pack Fabienne
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

06:32 min | 2 years ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"I'm a new summer ODI and for most kids around the country school is officially out of session, but unlike other summers, many kids and teens are stuck at home because of the coronavirus pandemic and so today. We've got an episode for everyone kids, adults, parents teens. You are all invited on this journey because we've invited a certain dad back on the show to share the coolest things he's learned over the years here on the Ted Radio Hour topics to blow the minds of young and old and. Mystery guest host. Can you please introduce yourself? It's the Ted. Radio NPR Guy Roz hello. Hello guy well back, thank you. Okay so guy, not only were you the host of this show until you so graciously handed over the reins to me, but you are also the host of a rather popular podcast for kids right? Yeah, it's called. Wow, on the world. It's a journey through real scientific research, and it sounds a little weird, but it's like a cartoon for the ear where me and my co host Mindy Thomas go on journeys into space and back in time and. Underwater and everywhere in between searching for incredible scientific discoveries, and it's this joyful wonderful experience for us, and hopefully for the kids who listen to the show. That includes my kids and we sorta figured since you and I are both home with our children this summer. Be The perfect person to come on and curate a special summer show for the entire Ted Radio Hour family and you have so kindly brought for of your favorite segments that you did over the years. How did you even begin to choose which segments we're going to bring us well I think like you probably experience there lot of Ted talks that my kids love and on a really inspired by, and then there's some that you know of course are sort of over their heads right, but I really wanted to bring segments that spoke to curiosity and. The sort of all that kids naturally have about the world, and so that's how we kinda came up with this. This collection and I will say I did feel that way about the first segment that you brought to us. This one is called. How do trees collaborate? Tell us about it I love this segment so much So basically, scientists basic forever thought that trees competed against each other for resources right for water and son, and nutrients, and they figured that the tallest trees in the forest where the strongest trees right it makes sense. But Suzanne Simard the scientists that were about to hear from she. Changed the way that scientists now think about trees because it turns out, they don't compete at all. In fact, trees collaborate. They work together through this mysterious. Superhighway, there is an entire communication network happening under our feet. Let's listen. Forest ecologist Suzanne Simard had a hunch. Yes, that's right. She thought that trees. Could Talk. Imagine like when you're walking through the forest, you, might you hear the crunching of the? Twigs under your feet in the rustling of the lease. But she thought. If, there's more going on. Big Chattering going on that. We can't hear. That, they're attuned to each other. Now at the time, a team of scientists in England were wrapping up an experiment where they'd grown in the laboratory. These pine seedlings together in little route boxes that you could see through. And the scientists took two of these pine seedlings, these baby trees that were in the same box in the same dirt, and then the exposed one of these ceilings to a radioactive carbon dioxide, gas, carbon, fourteen radioactive carbon, and what they found was that some of that radioactive gas, the carbon fourteen made its way into the second seedling. You can visualize you could see it, and so from this experiment. It seemed that somehow these two plants in the same dirt. Or connected and I thought wow. Maybe this is what's going on in my. Maybe Suzanne. Samara thought maybe all the trees in a forest or connected. In a kind of network. Like our airport system or transportation system our social networks. And maybe she thought all of this was happening underground. When we walk through the forest, what we see as human beings, we just see these beautiful trees growing out of the ground, but we don't see that there are actually completely linked underground in this superhighway. Suzanne decided to prove this underground network existed. She devised an experiment using some of the same radioactive gas, a geiger counter to measure it and a patch of Birch and for trees. I figured the Burton a for would be connected in a below ground web. Suzanne picks up the story from the Ted Stage, and I gathered my apparatus plastic bags and duct tape and shade cloth paper suit a respirator. And then I borrow some high-tech stuff from my university. The first day of the experiment we got out to our plot, and I pulled on my weight paper suit I. Put on my respirator. I put the plastic bags over my trees I got my giant Syringes, and I injected carbon fourteen, the radioactive gas into the bag of Birch. I waited an hour I figured. It would take this long for the trees to suck up the CO two through photosynthesis Senate down into their roots, and maybe shuttle that carbon below ground to their neighbors I went to my first bag with the Birch I pulled the bag off Iran. My Geiger counter over its leaves. Perfect. The Birch had taken up the radioactive gas. Then the moment of truth I went over to the for tree. I pulled off its bay. I ran the Geiger counter up its needles, and I heard the most beautiful sound. It was the sound.

Suzanne Simard Birch Geiger Ted NPR Mindy Thomas Samara England Iran Burton
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

08:40 min | 2 years ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Pleasure and avoiding pain the ability to approach things. That are good for you and avoid things that are bad for you is fundamental to survival and in our modern day society trouble telling. The difference can be labeled as a mental illness. If I was having car trouble and I took my car mechanic. The first thing they do is look under the hood but with Mental Health Research. You can't just pop the hood with the press of a button. So this is why we do experiments on animals specifically in my lab mice to understand the brain. Well we need to study brains okay. So how does she do this? And and where does she do? The she has a lab so she is working out in California using a technique called upto genetics So in every ted talk like there to be a tab of vocabulary. Words will be tested on this late. We'll be the vocabulary word here. So algae have this light sensing Gene Right Gene tells them when to migrate up and down in the oceans remember the oceans and so the light hits it and the algae now oh let's go get more light so we can make more food. You can put this gene into other cells and one of the cells that they put it in is neurons. Those are the core cells of your brain. So when you shine a light on the neuron it either turns on or off and by controlling the neuron you can then control the mind the way. I think of optics. Genetics Is that. It's almost like building a remote control so my understanding is with Kay. It's it's a way to manipulate mices brains to turn certain areas on or off and then see if you if you mess with them physically those little mice brains. Has it change their behavior? Is that a really simplified but simplification of what works good. So she's she's working with mice. She's working with light and she studies. How our brain gives rise to emotion related behavior like people who struggle with anxiety that some of the things that she's trying to figure out how nice help us figure that out. Pretty anxious don't you think so? Mice have this behavior where they kind of you know generally stick to the corners And kind of hide themselves from that big bad world of of predators. But if you shine a light into their brain in a certain way they default to a more kind of exploratory behavior where they go out into the open a bit more now. Obviously a mouse life requires a bit of both But just by shining a light on these neurons. You're able to flip the switch of that behavior and drive the mice either out into the open or allow it to kind of follow. Its natural behavior and can hide in the corner. This is the elevated plus maze. It's a widely used anxiety test that measures the amount of time that the mouse spends in the safety of the closed arms relative to exploring the open arms. Mice have evolved to prefer enclosed spaces like the safety of their burrows but to find food water mates. They need to go out into the open. Where they're more vulnerable to predatory threats. So I'm sitting in the background here and unbought the flip the switch and now when I flip the switch and turn the light on you can see. The mouse begins to explore the open arms of as more and in contrast to drug treatments for anxiety. There's no sedation. No locomotor impairment just coordinated natural looking exploration so not only is the fact almost immediate but there are no detectable side effects. Now when I flip the switch off you can see. The mouse goes back to its normal brain function and back to. It's corner when I was in the lab and I was taking these data. I was all that myself and I was so excited so excited when these quiet screams how why was I so excited. I mean yeah. Theoretically I knew that the brain controlled the mind but flip the switch my hand and see the mouth changes behavioral state so rapidly and so reverse ably. It was really the first time that I truly believed it. You know as a scientist. This is the moment the moment where you get. It's uncharted and then you just heard it right there. That's right. What is the significance of her being able to turn on and off these behaviors? Well it starts to tease apart. What is kind of inherent inborn behaviour? What and what is Conscious behavior and where those borderlines are. Now obviously this is just mice and we're not shining lights to control people's brains as of yet But this is helping us understand how the kind of physical architecture of a brain then gives rise to these behaviors that we look at as evidence of a mind so when you call someone like Kaitai. She seems like someone who you know. She's thinking about humans. She wants to change the way that they're treated. She wants to help them. Essentially so is when she gets the call from you. Is she ready to go to explain this in Layman's terms or is that something that Wo- you know these papers that are published and reviewed by their colleagues and peers turning that into something that is not only educational but also entertaining is? It's a real. It's a journey. It's a slog I would even say having given a Tedtalk it's hard. Well it depends on the person. Sometimes you get to work with the Real Jim K. was a real gem. Your Real Jim It's part of the reason I have a job or sometimes I feel like my job is translation in large part. Taking a scientific jargon a word like up to genetics and translate that into something that everybody can understand. And it's super important that everybody understand these things because science is kind of building the world around us these Endless frontiers of discovery. That's what gave us the IPHONE. That's what gave us all the things that were coping with in our in our day to day lives and science will determine the world we live in in the future so understanding this and translating this for for everyone I think is crucial super important and I think just even walking around in your day to day life. I mean just after our conversation I'm made of Stardust Rocks Camille live What else there's a part of my brain that makes me want to have chocolate at four. Pm Or is it my mind. We're not sure yet. And there are species living at the bottom of the earth that that my imagination cannot fathom what they look like. And I think you know as we're bombarded minute after minute hour after hour with the headlines and we're we're thinking about running around as humans on earth it's important to reconnect with the wonder of the planet that we live on. That's right and the wonder of the universe that we find ourselves and it is these minds of ours that enable us to kind of look out there and be curious and find answers. David Yellow Ted's science curator. Thank you so so much thank you. That's David Yellow. He is Ted's science curator. Thanks so much to him for sharing his favorite talks and taking us into uncharted territory. You can see all the toxic David mentioned at Ted Dot. Npr Dot Org. You can see hundreds more. Ted Talks at Ted DOT COM or on the ten our production staff at NPR includes Jeff Rodgers Sanaa's Mesh comport Rachel Faulkner Deeb Motor Sham. James Delo Hussey JC Howard Katie. Monteleone ON RIA Gutierrez Christina. Kala here Brown end. Hannibal on IOS with help from Brent Bachman and Daniel Shchukin. Our INTERN IS MATTHEW. Klay and our theme music was written by Rahm Teen Arab. Louis our partners at Ted Chris Anderson Colin Helms Anna Phelan and Michelle Quinn. I'm newsom Roti and you've been listening to the Ted Radio Hour from NPR..

David Yellow Ted Jim It Ted Talks Mental Health Research Ted Chris Anderson Gene NPR Ted Dot RIA Gutierrez Christina California James Delo Hussey Klay INTERN Hannibal David Yellow scientist Kay
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Hey everybody it's minutia a quick note before we get started. The Ted Radio Hour team is now working from home. Maybe you are too because lots of things in our world are changing for all of us but we want you to know that we are working extra hard to keep bringing you great stories and big ideas each week. Some episodes we hope will provide a welcome distraction from the corona virus. And everything going on others like this. One will provide context to our new reality which a lot of US includes spending a lot of time online. Jesse no the show may sound a little different in the weeks to come since we're producing it remotely but our goal is to keep bringing you context kindness and stories that help you understand this weird world better so be well and enjoy the show. This is the Ted Radio Hour. Each week groundbreaking. Ted Talks our job. Now is to dream big delivered at Ted Conferences to bring about the future. We want to see around the world to understand who we are from those talks. We bring you speakers and ideas. That will surprise. You just don't know what you're GonNa Find Challenge. You have the acts ourselves like why's it noteworthy and even change you. I literally feel like I'm a different person. Do you feel that way ideas worth spreading from Ted and NPR? I'M NEW SUMMER. Odi and I think I'm a pretty good citizen. I am law-abiding I stop at Red Lights. I pay my taxes. I try to be nice to my neighbors. You probably do to. But what roles do we follow when we go online will none? There are no rules but maybe there should be because what happens on the Internet can have real life reprecussions so this particular example happened was the end of April..

Ted Ted Conferences US Jesse Red Lights NPR
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

06:59 min | 2 years ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Stage. I started talking to neuro scientists and cognitive psychologists and what they told me was fascinating it turns out that when you get bored you ignite a network in your brain called the default mode so our body. It goes on autopilot while we're folding the laundry or we're walking to work actually. That is when our brain gets really busy. Here's boredom researcher. Dr Sandy man wants to start daydreaming and allow you to really wonder you start thinking a little bit beyond the conscious a little bit into the subconscious which allows sort of different connections to take place. It's really awesome. Actually totally awesome right. So this is my brain and FM Ri. And I learned that in the default mode that is when we connect disparate ideas. We saw some of our most nagging problems and we do something called autobiographical planning. This is when we look back at our lives. We take note of the big moments. We create a personal narrative and then we set goals and we figure out what steps we need to take to reach them but now we chill out on the couch also while updating a Google doc. Who are replying to email. The average person checks email seventy four times a day and switches tasks on their computer. Five hundred and sixty six times a day. I discovered all this talking to professor of Informatics Dr Gloria Mark. So we find that when people are stressed. They tend to shift their attention. More rapidly We also found strangely enough. We find that the shorter amount of sleep that a person gets the more likely they are to check facebook. Were in this vicious habitual cycle. What could this cycle be broken like? What would happen? If we broke this vicious cycle what if we reclaim those cracks in our day? Could it help us? Jumpstart our creativity. Maybe my listeners could help me find out we call the project board and Brilliance and Within Forty eight hours twenty thousand people signed by. Yeah I was like. Oh not a special snowflake. This is a thing. People are feeling this so one day. Take the APP that your thumb always seems to gravitate towards take it off your phone and observe what it feels like and then decide. Do you want it back on your phone? Cool go forward if you do. But do not let the tech companies decide as their decision making. Don't let that be the default which it very much has become. I think for consumers so how tens of thousands of people who signed up for the challenge. Some of them called her up because they started to realize that their relationship with their phone had kind of become co dependent the relationship between a baby and teddy bear or a baby. Banke or a baby that wants its mother's cradle when its done being held by stranger that's the relationship between me and my I think of my phone leg power tool useful but dangerous if I'm not handling it properly if I don't pay close attention I'll suddenly realize that I've lost an hour of time. Doing something totally mindless okay. But to really measure any improvement we needed data right. Because that's what we do these days so we partnered with some APPs that would measure how much time we were spending every day on our phone. And if you're thinking it's ironic that I ask people to download another APP so that they would spend less time on their phones. Yeah you gotTa meet people where they are but when the data came in it turned out that we had cut down on average just six minutes from one hundred and twenty minutes a day on our phones to one hundred and fourteen look amazing that you you got so many people involved and then looks at the data and turned out. The people just saved six minutes a day. Don't just sort of like like deflating right. I mean after all this effort people are only sixty six minutes a day. Which tells US something about ourselves? Yeah I mean well first of all it tells me that I have been trained to expect. Tax Returns Right. You know. We expecting huge numbers. And I I thought six minutes was nothing but when I went back to the scientists and researchers were who were advising me on this they I'm not joking. They laughed in my face. They were like who says six minutes isn't significant. And frankly like you know the fact that you got people to change their behavior at all over a week is extraordinary and listen to the stories because the stories will tell you so much more than any data can And that's what people told me. They told me stories about how they realize. They used to relax by playing their guitar and then they suddenly understood that they they hadn't played it in years or things bigger than that That people had sat down this thought. About what the family dynamics were and get to a better place in their relationship there were all these amazing stories that people told us and I thought you know what you're right. F The six minutes right. Get totally or like. Let's stop giving boredom such a bad rap. It actually is an extremely important human function that we are starting to just sort of breed out of our daily lives. And I I sort of look around and I see. There's lots of things like that Downtime eye contact conversations out loud where people stutter or make mistakes or take more than a quick. You know one hundred forty characters to figure out what they want to say. We've lost the capacity in many ways. I think for patients if we want to have excellent ideas the best ideas we need to let them take the time to take root and then blossom and that does not happen in a tap of a of an APP. We're humans we need. I'm and that's the one thing that our phones and it was more of that was me minutia. The new host of Ted Radio Hour talking to guy. Ross the old host Ted Radio Hour back in two thousand eighteen. You can see my full Ted talk on Ted Dot Com and we've got a new episode of the Ted Radio Hour for you coming this Friday..

Ted Dot Com Ted Dr Sandy man Ri researcher facebook Google US Dr Gloria Mark professor of Informatics Banke Ross
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Finally this hour that idea from Galileo. That math is a language. Well it doesn't really matter whether you're a mathematician or a musician knowing the language which now I feel like I might vocabulary increased and so therefore able to communicate my ideas. Even Better Drummer Clayton Cameron and says studying math actually gave him a new confidence in how he played music. I'm going to share a story about by confidence and sitting down knowing that if I do a certain thing it's gonna be motor certain feeling. Yeah if done right so I'm playing at the Hollywood bowl with James Brown and I've been told that By the musical director Cranston bride. He said look. You Know Clayton James Drummer. You know Mr Brown's drummer and you know he's he created this genre of music. So chances are he may not like anything you play and I said well you know I'm a professional. I've been around and I you know I understand that. So I talked to a couple of drummers friends of mine that played with James Cystic. Get some inside. Listen to the record that James Brown. I've done it was a jazz record. Soul on top nineteen sixty nine but he never performed any of them so I there's one song called September song that had a a booby. Oh It's Oh no to get back to UH. That was kind of like what was happening at the time when she has gotta sit down so I said well I'm Gonna I'm GonNa bring up a little bit. I'm going to kind of do a little different beat on it. And I had put a special snare up and and then I've worked on this little groove to do more on since that was the grew so we get to the rehearsal where playing and in crystallography calls off the song and James Brown has the pickup and the the lyric is. Oh it's into the group. I'm into my now remember. It's been told to an embedded in my head that James Brown is not going to like anything you play. Yeah after we played that group James Brown turned around and said now that was Falke so anyway so that kind of stuff you know once you get into the numbers and you understand that gave me the confidence to sit down and go. Oh I know what that is. The numbers are there in Cameron. You can watch his talk. Ted Dot COM for model they Hey thanks for listening to our show this week solving for x numbers shape the world production staff. NPR includes Jeff Rodgers. Bachman Megan Kane Neva. Grant Chris Bender Rev with help from Daniel Shchukin. Pardoned Goodwood is our intern in the front office. Eric Newsham in Porsche Robertson. Magus partners Ted Chris Anderson Jude Cohen Intern trip and Janet Leigh Guy Roz. And you've been listening to the Ted Radio Hour from NPR. The forecast from the trauma and trauma..

James Brown Clayton Cameron Clayton James James Cystic Ted Chris Anderson Jude Cohen Bachman Megan Kane Neva intern NPR Chris Bender Hollywood Eric Newsham Janet Leigh Falke Daniel Shchukin Porsche director Jeff Rodgers
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Do you like Algebra yes. I love. L. Dot why. Because it's beautiful how I keep hearing here mathematician so it's beautiful and then you like CD's movies but these crazy scrawling on a chalkboard. It is kind of Nice actually but but I still don't get it. I think that's a matter of temperament. There's some people to whom mathematical proof appears as a thing of beauty. It speaks of a higher truth. It speaks of a harmony to to knowledge the fact that it works at all let alone that we can understand. It speaks to a larger category of existence and knowledge Terry Moore you can see his full talk. Y is x the unknown at Ted Dot. NPR DOT ORG kinked tax. So we're going to be hearing a lot of these drumbeats throughout the show. Today they are the work of Clayton. Cameron I'm a provocateur of rhythm. Planes drummed for a few musicians. You might have heard of including Frank Sinatra Dean Martin. Sammy Davis Junior and here with Tony Bennett uncover anyway. We asked Clayton to do some of the music on the show today and to talk about an idea from his Ted talk doc an idea. He calls a rhythmic Arithmetic basically it's a way to understand how numbers and rhythm intersect and idea. That had never really occurred Clayton until he moved next door to a mathematician and we were talking and I'm no mathematician okay by any stretch of the imagination however He said something to me that I never forgot. He's he he said. You know. Those are really some beautiful numbers like so. Were you just talking talking. Like a beat or song or something. And he's like there's a beautiful numbers absolutely And I said wow. I said if you're at a certain level with math I guess guests they could be beautiful numbers and Then I had a conversation. One day with a friend of mine is incredible drummer musician named Marvin Smitty Smith. I said Marvin is a track you do. I said there's no way you could be thinking about this music way. I'm thinking about it because you make it seem so simple hot and some Marvin set will i. I just think in cycles. And then he didn't have to say another word I knew exactly what he meant. And so Between numbers are beautiful. Oh and you know I just think in cycles from my friend Marvin. All these things started coming together. He started noticing like these cycles of numbers in the rhythms. That you've even playing for years absolutely not watch this. I'M GONNA I'm GonNa play something Two different even Lee spaced Beats One will be three. Rian won't be too so we have one two three one two one two three one two so I'm going to give you a different sound. Only my left hand. I'm a little play. Just two beats in within the same space of time so we have one.

Marvin Smitty Smith Ted Dot Clayton Sammy Davis DOT ORG Frank Sinatra Tony Bennett Marvin Terry Moore Rian Cameron Dean Martin NPR
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

07:20 min | 2 years ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Their passion and I feel like that can be an intimidating and almost cruel thing to say to people at times because first of all if somebody has one central powerful burning passion. They're probably already following it. Because that's sort of the definition of passion is that you don't have a choice if you don't which is a lot of people have one central Burning Passion and and somebody tells you to follow your passion. I think you have the right to give a finger because it just makes you feel worse and so I always say to people. Forget like if you don't have a an obvious fashion forget about it. Follow your curiosity because passion is sort of a tower of flame that is not always accessible and curiosity is something that anybody can access any day. Your curiosity may lead you to your passion or it may not it may have been for. We're quotes nothing. In which case all you've done your entire life is spend your existence in pursuit of the things that made you feel curious and inspired a national be good enough in a lot of ways. That's sort of been a metaphor for what we do on the show because it's really about watching a lot of Ted talks wchs and and just getting inspired by an idea and then building a show around around that idea Wanting and to know more about what he said. I'm going to assume that there are some people who just think because you have interviewed all these amazing people people and had so many hard conversations about so many topics that you must have internalized a lot of the lessons that they bring you too you too these interviews from their talks and that maybe I don't know maybe you're like a super better person in some way because you can I mean am I going to go through transformation guy I guess is what I want to know I mean yes yes. Of course I think what I've learned even from you talking to people who just so inspiring to me that I have so much admiration for is that we are all flawed and complex right every single one of us right every single one of us us can be unkind unforgiving But what I I. I love this idea that we also change a lot We had we had Dan Gilbert on his he. He's a professor of psychology at Harvard. And he he did a lot of research into how our personalities really changed profoundly over the course of our lives. We don't think that's the case. But what he has shown is that more or less every ten years who we are our personalities. Our values change a a lot. Most of us can remember who we were ten years ago but we find it hard to imagine who we're going to be and then we mistakenly think that because it's hard to imagine it's it's not likely to happen. Sorry when people say. I can't imagine that they're usually talking about their own lack of imagination and not about the unlikelihood of the event event that they're describing. The bottom line is time is a powerful force. It transforms preferences reshapes our values. It alters is our personalities. We seem to appreciate this fact. But only in retrospect only when we look backwards do we realize how much change happens in the decade. It's as if for most of us the present is a magic time. It's a watershed on the timeline. It's the moment at which we finally become Ourselves human beings are works in progress. That mistakenly think they're finished. The person you are right now is as transient Enzi and as fleeting and temporary as all the people. You've ever been the one constant in our life is changed. I love that because I think that you could argue that. Over the course of our lives we become increasingly sort of better versions of our previous self which I hope is true because I You know like I think most people I am still at work in progress and I hope you know hope you are hope. Most most people listening are to That's lovely so Any words of wisdom for me as I go forth Do's and don'ts yeah I mean. I think I think you already do this. And I'm I'm just GONNA double down on the Lisbeth Gilbert's advice but it's follow your curiosity so you have this opportunity to really follow it in any direction to go down any rabbit hole to have conversations with people who have thought really deeply about their ideas. Some of them are simple. Some of them are more complicated but But there's almost no idea that in my view isn't worth at least hearing out and I think you know one of the ways that you've been such a great host. Is that you have modeled for listeners. How to be curious about ideas you've shown them that if you just keep digging ask the next question or keep going or pull a thread? You might find something extraordinary. Certainly unexpected something that may be unlocks a door that you didn't even know was there and I think that that has been the pleasure and joy of listening to this show for the last seven years so thank you. That's very nice. Thank you thank you for saying that. It's been it's been amazing and I can't wait to hear to hear what you do with. I can't wait to go. This is the height of the party. F- cards over. We're having fun. Let's go nice. Good stay memories. Hey thanks for listening to episode on wisdom in Hindsight this week and thank you for being such an amazing community listeners. It's been an absolute honor guide past seven years. I won't be far. You can still hear me on how I built this world world and wisdom from the top and if you WANNA find out more about who is on the show this week go to Ted Dot. NPR Dot Org and to see hundreds more. Ted Talks Checkout Ted DOT COM or the tap production staff at NPR includes Jeff Rodgers Sanaa's Michigan poor. Rachel Faulkner Diba Mohtashami James Delicacy. JC Howard Katie. Montolio Maria Paz Gutierrez and Christina. Kala with help from Daniel Shchukin our journeys Kierra Brown grab our partners at Ted Chris Anderson Colin Helms and the Phelan and Michelle Quinn and a special thanks to Newsom Rhody you can hear new episodes of the show with Manouche rush starting in the spring. Garages and you've been listening to ideas worth spreading right here. I'm Ted Radio Hour from NPR.

NPR Ted Ted Talks Ted Dot Ted Chris Anderson Dan Gilbert professor of psychology Rachel Faulkner Diba Harvard Montolio Maria Paz Gutierrez Lisbeth Gilbert Ourselves Howard Katie Michigan Jeff Rodgers Sanaa Kierra Brown Newsom Kala Daniel Shchukin
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"On the show today wisdom in hindsight and as I mentioned earlier this is my last new episode and after interviewing hundreds of incredible speakers for this show. I'm going to switch around to the other side of the table. And if you don't mind pass the MIC on to the next host of the Ted Radio Hour Mnuchin Maruti. Hello Oh oh hey. Hey how are you. I'm good. I'm good yeah Are you how do you feel. I feel oddly. Calm right would you should. Yeah that's it's great. I know I think means grownup now guy. Yes I think this this great okay. So you're wrapping up your last episode Assode Guy and I Kinda WanNa turn the tables and ask you what strikes you about the last seven years. What are some some of the ideas the people that you will take with you as you go into the next chapter yeah I mean I think that that throughout the seven years I've been the host of the show every interview is like it's a a journey and every interview is extremely meaningful right like I interviewed you. You're on the show and I remember our interview and it was so it was so great and you were so kind and and funny and warm and generous with your ideas. Thanks and so every interview is like it's Consolo weird but it's like a a a whirlwind romance. I fall in love with everybody. I interview for that power and yet you you kind of have have to because I am there to to bring the to help that person bring their idea out into the world. Because I think that's an idea worth hearing that hopefully hopefully will give our listeners. Something to take with them. They're so many of these conversations hundreds of these conversations that have been those experiences They're few that I really come back to a lot We had this episode that we did on memory and we are invited Daniel comment on. He'd given Ted talk about memory and When I interviewed him he had just returned from Switzerland and I said how to go and he said it was wonderful it was it was amazing and I said Oh that sounds great He said but we left. We left a day early. I I said Oh no what happened. He said Oh no no. We decided to leave a day early because we were having such a good time and I was confused at that point right without well. Why would you leave advocation a day early and then began this conversation about memory and my wife and I both decided not to so you decided to cut short your vacation station just to make sure that you wouldn't? You wouldn't mess it up that we wouldn't ruin the memory. I mean you know you might have had a great day absolutely. Wow depending how you look at it. This could be a mistake. It really depends how much weight you want to give to the kind of memory you. Why does that happen? I mean why. Why do we remember ember things based on what happened at the end of the peak in the end? Yeah actually I think there is a good evolutionary reason for this. You know if you were to design an animal and you were economizing on. How complicated the brain of that animal would be? You might say. Well I want the animal to store the pecan. He can to slow the end. And how long the episode was really doesn't matter what matters is how bad with a threat and and whether the story.

Assode Guy Maruti Ted Switzerland Daniel
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Ted Stage in the summer of one thousand nine hundred sixty three two hundred and fifty thousand people showed up on the mall in Washington to hear. Dr King's speak. They sent out no invitations and there was no website to check the date. How do you do that so well? Dr King Wasn't the only man in America who suffered in a pre civil rights America America in fact some of his ideas were bad but he had a gift. He didn't go around telling people what needed to change in America. He you know he went around and told people what he believed. I believe I believe I believe he told people and people who believed what he believed took his cause and they made it their own and they told people and some of those people created structures to get the word out even more people and Lo and behold two hundred and fifty thousand people showed up on the right day on the the right time to hear him speak how many of them showed up for him zero. They should for themselves It's what they believed about. America that got them to travel on a bus for eight hours to stand in the sun in Washington in the middle of August. It's what they believed and it wasn't about about black versus white twenty. Five percent of the audience was white. Dr King believed that there are two types of laws in this world. Those that are made by a higher authority and those was that are made by man and not all the laws that are made by men are consistent with the laws that are made by the Higher Authority. Will we live in a just world. It just so happens. Is that the civil rights movement was the perfect thing to help him bring his cause to life. We followed him not for him but for ourselves and by the way he gave the I have a dream speech. Not The I have a plan speech. What is it about like human nature that motivates us to action? Is it do. We need to be inspired. We're tribal animals. And one of the things that ensures the success us of the tribe and indeed the species is our sense of belonging and belonging comes from a common sense of values and beliefs. And sometimes those things things are understood but they start to have scale the ability to scale when when they're directed. And when someone does actually lead us and and can articulate where we're going and so when we think of a great movements like the civil rights movement or the anti-apartheid Movement in South Africa right or even movement like the the the the Russian Revolution Right. I mean there were leaders who inspired people to take action. How like what is a leader have like? Why do some people have that ability to inspire what is it that they have will first of all? They have deep undying belief in something bigger than themselves and the best leaders are actually the best followers because they don't see themselves as the thing to be followed they actually see themselves as following a cause is bigger than themselves they actually see themselves in service to something else. it's the rest of us who choose to follow them in just a moment why the world could use more of those kinds of leaders and what it takes to become one on the show today inspire fire to action on garage. And you're listening to the TED radio hour from NPR Hey everyone just a quick thanks to two of our sponsors who helped make this podcast possible I to target red card. Save five percent and get more every day more young for your weekly Grocery List more fun with the perfect stocking stuffers more. Wow for decorating the tree from kids wishlist to the hottest tech gifts red card. Gets you more learn. More in store or online restrictions apply see target dot com slash red card for details. Thanks it's also to Google fi a phone plan by google switch to Google Fi. Get data abroad for no extra charges so you never have to worry about calling up your provider divider to let them know. You'll be traveling. Google is made with features that people actually want like three networks included in. What would let's tap into multiple networks for the best signal nearby? Learn more at five dot. Google.

Dr King Google America Washington Ted Stage Higher Authority Lo South Africa NPR