35 Burst results for "TED"

Giannis Goes on Attack as Bucks Force Game 7

Jim Bohannon

00:21 sec | 2 d ago

Giannis Goes on Attack as Bucks Force Game 7

"Will be a Game seven for the Bucks Net series. They're going to run out the time. The final here in Game six Bucks one. Oh, four Brooklyn Nets 89 Bucks radio Networks play by play announcer Ted Davis With the call at the end of Thursday's Game Advisor Forum. The deciding game of the series is Saturday, with the winner advancing to the Eastern Conference finals.

Bucks Brooklyn Nets Ted Davis
Sen. Ted Cruz Schools the Media on the Need for New Voting Rights Bill

Mark Levin

01:54 min | 2 d ago

Sen. Ted Cruz Schools the Media on the Need for New Voting Rights Bill

"The media want to know about the voting rights building the poll, the poll people support changes in support for voting rights and so forth. Here's our man. Ted Cruz. Cut 10 Hat Tip C Span goat. You talked about how this was a show of force. One of the reasons is the press coverage so far of this bill. Has been virtually non existent. You're right. If you do polling on do you support protecting the right to vote? I'm amazed that's not 100%. Protecting the right to vote is a wonderful thing. You know if you also do polling on do you support the fuzzy kittens and puppy law? That has really good support in the polls, too, If you actually asked people about what is in this bill, It is incredibly unpopular. Democrats don't want to talk about getting rid of voter ID. Because 70 to 80% of Americans supported a majority of Democrats supported a majority of African American support it. I don't want to talk about that Democrats don't want to talk about getting rid of the ballot harvesting laws. Because people recognize that invites corruption When you have ballot harvesting, you get a paid operative from the DNC. Who goes in to say, a nursing home. And collects dozens or hundreds of ballots, some of whom some of which are from people who may not be competent to vote. And the reason it invites fraud is are sitting right there. And if that person votes the wrong way. There's nothing to stop but unscrupulous operative from just throwing that ballot in the trash can and only mailing in the votes that vote the way they want. That's why Jimmy Carter. Said. Ballot harvesting invites voter fraud and Jimmy Carter also said Along with James Baker, believe 15 or so years ago. That these mail drop voting activities. A mail in voting activities were highly susceptible to fraud. Of course, the media know all this. The media know all this and don't give a damn

Ted Cruz DNC Jimmy Carter James Baker
What can be expected from the Biden-Putin summit?

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:16 sec | 4 d ago

What can be expected from the Biden-Putin summit?

"A quick update. The big summit between President Biden and Vladimir Putin is over. Biden departed the summit venue in Geneva. After about 3.5 hours of meetings with Putin. The summit Was a shorter than originally anticipated and both expected to have news

President Biden Vladimir Putin Biden Geneva Putin
A New Approach to Defending the Human Rights of Migrants

TED Talks Daily

01:54 min | 4 d ago

A New Approach to Defending the Human Rights of Migrants

"A decade ago after peaceful revolution toppled longtime tunisia dictator bin. Ali i was sitting in an orange grove outside athens. Greece documented migrants. Were hiding there. I came to interview them about human rights abuses suffered while enter europe one of them. Tunisian fellow in a leather jacket explained the people who overthrew ben ali they want democracy and identified life. We across the mediterranean want. Democracy didn't life. What is the difference. The migrant is a kind of revolutionary is idea stuck with me and informed might work as a lawyer and a scholar ever since as middle eastern revolutions turned into civil wars. The refugee crisis unfolded in the measuring. This exacerbated political pressures against asylum-seekers. Initially the european court of human rights took a strong stand against sport or violence in two thousand twelve court decided that the cannot turn asylum seekers back from the mediterranean dangerous libyan territory that first hearing them the human rights community cheer. I was not one of those who cheered in my scholarship. I predicted that this kind of decision could also generate bad results states determined to enforce their own return back asylum seekers even before the entered the supervision of their own courts. I was regretfully correct in recent years. The italians have relied on living to do their dirty work. So eager are some european governments deduction on human rights obligations if an armed libyan militia ignoring the rampant use of torture. This is also why since january. Twenty fourteen more than thirty. Four thousand migrants died by grounding in the mediterranean and since covid nineteen again the militarized border into. Mentoring has come in some ways. Even more extreme but has the militarized quarter caused deaths by drowning.

Dictator Bin Mediterranean Ben Ali Tunisia Athens ALI Greece European Court Of Human Rights Europe
How to Empower People to Solve Their Own Legal Problems

TED Talks Daily

02:11 min | 6 d ago

How to Empower People to Solve Their Own Legal Problems

"Start by telling you a story about danielle. When she was a senior in college. Danielle's dad passed away which left her mom with no way to support herself so danielle had to drop out of college and pick up. Three jobs is a barista a bar. Tender nicole washer altogether three jobs pay danielle twenty three thousand dollars per year which wasn't a whole lot but allowed her to feed her mom and keep a roof over their head and for danielle. That was enough but early one morning when danielle was driving home from one of her jobs. A deer in front of her car. She swerved off the road and crashed into a bar. And then y'all doesn't remember exactly what happened next but when she woke up in hospital a few hours later a doctor told her that she had damaged her brain stem and c one vertebrae now. The good news is that danielle was gonna leave the hospital alive. The bad news is that danielle had fifty five thousand dollars in medical bills now. Did y'all tried so hard for the next two years to try and pay back that debt but it was impossible. It was impossible for danielle to pay back fifty five thousand dollars in medical bills. Earning just twenty three thousand dollars per year. She felt trapped. One freak accident put danielle on the verge of homelessness hunger poverty. And when you're in daniel shoes bankruptcy is a lifeline. It's a powerful legal tool that allows you to relieve your debt and reenter the economy medical emergency job loss divorce. These are financial shocks. That could happen to any of us and when you're living paycheck to paycheck and don't have a whole lot of savings like so. Many americans. a financial shock can ruin your life. Bankruptcy gives you a second chance. Then you'll want to go find a bankruptcy lawyer. She like so many others filing for bankruptcy learned that it was going to cost her fifteen hundred dollars. She can have that kind of money. I mean what a cruel irony in america it costs you fifteen hundred dollars to tell the court that you have no money when you walk into a court everyone from the judge clerk the form themselves will tell you to go find a lawyer no matter how little money you have

Danielle Nicole Washer Daniel America
‘Ted’ TV Series From Seth MacFarlane Based on Movie Ordered by Peacock

Colleen and Bradley

00:19 sec | Last week

‘Ted’ TV Series From Seth MacFarlane Based on Movie Ordered by Peacock

"And finally, a live action series adaptation of the movie Ted has been ordered straight to series at Peacock. Seth Macfarlane is currently in negotiations to reprise the voice role of Ted. A foul mouth pot smoking teddy bear brought to life by the magic of a little boy's wish. The first Ted movie was a big old hit back in 2012. I never understand. Had a

TED Seth Macfarlane Ted Movie
The Real-Life Superheroes Helping Syrian Refugees

TED Talks Daily

01:54 min | Last week

The Real-Life Superheroes Helping Syrian Refugees

"A. Let me tell you a different story my story. I'm a filmmaker and reveal g from a small village in northern syria in our village growing up there was no stable supply. We spend most of our nights are on gas lanterns and build stories about syrian mythological super beings that protected. The vulnerable was a boy who loved stories of superheroes but later on these stories shifted to tells of heroes that my family has to face and are the assad dictatorship. One of my uncles was killed under torture. My father had to burn his books before they were even published in order to protect us from the reaching. He burned his dreams along with his books. These stories must not be forgotten. My parents insisted the stories stopped being a best time. It's became a form of resistance. I studied filmmaking focused on the commentaries commentary. Filmmaking became my way of resistance. I commend stories of syrian hobos. Assad regime and an elephant when the revision started. I was arrested tortured and sexually assaulted when i was released. I left syria a west traumatized and tried to end my life. My wife stood by me and held me hang onto life but as a result i stopped making films

Syria Assad
GOP Senators Claim 'Unequal Justice' in Capitol Riots Compared to Protests

The Mark Levin Show

01:59 min | Last week

GOP Senators Claim 'Unequal Justice' in Capitol Riots Compared to Protests

"Justice must be administered equally. Republican senators demand answers for 2020 riots and Capitol Hill riot from Department of Justice. Group of Republican senators sent a letter to Attorney General Merrick Garland demanding answers regarding punishments for those who stormed the capital in January six and those who ride it over the spring and summer 2020. So the daily caller first obtained the letter, in other words, was leaked to them. Which was sent to the Department of Justice by these senators. Ron Johnson, Ted Cruz, Tommy Tucker Field at Tuberville. Excuse me, Mike Lee and Rick Scott. The letter, the group of Republicans Why only five? Let's 123 where all the rest of the Republican senators, every damn one of them should be signing this letter. In the letter, the group of GOP senators draw parallels between the treatment of the capital riders to the treatment of riders throughout the spring and summer 2020 and call for clarifications on punishment. At the spring and summer 2020. There were nonstop protests and riots after the death of George Floyd cities were set on fire in companies in small businesses were looted across the country. Republican senators Asked, among other questions, how many people were arrested for committing crimes during the 2020 spring and summer riots in federal law enforcement used Geo location data. For defendants cell phones to track riders down how many of the rioters were released on bail? The federal law enforcement utilized Geo location data from defended cell phones to track prosecutors associated with the unrest in the spring and summer 2020. If so, how many times and for what locations and riots? How many individuals who may have committed crimes associated with protests in the spring and summer 2020 were arrested by law enforcement using pre dawn raids and SWAT teams. These are damn good questions. But you only have 10% of the Republicans who signed this letter. Where's the other 50? Excuse me 45

Attorney General Merrick Garla Department Of Justice Ted Cruz Tommy Tucker Rick Scott Ron Johnson George Floyd Capitol Hill Mike Lee GOP Swat
Jeff Bezos Will Fly to Space Next Month

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:18 sec | Last week

Jeff Bezos Will Fly to Space Next Month

"Steps down as CEO of Amazon early next month in about two weeks after that, he'll be on a space ship. Today in an Instagram post, Bezos said he would go to space when his company Blue Origin launches its first passenger carrying mission next month, and his brother Mark will also be on board for the trip.

Blue Origin Bezos Amazon Mark
Essential Questions to Ask Your Future Self

TED Talks Daily

02:03 min | 2 weeks ago

Essential Questions to Ask Your Future Self

"We need to talk about the empathy gap so the empathy gap is why we sometimes hate on people on the other end of the political spectrum. Or it's five. Maybe we shrug our shoulders. The problems of those who look different or live different or love different than we do. It's why we almost certainly aren't doing enough to protect our kids and grandkids from climate change. Its can just be difficult sometimes to care about people that we don't know or to do right by people who don't even exist yet. But what if. I told you that that same empathy gap can also get in the way of us doing right by ourselves in our twenties and beyond and before i go on let me say that everything about to talk about also applies to all of us out there who are well beyond twenties but for a little bit of background in twenty thirteen. I gave a talk about. Why are twenty matter. So it's about almost ten years later. I'm still a clinical psychologist. Who specializes in twentysomethings. But these days the twentysomethings i ac- they know their twenties matters so they want to get there from right. They wanna move to the right city. They wanted to take the right job. They wanna find the right partner. They wanna have the right answers well. The bad news is there are no right answers. There are no right answers for where you should live or where you should work or how you should settle down. These are what are called large world problems because there are just too many unknowns now app no algorithm know. Any of them can ever solve these problems. Or answer these questions for you but the good news is because there are no right answers. There are no wrong answers. There are only your answers. So you're twenties or a great time to listen to be honest with yourself. There a great time to have a conversation with your future. Self so philosopher. Derek parfitt said we neglect our future selves because of some sort of failure of belief or imagination.

Derek Parfitt
Ted's Woodworking, Its a Scam

Thumb and Hammer Home Improvement Podcast

01:50 min | 2 weeks ago

Ted's Woodworking, Its a Scam

"Hello friends have. I got a deal for you. My name is doug. This is the thumb and hammer. Home improvement podcast. And if you're like me you have searched the internet looking for woodworking plans. Well what if. I told you that you could get thousand plans for the low low price of only sixty seven dollars while there's this guy. His name is ted. Woody mcgrath. Now you know. He's legit because after all his nickname is woody. So he's obviously a woodworker. Because every woodworker i know is nicknamed woody right any. He spent decades compiling woodworking plans that he is offering to sell for the low low price of only sixty seven dollars. Now consider the most plan self around five ten bucks each on the internet. How could you possibly go wrong. How indeed. you've no doubt seen the ads on facebook or other websites than i am. Of course talking about ted's woodworking. And like i said to have access to such a vast array of plans for under a hundred bucks seems like the best deal ever. Steve ramsey of woodworking for mere mortals posted several videos about this offer back in two thousand twelve. Other woodworkers woodworking sites and forums and youtube channels have reviewed and researched and warned against ted's woodworking. But it has never gone away and it seems to be flooding. My facebook feed now more than ever different website. You are of course but all leading to the same landing pages

Woody Mcgrath Woody TED Doug Steve Ramsey Facebook Youtube
How the U.S. Will Allocate First 25 Million Vaccine Doses Worldwide

Michael Savage

00:48 sec | 2 weeks ago

How the U.S. Will Allocate First 25 Million Vaccine Doses Worldwide

"Administration is committed to sharing unused covert vaccine with other countries, but some lawmakers questioned the allocation plan announced. White House coronavirus response coordinator Jeffries Science is most of the first traunch of 25 million doses will be allocated through Kovacs that U. N backed vaccine sharing program. Some lawmakers disagree. Republican Senator Ben Sasse says the U. S. Should deliver vaccines ourselves to align with US interest. California Democrat Ted Lieu also says the U. S. Should help allies first. Instead of letting a third party decide We're vaccines

Jeffries Science Senator Ben Sasse Kovacs White House Ted Lieu California United States
California to Pay Churches’ Legal Fees Over COVID-19 Closures

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:38 sec | 2 weeks ago

California to Pay Churches’ Legal Fees Over COVID-19 Closures

Princess Diana's Wedding Dress Goes on Display in London

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:18 sec | 2 weeks ago

Princess Diana's Wedding Dress Goes on Display in London

"The dress Princess Diana wore at her wedding to Prince Charles is on public display at the late princess is former London home, The taffeta darling ruffled white dress with its 25 ft sequin encrusted train. Up to seal the fairytale image of the 1981 wedding of Lady Diana Spencer and heir to the British

Princess Diana Prince Charles London
Who Judges the Judges?

TED Talks Daily

01:56 min | 2 weeks ago

Who Judges the Judges?

"Your room you don't want to be in something bad has happened. There's a stranger in a suit with your future in their hands. A judge four years ago. That judge was me the people looking up at me then had no choice but to trust me but what had i done to deserve it. Ustralia judicial system operates under a shroud of mistake. Which fans off. Tough questions like this but you will have the right to ask how people like me. Prepare for the job of judging and you may not feel comfortable with the answers. The system needs to change to set the scene first. Let's think about public confidence judges in australia and not elected yet. The power they wield is immense openly. We trust the system because we believe that judges generally get it right if we lose that belief. We risk unbalancing the whole constitution. But we live in a time when blind faith and elites is eroding fast judges are increasingly vulnerable to the why question. Why do you deserve the power we have given you. And so they should be sickened. It's fundamental that judges have to be seen as independent doing their jobs without fear or favor to avoid any pressure from the government of the day judges have higher salaries which can never be cash and they can't be fired for what they say or do and lace. They obviously corrupt ahmed.

Australia
Vietnam Discovers New, Highly Contagious Covid Variant

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:13 sec | 2 weeks ago

Vietnam Discovers New, Highly Contagious Covid Variant

"The Vietnamese Health Ministry announced. Scientists have determined the new variant has traces of strains from both the United Kingdom and India because the virus has mutations of strains from both countries in his particularly susceptible to transmission

Vietnamese Health Ministry United Kingdom India
Hands from $5/$10 Online 6-Max Cash

Chasing Poker Greatness

04:18 min | 2 weeks ago

Hands from $5/$10 Online 6-Max Cash

"We'll just jump right into it then a and that actually. This had got reviewed poker power on wednesday and there are a lot of Differing opinions. On what i should what people thought i should be doing So go flip it back to you and see what what you have to say. Hand starts with me opening the cutoff at five. Ted nolan that with pocket. Jacks the button only have two hands on him but appears to be fish. Flat the button and the big blinds. Who i'm guessing as a also don't have too many hands on him also calls we go to a nine four deuce two-tone flop the big blind checks off again. I pocket i check. I'm going to be checking range. Multi way Especially on a board. Like this. I think and then the fish on the button. That's forty dollars in to seventy to fifty the reagan the big blind raises to one hundred and ten dollars and i was pretty lost what to do facing the check. Raise with an repair multi. Yes so when we were looking at this hand before in the run through. I think that in game you were not clear as to whether or not the button was a fish because they do have mostly full stack. My intuition told me kinda straight away before you even described anything about the hand that the button was a fish because they had nine eighty in their stack. The blinds go through. That would be ninety nine hundred five. I got the feeling that they were fish. But then when they bet forty into seventy two on the flop. I think that kind of confirms that there a weaker player in the pool. Because i don't think that's sizing should like be thing. Whatever it is that they. I don't even know. What percentage that is that they chose to bet they're a little bit more than fifty percent so yeah like basically the button who is a fish. That's about sixty percent and the big line to looks to be a rag and intuitively. I would imagine they are oreg check raises less than three x here here than the actions back on us with our jackson. Nine four two hearts so my first inclination here is to bet three bet or not bad three bed. Check three bet. And that's for a few reasons number one. The buttons forty dollar bet because that designates them a fish. I have to imagine that the big blind wants to raise choose a larger sizing with their sets and their value. So that kind of small check raise from forty to one. Ten makes me believe that like they could be doing this fairly wide. They don't necessarily just have to have like sets or even like a street as five of heart type hands. They could be doing this with like top pair just as protection. They'd be doing this with just whatever they could check raised with like jackson diamonds. Trying to run a multi street bluff. I guess again objective diamonds. We got jack of diamonds. But you see my point right like basically some sort of back doors type type hand and the reason that i want to put more money in the pot now Kind of smallish around two thirty five ish to thirty by my go-to would be like to thirty four. But i can't tell you why secret proprietary information is to thirty four but because i think the check razor doesn't necessarily have sets here all the time like they've got an expanded wider range than that we can check raise against them just fine. I don't wanna flat because we flat that gives the button a great opportunity to call and realize equity getting just an amazing price. I think at that point if we flat. There's like three thirty in the pot. They've got the call seventy two win three thirty so they're getting like close to five to one and our hand does need some kind of

Ted Nolan Reagan Jackson
Climate Change Will Displace Millions. Here's How We Prepare

TED Talks Daily

01:47 min | 2 weeks ago

Climate Change Will Displace Millions. Here's How We Prepare

"It was about two years after hurricane. Katrina that i. I saw the louisiana flood maps. These flood maps are used to show land loss in the past and land loss. That is to come on this particular day at a community meeting. These maps were used to explain. How a thirty foot tidal surge that accompanied hurricane katrina could flood communities like mine and south louisiana and communities across the mississippi and alabama coast. It turns out that the land we were losing was our buffer from the c. I volunteered to interact with the graphics on the wall and in an instant my life change for the second time in two years. The graphic showed massive land loss in south louisiana and in encroaching see but more specifically the graphics showed the disappearance of my community and many other communities before the end of the century. I wasn't alone at the front of the room. I was standing there with other members of south louisiana's communities black native poor. We thought we were just bound by temporary disaster recovery but we found that we were now bound by the impossible task of ensuring that our communities would not be erased by sea level rise due to climate change. Friends neighbors family my community. I just assumed it would always be their land trees marsh by us. I just assumed that it would be there. As it had been for thousands of years i was wrong

South Louisiana Alabama Coast Katrina Hurricane Hurricane Katrina Louisiana Mississippi
"ted" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

04:50 min | 3 months ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"Without the ability to live in a life of dignity and a place that protects. You drugs won't work the full scope of your ability to live. A fruitful life is restricted. Did the plan come together. Then you will join him and help his mission through architecture. So that started a long journey to work with dr farmer and his team in rwanda and The first thing that i did was i met their head engineer. An amazing guy named bruce and bruce was leading all their building projects. Airborne diseases are mitigated by moving more air through the room. So i worked with bruce and his team and came up with the design whose primary goal was to reduce transmission of infections to create all the waiting areas in the exterior a to think about airflow. Basically remove all hallways To increase the height of the wards. So that we got both son and heir movement as the. Who prescribes but also had plenty of space for patients to walk around and are precedents. Were tb sanatoriums designed in the twenties and thirties medical facilities designed in the nineteenth century like florence nightingale and alvar aalto and these incredible designers who were thinking about airflow before the advent of hvac or mechanical ventilation. They were thinking about. How building is cited and oriented to capture and maintain and control as much air as possible in order to make people healthier. And we're thinking about this all the time. i'm sure now. You're thinking about with the coronavirus. The tables that you're touching the spaces and those handle and all of that is related to Some degree being spatially aware of what is invisible around us. Okay so you you wrapped up that project in rwanda back in two thousand eleven and since then you have gone on to build more hospitals and schools affordable housing senior homes. And what's amazing to me is that you have been thinking about architecture and airflow for over a decade and i mean the rest of us literally has started thinking about this in the last few months. Yeah i mean. We're undergoing a real existential moment in our relationship to the built environment around us. Sort of recognizing that suddenly the built space around us could really threaten us and while hospitals are designed or at least we hope they are designed to think about mitigation of disease apartment. Building that you live in is not designed that way. The restaurant that you go to is not designed to manage disease transfer and so we are suddenly in this moment where we have to think about all buildings as threatening our health all built spaces as potentially improving or protecting us a little bit more seriously. Do you think even when the pandemic is over that we are going to be forever changed in some plays with our relationship to our homes and two indoor spaces. I think so i hope so. I mean six feet is really a proxy for us to get more airflow and with that understanding we start to see. At least i started to see buildings really as breathing machines as lungs themselves if we acknowledge and accept the fact that buildings are basically allowing us to breathe freely then it really becomes a question of rights that we have the basic human right to breathe and we then can demand it in our policies and our codes in demand that housing is better that with that demand. How could we allow prisons to exist. The way they institutional buildings have to be radically rethought under this rubric of the right to clean air. The right to breathe freely. And i think that's a while challenging and certainly going to be difficult to redesign spaces. I think the public will be demanding more accountability from the world around us. Which i think is a really good thing. That's michael murphy. He's the founding principal and executive director of mass design group which designs hospitals schools and memorials around the world including the national memorial for peace and justice in alabama. You can see his full talk. At ted dot com on the show today. The power of spaces. I minutiae zimmer roti and you're listening to the ted radio hour from npr..

michael murphy alabama nineteenth century six feet rwanda today bruce twenties zimmer roti both florence nightingale alvar aalto over a decade first thing ted dot com two thousand two indoor spaces last few months thirties eleven
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

02:40 min | 5 months ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"We don't know yet we don't know yet khloe but the you're twenty thirty four. I'm waiting for you. Dragonfly that talk okay so chloe. Let's say someone is listening and they're thinking you know what i i have a good idea for a talk. How will they know if their idea is good for the ted stage if they should even take the steps to submit a great question so i mean i think one thing that we tell people is to think about the difference between a topic and idea so a topic example might be something like we need to fix the opioid crisis. Like of course that's fascinating and most people would agree that. What's the idea within that. So an idea might take that step further like a specific angle that stems from the topic. with a unique message solution or insight so talk idea that actually became a talk from from that topic might be in the opioid crisis. Here's what it takes to save a life so we're actually hearing about you know the steps to potentially end this person by person. Okay got it. Now let's say a person has thought through all of that. They still think their ideas legit. What should they do. How can they get their idea to you and your team so please please spread the word if you know someone who has an idea we're spreading or if you are that person apply it's still open until the end of january so you can apply at go dot ted dot com slash idea. Search and winners will be invited to give. Ted talks either. Virtually person khloe. Sasha books is speaker. Development curator at ted khloe. Thank you so much for spending this hour with us. Thank you so much for having me. Thanks so much for listening to our show this week on ted's idea search and again for more information on how to submit your idea visit go dot ted dot com slash idea search and as always to learn more about the people who were on. Today's show go to ted dot. Npr dot org and to see hundreds more. ted talks. Checkout ted dot com or the ted app are ted radio production staff at. Npr includes jeff rodgers son as michigan. Poor rachel faulkner diba mohtashami james l. Tc howard katie monteleone. Maria paz gutierrez christina kala matthew ta and farah safari with help from daniel shchukin. Our intern is janet jong lee. Our theme music was written by rahm teen arab louis. Our partners at ted. Are chris anderson colin helms and a phelan and michelle quint. I'm a new summer odi. And you've been listening to the ted radio hour from npr..

janet jong lee jeff rodgers Maria paz gutierrez katie monteleone daniel shchukin chris anderson Sasha rachel faulkner end of january christina kala michelle quint Npr go dot ted dot com this week twenty thirty four ted radio Today ted james l. Ted
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

06:30 min | 7 months ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"I'm anew and for most kids around the country. School is officially out of session. But unlike other summers many kids and teens are stuck at home because of the coronavirus pandemic and so today we've got an episode for everyone. Kids adults parents teens. Go are all invited on this journey. Because we've invited a certain dad back on the show to share the coolest things he's learned over the years here on the ted radio hour topics to blow the minds of young and old and a mystery guest host. Can you please introduce yourself. It's the ted radio hour. Npr hello although guy welcome back thank you okay so guy not only were you the host of this show until you so graciously handed over the reins to me but you are also the host of rather podcast for kids right. Yeah it's called. wow on the world. It's a journey through real scientific research into sounds a little weird but It's like a cartoon for the ear. Where me and my co host. Mickey thomas go on journeys into space and back in time and Underwater and everywhere in between searching for incredible scientific discoveries. and it's this choi full wonderful experience for us and hopefully for the kids who listen to the show. Well that includes my kids and we sort of figured since you and i are both home with our children this summer. We thought it'd be the perfect person to come on and curate a special summer show for the entire ted radio hour family and you have so kindly brought four of your favorite segments that you did the years. How did you even begin to choose which segments you were going to bring to us. Well i think like you probably experienced their lot of ted talks that my kids love and on a really inspired by and then there's some that you know of course are sort of over their heads right but i really want to bring segments. That spoke to curiosity and the sort of the. Aw kids naturally have about the world and so that's how we kinda came up with this this collection and i will say i did feel that way About the first segment that you brought to us. This one is called. How do trees collaborate tell us about it. I love the segment so much So basically scientists for basically forever thought. That trees competed against each other for resources right for for water and son and nutrients and you know they figured that. The tallest trees in the forest were the strongest trees right and make sense. Might but suzanne simard the scientists that were about to hear from she totally changed the way that scientists. Now think about trees because it turns out they don't compete at all. In fact trees collaborate. They work together through this. This mysterious underground superhighway. There is an entire communication network happening under our feet. Let's listen forest ecologist. Suzanne simard had a hunch yes. That's right. She thought that trees could talk. Just imagine like when you're walking through the forest you. Might you hear the crunching of the twigs under your feet in the rustling of the but she thought what if there's more going on big chattering going on that. We can't hear the third attuned to each other now at the time. A team of scientists in england were wrapping up an experiment where they'd grown in the laboratory these pine seedlings together in little route boxes that you could see through. And the scientists took two of these pine seedlings. These baby trees that were in the same box in this aimed dirt and then they exposed one of these seedlings to a radioactive carbon dioxide gas carbon fourteen radioactive carbon. And what they found. Was that some of that radioactive gas. The carbon fourteen made its way into the second ceiling. You can visualize you could see. And so from this experiment. It seemed that somehow these two plants in the same dirt or connected. And i thought. Wow maybe this is what's going on in my forest. Maybe suzanne smart thought maybe all the trees in a forest or connected in a kind of network like our airport system or transportation system our social networks and maybe she thought all of this was happening underground when we walk through the forest what we see as human beings we just see these beautiful trees growing out of the ground but we don't see that they're actually completely linked underground in this superhighway. So suzanne decided to prove this underground network existed. She devised an experiment using some of the same radioactive gas geiger counter to measure it and a patch of birch and for trees. I figured the burcin effort would be connected below ground web. Suzanne pick up the story from the ted stage and i gathered my apparatus plastic bags and duct tape and shade cloth. A paper. suit a respirator. And then borrow some high-tech stuff from my university. The first day of the experiment. We got out to our plot and i pulled on my weight. Paper suit i put on my respirator. I put the plastic bags over my trees. I got my giant syringes and i injected carbon fourteen radioactive gas into the bag of birch. I waited an hour. I figured it would take this long for the trees to suck up the co two through photosynthesis senate down into their roots and maybe shuttle that carbon below ground to their neighbors. I went to my first bag with the birch. I pulled the bag off. Iran mike geiger counter over. Its leaves perfect. The birch had taken up the radioactive gas. Then the moment of truth i went over to the for tree. I pulled off its bay. I iran the geiger counter pits needles. And i heard the most beautiful sound.

Suzanne simard ted Npr mike geiger Mickey thomas Iran england
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

06:30 min | 7 months ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"I'm anew and for most kids around the country. School is officially out of session. But unlike other summers many kids and teens are stuck at home because of the coronavirus pandemic and so today we've got an episode for everyone. Kids adults parents teens. Go are all invited on this journey. Because we've invited a certain dad back on the show to share the coolest things he's learned over the years here on the ted radio hour topics to blow the minds of young and old and a mystery guest host. Can you please introduce yourself. It's the ted radio hour. Npr hello although guy welcome back thank you okay so guy not only were you the host of this show until you so graciously handed over the reins to me but you are also the host of rather podcast for kids right. Yeah it's called. wow on the world. It's a journey through real scientific research into sounds a little weird but It's like a cartoon for the ear. Where me and my co host. Mickey thomas go on journeys into space and back in time and Underwater and everywhere in between searching for incredible scientific discoveries. and it's this choi full wonderful experience for us and hopefully for the kids who listen to the show. Well that includes my kids and we sort of figured since you and i are both home with our children this summer. We thought it'd be the perfect person to come on and curate a special summer show for the entire ted radio hour family and you have so kindly brought four of your favorite segments that you did the years. How did you even begin to choose which segments you were going to bring to us. Well i think like you probably experienced minu. Their lot of ted talks that my kids love and on a really inspired by. And then there's some that you know of course are sort of over their heads right but i really want to bring segments. That spoke to curiosity and the sort of the. Aw kids naturally have about the world and so that's how we kinda came up with this this collection and i will say i did feel that way about the first segment that you brought to us. This one is called. How do trees collaborate tell us about it. I love the segment so much So basically scientists for basically forever thought. That trees competed against each other for resources right for for water and son and nutrients and they figured that the tallest trees in the forest were the strongest trees right and make sense might but suzanne simard the scientists that were about to hear from she totally changed the way that scientists. Now think about trees because it turns out they don't compete at all. In fact trees collaborate. They work together through this. This mysterious underground superhighway. There is an entire communication network happening under our feet. Let's listen forest ecologist. Suzanne simard had a hunch yes. That's right. She thought that trees could talk. Just imagine like when you're walking through the forest you. Might you hear the crunching of the twigs under your feet in the rustling of the but she thought what if there's more going on big chattering going on that. We can't hear the third attuned to each other now at the time. A team of scientists in england were wrapping up an experiment where they'd grown in the laboratory these pine seedlings together in little route boxes that you could see through. And the scientists took two of these pine seedlings. These baby trees that were in the same box in this aimed dirt and then they exposed one of these seedlings to a radioactive carbon dioxide gas carbon fourteen radioactive carbon. And what they found. Was that some of that radioactive gas. The carbon fourteen made its way into the second ceiling. You can visualize you could see. And so from this experiment. It seemed that somehow these two plants in the same dirt or connected. And i thought. Wow maybe this is what's going on in my forest. Maybe suzanne smart thought maybe all the trees in a forest or connected in a kind of network like our system or transportation system our social networks. And maybe she thought all of this was happening underground when we walk through the forest what we see as human beings we just see these beautiful trees growing out of the ground. But we don't see that they're actually completely linked underground in this superhighway. So suzanne decided to prove this underground network existed. She devised an experiment using some of the same radioactive gas geiger counter to measure it and a patch of birch and for trees. I figured the burcin effort would be connected below ground web. Suzanne picks up the story from the ted stage and i gathered my apparatus plastic bags and duct tape and shade cloth. Paper suit a respirator. And then borrow some high-tech stuff from my university. The first day of the experiment. We got out to our plot and i pulled on my weight. Paper suit i put on my respirator. Put the plastic bags over my trees. I got my giant syringes and i injected carbon fourteen radioactive gas into the bag of birch. I waited an hour. I figured it would take this long for the trees to suck up the co two through photosynthesis senate down into their roots and maybe shuttle that carbon below ground to their neighbors. I went to my first bag with the birch. I pulled the bag off. Iran mike geiger counter over. Its leaves perfect. The birch had taken up the radioactive gas. Then the moment of truth i went over to the for tree i pulled off its bay iran the geiger counter pits needles. And i heard the most beautiful sound.

Suzanne simard ted Npr mike geiger Mickey thomas Iran england
"ted" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

05:08 min | 9 months ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"It's the Ted Radio Hour from NPR I'm a new she's Emirati. In for the past couple of months while we've all been doing our part to keep ourselves and others safe. We've also had some time to think about what we value most. Walk through the woods near my home a few minutes walk away from. The village that I live in southern England and for a lot of US including Tom Rivet Karnak, it's planet. Beautiful Part Audi May. See the, light can. Tom Is an expert in climate change policy back in twenty thousand fifteen he helped bring together nearly two hundred countries to support the Paris Agreement, which was the UN deal to curb greenhouse gas emissions. But of course, right now, Tom's been spending his time closer to home one of the amazing things about this forest over the last few weeks of course, is that his deserted. Now. There's no one hand. For many of us, the pandemic marks, the first time, the whole planet having one shared experience. Maybe the first time we feel like we are one species and Tom says, this moment is an opportunity none of us who are alive right now have ever lived through anything like this. We are all facing one challenge, which is how we collectively going to deal with this moment. Now. The best outcome of this is that we as humanity remember we can no longer afford the luxury of feeling powerless. Like the rest of the World Ted Stage is now happening remotely. So Tom Karnak delivered his talk from those woods near his home. Right now, we are coming through one of the most challenging periods in the lives of most of us, the global pandemic has been frightening whether personal tragedy has been involved or not, but it has also shaken our belief that we are powerless in the face of great change. In the space of a few weeks we mobilized to the point where half of humanity took drastic action to protect the most vulnerable. Friday morning. The twentieth. By shift yesterday I came back into the emergency department full. We just like a war room in the respiratory report room. So many people are trying to figure out what a summit to take. Tired. Just been running unfortunately it's not over we're still going up. And so I'm still going back to work tomorrow. These people are caregivers and nurses who have been helping humanity face. Corona Virus Covid nineteen. Now. That's interesting because it shows that humans are capable of taking dedicated and sustained action even when they can't control the outcome. But leaves us with another challenge. The climate crisis. Because make no mistake. The climate crisis will be orders of magnitude worse than the pandemic. If we do not take the action that we can still take to avert the tragedy that we see coming towards us. There's a line in your tedtalk that kind of hit me like a brick wall where you warn us that the climate crisis will be worse than the pandemic. You know we're we're just so in the pandemic right now that it's hard to take the longer view on that. Make the case for why we Yeah I mean one simple answer to that question is that the climate crisis will be permanent. The pandemic is you know a major global emergency that we are right in the throes of right now but we will find a vaccine. We are learning about this virus all the time we are working on social measures to reduce its spread. We're working on back scenes those will take months or maybe years, but we'll come to that point and we'll come through it. World will return to some form of normality although will probably look quite different. In the climate emergency, the climate crisis if we allow ourselves to pass these tipping points. After which we begin to lose control of the climate system itself because certain things about the planet change like when the Sea ice reduces, it exposes the dark water underneath that dark water absorbs more sunlight which leads to more sea ice law. So you get these feedback loops where it becomes runaway. So you lose control of the climate system if we.

Tom Tom Rivet Karnak US NPR Audi England UN Paris
"ted" Discussed on The TED Interview

The TED Interview

03:38 min | 9 months ago

"ted" Discussed on The TED Interview

"It's called countdown that we're working together, which is exactly the counting down of those emissions, the mending of the of the curve. What intrigues you about about this initiative, what is different about it and what what, what are your hopes for it? Well many things I'm I'm very excited about it. The first is Chris. I think five Ted's climate countdown will do something. I have aspired to do for many years unsuccessfully, which is to take this conversation outside of the climate bubble. In order to reach the global targets we need to go beyond those of us in the climate community. The second reason is precisely that the opportunity I hope that this is really going to further the understanding that decarbonising our economy's. Certainly is a moral responsibility, but it is an economic opportunity and not the many projects that we are going to put their on stage will show that this is about people certainly, it's about planet, but it's also by prophet and that dot triple bottom line is exactly what we all need to pursue because one without the other is just not going to make it and the third thing that I'm very excited about. that. I really think that you have managed to position. Ted In the imagination of people people look to. Ted Talks and to Ted events to spark their imagination to spark their thinking to innovate. To to really get out of our Rut of thinking and move over to a different mindset to a different way of thinking about things and I think that's exactly what we need. We have to get out of our mental Rut and understand that this is really quite exciting and that we as human beings town for the first time in the history of humanity in the incredibly privileged position of having full power of designing our future. We have never had that power ever in the history of mankind humankind as my daughters would correct me. And that's what we have right now we are holding the pen in our hands and we can and we will. We're actually going to define a very, very wonderful future. One of the things that's been exciting Ted of the last few years is being the spread of these Fedex groups around the world who self organize and. We're applying this very much to this initiative is often framed as a problem that our political leaders have to solve and our job is to protest and get angry at them. It's also a problem that all of us have to solve. We've got really excited at the thought of having literally thousands of groups around the world engaging on this issue company by company city by city people often feel powerless about it and do feel this just overwhelming sense of dread but probably have more power than they know you know twenty organized employees in a company. Working with the C. Suite can actually get a lot done in terms of making the kind of bold for the long term decisions for that company about how to contribute to that. Beautiful. Carbon emission free future that we all audrey more. Christianity I have to have you and Tom and many many others engaged in helping frame. This initiative is unbelievably exciting. I guess I should say that a certain for this.

Ted Talks Fedex Chris Tom C. Suite
"ted" Discussed on The TED Interview

The TED Interview

05:54 min | 9 months ago

"ted" Discussed on The TED Interview

"You you have the skill to. Persuade other people even if they're not feeling it to take the optimistic science just as to go with it and to say imagine that other people are capable of doing more than you think they're doing. Now, what are you capable of doing that? You just did that repeatedly tell us what actually happened at Paris because a lot of people it's a puzzling agreement to to people people think of an international treaty as being you know these rules setup and has to abide by the and you know Kato. Paris didn't work that way and some people as a result of said, there was nothing legally binding as it's actually amounts to nothing. You believe strongly I believe strongly, it did not amount to nothing what what actually happened there. What do people agree to do? Well. First of all, it is legally binding at least it is legally binding in the hundred and eighty four countries that have ratified the Paris Agreement International Law. What has legally binding though is not is not to do specific things to make specific emission targets, but to agree to a process, is that right? Well, yes and no. So what is legally binding is the ultimate destination which we called the long term target of reaching a global economy that has zero net emissions by twenty fifty..

Paris Paris Agreement International
"ted" Discussed on The TED Interview

The TED Interview

01:44 min | 9 months ago

"ted" Discussed on The TED Interview

"Hello i'm chris addison to the ted interview. Today i'm re sharing with you. A conversation with christiana figueres from last december because it connects directly to an amazing event. That's happening this coming saturday. Ten ten twenty twenty. I really want ever understood into this to be part of that event. If you possibly can so cristiana has probably done more than anyone in the world to bring people together over the climate issue in harare the united nations. She was credited as the architect of the paris climate agreement which probably remains humanity's best roadmap into a hopeful future. And that's because she found ways to persuade people to change that assumptions about what was possible in this episode. We talk about this major new inish different ted which we just kicked off back then. When this conversation happened it's called countdown. it's global initiative to champion and accelerate solutions to the climate crisis. The goal is to build a better future by cutting greenhouse gas emissions in half by twenty thirty in the race to zero carbon world. a lot. safer tina faira. Frankly better for everyone. And now it's hard to believe it but despite a global pandemic and the most challenging year that many of us have seen in our lives. It's finally come together on ten ten twenty twenty saturday. We're kicking off with a virtual event that will be live streaming on. Youtube is going to be a global audience numbering in the millions. We've got some incredible speakers. Like prince william al gore and of course christiana figueres has self many others. Great artists use activists great scientists..

christiana figueres chris addison cristiana harare tina faira united nations paris ted prince william al gore Youtube
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

04:36 min | 1 year ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Sometimes, simple act of kindness toward another person. A, thank you. Complement of vote of confidence can have a much bigger effect than we realize and can even change the way we look at ourselves. And for Jacobs that kind of appreciation turned into a journey of a thousand. Thank us all for just a cup of coffee. I decide to go backwards so started with the Barista at Joe Coffee, which is coffee chain in New York where I go? And I thanked her, and she thanked me for thanking her. Would you say to her? You said Hey I just WANNA extra. Thank you for making my cup of coffee this morning. That's it I just rest my gratitude and I think she was pleasantly surprised because he doesn't get thanked all that often. So you after thinking the Barista I, guess you decided to meet with a guy named Ed Kaufman, who who works for Joe Coffee, so yeah I met at Kaufman who is the guy who goes around the world testing the beans tasting them and I loved that because he was so passionate about this brown liquid, and he taught me how to differentiate the tastes, because he would take a sip, and his face would light up, and he would say sensing honey, Crisp Apple, and able syrup in pineapple, upside down cake, and I love that idea of of savoring and appreciating. It's so tied.

Joe Coffee Ed Kaufman Jacobs New York Apple
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

04:36 min | 1 year ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Sometimes simple act of kindness toward another person. A thank you. Complement of vote of confidence can have a much bigger effect than we realize and can even change the way we look at ourselves. And for Jacobs, that kind of appreciation turned into a journey of a thousand. Thank you all for just a cup of coffee. I decide to go backwards so started with the Barista. Joe Coffee which is coffee chain in New York where I go? And I thanked her, and she thanked me for thanking her. Would you say to her? You said? Hey I just WANNA extra. Thank you for making my cup of coffee this morning. That's it I just rest my gratitude and I think she was pleasantly surprised because he doesn't get thanked all that often. So you after thinking the Barista. I guess you decided to meet with a guy named. Ed Kaufman who who works for Joe Coffee, so yeah I met at Kaufman. Who is the guy who goes around the world testing the beans testing them and I loved that because he was so passionate about this brown liquid, and he taught me how to differentiate the tastes, because he would take a sip, and his face would light up and he would say I'm sensing honey, crisp apple, and able syrup in pineapple, upside down cake, and I love that idea of of savoring and appreciating. It's so tied.

Joe Coffee Ed Kaufman Jacobs New York apple
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Writer professional lifestyle experimenter. self-described curmudgeon I talk about I think in every everyone has the two sides the Larry David side in the Mr Rogers side, so the grumpy pessimist and the optimistic grateful side so many people have helped me to come to this night and I believe. I was born with a very strong. Larry David Side I was very good at finding things to be annoyed about and I think a lot of us are, if you hear a hundred compliments and a single insult, what do you remember the insult? Would you just take along with me? Ten seconds to think of the people who have helped you. Become who you are I was. Aware here that I have this negative bias. This Larry David side, but I wanted to bulk up the Mr Rogers side. Ten seconds of silence. I'll watch the time. It's not something that comes naturally to me and to most people I don't think it comes naturally. You have to cultivate this idea of gratitude. Whomever you've been thinking about. How pleased they must speed to know the difference you feel they've made. What what happened to you to say? Wait a minute I'm not. Appreciate people not. Being grateful. was, a Piff Neil. What was it? Well I. Think it was partly intellectually I knew the power of gratitude. There are tons of studies about how good it is for you. How helps ward off depression? You recover more quickly. You sleep better better. You're more generous. So, intellectually I knew like I should be grateful. But how do you do that and that's when? I decided you know what I'm going to try? This ritual at home where I'm going to try to say thanks to all the people who helped make my meal a possibility so I would I would. Say you know I'd like to thank the farmer who grew the tomato? Cashier who rang the tomatoes up at the grocery store? And, that's when my son who is ten very perceptively said. You Know Dad that's fine, but it's also totally lame, because those people can't hear you. They're not in our apartment. So if you really are committed, then you should go and thank those people in person. Aj. Jacobs picks up the story. From the Ted Stage. Now I'm a writer and for my books. I like to go on adventures. Go on quests so I decided I'm going to take my son up on his challenge. It seems simple enough and to make it even simpler. I decided to focus on just one item my morning cup of coffee. Well, it turned out to be not so simple at all. This quest took me around the world. I discovered that my coffee would not be possible without hundreds of people I take for granted so I would thank the trucker who drove the coffee beans to the coffee shop, but he couldn't have done his job without the road, so I would think the people who pave the road. And then I would think the people who made the asphalt for the pavement. And he couldn't do his job without the folks who drew the yellow lines on the road because they kept my truck driver from smashing into oncoming traffic. Splitting an atom because you can think the people who mixed the paint for the lines on the road, and then the people who made the machines to enable the paints to be mixed and the people who mind the iron to make the machines to mix the paint then. You can. There's lots of people think. Oh, it's never incident. I could have spent the next fifty years of my life, thanking people and I could have given a Ted talk that was about four hundred hours long, because yeah, that's what it made me realize how interconnected! Everything is how many people it takes. It doesn't take a village to make a cup of coffee and takes.

Larry David Side Mr Rogers writer Ted Stage Piff Neil Jacobs
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

07:40 min | 1 year ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Different parts of the light spectrum that we simply can't see with our human is so imagine. There's a stone wall somewhere in Italy that dates to the Roman period so roughly two thousand years ago, and you'd walk over a field and you wouldn't see it. Yeah, well that stonewall. STONEWALL, which may be under a meter, or so of earth it affects the overlain topography so the roots going down. They couldn't go as deep because they'd be stopped by the stonewall and so processing the satellite data, you can actually map out and see those changes we'll start seeing straight lines, and those straight lines form structures, which definitely aren't natural, so just as an example We got a hold of new satellite imagery for most of the pyramid fields and. What I what I started processing. It feels like cheating. You can see everything. How many sites are have you guys? found using pictures from satellites I'm at the point where I've lost count It is in the many thousands, but I don't know anymore. I believe we have barely scratched the surface in terms of what's left to discover. In the Egyptian Delta alone we've excavated less than one thousandth of one percent of the total volume of Egyptian sites. When you add to that. The thousands of other sites team and I have discovered. What we thought we knew. Pales in comparison to what we have left to discover. When you look at the incredible work that my colleagues are doing all around the world and what they're finding. I believe that there are millions of undiscovered. Archaeological sites left to find. Discovering them will do nothing less than a mock the full potential of our existence. When we come back, we'll hear more from Sarah about how her work can help us. All discover more about the planet we call. I'm a new summer. Roti and you're listening to the Ted Radio Hour from NPR, stay with us. He everyone just a quick thanks to our sponsor. Virgo summer is here and vacation is just drive away. Search thousands of nearby vacation rentals on Verb Oh to find your family private home all to yourself you can spread out chill out and feel that vacation feeling again together book them that makes the vacation download the verb virgo. APP, that's V. RB OH. I'm Gregory Warner with NPR's rough translation, so there's a holiday in the Netherlands where every year thousands of white folks where black face some people trying in that tradition, but in very Dutch way you talk you talk you talk you talk you talk until you reach consensus. Can you fight racism in a way that brings the whole country with you? That's on NPR's rough translation. It's the Ted Radio hour from NPR News Zimmer Odi and today on the show ideas for the whole family with my predecessor guy rise in addition to previously hosting this show. He is the host of the kids science podcast. Wow, in the world. Hey, Guy Hello. Before the break we were hearing from you and Sarah Park the space archaeologist about how many ancient sites she has already begun to uncover using satellite imagery. Let's get back to your conversation with Sarah. All right. I mean what you're saying. is we only know a tiny bit about our past? Is that true I mean is most of our history hidden? I would say yes. Because history is always written by the winners and yeah, people are living in places where they've always lived for thousands of years look at places like Rome and his tunnel, and Cairo those cities layers upon layers. Paul layers of of history so I think we've taken a lot for granted about who we are and where we come from, we think living in this very modern age with smartphones and Internet, and and sort of this whole world of knowledge at our fingertips. We know everything the more and more we delve into the past. The more we realized that we don't and that it has a lot of lessons to teach us for today. I wish for us to discover. The millions of unknown archaeological sites around the world by creating a twenty. First Century Army of global explorers will find and protect the world's hidden heritage, which contains clues to humankind's collective resilience and creativity. So how are we going to do this? We are going to build an online crowd source citizen science platform to allow anyone in the world to engage with discovering archeological sites and protect them. By creating this platform, we will find the millions of places occupied by the billions of people that came before us. Acknowledging that the past is worth saving. Mean so much more. It means that we're worth saving two. And the greatest story ever told. Is, the story of our shared. Human Journey. But the only way that we're going to be able to write it. Is If. We do it together. Thank you. I love that line. Re she says means that we're worth it to so great, so I have to ask, it's you could go on an archaeological dig the ancient civilization of your choice. Where would you go? I think I would want to do something like way way way back like early humans or like our even our human predecessors they were. Like creatures at least seven or eight million years ago, and that's what we know of and we've only discovered. The remains of like a teeny number of human like species, and so there's there's very little doubt that we have so many more to discover like hundreds thousands of species, and that would be amazing to go on one of those digs I wanna call Sarah and ask her. If I can go visit one of those places in Peru. She could hook me. Oh my God right. So cool all right, so we have talked about trees, dolphins and ancient civilizations before our final segment I wanNA talk to you guys about two words that we say every day, or at least we should say every day. Thank you two very simple words. Yes, that are incredibly powerful and a j Jacobs wanted to show how powerful those words were, so he took us all on a journey with him through gratitude. Do you talk to your kids about saying? Thank you like. Please all the time because I. Worry that. My kids say it, but I'm not sure that they totally mean it. Yeah I. Think it's natural. We all touch kids about saying, please and thank you. Please and thank you, but It has to be more than just saying. Please and thank you. It's about actually internalizing gratitude, which which is what Aj kind of describes in this in this talk. To practice gratitude you really have to. Slow things down and notice. Age as a.

NPR Sarah STONEWALL Sarah Park Italy Egyptian Delta Cairo Netherlands Aj Gregory Warner Century Army of Paul Rome Peru j Jacobs
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

06:50 min | 1 year ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Different parts of the light spectrum that we simply can't see with our human is so imagine. There's a stone wall somewhere in Italy that dates to the Roman period so roughly two thousand years ago, and you'd walk over a field and you wouldn't see it. Yeah, well that stonewall. STONEWALL which may be under a meter, or so of earth it affects the overlain topography so the roots going down. They couldn't go as deep because they'd be stopped by the stonewall and so processing the satellite data you can actually map out and see those changes we'll start seeing straight lines, and those straight lines form structures, which definitely aren't natural, so just as an example We got a hold of new satellite imagery for most of the pyramid fields and. What I what I started processing. It feels like you can see everything. How many sites are have you guys? found using pictures from satellites. I'm at the point where I've lost count It is in the many thousands, but I don't know anymore. I believe we have barely scratched the surface in terms of what's left to discover. In the Egyptian Delta alone we've excavated less than one thousandth of one percent of the total volume of Egyptian sites. When you add to that. The thousands of other sites team and I have discovered. What we thought we knew. Pales in comparison to what we have left to discover. When you look at the incredible work that my colleagues are doing all around the world and what they're finding. I believe that there are millions of undiscovered archaeological sites left to find. Discovering them will do nothing less than a mock the full potential of our existence. When we come back. We'll hear more from Sarah about how her work can help us. All discover more about the planet we call. I'm a new summer. Roti and you're listening to the Ted Radio Hour from NPR. Stay with us. He everyone just a quick thanks to our sponsor. Virgo summaries year end vacation is just drive away. Search thousands of nearby vacation rentals on Verb Oh to find your family private home all to yourself you can spread out chill out and feel that vacation feeling again together. Book them that makes the vacation download the VERB VIRGO APP. That's V rb Oh. I'm Gregory Warner with NPR's rough translation, so there's a holiday in the Netherlands. Where every year thousands of white folks where black face some people trying in that tradition, but in very Dutch way you talk you talk you talk you talk you talk until you reach consensus. Can you fight racism in a way that brings the whole country with you? That's on NPR's rough translation. It's the Ted Radio hour from NPR. News Zimmer Odi and today on the show ideas for the whole family with my predecessor guy rise in addition to previously hosting this show. He is the host of the kids science podcast. Wow, in the world. Hey Guy Hello. Before the break we were hearing from you and Sarah. Park these space archaeologist about how many ancient sites she has already begun to uncover using satellite imagery. Let's get back to your conversation with Sarah. All right. I mean what you're saying. is we only know a tiny bit about our past? Is that true I mean is most of our history hidden? I would say yes, because history is always written by the winners and yeah, people are living in places where they've always lived for thousands of years look at places like Rome, and his tunnel and Cairo those cities layers upon layers Paul layers of. So I think we've taken a lot for granted about who we are. And where we come from, we think living in this very modern age with smartphones and Internet, and and sort of this whole world of knowledge at our fingertips we know everything but the more and more we delve into the past. The more we realized that we don't and that it has a lot of lessons to teach us for today. I wish for us to discover. The millions of unknown archaeological sites around the world by creating a Twenty First Century Army of global explorers will find and protect the world's hidden heritage, which contains clues to humankind's collective resilience and creativity. So. How are we going to do this? We are going to build an online crowd source citizen science platform to allow anyone in the world to engage with discovering archeological sites and protect them. By creating this platform, we will find the millions of places occupied by the billions of people that came before us. Acknowledging that the past is worth saving. Mean so much more. It means that we're worth saving two. And the greatest story ever told. Is the story of our shared human journey. But the only way that we're going to be able to write it. Is If. We do it together. Thank you. I love that line. Re she says means that we're worth it to so great, so I have to ask. It's you could go on an archaeological dig the ancient civilization of your choice. Where would you go I? Think I would want to do something like way way way back like early humans, or like our even our human predecessors, they were human like creatures at least seven or eight million years ago, and that's what we know of, and we've only discovered. The remains of like a teeny number of human like species, and so there's there's very little doubt that we have so many more to discover like hundreds thousands of species, and that would be amazing to go on one of those digs. I WanNa Call Sarah and ask her if I can go visit. One of those places in Peru, she could Hook me Oh my God right. So cool all right, so we have talked about trees, dolphins and ancient civilizations before our final segment I wanNA talk to you guys about two words that we say.

Sarah NPR STONEWALL Egyptian Delta Italy Rome Netherlands Gregory Warner Peru Cairo Paul
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

08:10 min | 1 year ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"The show today ideas for curious thinkers of all ages and our guide on this hour is my predecessor Guy Ross. Hello, okay, so we just heard Suzanne Simard to tell us about how trees cooperate with one another, and it really gets you thinking about how all kinds of other beings may be communicating, which brings us to the next topic that you brought us. Dolphins Oh man. KINK around with Dolphin. Can't go wrong dolphins. I I learned about and dolphins like communicate through clicks right learn about this from the prisoner about to hear denise hosing. She has spent her entire life studying a very specific pod of dolphins in the Bahamas, and I, remember Malaysia remember seeing this Ted Talk in person and twenty thirteen. And I was totally blown away at the idea that one day we might be able to talk to communicate with not just with dolphins, but with animals like Dr Doolittle. Right I was. Fascinated by that story as a kid never that. And we are closer to that possibility today than ever before. I've seen lots of pictures of if you under water holding a camera. When you're down there. Does it feel like. It's almost like A. Just a better place to I, don't I don't do you get that feeling while you know. It's an immersion into a three dimensional world. The tides and the currents and the salt and the waves, and I mean. It all feeds into your understanding of what their world is like. Usually when I'm down there I'm like trying to follow behavior in make cameras on. It's actually mostly work really right. Denise hosing has been doing that work every summer. With this same group of Dolphins in the Bahamas see is just calculated recently for thirty five years. Breath thousand encounters in the water with the dolphins. Each of those a counters is about twenty minutes long so over one thousand hours of footage and. Data so yeah, it's a lot of data certainly for dolphins and the point of all that data of all that work is to help denise answer one question. Do they have a language. And if so, what are they talking about? A here's denise hurting on the Ted. Stage, now I'm interested in dolphins because of their large brains, and we know they use of that brainpower for just living complicated lives. But what do we really know about Dolphin Intelligence? We know that their brain to body ratio, which is a physical measure of intelligence, is second only to humans. cognitively they can understand artificially created languages. And they pass self awareness tests in mirrors and some parts of the world. They use tools like sponges to hunt fish. Now Dolphins are natural acoustics. They make sounds ten times as high and here's sounds ten times as high as do, but they have other communications signals they use. They have good vision, so these body postures to communicate. They have taste, smell, and touch and sound can actually be felt in the water, because the acoustic impedance of tissue and water's about the same, so dolphins can buzz and tickle each other at a distance. So decades ago, not years ago. I set out to find a place in the world where I could observe dolphins underwater to try to crack the code of their communication system. I will how? How do dolphins communicate to each other? Well, you know we can actually hear fairmount Their whistles are fairly audible to us. They have plex. They have burst pulses which are also. Packets of clicks. So. They have all these different cues, and they use body postures in combination with sounds that will basically communicate certain things to each other. This is total anthropomorphic station, but When you think of like when you see a dolphin animated or drawn and a kids book. They seem be smiling, but we should not interpolate that that means that they're happy all the time. Right Oh definitely. No, yeah, that is just a physical. Physical Cigna they have, going How do you respond? When other researchers say you know? Push back and say hey, like let's not do that. Let's not. anthropomorphized these creatures. You know you just keep doing your work, I think I. don't even think it's a discussion anymore. Honestly most of us that work with social mammals I think kind of move beyond that and just say well. It's a valuable tool for thinking about how they might think. Let's do the work, is it? Is it even we're to talk about Dolphin language, or or is, is it? Should we be talking about Dolphin Communication Yeah. We don't really usually talk about language because we don't have it yet. but thinking out of the boxes. Boxes you know it's like intelligence are other different kinds and types of intelligence. Are there different kinds and types of language I mean? We know there's tons of kinds of language with humans right, but one of the big things about language is that you can communicate about a different time and space right? Are they talking about the food? They're chasing. Are the eating, or are they talking about? Hey, let's go to the reef and a couple of days and meet up with this other group. You know we don't know and that's where. ANTHROPOMORPHIC can be a tool for thinking about how animals might be thinking. which brings us back to the Bahamas and a pivotal moment in Denise Hers Ings Years of work with Atlantic spotted dolphins there. It happened one summer because in the mid nineties. The dolphins did something they had never done with denise before. We just started noticing the dolphins were just start doing things. This is completely a wild right but we knew the individuals and they would start doing things like. Our Body posture in some cases mimicking rhythm of our sounds in the water. We were doing anything vocally. And we just Kinda thought. Would it be cool to see what we empower them? To communicate back to us. In the key to unlocking that communication. Turned out to be, play. Dolphins just like humans love to play games. Mostly with toys, piece of Robe, a bit of seaweed, anything can pull around in the water. Correct! So what kind of games do they like to play well, it's mostly called. Keep away. That is if they get the toy, then the ideas they like to be chased they like to let you get almost close enough to grab the toy, but then they speed off and that's the game. That's what they play with each other actually. The only question was had to use that play to crack the code. The code that would unlock the meaning behind the dolphins noises now one way to crack the code is to interpret these signals and figure out what they mean, but it's a difficult job, and we actually don't have a Rosetta stone yet, but a second way to crack the code is to develop some technology, an interface to due to a communication, and that's what we've been trying to do in the Bahamas and in real time. So we built a portable keyboard that we get pushed through the water and we labeled four objects. They like to play with the scarf ropes, guests them, and also had a bow ride, which is fun activity for open. And that's the scarf whistle, and these artificially created whistles. They're outside the Dolphin's normal repertoire. But. They're easily mimicked by the dolphins and I. Spent Four Years With my colleagues. Adam pack and Fabienne dealt four a working out in the field with this keyboard, using it with each other to do requests for toys while the dolphins were watching, and the dolphins get in on the game, they could point at the visual object, or they could mimic.

Bahamas Denise hosing denise Suzanne Simard Ted Talk Guy Ross Dr Doolittle Denise Hers Ings Malaysia Adam pack Fabienne
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

06:32 min | 1 year ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"I'm a new summer ODI, and for most kids around the country school is officially out of session, but unlike other summers, many kids and teens are stuck at home because of the coronavirus pandemic and so today. We've got an episode for everyone. Kids, adults, parents teens. You are all invited on this journey because we've invited a certain dad back on the show to share the coolest things he's learned over the years here on the Ted Radio Hour topics to blow the minds of young and old and. Mystery guest host. Can you please introduce yourself? It's the Ted. Radio NPR Guy Roz hello. Hello Guy, well back, thank you. Okay, so guy, not only were you the host of this show until you so graciously handed over the reins to me, but you are also the host of a rather popular podcast for kids right? Yeah, it's called. Wow, on the world. It's a journey through real scientific research, and it sounds a little weird, but it's like a cartoon for the ear where me and my co host. Mindy Thomas go on journeys into space and back in time and. Underwater and everywhere in between searching for incredible scientific discoveries, and it's this joyful wonderful experience for us, and hopefully for the kids who listen to the show. That includes my kids and we sorta figured since you and I are both home with our children this summer. Be The perfect person to come on and curate a special summer show for the entire Ted Radio. Hour family and you have so kindly brought for of your favorite segments that you did over the years. How did you even begin to choose which segments? We're going to bring us well. I think like you probably experience there lot of Ted talks that my kids love and on a really inspired by, and then there's some that you know of course are sort of over their heads right, but I really wanted to bring segments that spoke to curiosity and. The sort of all that kids naturally have about the world, and so that's how we kinda came up with this this collection and I will say I did feel that way about the first segment that you brought to us. This one is called. How do trees collaborate? Tell us about it. I love this segment so much So basically scientists basic forever thought that trees competed against each other for resources right for water and son, and nutrients, and they figured that the tallest trees in the forest where the strongest trees right it makes sense. But Suzanne Simard the scientists that were about to hear from she. Changed the way that scientists now think about trees because it turns out, they don't compete at all. In fact, trees collaborate. They work together through this mysterious. Superhighway, there is an entire communication network happening under our feet. Let's listen. Forest ecologist Suzanne. Simard had a hunch. Yes, that's right. She thought that trees. Could Talk. Imagine like when you're walking through the forest you, might you hear the crunching of the? Twigs under your feet in the rustling of the lease. But she thought. If there's more going on. Big Chattering going on that, we can't hear. That they're attuned to each other. Now at the time, a team of scientists in England were wrapping up an experiment where they'd grown in the laboratory. These pine seedlings together in little route boxes that you could see through. And the scientists took two of these pine seedlings, these baby trees that were in the same box in the same dirt, and then the exposed one of these ceilings to a radioactive carbon dioxide, gas, carbon, fourteen radioactive carbon, and what they found was that some of that radioactive gas, the carbon fourteen made its way into the second seedling. You can visualize you could see it, and so from this experiment. It seemed that somehow these two plants in the same dirt. Or connected and I thought wow. Maybe this is what's going on in my forests. Maybe Suzanne Samara thought maybe all the trees in a forest or connected. In a kind of network. Like our airport system or transportation system our social networks. And maybe she thought all of this was happening underground. When we walk through the forest, what we see is human beings. We just see these beautiful trees growing out of the ground, but we don't see that there are actually completely linked underground in this superhighway. Suzanne decided to prove this underground network existed. She devised an experiment using some of the same radioactive gas, a geiger counter to measure it and a patch of Birch and for trees. I figured the Burton. A for would be connected in a below ground web. Suzanne picks up the story from the Ted. Stage and I gathered my apparatus plastic bags and duct tape and shade cloth paper suit a respirator. And then I borrow some high-tech stuff from my university. The first day of the experiment we got out to our plot and I pulled on my weight paper suit. I put on my respirator. I put the plastic bags over my trees I got my giant Syringes and I injected carbon fourteen, the radioactive gas into the bag of Birch I waited an hour. I figured it would take this long for the trees to suck up the CO two through photosynthesis Senate down into their roots, and maybe shuttle that carbon below ground to their neighbors. I went to my first bag with the Birch I pulled the bag off. Iran my Geiger counter over its leaves. Perfect the Birch had taken up the radioactive gas then the moment of truth I went over to the for tree. I pulled off its bay. I ran the Geiger counter up its needles and I heard the most beautiful sound. It was the sound.

Suzanne Simard Suzanne Ted Radio Geiger Ted Suzanne Samara NPR Mindy Thomas Iran England
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

06:32 min | 1 year ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"I'm a new summer ODI and for most kids around the country school is officially out of session, but unlike other summers, many kids and teens are stuck at home because of the coronavirus pandemic and so today. We've got an episode for everyone kids, adults, parents teens. You are all invited on this journey because we've invited a certain dad back on the show to share the coolest things he's learned over the years here on the Ted Radio Hour topics to blow the minds of young and old and. Mystery guest host. Can you please introduce yourself? It's the Ted. Radio NPR Guy Roz hello. Hello guy well back, thank you. Okay so guy, not only were you the host of this show until you so graciously handed over the reins to me, but you are also the host of a rather popular podcast for kids right? Yeah, it's called. Wow, on the world. It's a journey through real scientific research, and it sounds a little weird, but it's like a cartoon for the ear where me and my co host Mindy Thomas go on journeys into space and back in time and. Underwater and everywhere in between searching for incredible scientific discoveries, and it's this joyful wonderful experience for us, and hopefully for the kids who listen to the show. That includes my kids and we sorta figured since you and I are both home with our children this summer. Be The perfect person to come on and curate a special summer show for the entire Ted Radio Hour family and you have so kindly brought for of your favorite segments that you did over the years. How did you even begin to choose which segments we're going to bring us well I think like you probably experience there lot of Ted talks that my kids love and on a really inspired by, and then there's some that you know of course are sort of over their heads right, but I really wanted to bring segments that spoke to curiosity and. The sort of all that kids naturally have about the world, and so that's how we kinda came up with this. This collection and I will say I did feel that way about the first segment that you brought to us. This one is called. How do trees collaborate? Tell us about it I love this segment so much So basically, scientists basic forever thought that trees competed against each other for resources right for water and son, and nutrients, and they figured that the tallest trees in the forest where the strongest trees right it makes sense. But Suzanne Simard the scientists that were about to hear from she. Changed the way that scientists now think about trees because it turns out, they don't compete at all. In fact, trees collaborate. They work together through this mysterious. Superhighway, there is an entire communication network happening under our feet. Let's listen. Forest ecologist Suzanne Simard had a hunch. Yes, that's right. She thought that trees. Could Talk. Imagine like when you're walking through the forest, you, might you hear the crunching of the? Twigs under your feet in the rustling of the lease. But she thought. If, there's more going on. Big Chattering going on that. We can't hear. That, they're attuned to each other. Now at the time, a team of scientists in England were wrapping up an experiment where they'd grown in the laboratory. These pine seedlings together in little route boxes that you could see through. And the scientists took two of these pine seedlings, these baby trees that were in the same box in the same dirt, and then the exposed one of these ceilings to a radioactive carbon dioxide, gas, carbon, fourteen radioactive carbon, and what they found was that some of that radioactive gas, the carbon fourteen made its way into the second seedling. You can visualize you could see it, and so from this experiment. It seemed that somehow these two plants in the same dirt. Or connected and I thought wow. Maybe this is what's going on in my. Maybe Suzanne. Samara thought maybe all the trees in a forest or connected. In a kind of network. Like our airport system or transportation system our social networks. And maybe she thought all of this was happening underground. When we walk through the forest, what we see as human beings, we just see these beautiful trees growing out of the ground, but we don't see that there are actually completely linked underground in this superhighway. Suzanne decided to prove this underground network existed. She devised an experiment using some of the same radioactive gas, a geiger counter to measure it and a patch of Birch and for trees. I figured the Burton a for would be connected in a below ground web. Suzanne picks up the story from the Ted Stage, and I gathered my apparatus plastic bags and duct tape and shade cloth paper suit a respirator. And then I borrow some high-tech stuff from my university. The first day of the experiment we got out to our plot, and I pulled on my weight paper suit I. Put on my respirator. I put the plastic bags over my trees I got my giant Syringes, and I injected carbon fourteen, the radioactive gas into the bag of Birch. I waited an hour I figured. It would take this long for the trees to suck up the CO two through photosynthesis Senate down into their roots, and maybe shuttle that carbon below ground to their neighbors I went to my first bag with the Birch I pulled the bag off Iran. My Geiger counter over its leaves. Perfect. The Birch had taken up the radioactive gas. Then the moment of truth I went over to the for tree. I pulled off its bay. I ran the Geiger counter up its needles, and I heard the most beautiful sound. It was the sound.

Suzanne Simard Birch Geiger Ted NPR Mindy Thomas Samara England Iran Burton
"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

06:59 min | 1 year ago

"ted" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Stage. I started talking to neuro scientists and cognitive psychologists and what they told me was fascinating it turns out that when you get bored you ignite a network in your brain called the default mode so our body. It goes on autopilot while we're folding the laundry or we're walking to work actually. That is when our brain gets really busy. Here's boredom researcher. Dr Sandy man wants to start daydreaming and allow you to really wonder you start thinking a little bit beyond the conscious a little bit into the subconscious which allows sort of different connections to take place. It's really awesome. Actually totally awesome right. So this is my brain and FM Ri. And I learned that in the default mode that is when we connect disparate ideas. We saw some of our most nagging problems and we do something called autobiographical planning. This is when we look back at our lives. We take note of the big moments. We create a personal narrative and then we set goals and we figure out what steps we need to take to reach them but now we chill out on the couch also while updating a Google doc. Who are replying to email. The average person checks email seventy four times a day and switches tasks on their computer. Five hundred and sixty six times a day. I discovered all this talking to professor of Informatics Dr Gloria Mark. So we find that when people are stressed. They tend to shift their attention. More rapidly We also found strangely enough. We find that the shorter amount of sleep that a person gets the more likely they are to check facebook. Were in this vicious habitual cycle. What could this cycle be broken like? What would happen? If we broke this vicious cycle what if we reclaim those cracks in our day? Could it help us? Jumpstart our creativity. Maybe my listeners could help me find out we call the project board and Brilliance and Within Forty eight hours twenty thousand people signed by. Yeah I was like. Oh not a special snowflake. This is a thing. People are feeling this so one day. Take the APP that your thumb always seems to gravitate towards take it off your phone and observe what it feels like and then decide. Do you want it back on your phone? Cool go forward if you do. But do not let the tech companies decide as their decision making. Don't let that be the default which it very much has become. I think for consumers so how tens of thousands of people who signed up for the challenge. Some of them called her up because they started to realize that their relationship with their phone had kind of become co dependent the relationship between a baby and teddy bear or a baby. Banke or a baby that wants its mother's cradle when its done being held by stranger that's the relationship between me and my I think of my phone leg power tool useful but dangerous if I'm not handling it properly if I don't pay close attention I'll suddenly realize that I've lost an hour of time. Doing something totally mindless okay. But to really measure any improvement we needed data right. Because that's what we do these days so we partnered with some APPs that would measure how much time we were spending every day on our phone. And if you're thinking it's ironic that I ask people to download another APP so that they would spend less time on their phones. Yeah you gotTa meet people where they are but when the data came in it turned out that we had cut down on average just six minutes from one hundred and twenty minutes a day on our phones to one hundred and fourteen look amazing that you you got so many people involved and then looks at the data and turned out. The people just saved six minutes a day. Don't just sort of like like deflating right. I mean after all this effort people are only sixty six minutes a day. Which tells US something about ourselves? Yeah I mean well first of all it tells me that I have been trained to expect. Tax Returns Right. You know. We expecting huge numbers. And I I thought six minutes was nothing but when I went back to the scientists and researchers were who were advising me on this they I'm not joking. They laughed in my face. They were like who says six minutes isn't significant. And frankly like you know the fact that you got people to change their behavior at all over a week is extraordinary and listen to the stories because the stories will tell you so much more than any data can And that's what people told me. They told me stories about how they realize. They used to relax by playing their guitar and then they suddenly understood that they they hadn't played it in years or things bigger than that That people had sat down this thought. About what the family dynamics were and get to a better place in their relationship there were all these amazing stories that people told us and I thought you know what you're right. F The six minutes right. Get totally or like. Let's stop giving boredom such a bad rap. It actually is an extremely important human function that we are starting to just sort of breed out of our daily lives. And I I sort of look around and I see. There's lots of things like that Downtime eye contact conversations out loud where people stutter or make mistakes or take more than a quick. You know one hundred forty characters to figure out what they want to say. We've lost the capacity in many ways. I think for patients if we want to have excellent ideas the best ideas we need to let them take the time to take root and then blossom and that does not happen in a tap of a of an APP. We're humans we need. I'm and that's the one thing that our phones and it was more of that was me minutia. The new host of Ted Radio Hour talking to guy. Ross the old host Ted Radio Hour back in two thousand eighteen. You can see my full Ted talk on Ted Dot Com and we've got a new episode of the Ted Radio Hour for you coming this Friday..

Ted Dot Com Ted Dr Sandy man Ri researcher facebook Google US Dr Gloria Mark professor of Informatics Banke Ross