25 Burst results for "T. A. L. E. S"

6 staffers setting up for Trump rally positive for COVID-19

Ric Edelman

00:23 sec | 4 months ago

6 staffers setting up for Trump rally positive for COVID-19

"Just hours before the Tulsa Oklahoma rally started the trump campaign announced that six staff members who are helping set up the event had tested positive for covert nineteen campaign communications director Tamar tal says Corentin procedures were implemented and it neither the affected staffers nor anyone in immediate contact with them attended the

Tamar Tal Tulsa Oklahoma Director Corentin
"tal  e. s" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

04:13 min | 4 months ago

"tal e. s" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Get back to the real thing you know at least we're all trying to do something to keep. Keep the music happening out there. Something we'll keep the music flowing in some way. It just has to that I know. I WANNA. See Tall back on the road. And while I love those old guys, the immediate family, the section, those guys and what they accomplished. At least they have laurels, and probably some cashing around to get through all of this you know but tall and those like tall. Or just starting their journey as a solo artist you know she was about to hit the tour and probably be on the road forever as the workhorse she had already proven herself to be so it must be doubly hard for her. And this next generation of musicians that are coming up. You know their fucking lies on hold and for how long. I I worry you know, but at the same time you know and you know now listening to her show figure something out because let's face it. As you can tell from the interview. There's no plan B. for this girl. I wish her all the luck and look forward to what she does. Do because she is a rare talent. Okay next week is an interview with Director Jared barral and one of the stars in his new film who also acted as the musical director Alex Emmanuel. The films called the incoherence a movie about four fortysomethings each mired in some of Midlife Malays, that reunite their nineties indie rock band. It's never too late for a comeback. It's sweet and on a good family flick with cool music It can't beat it for cheap date night on the couch the incoherence has just been released on on demand, so you can go watch it now and get ready for the interview next week, so come back for that one all right, lastly Adam and Eve dot com. If you've got nothing better to do the. Digs at checkout. Get you free sexy stuff. And we all need more sexy stuff. Let me tell you. let me leave you with Ms Wilkin Feld tearing it up from her two thousand seven jazz fusion for A. With. A song called B. C.. Until then. You know what to do. Keep up the Rockin..

Director Jared barral Ms Wilkin Feld Adam director Alex Emmanuel
"tal  e. s" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

05:11 min | 4 months ago

"tal e. s" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Pleasure having you on deeper digs. Tell welcome Phil. Thanks for having me I really. Burden Bentsen. Thirteen! Thank you for the wonderful interview.

Phil
"tal  e. s" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

05:16 min | 4 months ago

"tal e. s" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"For anyone. You know to to recognize that you're not. You're not your thoughts. You're not your body, and not you not anything but. Awareness itself. Very interesting. It's a center at the centering technique. It keeps you. Present and keeps. You focused A. In. Remind you that you are. More than what you know this. Particular Body might be at this particular moment Yeah, we're not even necessarily more but. But. But just you that simply the the awareness it is. that is. In which all these other things arise. Thoughts and Whatnot! and. I guess I. It's different for for different people like some people want to just have meditation as. As a centering technique and other people. It's it's a a lifestyle. Meditation goes way beyond sitting in in a sudden position. Still it's you know meditation can be present. All the time pending upon. You know what the meditation is what you're focusing on. We're not focusing on. Yes it's. It's a really important part of my life and. In some traditions that will, they will say that awareness. That which is All these things arise. They is kind of akin to love and so. Love because I haven't really found myself EXP- explaining. The. This is pretty funny myself talking about it. I may stumble and trying to explain this, but That awareness is like. Putting. That that attention onto an object that. That is what love is. And so anyway, that's what kind of inspired the album title. everything or awareness and then. Consciousness, then love remains like only. Only loves remains. and. Is Is impermanent. And and also the the reason why was attracted to that title is because it can also mean. The and Almost opposite idea like the remnants of laws like failed love like which isn't really loves that it's an experience attachment to human so and that's kind of what my. The topic of my album. Is focused on. Yeah I hope I. I hope I made any kind of sense in the last five minutes. You did in the sense that we're all searching for meaning and artists like yourself help. To each of us to find what that means is I mean you know some of us are lucky enough to be able to. Take those lessons, and then express them. and some of US get a large microphone to or To do so and and and you. You've been able to do that and what you know. What better message can you give to humanity? Then you know a true authentic. Opening of yourself in the hopes that other people will take something positive from that experience. How's that running it back to you? I, love it. All Right? I have to ask even though. This is A. Question Mark for everybody on the planet right now, but what's next and When are we GONNA? See out there again..

US Mark
"tal  e. s" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

02:51 min | 4 months ago

"tal e. s" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Than next then that's what they're going to experience. Like I I didn't feel self conscious about that. I also didn't. Conscious about being on the stage with with legend, bitter three times my age, and and you know during the whole thing like, but you feel that way. And so I think it's just it's a choice to just sort of like. Be Present with people. As so to solve. And and that you're you're only experienced once you get on the stage. Because you're thinking about any of that other stuff, it's just to get in the way the music and the way of the communication between the other people. Even on your worst day. You're a bad motherfucker. Is your is your point, right? I'm not cheating by Aaron haunts. Anybody. Off Right right right but I'm saying we could make that choice to just like. Let all that those ideas go yeah. Yeah. All, right? Let's talk about staying seen in the age of Covid Nineteen, I understand. Do you use meditation? As your spiritual practice. Yeah. Talk a little bit. Is there a particular path you follow or is this your own? I I've I've studied many different kinds of meditation with different. People And I've actually found myself using different. Methods, depending upon the day, or or what what's needed and what's needed is something that I to it for myself. but yeah I have been. Trained in. PM and. Primordial sound and a Bu- a bunch of I mean. Quite a long list I've spent a Lotta time. In various kinds of monasteries, and It's just something that I've always been. Dedicated to. Exploring. And Yeah! It's a very personal thing like I. That that that is why I tend to just. Direct people to meditation, but not were kind of meditation, because it is such a personal thing, and and and different things appeal to different people, but you know the the the idea of seeing with yourself and allowing. Thoughts to to poss-. and. You know not not fighting the thoughts that arise, but but also just. Reminding itself to focus inward and. I think that's just a really important..

Aaron
"tal  e. s" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

04:30 min | 4 months ago

"tal e. s" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Yes. Supporting me in this way, and and he was also like really supportive of of my choice to work with coal. Stacey is my producer like he didn't like. A cool things. He got into the weeds of the album like like he did so much work. And Just You know it took some time just. Between each stage like I was saying, and he was there for me to like the whole time, so I'm really lucky to have like such supportive. People in my life, and you know same with the musicians that we're on the record them on Jeremy Blake. They were all like just really supportive and. Gave me the time if I needed to like talk about how recording to and out or Yeah they. They're just really good frets. Well. You're certainly deserving the the musical comradery alone. Is. is is worthy of any of these legends they. I'm sure recognize. This the incredible talent that that you are lucky enough to have it is. It is definitely a gift. I I've been a musician. My whole life, but I've had to work my ass off my whole life. This all just come so naturally to you. And I mean that in the best way. You are not only an incredible instrumentalists. Now you're incredible songwriter You're an incredible front person urine credible singer This guy is just. Unlimited for you and and I. Think all of these people legends. Themselves recognized that the the second they get. A glimpse of what it is, you're capable of doing. It often takes a Lotta luck. Get. And dedication, you know you said a couple of things. That need to isolate. And to practice your craft and work on it. Because as we know, you know, you may have you know all the talent of you know from the Gods, but you still have to hone. It is still have to work on it, and they're still You know people.

Gods Jeremy Blake Stacey producer
"tal  e. s" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

04:39 min | 4 months ago

"tal e. s" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Like. Continuing to work at towards where I could like, get back in the studio and record. Like a whole. And so I wanted to compose some more songs than I wanted to save up and so that was that just me like over a year to do that, and then I ended up recording more of it Towards the end of two thousand fourteen, and then and then I couldn't afford to like do I really wanted to do like strings and woodwinds on a couple of songs, but had to wait about another year. Do that and then I had to wait again to like mix and had to wait again then I then I did a pledge campaign to like help. Finish things off. Financially and like moss album, and do the work and all that kind of stuff and then I don't know if you know but like. Pledge ended up going bankrupt and so they. Pay Me Yeah Yeah, like yeah. So I got a little bit of the money, but like I didn't get. A huge chunk of the money, and so then I had to figure something else out, and then I ended up. I ended up getting a record deal with with BMG. And so! By the time I got the deal, and we did the paperwork to the deal that was like that took me to the end of two thousand eighteen, and so then it was like maybe September Timber Tober and I was like okay well. We'll put this out. In the beginning of two thousand nineteen, so like it just took forever with all the finances and this and that. You know if if I had like all the finances and whatnot, it could come out in. Two Thousand Fifteen Gavin. You know I think it was important to me to sort of go through that and learn into that of the business, and thankfully also got. To tour during those years playing those songs, even though the album wasn't done, which was really Nice, so I've gathered a lot of experience as a bandleader and as a side, woman and So really like. I feel like it's all been really productive. You know I mean I've been disheartening at times. Healing with some of the stresses of the industry whatnot, but like overall. I'm.

BMG
"tal  e. s" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

04:13 min | 4 months ago

"tal e. s" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"I started off as this thing right like like as I mentioned like when I first. Team against. How're it wasn't just like I WANNA? Do this forever, but it was also like me singing and writing songs like instantly and I kind of. Put that aside. Because I I wanted to focus on my instruments so that that felt like. You know almost like. Just as seamless as speaking English. Extension of your body, yeah. I wanted to catch up the guitar to like. Me, speaking which is sort of like a version of me, singing because the kind of songs that I was riding. Then it's not like. They need. Singer stuff it's. It's more like story telling. Stuff like my favorite thing is are. You. The time like Jimi Hendrix was was one of my favorite. Singers. And instrumentalists and. It's he. He never thought of himself as a singer. They keep out of himself as like a storyteller like. That's why I love Bob Dylan Leonard Cohen. Simon and I mean the list goes on, but Be Your! Grades Right there. I yeah, So so I wanted to focus on my instrument, but then you know as I began to focus on my instruments, I realized just how much there was to focus on how many different avenues could go down to sort of? Get to know the instrument, and that's what attracted me to to go to New York into jazz as a ways to like. Understand my instruments from different angles. but then eventually like I just started missing. The the writing of songs and lyrics. And and I wanted to sort of. Get back to my roots in a sense. So back to back to the beginning when you were fourteen, and you picked up the guitar, and you knew instantly that this is what you wanted to do for the rest of your life, your your education was in mastering your instrument first and then going back to your songwriting so that that would support. A. An incredible foundation to build your songwriting upon. Yeah I mean I I didn't I don't know if I. Had It all completely mapped out in my head I was just kind of going with. What I- intuited was right to me at at each point in my career. And this is where I've landed. Good landing, good landing, and I think the the album love means. Took took several years to to kind of put together. There's ten songs on it I think I started working on it. in two thousand thirteen. Is that right? I did working then the reason that took as many years as it did was. Not Because of the recording process 'cause the whole recording process was like ten days in the studio. the the thing that took a while. Is that I was funding it myself? And, so I went in the studio, and just tried like for one day and tried a couple of songs corner. Painter was one of them and then. The song didn't end up on the record and when I went in. And recorded that with pull stacy was was producing with me, and I had his brother Jeremy Stacey playing drums and Blake Mills. Who's playing guitar and when I heard that sound? Back from the speakers I was like well. This is this is what the whole album should be like I. Love this vibe. Of these musicians! And and then.

Jimi Hendrix Simon Bob Dylan Leonard Cohen stacy Jeremy Stacey New York Blake Mills
"tal  e. s" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

04:00 min | 4 months ago

"tal e. s" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Bolero and then like Jimmy walks out. Then we just busted the immigrant song and changed the tempo, and then, and then we'll change in temperature back and go an end. WE LL arrogance and like. And, they both agreed to do it like spontaneously, but like nobody was with them and so. We all like nobody told anybody else that we were going to do that and we'd already done soundcheck, so they were all prepared for it to be defects Bolero. And meanwhile jets gets hot check was was also playing a twelve string acoustic to just sort of sadden up the sound, and he was kind of doing it from side stage checking for Jeff's, and so he know about it. All of a sudden well like playing. Baseball and we go into like immigrant song and. Apparently like just to manage, told told us that like the tech almost like Shatin. Pass like what is going on. He's just like stopped flying. A laughing, because also like nobody expected it, so it was really. Yeah. Thinking about? Getting Immigrant Song. Yeah, pretty amazing all right? Let's get into the present new album a very very different from the first album. In fact, Ame- light years apart you may, you may disagree, and and you may be telling me in the next five minutes why they're so similar, but you know it's. It's interesting this is this is a songwriter's album as opposed to the first time, which is very much an instrumentalists album, and in fact it's it's all an instrumental album, so why the shift? How tell tell us about that journey? Because it is, there is a long time I think. The first album comes out in two thousand five. Is that right and? The new album now just now in two thousand in one, thousand, nine, a or tooth. I'm sorry. Two Thousand Twenty came out last month. I think I think my first one came out in two thousand seven and then I. Think this one came out exactly a year ago in March of two, thousand, nine, hundred ninety, but I. But I. Only just put out a video a week ago for one of the songs on it, so it's this. Come out. Oliver again. Yeah yeah, it's. An okay, so so let's first. Let's let's let me let me ask again. Why the shift and how did that go from you? You know. Being so dedicated to being a you know A. You know I hate to use the term prodigy, but you know a genius, Bass player and I mean that in all sense of the words tall. You're you you. You have this way of plane. That conveys of more emotion than most people are able to get out of there. Just solely instrument, I mean there's a reason why people gravitate to songs because the voice everybody's got one of those everybody can see themselves in that, and if you know if your lyrics are universal, they can see themselves in the lyrics. So there's there's usually an emotional connection that whereas you know. Most people don't quite get the music. They appreciate it. They know it. They feel the beat or what have you, but they're not going to be able to pick out. You know somebody that you know just stands. Head and shoulders above the others, and yet you do as an instrumentalist, but but yet you're packing that behind now, and I'm not saying that you're going to go away from that completely, but but into a singer songwriter, which is really know the center of the music world. So how do you do that? How does how does somebody do go from that to do this next and be able to successfully do that?.

jets Jimmy Baseball Ame Jeff Oliver
"tal  e. s" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

05:54 min | 4 months ago

"tal e. s" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Like a one time he like just showed up to I had like a little potty. Recording party is my friends. and he just showed up instead of jamming with US surely fun. Good Guy. Oh? Yeah, yeah, he always comes across as a bit of a cartoon character of, but just you know the life of the party if there ever is a party Yeah, yeah, he prevette like literally. Literally. And interestingly. The opposite is you also worked with? Our dearly departed prints. Yeah. That must've been interesting the opposite of Steven Tyler Right. I mean Y- everyone their own individual. I don't even know about like. It's kind of. Either A or B, but there's too many like infinite possibility so. I I don't know I. Don't know how to compare prince to anybody. Thank you I. Don't think we can compare prints just about anybody, but did you. Did you tour with him? Or did you just plan on a couple of tracks? Or what? What? What was your engagement with with the Purple One? we. We made bike I. Don't know maybe like two tracks together He called me up and asked me to. Find Him Drummer. He wanted to make a new band like a trio with me and a drummer and and he trusted me to choose someone. that that resonated with me so like kind of. Audition people. Without telling them what they were auditioning for. And And, then you know what? I think a few at a ready gone to his place in La. A few times been jammed within their He he does had like a couple of Toddy, and they went to, and like a few times that I just I remember one time. I went over there and like he just wanted to drive around. In a Limo, listening to music, and like kind of kind of like a experience to like. What I did with Anthony. Jackson just like Oh. What do you think this? What do you think you this? What did the speak you? Yeah we did that. He's he was testing you. He was testing your knowledge and your musicality. With that I Don I didn't feel like a test. You felt like he was just asking me if I like. If I liked something or resume. Maybe he was I duNNo. If it were already working together, so yeah. He does we just I just wanted to like. Enjoy listening to music I think. What and stuff and.

Anthony US Steven Tyler Jackson Toddy La
"tal  e. s" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

04:51 min | 4 months ago

"tal e. s" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Of. During cause we've ended as loved or it's. He's like just pointed to me like Solo, and so I started soloing on that song and And I. Guess Doug it because he kept that in the set your week, he has done before. It was just kind of a spontaneous thing, but then that turned into part of the show, and then when I. Went into crossroads that was. That was part of the show. You know. Yeah, that's the part of the show. We all remember where at this is the crossroads concert in Chicago? I think it was two thousand seven, if I remember right and. And you know Yeah Jeff Hands it over to you. You do this based Solo that causes everybody who's ever seen it to just. Well to use your story shit their pants. And even. Jeff just bows in awe of of your greatness. right then, and and it's all welcome. Welcome field welcome to the Big Leagues Day I mean. One of my. One of my favorite moments, I think was like right after like the we played our set like I walked off stage, and like Bill Murray lifted me up like almost like like trout, dad like. That's like it's on the on the end of the DVD like. That was just so fun. I BET! And then through that. You've played with Jeff. I think you've played with him. Two thousand seven to two thousand thirteen. Is that about right? Yeah something like that. Yeah Sagan's fourteen fifty, I don't know because we done like gathered things as well like even after like I had to leave the band like we still do things for like we did SNL I. Don't remember what year that was. That was two thousand. Fifteen that would make Jagger. I remember when that was, but we. We still have doing one off things even when I wasn't touring. So, but yeah, I mean we still in touch. That's good. That's good and then a couple other people. Just WanNa. Bring that you've played with. Herbie Hancock, in Montrose that that was pretty incredible like that. Oh. Thank. Yeah I mean. That was incorrect. It was it wasn't a the first time I play with then with actually when I went to go and film Ronnie, Scott's with Jeff which was into the also thousand seven about four months after the crossroads. GIG.

Jeff Hands Doug Bill Murray Herbie Hancock Chicago Jagger SNL Sagan Ronnie Montrose Scott
"tal  e. s" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

03:52 min | 4 months ago

"tal e. s" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"So so me and Anthony as he became kind of like a mentor to me, and so we'd like once a week. We'd like the student his car for hours, but it's funny, because like apparently like everybody. Knows Anthony like has spent so much with him sitting in his car like it's just a thing burn. but we just sit in his car, and like we analyze records together like we didn't really sit with bases in hand more than once to like an hour. Every other thing was like well, can you? Can you see how when he played on the upbeat on the base, and then he left that base there. Can you see how that impacted the course like yeah. Now if I hadn't have done that, then guitarist would have done this. We'd go into this full analysis of records and that. SORTA, Kinda like it just opened up my my ears in in a in a in a really awesome way and and also he was just kind of like. You. Know kind of like a mascot for me like he was. He comes to my shows like I. Stop Playing in clubs in New York, and he would come to these these shows and sit in the front row, and like the really supportive of me, and like if I was ever like upset after a show like that I felt like I could have done better or whatever he'd be like. Now now, listen tell as Steve. Gadd used to tell me. On your worst day. You're still ups. Bad motherfucker. Yes. I believe I believe you've taken that to heart, yes. You'll have to. You have to beat that out, but no. But. Yeah, that was he would. Often it was so sweet he's. He was really yeah, really amazing supporter of me. You gotTa Graham and amendment I'm one of my favorite musicians, so that's pretty lucky and then Wayne Krantz. You know it's always a huge fan. I. I started playing with him and like he ended up playing on my record transfer making a record. Yeah, so. An advocacy was the one that's Kinda of like connected me with Pete. Who played drums on the record right? Yeah, it was really right, right, which which transformation by the way folks this one hundred and eighty degrees from the new record. Or what you may have expected seeing a tall play with Jeff back or. Various other of rock luminaries. This is a very traditional type of jazz album out there in in in some ways, it ends up being resume. For you to play with Korea right. Yeah and Jeff. And like this recording of me with the allman brothers. Like I had is kind of like things to send people off. Yeah, so so the the album itself and. I think the allman brothers show was recorded as well and then that kind of got on On some sort of video or that started tape trading around if I remember right. Yeah. Yeah..

Anthony Jeff allman Wayne Krantz Gadd New York Steve Korea Pete Ta Graham
"tal  e. s" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

03:35 min | 4 months ago

"tal e. s" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"You got nothing but time till this is the time master drums now. You know I sort of I I've become so focused on composition. More than playing any instrument like the instrument is to me as now just become a vehicle. To compose. But I do love playing the drums His a quick word from her sponsors. We'll be back in a bit. And now back to the program. Yeah, but but base I mean that's our first introduction to you you. You pick this thing up. And I think. I think I've read that you. You learned it in a couple of weeks, and there was competition, and you won the competition or something like that. And we'RE GONNA competent. It was that was a drum clinician coming to the school and at the time I've been playing for a couple of months. Oh? This is how you meet Vinnie Kelly you too right. Yeah Yeah, because there was like a competition, I mean not a competition. No was like. The clinician came and One of the The head people the school like. Can you pick your favorite bassist and guitarist to accompany this guy and He picked me and the guitars and then. when when his name's Vito the drummer so when Vito came to the school? he's like so. What do you WanNa play and like the Qatar? EST was like well. Why don't we one of tall songs because? I was already writing. These kind of like. You know odd, Mater. Fusion songs and New Drummer was you know likes to play that kind of music and jazz and stuff, and so we played like one of my songs I mean I think played like a jazz blues. I figure I. Remember it being an F. Two I just like I. Remember I remember it quite well the day. And so And then he was like really good friends with me, and so he introduced me to him and. I've been playing for a couple of months and. was very was very shy at that age and nervous around musicians that I. Have too much respect for. Right But then I like I moved to New York like within like a couple of months because I wanted to focus on. On Jazz and that was the best place. I never yeah. Yeah, yeah La doesn't have the jazz scene that New York does. Yeah, so I didn't end up getting to play with any bit like we were like well, let's play you know sometime and so then I went to New York like I was fascinated with Wayne, krantz and I would go every day to the fifty five. And watch him play and Anthony. Jackson was also playing the bass, and so I went up and like when I went to Anthony Jackson like he's like. Oh, I've already heard about you. Have you heard about me. He's like Oh. Yes. Enriches our told me about you Lee? Written our tells. In folks just just just just so you know we're talking tall is eighteen at this point. When she moved to New, York, in his getting involved with all these folks are I talk Oh head..

New York Anthony Jackson Vito Vinnie Kelly Qatar krantz La Lee Wayne
"tal  e. s" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

04:00 min | 4 months ago

"tal e. s" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"I mean. I it's difficult. It was difficult because. Obviously, there was no safety net. If this went wildly wrong. I wouldn't have had a high school diploma. College diploma. But I was such a driven I guess teenager The her me like I. Just couldn't see any other options like I really just couldn't. I very very mono focused on music and. And so I guess I just went with it. And they went with it. No Plan B.. Is. And I've heard that many times from from the legends of that I've spoken to is in the end there's just there's just no plan. B. This this is this is it doesn't happen I. Don't know what my life would would be like, and it sounds like you fit into that category as well. So you, and and again like I feel like every musician in the world, right now is is reassessing their lives I mean actually. Every human is because of this. Catastrophe and You know like. It's a great opportunity to be creative right now to really great opportunity It's it's You know. Financially it's a whole different story. Like who who can survive this? I don't know we don't know. HOW LONG IT LASTS! I know. Canceled to. Kill like early next year it. So. For people that like. Have a career in touring. I must be incredibly frustrating for you. You just release this album that you've been working on for a long time. you're about ready to really make a name for yourself, and now you're kind of stopped dead in your tracks. I can't imagine the frustration you must deal. I mean I'm not really that frustrated I'm just like. Trying to make the most of and like make a lot of music now. I just it's just stressful more than anything. It's like it's financially stressful, not just the major, but all of my friends and we're trying to help each other and support each other and. Just It's a stressful time. I wouldn't say I'm like frustrated. or how could you really be angry about it so so much out of control like? It just kind of here's what it is. So if touring is off until twenty twenty one, you know. I guess I just have to ask. Where do you see the music business? For the next twelve to eighteen months, but what can we definitely Yeah, definitely. GonNa be streaming concerts, online lessons and masterclasses. a lot of composing a lot of Reno releasing music that you make by by yourself, which honestly has been happening for the loss. Seven years or so anyway more than it ever has because you know the music industry. has less to offer financially so more people are making music in their own home studios than ever before. and and so people have already started to make more of an income like dry, their youtube, channel and whatnot..

youtube Reno
"tal  e. s" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

01:48 min | 4 months ago

"tal e. s" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"This one is also special for me. 'cause I've been working with pleasant game in here now for eight months to put this all in place and as expected. She has created a real winner. Rock and Roll and the occult have gone hand in hand ever since it was rumored that Robert Johnson sold his soul to the devil. Hollywood icon and and roll, which pleasant game takes you to the dark depths, music and Heathen Hedonism meet the occult. These are no-holds-barred conversations with famous and infamous guests. That includes a stories at believe me seem to be true I've heard him. They seem to be true, but they are. Until, you realize there's no way they could be made up right right right from backstage touring debauchery to Taro. Synchronicity and sex magic to wild paranormal experiences. I'm telling you. This show will bring your demons out to play hop into the hot rod. Baby were on a highway to hell with pleasant Gaiman. All right we will be announcing even more new shows in the weeks ahead, so stay tuned lots of big surprises for. Out there all the music all the time here at Pantheon podcasts. Okay thanks to our Patriots on patrons. The Pantheon. On patrons who say that three times we sincerely appreciate those that give help in that way. If you are interested, please visit Patriot, Dot Com backslash rock and roll podcast. Hey. If you want some rock.

Robert Johnson Hollywood Gaiman
"tal  e. s" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

01:36 min | 4 months ago

"tal e. s" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Group, the new math with one and has collaborated with artists, including d styles and Motion Man David. Ma is a writer editor and journalist whose work has appeared in publications like Wax Poetic. The Guardian Red Bull Music Academy in is the founder of audio blog notorious. NOTORIOUS DOT COM nate Leblanc is a record collector who worked as the.

"tal  e. s" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

03:52 min | 4 months ago

"tal e. s" Discussed on Pantheon

"So so me and Anthony as he became kind of like a mentor to me, and so we'd like once a week. We'd like the student his car for hours, but it's funny, because like apparently like everybody. Knows Anthony like has spent so much with him in his car like it's just a thing burn. but we just in his car, and like we analyze records together like we didn't really sit with bases in hand more than once to like an hour. Every other thing was like well, can you? Can you see how when he played on the upbeat on the base, and then he left that base there. Can you see how that impacted the course like yeah. Now, if I hadn't have done that, then guitarist would have done this. We'd go into this full analysis of records and that. SORTA Kinda like it just opened up my my ears in in a in a in a really awesome way and and also he was just kind of like. You know kind of like a mascot for me like he was. He comes to my shows like I. Stop Playing in clubs in New York and he would come to these these shows and sit in the front row, and like the really supportive of me, and like if I was ever like upset after a show like that. I felt like I could've done better or whatever he'd be like. Now now listen tell as Steve Gadd used to tell me. On your worst day. You're still ups. Bad motherfucker. S. I believe I. Believe you've taken that to heart, yes. You'll have to. You'll have to beat that out, but no. But yeah, that was he would. Often it was so sweet he's. He was really yeah, really amazing supporter of me. You gotTa Graham and amendment I'm one of my favorite musicians, so that's pretty lucky and then Wayne Krantz. You know it's always a huge fan. I I started playing with him, and like he ended up playing on my record transfer making a record. Yeah, so. An advocacy was the one that's Kinda of like connected me with Pete collar, who played drums on the record right? Yeah, it was really right, right, which which transformation by the way folks this one hundred and eighty degrees from the new record. Or what you may have expected seeing a tall play with Jeff back or. Various other of rock luminaries. This is a very traditional type of jazz album out there in in in some ways, it ends up being resume. For you to play with Korea, right. Yeah and Jeff. And like this recording of me with the allman brothers. Like I had is kind of like things to send people off. Yeah, so so the the album itself and. I think the allman brothers show was recorded as well and then that kind of got on On some sort of video or that started tape trading around if I remember right. Yeah. Yeah, yeah, yeah, and and just everybody knows so you met Oh -til, a and Who was the bass? Player of the allman brothers at the time now, deadandcompany. and. Derek and Derek trucks right, and and somehow they invite you to the show and a you're gonNA. You're just GONNA get up at Madison Square Garden and Employee Base Right. Well the beacon theater..

allman Anthony Jeff Steve Gadd Derek Madison Square Garden Wayne Krantz Pete collar New York Korea Ta Graham
Early results from Moderna coronavirus vaccine trial show participants developed antibodies against the virus

First Light

01:39 min | 5 months ago

Early results from Moderna coronavirus vaccine trial show participants developed antibodies against the virus

"The hour so the Great Awakening is underway now is we try to get the Kinks out of the American muscle you know it's going to be a long process and as the country begins to re emerge from life in lockdown one thing is crucial to long term taming of the corona virus and that of course is finding an effective vaccine one company says it may be a step closer to protecting people from that virus Karen Kaiser reports Dr tal Zaks chief medical officer of the drug manufacturer Madera says they are seeing promising results in human trials really good news for us and everybody that's been watching for this day the biotech company in partnership with the national institutes of health measured antibodies in eight people in vaccinated then all eight developed neutralizing antibodies these antibodies were proven to be able to unlock the ability of the virus to infect so we are already seeing an immune response at the level of people who've been infected with this virus and are believing out not to be susceptible to further disease origin but we still don't know if people who have been infected with the virus are immune from it in the future so it's not clear whether vaccination will provide total immunity so far Madonna has vaccinated between sixty and one hundred participants starting in July the company plans to begin to conduct large scale clinical trials which typically consist of tens of thousands of people if those studies are successful the company hopes to have a vaccine on the market between January and June of next year this is really a very first important step available for the people who need it the most as researchers work at lightning fast speeds medical experts caution it may be some time before it could be nineteen vaccine is

Karen Kaiser Medical Officer Madera Madonna Dr Tal Zaks
Vocalis Health CEO Tal Wenderow

The Voicebot Podcast

02:26 min | 6 months ago

Vocalis Health CEO Tal Wenderow

"County. Health is actually an Israeli. Start up with our in the clinical de Science in Israel headquarters out of the Boston area. High actually leaving Newton outside of Boston and what we're doing can think you know that vocal by Maka right so we analyzing the voice and we collate that to disease symptoms and conditions and what happened is Which not only we walk in disruptive area by trying to learn and teach democracy new vocal about a mock we kind of disruptive ways so two point two full months ago a we merged two Israeli startups beyond verbal. Health is for both do in the vocal biomarker space to foam vocalists company which is not a trivial thing to do to get to startups together. That each one they can change the world. Come to the realization. I cannot do it by myself right with. Find the right partner to do that right. But it's all about people so Mike Mike Partner in crimes shoddy facilities actually physician that he was the CEO of Elsa mice and we're both raising money and we met not together but we met in Israeli one of the leading Israeli. He'll stick fun named Aimal Alot. Nda distractedly decided to enter voice face in healthcare but there are looking for the right company. And the Roy. Who's chairman of the board right now? Said we don't know which one to pick if you merge invest in both of you. Yeah sure that's not a big deal. So so so. That's why he's sounds like it's not a big deal but it's usually. It is a big deal. It is a big real so that was probably June shoddy and I. We met two days later on a good cup of Espresso couple of Russell. In four weeks later we presented to investment committee and then a fortune lawyers to cover. It took US another three months to close but we were done after. One are right because it makes sense. It's not just because we got the money. We can do to realization one. If we don't match we'RE GONNA compete with it right so you know it's it's

CEO Israel Boston Partner Mike Mike Maka Newton United States Chairman Russell
Ethiopia skips latest US talks with Egypt over dam dispute

BBC Newshour

00:43 sec | 8 months ago

Ethiopia skips latest US talks with Egypt over dam dispute

"Ethiopia says it will not take part in what was expected to be the final round of talks with Egypt and Sudan about a Jon dam it is building on the river Nile calculate on your bell tal reports from Addis Ababa the talks will do to increase the formal signing of a deal reached by officials from Ethiopia Egypt and Sudan earlier this month but they feel pending litigation now says it wants to go the ministry of water irrigation and energy save the negotiation team had not yet finished consulting stakeholders I told the ministry has not said when or even if if your pet would return to the talks but it's since we pose yet another delay to reaching a resolution over the grand renaissance

Ethiopia Egypt Jon Dam Addis Ababa Sudan River Nile
Waking From The Dream With Dr. Kirsten Van Heerden

9INE POINT Started With A Dream Podcast w/ Jacolby Gilliam

08:21 min | 9 months ago

Waking From The Dream With Dr. Kirsten Van Heerden

"So the question that everyone that Oh come on it? When you're younger has an athlete will bigger than the gold you went to achieve? It's an interesting question that when I was young athlete and often talk to people about this and and say I was not one of those athletes. That's when I was young dreamed of being Olympic athletes. I think I just if I'm honest. I love swimming and I was super competitive additive so I swam. 'cause everybody just loved it and I was obviously That even from Gina level at school and I just love love being in the water and I'm super competitive in whatever ideas that kind of suited me and they just found my way within that then of course as a status train hard it was probably in just entered. High School is around twelve twelve and I decided to stop doing the sports. I used to do a little bit odd gymnastics until I grew six toll. I can't gymnastics to told to do it. I did a bit of basketball okay of Naples but of high jump but you as a win. It's too high school. I really try something. That was the thing that I wanted to do and really became focused on that from Yasser around twelve eighteen years of age End of mates genius African teens and progressed to some senior African team so my career kind of just suppose it flowed from nats and it was really just something to say. I love to end enjoyed competing in flow going on that. Have you find flamingos by one day being fined the pool one day. Anything I love this. I'm actually a mismatch and so when I was younger the young kid. The doctors That she takes me swimming because is being is pretty good for asthma. Actually a lot of Zuma's that I know have have esmer's well and so. She decided to take some swimming lessons. I have all the brother and he was going at the same time so I think it was convenient for her to take together. So y'all got into. It's probably from the age of roundabouts three. I was in the pool and really as I got in. I just remember accidentally loving being in the water and something that kind of came naturally as foes and we would spend some. I remember my my brother and I in the neighborhood children in our swimming pool and pain gains. And you're running around crazy. Certain has always been around horror and then we would have cepal days we would have family holidays at the beach McCain from the ages of love being in the water at the beach each say something to say from the Seemed seven affinity full. Lucky could I had asthma too. And my day run more doc icon. Brenham come out of it and now they okay. We'll get they're gonNA run so when you started kind of seeing you Kinda went all in on the Fleming economist at age twelve and Says at what point did you say I wanNA take this to be the next web for me. You almost around about that age. Say as I got into grade eight at high school in the the middle of great eight assay ahead some decisions to make around various different sports. I thought to myself at that point. You know what I couldn't imagine myself is carrying on gymnastics. I'd go into the provincial cuts for its net end soon with Nipple Hijab but I thought to myself you know when I finished school I can really see myself carrying on swimming. That was the one thing that I really love. And so has steadily from say probably that middle of great age. It was a conscious decision that this was something that I really wanted to do. And then by the end of Grade Eight said made my fist acid African junior team. And so I suppose I kind of got rewards straight away. Wait for that decision which was great because okay this on the right path yet and every year after that I was fortunate enough to make a team to travel whether whether it was to Europe or the states or something like that and compete and so getting those kinds of awards for your hard work really motivated me to keep going and keep the suing it. Sometimes when we these like at a young age we know it can not either you know give of competent world or you know kind of backfire on though so for you. What kind of cup? Humble you know an offensive you know you achieve great thing but always More work be done better. Yeah I I think there were a number of Vista. I think my family kicked my feet on the ground and I'm always incredibly grateful for that. You know when I was at home. It was very much you simply Chris. We don't care what swimming team rewritten you. Part of the family things that you need to do here so they say my family rarely did kind of keep my feet on the ground and as much as I say that I made some African something teams which I did. I was never travelling overseas. And being the best in the world from straightaway and even in South Africa. You know there was some competitive. The report. me so I think you had to in maybe at school level. It's a little bit easier into into the higher levels and other that had quite hard to beat the goal that was in front of me. I'm going to make the teams and you go the season. You realize WHOA. I'm at be good inside Africa but I'm not that great internationally and because of my competitive nature I think that was just kicked me pushing me motivation to push further rally and yes. The safe was both of those things in my family instrumental. Tremain Tal in just helping. Keep me grounded said lots of friends I think as well that were nonstop is unknown athletes. And she's saying to someone earlier today in the best possible way. I didn't really care about you. Know as it was really fantastic that you could go and just hang on him and not have to be kissed in the summit you could it just via self. I love the Laflin because he kriton yourself having a lot of time. You know like we don't really like her last call that we have to call them in our did any of being you know Kobe. The athletes Stand your kristen. Yeah exactly it has sometimes. Yeah people don't even know your name that would just use is a summer where you're the one at school is being called from the stage for example in assemblies and that you get whatever crisis that might be and as much as it was great right your identity entity can become wracked at the net. And I think all athletes union was the soft place to land this alternative world because the world of elite sport can actually be pretty cautioned. Tough and you need this other world that you can just be a selfish and self worth as well you know for me. And I'm sure we'll get onto this. You know not drawing that Ernie from my formats and the swimming pool being able to see self worth a posh from that and you hang out with friends that disliked you for you because you were doing one on the swimming pool thousand South I learned the hard way got hurt my tomato and along the athlete and I saw how the world kind of shifted for me a little bit. You know the longer no the guy like just another do not like oh different world at this way absolute is trying to figure that out and again talk a fad at old figured out. That didn't they. Were certainly times way. It was incredibly difficult when I didn't make team why didn't perform well. It's taught not enjoy yourself with from that it's hard not to see yourself as that and actually it was just off to school. I had qualified qualified for the Commonwealth Games. And Americans know the Commonwealth Games up all the Commonwealth countries are involved end. It's quite a major event and I'd qualified for it but some Africa have a standard way you have to make the qualifying time in the final at nationals and had been in the week eating up to the nationals. I didn't make time and I remember being completely devastated that a hedonist made the Commonwealth Games and it was almost a sense at that point of the second was who am. I haven't made this team. I say I remember so clearly thinking and family will love me but I had to go until my friends at this is what had happened and and your moment's started to realize that I couldn't only see myself as kristen head to also really make sure that I was seeing myself as someone else

Asthma High School Brenham Africa Basketball Yasser Fleming South Africa Europe Swimming Zuma Kristen Mccain Tremain Tal Nats Naples Esmer Chris
Jewish people from around the world gather to celebrate the first night of Hanukkah

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:45 sec | 10 months ago

Jewish people from around the world gather to celebrate the first night of Hanukkah

"A gathering of Holocaust survivors at the western wall in Jerusalem today marking Hanukkah and history and in the distance a gathering at the the western western wall wall hundreds hundreds of of Holocaust Holocaust survivors survivors are are also also taking taking part part in in a a candle candle lighting lighting of of the the Honda Honda come come in in all all right right in in New New York York Munich Munich and and Moscow Moscow Collette Collette abi abi tal tal is is the chairperson of the center of Holocaust survivor organizations in Israel on why they gather tried to make the local survivors those are with us today bring them some the eight day festival of lights symbolizes the tribe of light over darkness and of democracy over

Jerusalem Honda New New York York Munich Munic Israel Moscow Moscow Collette Eight Day
Holocaust survivors mark Hannukah at Western Wall

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 10 months ago

Holocaust survivors mark Hannukah at Western Wall

"All and in the distance a gathering at the western wall hundreds of Holocaust survivors are also taking part in a candle lighting of the Honda come in all right in New York Munich and Moscow Collette abi tal is the chairperson of the center of Holocaust survivor organizations in Israel on why they gather tried to make the local survivors those are with us today bring them some light the eight day festival of lights symbolizes the triumph of light over darkness and of democracy over tyranny I surely antler

Honda Israel New York Munich Collette Abi Tal Eight Day
"tal  e. s" Discussed on Go Beyond Disruption

Go Beyond Disruption

14:42 min | 1 year ago

"tal e. s" Discussed on Go Beyond Disruption

"The accounting and finance professional and help you stay ahead of the curve whatever sector you work in I'm Kyle Hannan and I'm base the EPA and seem office in the heart of help us understand what that's all about we'll be talking to expert guests Marcia Tell Marcia is the CEO of toll solutions she's the founder of the positivity tech login platform and she is an expert on data so she'll be giving us the inside track getting real financial value from a much better understanding of listening to the voice of customers how do that in new ways and how to use that approach to get new insights to be telling us about this platform cheese helping which helps make this all easier what Marshall do is give some new understandings of how financial institutions can make betsy use of that customer to explore the predictive capabilities of enterprise data advance analytics we'll hear about how her positively tech platform helps these institutions to identify and then implement new revenue generating opportunities which impact the bottom line and that to you and me means Prophet and lost and then she'll be talking us from the piano to the yeah I how to utilize artificial intelligence and machine learning to reveal unexpected opportunities in customer complaints new so then tell us about how accounting and finance professionals can go beyond disruption by leveraging information from individual customers and doing some quite unexpected the use of things with it and of course because it is cybersecurity mouth we might ask how we can make sure that data's kept safe if anyone knows it's Marsha so this plenty of valuable insights on the way and of course once you've listened to this episode you can explore links and get other information and the show notes which accompany it and you'll find those in the podcast using so let's get started with this week's conversation Marcia where you joining us from today High Kyle I'm in New York City give us a sense of are you sitting or you two thirds of the way up a skyscraper are you in a Brownstone what's your view like at the moment and actually sitting in my office my offices are in Long Island city queens switches right over the Queensboro bridge from midtown Manhattan talking of us let me give people an overview of what you're all about we've said that you the the visionary the the CEO the person's put this positively tech intelligent platform together your own background comes from a long time spent consumer banking as I understand it new spent you career where voice of consumers meets advanced analytics now to me I'm not expert in it but fortunately you are and you gave that expertise working in the decision management's department I believe of city groups you exited vice president of decision management and that's what you built and ran a global function bringing advanced analytics capabilities to thirty countries Sir let's get started with what I might have left out about gee what else he working out today one of the things that I find most important in my work is really to raise the voices of your customers and for businesses to understand that they have this most value ripple asset in their customers voice and the idea though is that you really need to be able to listen and listening to your customers Alert in your customers complaints can become a critical part of your success my goal is to help organizations understand that they would look at complaints not as drain on resources but actually as a critical source of information that can be used to power their success in proactively strength in business so how do you go about doing that the I the way I've approached this is I've thought about customer complaints as a date asset almost as a portfolio and at the same time with using advanced technologies to reveal within the customer customers voices the customers narrative unexpected opportunities with finding hidden pieces of information that are helping us to direct titular actions that organizations can take in order to help keep them ahead of the competition. Masha this is in many ways the script because many people tend to ignore customer complaints to one side but you saying that this is something companies up until now haven't really understood can actually in an acid instead of my ability what I'm saying is that the way in which organizations today are listening to and responding their customer complaints because they are there's a lot of focus on this topic but they're doing it almost by the ones as a transaction so happening is for every customer complaint that comes in an organization is responding in some way to it however what happens as a result of that response in the exchange that takes place in the conversation the takes place in the information that the customers sharing is not something that's really being explored further in conjunction with the way other customers are discussing the issues that are bothering them so if you imagine for example that the way in which organizations address customer complaints usually is in their operations organizations and we are doing this as a set of important transactions what we're doing is we're taking a step back we're integrating all of that information we understand that it's not only what each customer is telling you but it's what all of your customers at telling you and the way in which we're doing that is we have basically a four step process will trying to understand first we're trying to identify actually what are the early warnings of these complaints what are the pain points that can be illuminated then we're trying to understand these complaints through the use of keywords that providing deeper meaning into the complaints that the organization is receiving and then we're using as you said earlier different type of advanced analytic techniques to predict uncover what triggers there are that are going to help you identify those complaints before they happen alternately culminating in prevention where we're really trying fine to recommend the specific actions that will eliminate future complaints by linking it back to the financial impact that type of an issue or complaint white so that see if I've got this right so you identify you understand you predict a new prevent which is seems perfectly logical but you're saying that up until now there hasn't really been a full appreciation of how will that can be tight together to actually take all of these and really point them what a customer is actually able to tell business about how they can do things better but this is not simply looking at what's just happened you you're saying this can help you look ahead you you said that this can help you must see the future was just footsie future complaints in that causes tell us talking about platform does that I will and maybe as you had given the introduction to my background one of the things that will say is that oftentimes there's a common approach to how you actually use your data right and how you actually analyze your data for the purpose of of a prediction and prevention so these steps that you just described I described such as identify understand predict prevent this is really entire framework this is an approach to how you work with your data around specific issues and in this particular case we are abusing this framework in this approach to analyze customer voices that are coming into an organization Shen we have focused on the complaint aspect of these customers voices and we are using data therefore to go through the process identification understanding predict and prevent and in regard to foreseeing future complaints the way in which we do this is we've actually been wrote scores Predictive Algorithms and we've done this round key pain points that we understand organizations are struggling with I such pain points might be account closure so oftentimes I think you would understand that as customers complained you would worried that the account would close so we looked to see the relationship between these types of complaints future account closure we also look to see the relationship of these complaints to different types of enforcement actions or regulatory actions are lost suits that can come as a result of these complaints in the way we do this as we look to identify the severity of the complaint in combination with the volume with a number of complaints that you're receiving so that one would only sink that if you have a few complaints it's not a big deal it actually hand be a big deal and the way in which we do that as we've predicted with we've created our own proprietary severity score we do that based on the again language using natural language processing using different types of techniques and from those types of of techniques table to assess the severity of a complaint and then address what actions need to be taken in the future of this stems directly from work for example at Citi Group where you built up this core expertise of data infrastructure ending that with advanced analytic capability he's you've done that in the context of large financial services operations so has that changed at all or you still focusing on a particular sector and things that I've learned over the course of my career is the ability to transfer best practices so there are I used to have a way that I would uh-huh explained to the teams right that a lot of the work that we do is common but then there's definitely work that's unique and the idea of driving officiant let's see within the space of advanced capabilities is really understand what areas or common what are the techniques and the approaches in these frameworks are common across many different types of applications and then what is it that makes this particular application unique so that is the type of work Sir I do today within financial services and then the focus that I have positively tack on the positivity Tech Platform in building this really consider be an entire ecosystem is really about this idea of taking that framework of of the way in which you uncover these different communities and applying it to voice and narrative data without even bringing in other behavioral data at this point threaten your bottom line but the bet you do with them the more you're able to gain insights from translate that intelligence into some type of remedial work improvement in the mm sees things switch to the up am I right to is there another impact on the bottom line that we may be missing out on me I think that there are a couple of uh of key messages in takeaways right so customer complaints by the way they're not limited to just one area of the this right because strategic growth is everyone's business in when you're in an institution and we also understand that any complaint has the ability to be unpacked for oh you and we break down those complaints will look at their component language we do that by revealing therefore deeper insights we also understand that listening drives growth and we also understand that knowing your customer will enable you to provide a superior customer experience so the way in which were really integrating our technology and the solutions that we have is that we what we've done is we've basically built a system that self identifies visualize and automates the delivery of this type of analysis without manual intervention and what we're aiming to do take both our domain expertise around the technology in our business experience and put that together in a way that makes it seamless is for our clients to be able to gain this type of intelligence having cold as episodes from negatives to positives how to fit description customer complaints I'm getting the sense that this is something that is really important right now why do you think that this topic is so important to really well I think that in businesses the main focus right now is improving the customer experience and you can sense this by all of the different types of work and companies that are out there focused on people calling customer journey customer experience net promoter scores all of these types of both tools and possibilities.

Kyle Hannan
Life Changing Lessons from My Barber

Living Regret Free

04:39 min | 1 year ago

Life Changing Lessons from My Barber