20 Episode results for "T-Bone Burnett"

T Bone Burnett On Producing Legends And Singing His Own Tunes

World Cafe

29:33 min | 2 years ago

T Bone Burnett On Producing Legends And Singing His Own Tunes

"This message comes from n._p._r. Sponsor xfinity some things are slow like a snail races. Other things are fast like xfinity x. by get get fast speeds even when everyone is online working to make wifi simple easy awesome more at xfinity dot com restrictions apply. Hey you're listening to world cafe. I'm tallish langer all right. What do each of these pieces of music have in common. They were all produced by today's today's guest legendary producer t-bone burnett. He'll tell you insider stories about working with roy orbison elvis costello robert plant and alison krauss. He also captured one of my personal. Favourite vocal moments of all time on branded carlisle's the story brandy. She just went into some kind of other world. When she hit the moment. It was a moment of full release of absolute freedom. You know incredible right. T-bone says he never really had the need to be a public performer himself but at this point in his life he has some things he really wants to say. He's he's collected them on. An album called the invisible light acoustic space which came out in the spring and is his first new solo album in eleven years before our chat. Here's here's a little taste of one of the songs. It's t-bone burnett sr being there twitchy trigger finger itchy with the standoff figures. There's the excess three komo t-bone burnett welcome to our cafe. Thank you happy to be here yeah. I'm glad to have you so who i read the you wrote a lot of the words for this album at four in the morning and i don't feel that surprised listening to disarm it. Does it ninety nine o'clock in the afternoon on a sunny day kind of a you know or maybe it yeah no. It's not it's not i love. I love writing it riding in a in a half dream state when you're not quite awake and you're not quite asleep sleep and i feel i feel our defenses are down. My defenses were down and i just started saying the thing that i really was the most afraid of probably wow well when you're up at four in the morning and you're writing. Are you just waking up or you just going to sleep. No no. I'm just waking up. I started. I started actually it started because i was writing songs for musical and when i started writing those songs i started studying frank lesser who i think is the greatest songwriter in the history of the of the musicals goals and <hes> and and every line of his was a fist and i realized i didn't have any room to coast that i had. I had to get down. Get down to it and so i would wake up at four in the morning in in abject fear of i'm never going to be able to do this rally as what happened and and and i just started writing out of <hes> uh that and i i guess out of just being anxiety. I suppose i hate to say that but but once i got into it and once i got into the habit of it <hes> it was no longer that it's that was just the impetus for for how i started that i'd i'd never done that before almost my whole life. When i was up at four in the morning it was a it was at the end of the day at the beginning of the day. You're there's something so amazing about your first moments of your day where you're <hes> the writer julia. Yeah cameron talks about this. Your your sensor hasn't woken up yet like the the sensor brain is still sorta dormant and you can be free with your be free with your thoughts. That's exactly right so you and also sorry when you're writing at four in the morning. Where where are you sitting you sitting like your kitchen table or you. What's your what's your setup a lot of the times they'll just be laying in bed and i would just start writing the first thing that came into my mind then i would move around for three or four. We're our sometimes get up and get some coffee and go in the kitchen or going dining room. I wrote at the dining room table quite a bit well. Do you have to shake your head after going to such a at deepen stream of consciousness place to then continue with the rest of your day in society like after eight a m. I don't know if i ever really get into society or not cool. That's cool. I want to ask about another character. I guess on on on the record and other element that you introduce which is <hes> <hes> not silence but but not <hes> but not loud music <hes> and it's <hes> it strikes us for the first time halfway through the second song which is called a man without a country so i'm gonna play just what happens in radio listeners. Just listen listen really carefully in the multiple times. I've always been a man without a country. I've always been a citizen and now because the world is blue only to give you so what sounds like silence is not <hes> at all and that song goes on for another four minutes with with with bits of ideas and sounds. Tell me what you're what you're doing there well the the human race aces undergone over a century electronic programming and along with that has come a whole range of ramifications in some of them all the neurological and psychological disorders that we've been experiencing like alzheimer's and autism and asks burgers and put also the our attention spans have been demolished and i was finding myself alf being online <hes> reading you know we're starting to read an article reading the headline in the in the first paragraph and then i'm just saying at or findings and two hours later i've forgotten what i was doing in the first place after being down down the the wealth for a couple of hours or a couple minutes whatever but <hes> we started. We started this with the idea of let stretch our own attention spans. Let's give ourselves a chance to just relax into pure sound where there's no stimulation because so much of especially pop music these days. There's another hook every three seconds. There's something else to grab. You know to grab your attention and that's that's. That's that's being part of the problem. That's pandering to <hes> to an audience who's being brutalized allies really by by the electronic media. We're on one of the original electronic media now radio was was an important the first step in in <hes> in this ability to program large groups of people that this this. I've been studying really my whole adult life. I've been studying behavioral modification and conditioned responses and you know this. This is an anti behavioral. Hey vural modification device that you're that you're pointing out right now an anti behavior modification sorry. Can you explain what what you mean by that yeah. Well you know <hes> evonne pavlov who was a great russian sociologists psychologists study study in the beginning of the last century around ninety five or something like that started studying the dog's reaction to different stimuli so if he would ring a bell while the dog was being fed <hes> after a certain period of time when he would ring the bell the dogwood salivate even when no food was present and and that's something we've become expert out over the last century <hes> ringing the bell even with no food is present so we are intent was with this music was to not ring ring that bell but to actually provide food so so that so that that was the beginning of verse learning how to listen again. I understand what you're saying in that way. It's almost like a punk album. It's <hes> i think of it as very punky record yes. That's a rebellious value spirits who it for sure t-bone burnett is here with me on world cafe and his new album is called the invisible light acoustic space so t-bone. I would like to know a few indulge me in in talking about some of your some of your musical past because you have done some pretty incredible stuff worked with incredible people and and i wanted to talk about some of the moments that you have that you've produced and i wanted to start by talking about one of my favorite albums may be ever one of my favorite vocal moments. At least <hes> captured captured on record and it's a brand carlisle's two thousand seven album the story <hes> the title track on that album has this incredible moment that apparently was a reference for brandy and making her latest album the joke with dave cobb they were sort of trying to get back to the energy of what you guys had captured in two thousand and seven and it led to this great success and all these grammy awards for her and lots of mainstream attention but really it goes back to a moment that that that you were producing <hes> in studio so i wanted to play that and then talk about <hes> what what time in the studio with u._s. like <hes> <hes>. Eh is made <music> eh so i love that moan but those are beautiful. What do you remember about that day. What how how do you as a producer. Create this circumstances for something like that to come out of somebody. The producers main job is encouragement and support. That's about ninety five percent of what a producer does constructively actively and brandy was. She always had an extraordinary gift but she was still learning what to do with it. At that that time so it was there was no way to guide her into a it was just when she did that. It was just to say that's good stab op. You know we'll use that and i'm sure there was <hes> she just went into some kind of other other world when she hit that that moment it was a moment of full release of absolute freedom you know so and it wasn't wasn't it wasn't a proper or wasn't any of that. It was punky right. She was still very punky and something i one of the things that i love with working with young artists and even even especially on an artist i record is you're working with somebody who's been working under full autonomy johnny for his whole life and the last thing i want <hes> as a producer is autonomy over an hardest or i want to encourage them and support them but i don't want to tell them what to do and i find when you're working on a i record their artists may have been working for ten ten years under full autonomy and then after that i record the experts come in and start explaining how to do it to the artist austin than the artists has to work back to a place of autonomy but <hes> in in that case i was really i was playing brandy. He stuff i would rather than <hes> instructor or or try to control her because you can tell that the beautiful thing about that moment you just played. It's completely out of control but it sounds beautiful so that's all it makes any difference right. Control means nothing unless it sounds beautiful so i i love the thing that's out of control. In fact this whole new record we've done is all out of control so but but in that case yes i was i was playing or things to baby inspire her to help her to hear things different ways. Put i put i <hes> but i wasn't trying to really yeah what were you. What were you playing her well. I i know i played blue. I played her joni mitchell's record. I played later a lot of a lot of things maybe emmylou harris you know i was planning because there was some probably dolly. Parton certain probably played her. Some dolly parton stuff things like that female women singers that i thought were great storytellers towers and head of incredible way of getting a getting a song over t-bone burnett is here with me. World cafe in his new album is called the invisible acoustic space. I want to ask about raising sand the two thousand and seven right around the time that you worked with brandy working with robert plant and alison krauss on on sort of a game changing record i think for for both of them we got we got the lead singer of led zeppelin and we've got <hes> the most pure hearted <hes> singing voice courtesy of alison krauss together and one of the things that i find so amazing every time i listen to this record is vocal chemistry between the two of them <hes> so maybe you can help me pick pick a track to play and then also talk about how how you how you capture that that perfect balance that they have between the two of them well <hes> i love i love the i love polycom home just as a song and roberts version of that but if if i were gonna if i were going to tell you about the chemistry between the two of them in poor they both where they both found that third voice <hes> that metal that middle ground between them out to it was your long journey which was the last song on the record and the purity of that song in that melody was something that brought robert over from the devil music that he'd been playing as a life to the angel ben music that alison had been singing her whole life and and and robert was able to supply alison with some of the danger where the more dangerous place than she had been before and she was able to supply him with some of the safe place where it never been before beautifully. Let's listen a you calls in a uh-huh. I would think that would be the nicest place to live in studio hearing. Those sound like did you ever. I would think that you would never want that recording session to end. It's just nice to live. Ah yeah. I think that's right. I don't want to end by the way that's mike seeger playing auto harp and the here's an extraordinary musical force in the last century and and don't want him to be forgot uh-huh thank you for that <hes> you're also one of the co authors of somewhat of a bluegrass revolution at least in mainstream popular culture in the year two thousand housing with the coen brothers film o brother where how and you produce the score you composed the score or you you produced all the music in the film and composed the score as as well right if i got that right this right and in this mill carter carter burwell and collaborated on the score so in in this movie the music was just as important or maybe even more important than the story and i think all of a sudden people who might never have thought that bluegrass would be a style of music that they would enjoy were completely wheatley obsessed by it like it really it really wasn't moment in popular culture <hes> so what stands out to you when you when you think about about working on the music for that film well you know it started with a chain gang song if you remember the the movie and the and the record started with an authentic bendik alan lomax recording of chain gang and and it was it was a time right you know it was right after the turn of the century sorry and it was clear that there was this dream this river of american music that it slowed slowed at that time to really just a trickle but that had been there for a hundred something years and it it it had abdin and flowed and over that hundred years but it was clear that there was a there was an extraordinary group of musicians who were playing hang this music that were very under utilized and under known <hes> and suddenly we're going to have a coen brothers movie and george clooney movie to shine a light on this extraordinary group of musicians led by ralph stanley who i think was one of the great musicians of the last century and james carter who sings lead on this song po lazarus about a about a dangerous man <hes> didn't even remember singing the song when the lomax family found him in chicago married to a storefront preacher and brought him a <unk> a big check which was which was a wonderful moment. You know this. This guy who sixty years earlier had been recorded and remembered remember. Nothing of it got hundreds of thousands of dollars from this recording. That's one of the beautiful stories. I think that that emerged one. I mean i think everyone of us had a version of that story but that was the most that was the most profound one i suppose he's when you compare that to artists scraping by for like percentages of pennies on spotify plays that are completely tracked and how easily traceable everything is digitally think about like alan lomax chasing somebody down in finding him to give him a big check. That's very beautiful thing that's right. Ah i did is that. Is that additional improvement that you've done based around that original recording recording no that's just the way it came to. I think we probably tried to tone down the the backbeat a little bit but you know that's early hip hop and i have to to say the the hip hop community embrace that record embraced the oh brother where art thou record in an important way and largely largely because they were invited in with that first song and <hes> and and you know so much of the job of the of the record producers serves over the last century has been <hes> as civil rights activists john hammond was an important civil rights activists who brought billie holiday and the all the great jazz musicians of that time into the into the mainstream so to speak and sam phillips was the same way blending the black culture and the white culture and and that's one of the things i think we were we were able to do to some extent with that record. T-bone burnett is here with me on world cafe. His new album is called the invisible light acoustic space. You've talked before about learning something from every different person that that that you work work within studio. Is there a lesson that comes to mind now if i asked you you know what what's something that you have learned from a friend or collaborator that that really stands out with you. I think the the most important lesson i learned in all of music was from roy orbison who sang so quietly quietly. If you stood two feet away from him you couldn't hear him but when you would put a microphone in front of him it would sound like poverty. Dan and i learned i learned that the reality that you've in recording is is to live performance as filmmaking is to theater and that you can bring a camera right in on somebody and he doesn't have to project to the back row and and through working with orbison when when orbison would sing he would wear headphones pretty wouldn't have his vocal in the headphones because he would know how the notes felt in his jaw so so he would just have the ban in his headphones and feel the notes and and sing very softly sleeping presently and i realized that <hes> intensity and resonance doesn't come from volume that residents in fact comes from intensity. Pick us a a roy orbison song which you know what's better than dreams. That's a rhetorical torok question nothing or running or or running scared. Let's listen to running scared sure here we go wrong on and who yeah and i love that you've given us the gift of life picturing him with the muscle memory of his his job and like where where sounds sit for him and you can hear how softly singing there too and one of the one of the other things than this is a story i'll regale with but he was teaching me how he wrote songs and he said i just start on my lowest note and then i step up all all the way through the songs till i get to my highest note which is exactly what he does an dreams it goes from his lowest no two his highest note and when we were doing mystery girl when we were recording mystery girl elvis costello out a song called <hes> called <hes> the comedians and i told elvis that story about the lowest and the highest note and and he rewrote the comedians and went and listen to all roy's records and found his lowest houghton and found his highest note and we wrote the comedians to go through that range and then i took it to roy any listened to it. He came back the next day and he said this cat so amazing he did. He did exactly what i do. You know so so put that royal was a it was a great teacher and a great cat. I loved. I loved her orbison. Oh that's so great will go out on the song the comedians by elvis castillo at the end but i i just have one more question for you before we before. We wrap things out if that's okay <hes> i wanna know so as as somebody we're we're here. We're talking about the solo album that you've made the invisible late acoustic space almond. We're also talking about this incredible body of work that you've that you've produced <hes> and people make art because because they have things that they need and want to say <hes> and i'm wondering if being a producer who facilitates helping other people say what they need to say a ever gets in the way of of you needing or of you having that outlet to say what you need to say or if we can read anything into where you're you're at in your life where you're it seemed to be really making space for yourself to get your message out well. I think i've i've always been ambivalent about <hes> <hes> the notion of public performance <hes> and i never i didn't have that need read that particular need to get out in and be a public performer but i will say at this point in my life i have gathered a lot of information and i see some things very clearly and it's it's crucial to me to say these things now before before i slept this mortal coil you see so yeah. I'm going ah i haven't put out a record for eleven years and i'm gonna put out three double albums in the next twelve months. Hopefully you know up just finished up the second one and getting it ready to release in the fall and then i hope to have another one out in the in the in the next spring and that'll be the third edition of this of this series this invisible light series and i'm just gonna keep going with that. It may turn into five or seven records. I don't know how how much it's i don't know when it's going to stop but i do. I do feel the need to to summarize. I guess my my long experience handsome all of this we look forward to hearing all of it and we're going to go out on the comedians the song that you mentioned by elvis costello t-bone burnett it has been such a delight to talk to you. Thank he's so much so great to talk with you. Here we go so surf garbage cardiac come to answer and all these new fare founded winston says to spread screwed so elvis costello with the comedians. That song was chosen by our guest t-bone burnett. His latest album is called the invisible double light acoustic space. He is a brilliant musical mind. Jeez louise thank you so much t. bone for being here to talk on the show and thanks to our world cafe producer john meyers for all of his work on at this session. I'm talia slender and you're listening to the world cafe from n._p._r. Kylo listened upon inspection last spring yeah.

t-bone burnett producer roy orbison alison krauss elvis costello robert plant n._p._r carlisle langer alzheimer alan lomax joni mitchell grammy frank cameron spotify writer
T Bone Burnett: Perfection Is Second-Rate

Broken Record

56:49 min | 2 years ago

T Bone Burnett: Perfection Is Second-Rate

"I thought this is it man, Los Angeles. Quincy says, you know, I'd rather live in Los Angeles than heaven. That's T-Bone Burnett in conversation with my broken record partner. Rick rubin. We took a hilarious picture of Rick and T-Bone after they tape. This interview Ricksen a t shirt and shorts naturally T-Bone towers over him dressed impeccably in a white shirt and a black suit like some old school blues player, I think of T-Bone as Rick's spiritual. Godfather, he's a generation older in his early seventies. But he's had the same kind of extrordinary behind the scenes influence on the music. We all listen to T-Bone is probably most famous for helping launch the careers of artists. Like, Los Lobos, Counting Crows and Gillian Welch also for producing albums by brandy Carlisle Elton, John and the masterfully executed raising sand collaboration between Alison Krauss and Robert plant. Oh, he also produced and performed on my favorite Elvis Costello record of all time king of America. Then there's this film and TV credits. Are insane. He partnered with the Coen brothers as music supervisor on the big lebowski. He worked on O'Brien Where Art Thou. Walk the line crazy heart to detective to list goes on is a new record out called the invisible. Light acoustic space available wherever you get your music is the first in a series of records T-Bone will be putting out this year. And incredible outpouring of songs coming out of a play. He's providing the music for I only met him once years and years ago. What was the most star studded dinner party? I've ever attended was in LA. I got invited by accident and was wall-to-wall movie stars and T-Bone Burnett and the only person I wanted to listen to was T-Bone Burnett. You're about to understand how I felt I'm Malcolm God. Well, this is broken record. And I'm heartbroken. I didn't get to join in on this conversation. Here in conversation at Shangri LA studios in Malibu. Rick Rubin and T-Bone Burnett. Are you always writing songs now, you know, I took a job about three years ago? I I Marshall Brickman do, you know, Marshall Brickman incredible character. He was where the original focus in New York City. I didn't know that I really know him as a as a as a writer well in in the fifties. He was one of the cats in Washington square park, and he played on Judy Collins records, he played he was a session musician. He played all the played banjo and fiddle and Qatar mandolin guitar player on dueling banjos for deliverance. And by the time he was twenty three. He was the head writer on the Johnny Carson tonight show. And then he admitted the dick Cavite show, and then he wrote those movies with Woody Allen, she would know any all and Manhattan. And then he wrote jersey boys, which is a. Amazing. You know? So he's he's transitioned into theater and he called me up. And he said do you want to write a musical about the people who played ROY Rogers and Dale Evans, and do you remember them at all? So ROY Rogers was for my generation the biggest star in the world, you know, all through the fifties television show, and it was a an interesting idea. He's in the country music hall of fame because he's a great. He was fantastic singer. But I always thought he was ROY Rogers and how I saw Dale Evans was Dale Evans, but they were to actors. I didn't know that. Nobody knows that. So this is a story about the people who played them. And so they were like the Monkees here a little bit. Yeah. Except she wrote happy trails. She was a great song writer, and he was a great singer. But they were cast. Yeah. Into those parts. Yeah. And the whole character was a made up cab. Yeah. The healthcare. Unbelievable. How abroad Assad to play for you? Do. You wanna play me the song? Everybody wants to know the truth. But nobody wants to hear is. Everybody has to face the end, but nobody wants to get near. Everybody wants peace. But nobody wants to surrender. Every one lives in the past. But nobody seems to remember. There is nothing as long as Nova is everything burns it grows cold. Everybody wants to live forever. But nobody wants to get. Oh. Everybody wants to be forgiven, but nobody wants to confess. Everyone longs to hold onto moment. The no one can ever possess. Everyone wants to be free. But no one can pay the prize. Everyone wants to be. When no one has asked for advice. There is nothing as long as new does everything burns it grows code. Everybody wants to live forever. But nobody wants to get. Nobody knows the end of the story. We must wait for it to unfold. Everyone lives facing momento Mori, but nobody wants to get. Nobody wants to get. Nice. Where will that fall into the story? I think it's early on when he's. I think he's maybe auditioning for a radio show or something. He sings that song. But yeah, I think it's in the first act great. Yeah. Really good. Thank you have to right. Are you the point now where you you know, sort of where the songs fit, and is there ever a calling to like say, okay. In the end of the second act. We need to add a song miss spot. And this is what it needs to accomplish in the story, the up, in fact, I just wrote we did a twenty they colored a twenty nine our reading, which is you get all the actors up on their feet, and they read the parts, and you saw it you do it without costumes or that sets. But you get the you get the gist of it, the tempo of and I realized after the last one that there I didn't have a beginning song for ROY. And I didn't have an ending song for Dale. So what back in I did that. I wrote a road. Good song. Call out of nowhere for ROY to start off with. So you meet him and strength. And then Dale needed of saw a song at the end of a heavy duty number at the end. So yeah. And I'm sure we're going to we're going to open it in an Atlanta. And twenty twenty in the fall of twenty twenty and I'm sure once we get into the process of really getting it up and getting in front of audiences. They'll be a lot more changes to come. Yeah. Beautiful. I love the the peace and surrender lines. Really good. Right. Good. Yeah. Thank you. And I love the tagline the hook line is great. Yeah. Everybody wants to live forever. But nobody wants to get good. So. But when I accepted this commission in to to write these songs musical, and I'd done a lot of work with Sam Sheppard he and identify out of things for plays. And but of musicals different because every line has to be intentional. You know, you can't write just a cool salary. Yeah. It's narrative yet is narrative and planet became it was sobered me up quite a bit. And I started read I read Sondheim's books, and I started studying Frank lesser who I think was the greatest all the the Broadway composers and learner in low and of these cats, and it became clear that I was going to have to dancer get off the floor. So I started waking up every morning at four in the morning for about a year solid and riding when it was quiet. And then when I got through writing the twenty songs for the musical, I couldn't stop writing. So I. I have written. Now, I don't know how we've recorded about two hours of music. They were gonna start putting out April twelve is the process of writing a song for a musical different than writing asong, otherwise. Yeah. It is because. Yeah. Because it does have to move the story along, but, but but you start with music, I or do you start with the lyric us starting with the lyrics because it's as you say it's part of the book, it's part of the narrative. So you'd read it like a poem, basically. Yeah. Would you have a melody in your head? Yeah. Yeah. You know, melody is really just coda fide inflection. So you're as your storytelling, no matter what. And so the every sentence has a certain melody to it, and I was so I was doing that. I was writing, but I would have a sense of melody as it was going down. And then you know, I wrote. Putting out we're starting to put out records putting out three double records in the next year. This year, I'm gonna kinda work hip hop because I see these cats they just put stuff out constantly. So we've recorded a a lot of these tunes that have come afterward. Yes. A stopped. I really stopped producing other people for the most part, although interesting, I just made a record with Sarah Barilla's, that's really beautiful to you that she's a beautiful singer. And she's also gone through the experience of writing a play. She wrote a musical of waitress, and it raised the stakes for her to her writing has become much more resident deeper higher. It's interesting to hear her growth through the process house a collaboration with her different than her the records. We we did it more live, which is what I mostly do. That's the thing. I like most of the thing. I love about making records is when people are playing and singing all at one. Time and you get they get finished. And you say, yeah, that's great. You know, it's such a great feeling. It's such a there's something about people playing together that. No amount of getting it. Right. Yeah. Counters the energy of the interaction. That's really playing. Yeah. Perfection is a second rate idea shore and the computer is able to put out perfect music all day long. But it's not nearly as interesting as those Johnny cash records debate with him just sitting in a room with some people turn him onto a song and turning though, then turn the whole world onto the song the same way. So that's that's the process. I liked the most. And I think the band was great. She you know, is the same essentially same band that was on raising Sanjay Bill rose played drums Dennis crouch played string bass. Oh played guitar. I love that Hubble so much at raising Sanae in love, isn't that a beautiful beautiful. Yeah. It really took me by surprise. I don't know. I I wasn't expecting to be so beautiful and just blew my mind. You know, both that both of them have. Mystical beautiful voices. Yes. And and it was interesting to hear him softened up yet. But on paper, it wasn't necessarily must-listen Fe. And then hearing it was mind blowing also didn't I didn't know most of those songs. So that so I didn't know that they weren't original song. Yeah. So they were original for most people. Yes. Yeah. But it's got some of that same Butte. Sarah's record has some of that say that one come together, Robert Nells, this really, I think Bill Flanagan uniform, don't you Flanagan was doing that show crossroads. And I think he wanted to do a crossroads with with Robert and Allison and it ended up being a record. And then we did a crossroads later. But I think they met from that idea Flanagan pitch in them on doing it they met, and they did a they did a tribute to lead Bill yourself or some. Buddy up in up in Cleveland. I think and they enjoyed it. And then they called me up and said you wanna wanna make a record? And I sent him those two gene Clark songs. Those the first two things I sent through the morning through the night. And Polly, which I thought had those that chain had that dark mystical vibe that they both have. Syncing now to to hear Robert sing low and soft like that and go back and listen to Led Zeppelin beautiful showed another side and felt like a side that just the timing of. It was right for him. You know, what the to hear him sound like that was a revelation. Yeah. Wave sound like a grown, man. Yeah. Made sense. When before I mean, he he says himself in his early Led Zeppelin records e sound like a ca strato or something, you know, he was singing. So I, and I imagined that when he sings like that now it's more like he's imitating the old him, whereas raising sand sounds like more believable now. Yeah. I don't I really don't think he could sing those songs. He couldn't sing him in the rain. She used to sing a man, you know, same with Elton Elton's voices dropped could active IRS like that. And he's got this beautiful day resonant baritone now, and you're listening to some of the records. He says like he's. On helium or something after after getting used to his voice now and loving it and go and back in here. Not that they are. Absolutely classic and great food savers. Was there any reason you didn't do a second one with a follow up to raise? And I think we may go good. I think we may do one of these days love, maybe we should to gray. We should do it together. Let's do it's such a beautiful album. Yeah. I I would love to do do one. Again, we we went in and recorded some songs and having been through all the success. So to speak is the stake seem different when we went on the in the second time, and it didn't feel I don't think any of us felt the same kind of freedom that we'd say, isn't it interesting? How the stakes changed the whole process. Yeah. Yes. But but I think now it's been long enough. So we probably will go in and just play, you know? That'd be great. If you have ideas songs, I hadn't thought about it that much. I mean, they're just they're just been rumblings about about it. So we'll see we'll see where it goes. Have you done any other collaborations like that where it's been to artists who don't normally work together? I don't think I have have you done that. I see remember I've done I've done quite a few. You know, the rolling thunder revue, which was yes this studio was part of that whole time. Yes. That was a beautiful experiment, and it was a masterclass in art and show business. I mean, there was every Allen Ginsberg and an Waldman where they Sam Sheppard. Was there their incredible musicians? Joni Mitchell's there John by us. And how he Wyeth and David Mansfield one great musician after the mic Ronson from NPR Macron was part of it. Yeah. People from all different parts of the world, different disciplines different places, but everybody came together and collaborated, and it was a it was a tremendous learning experience that I've replicated or tried to replicate several times with like the ROY orbison black and white night show and incredible. That was a beautiful evening and. I saw at the other day. I was watching Leonard Cohen was in the audience. I'd forgotten that I think that idea of like Aerosmith and run DMC. Did you have anything to do with that supposed to? Yeah. I forgot it's hard. It's hard to think hard to think about project. Yeah. I know exactly. Just sort of it's hard to even look back at all shore. And I rarely yeah. Me too. But but that was certainly one of those that changed everything, and it'd be boys chain them doing. I'm down yet. Did you ever hear that? Oh, yeah. Never came out. It never came out. And never did. No. We couldn't get permission. It was supposed to be on that first album. I since two ill might have been the last thing we recorded for it. We couldn't get permission. It never came out. But I think it's on like YouTube or somewhere I heard it Steve Rabovsky politic. When just when. Yes in our guy. Yeah. And it was I'm really d. Fully be fully fully deal. That's right. So funny. So funny, man, they were cutting up. Yeah. I did that I did the guitar solo in the organ solo neither instruments that I really play. And it's really shows. When we come back T-Bone, premiers another brand new song for us. But first we pay the bills. In an election voted to the person who wants to make the world better. Right. 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And the impact they stand to have. Visit swell investing dot com slash broken record to start investing in the future. You want to do today for a fifty dollar bonus. When you open it account swell. Invest in progress. We're back and T-Bone has another new song to play for his called out of nowhere. Another number from the ROY Rogers and Dale Evans musical his writing for this is the song. I realized I needed a song to introduce ROY. I guess I didn't really have a powerful number two to introduce him. And as I said, the the guy who played him Leonard sly was a was a soulful beautiful cat. He wasn't at all. Like the swashbuckler. Buckling cowboy you know. He was he was different. And so I wanted to write something from inside him not not about him. Yes. But for something that that he was feeling about his life and Hillary came from. So the Sasanka out of nowhere. There is no into this road. We travel no conclusion is for. Once you just find thing. But it keeps you moving. That that can be one his words. Fi. Is no place to run between. No grievous. No Specht FRA. Can stop the wind from blow in? Can stop the river flow. Can stop the world from turn. Ken, stop the sun from burn. Gone a quit swin you expecting. If you want me to stay few dome. Of. To say. No. No. Happen. There is no into this road. We travel. No conclusion is for gun. Once you find thing. Keeps you. It keeps you. Back to that idea. You were talking about about the way art happens. Yeah. Right. Once you defined thing. You lose it yet. It's really hard. It's really hard. That's right. Yeah. So I mean, it's it's I think in retrospect after the moment of inspiration where the thing that wants to be revealed as revealed, and we know we like it, then we can maybe try to figure out why we like it. And then it's okay. Yeah. I think the other way around is very difficult. I don't know if it even happens. I think artists too. I think all really artists do is going down a road. And we we Mark things we say at this day. I was at this place. And I saw this thing and it was beautiful. Yes. And I'm gonna Mark this. So maybe you don't miss it. When you're going by. That's I think that's the real the real journey of an artist. I can remember seeing French impressionist paintings of trees in the French countryside and thinking it's very strange decision that that the artist is making, you know, putting all these different blotch is a color to make the tree. It's it's very poetic and beautiful. But it's you know, what wild imagination and then went to France the trees. Oh, that's what they action. I know note. I mean, it's like it's like the the lyrics of songs hit us in this sort of poetic magic. Away. When often if we hear the story of them, they turn out to be very ordinary descriptions of what really happened on its I guess, maybe it's the information that's left out that makes them seem so magical. Yeah. I think that's right. I do think. That's that's an interesting observation. I do. That's right in this song that you just saying the hook has a repetition of a phrase. The first only played did not have that. Right. Isn't it? Interesting that when writing words that certain words can be repeated often, and it feels really good and other words, repeat them, and it feels like you can never repeat them. Right. Some things become a chant. Yeah. And they've fallen really naturally, it's the melody of the thought its ability of the of the of the expression, maybe the phrasing as well. The the way they work with Mickley. So interesting you pretty good at this. It's very interesting never thought of that at all meter thinking of it right now. Really? Yes. It's part of the conversation. What's coming out from listening the solace? Excellent. How does that work? How do we do that? I've noticed the difficulty in it. But I've never thought about why. But that one this one here, I don't know. That's just something that became very important to me that idea and it was important in context. It was important for ROY Rogers because he for him everything just happened out of nowhere. Yes. Right. So important for him to embrace that idea. And but then it happened. I mean, the raising San record happened out of nowhere, right? Just think how does dad. Is the best things do. Yeah. That's right. They really do. They're not they're not they're not conceived or exactly they're just they're helped into existent love into a and b intention behind them is beautiful intention, but the intention didn't control it happening more like maybe the loud it allowed to be revealed that he got maybe just got Roland in the first place. And also in the first song if we were making record together if I was producing it. I would have suggested repeating the tag at the end of the first piece I'll do that. Well, we'll depends though because in the context of it, and I was civic about if we're making record together. It would be the purpose of the song would be different than the way. It would be applied. That's like, I don't know thinking about it. Like now str- the structure in play might be different than. Normal song structure wants to accomplish a different purpose. And we won't know until we get it up and were planted presentable one hundred percent, the I think the idea of making art like you were saying earlier about on the raising Santa mistakes got high, and then it changed because there was an expectation. I like to say I have said it before to artists that I've worked with his would we're making these things audience comes last. That's what I I agree. I agree. I don't believe you can do it for the audience know because I don't think we're I know that if we can make something that we like there's a better chance that someone else's gonna like it. And if we make what we that. We don't like, but we think someone else's gonna like that's impossible. That's that's one of the problems with, you know, working in television is there's a there are a lot of people that think they know what the audience wants. And they're always trying to get you. To do the thing the audience wants televisions of big collaborative medium. And you know, I I love to collaborate. And I love to collaborate with large groups, but it is it's a process of it's not a process of of starting with the audience and then working backward. Not at all about if you wanna make something good, right? And what audiences like is something? Good absolu-, you'll real real obligation or responsibility to the artist is to make thing you really love hundred percent. That's the if you do that this. There's a really good chance. They'll really love as well. Hopefully, so at least your best chance. Yeah, elise. You've got h aunts. And I feel like an as a record producer often feel like a proxy for the audience to say, right? Same. I'm not really musician. So all all I am is of of glorified fan. You know, really what I am while your listener. Yeah. That's it. Yeah. I listen. I try to understand I can tune into what pulls me into something. And what pushes me away, and I just really trust. Whatever that is. Right. Yeah. You never know. Why? You've learned to trust your instincts, that's valuable that's valuable thin. Most people don't that's one of the things. One of the things artists. Tested to how to do. Trust is instinct, all the best art is second nature. It's made by second nature. It's not made consciously in that way. That's why say artists artists role is the the goal of artists to create conscience not consciousness. You know? It's the create is secrete. The thing where you feel the the thing where you've for you empathize. Where you say. Yeah. That's right. That's true. That's beautiful. You don't do that. That's not a conscious decision. It's a it's an internal instinctive instinctual decision. Something that I I noticed relatively early in the working with different artists that that was interesting was one of the band. I worked with is called slayer heavy metal band, very. One of the inventors of black metal or like, very very aggressive metal. And and the lyrics were really dark and heavy and to some people they would look at that as negative content, and then I would go to a concert, and I would seen arena for of kids who were very much like the guys in slayer. Who were so filled with joy listening to this music. It was speaking directly to them. It completely was nourishing them, right? Combat would not have reached them just made them angry. Yeah. So it's like it's almost like beyond what the actual content is. It's more like how does what whatever the art is resonate with other people, and I personally don't like to see harm movies. I don't like see violence at all Haarer violence or anything. I almost never go to the movies of and maybe documentaries. But for some people that experience a feeling the thrill, they really got really moves a may like it. But again, I I don't know that there's a there's not a right and wrong, and there's not a positive and a negative in it. It's more like. It really is what entertains people and whatever stuff happened in their life that led them to a place where this darker things speaks to them in their case. It's it's healing to hear it. They don't they feel less alone. Right. Yeah. That's right. That's you know, the of called my new the new stuff, I'm working on with Keefe j of called the invisible light. And I feel that that's a because of that very thing you're talking about because the the what had say the words very dark the world. It's talking about is very dark. But if you listened to it, there's a great deal of light, invisible light. Yes, right beautiful. But you have to find your way into it. If you just if you just take it all at face value, or if you try to approach pedantically, you'll just say, well, this is this is a dark dark world. Well, it is dark world. But there's also, you know. Through though, there's all of that. There's the ocean in the trees the sky. It's all. It's all like like, I said earlier, I think it's all just a reflection of what's going on. You know? It's right. There's there's a there's tremendous beauty in the world, and is really bad stuff goes harder. And and all of that warrants being reflected back. It's interesting. I was been going around recently in most of the music, I'm hearing and supermarkets and department stores those things just going around life. Most of that. I'm hearing from the nineteen sixties, and I've curious about that because the nineteen sixties maybe the last time there was this sort of exuberance about art like whole foods the other day and the reporting good love, and I wanna hold your hand in this. And it was a it lightened the feeling and the and the place, and there really hasn't been that particular aspect of music since the nineteen sixties that I can think. No. And it's also it's also a time beyond what the lyrical content was when the industry was still small and the stakes were low. Yeah. I remind the people making that music probably were making it for themselves for the friends or for, you know, the high school dance, they weren't making it to sell out arenas because nobody had done that Raina play the everything it seems that anything. When it starts. It's small and has been awful intention and integrity in it. And then when it gets big and a lot of people are involved that just dissipates just in any any organization. This is one of the reasons I love as a producer. I love making records with I records with artists because you're dealing with an artist who's been working under complete autonomy. Yes. For a number of years, and he doesn't have experts telling him what the audience wants, for instance. So I've had very several very successful. I records with artists that are tremendous fun. And I still love today because because of that they're not they're unselfconsciously. No, baggage right. Yeah. I I've I've worked with both artists for the first time many artists in many successful artists, as you know, existing artists in it's definitely true. That with a new artist there's a freedom of how is this going to work whereas with the with the establish artists? There's all often a lot of bad habits to have to unlearn. Yeah. Yeah. Just playing in front of twenty or thirty thousand people will create something that had something to your brain. Well, it makes you it may it can make you be too broad. Yeah. And in studio the studio is like as a film, you know, like you you get right in on a person, you're close right by them. You know, they're singing in your ear in an large concert. You know, it's like a theater it's got lately you're projecting out into the last row. Yes. So it's very different. It's very different discipline and playing for large crowds, and what having Degen them up night after night could really give you some bad habits on the other hand working. With seasoned artists can be absolutely the best because there's little 'cause they're just good salute. I was gonna say when you mentioned the work that I did the, Johnny. And a lot of a lot of specially in the beginning when we started working together it was getting him to perform the songs less. Yep. Yes. Sell the songs just to tell it just tell me Friday night Sam sitting right here next to you. And we were sitting on the couch. Just sing me. The just tell me the story of the song. You don't have to perform it. And and there's recordings tape was role diamond. He would always himself. Get off stage cash get off stay. Yeah. He was a character would linka what a loss tremendous laws. That was. Yeah. Beautiful me. It was amazing. Yeah. I think he would have been anything. He would have done would have been good. Yeah. Because it was him. It wasn't wasn't that. He was the best musician or the best singer. It was he showed through what he made he chose that. But anything he would chose would've been great. You know, Sam Sheppard an hour doing play up in New York tooth of crime. And he called me up to to write music for it. And I was at a time in my life. When I couldn't I didn't know what music was anymore. I couldn't tell why one note should be here in another note should shouldn't be there. You know, every note was the same notes were even notes out. I was letting I was letting go of the idea of pitch and Tirlian just working purely off tone. I was at sea. And I said, and we were sitting in a theater somewhere. And I said to say, you know, I don't even know what music is anymore, man. And he said when you do it. That's what it is. And that was that was the most freeing thing anybody ever said to me in my life. And and and that's what I think that's the thing. We can help artists get to that point. I want to help other artists with with that same that same vote of confidence that same lack of questioning we'll be back with more of Rick's conversation with T-Bone after this. I'm just in Richmond producer broken record. The other day. I sat down with host. Rick Rubin to talk to him about how he could use Lincoln to hire people. How does hiring work on urine in the past? When I've had to hire people usually been more through word of mouth, asking friends looking for conditions, and it's honestly, not a easy process. One of the hardest things to do, but it's time consuming. Right. Absolutely. And you never you never really know. It's. The idea that there's a pool of talent out there available and that we can connect to that seems like something I would like to use it sounded make a higher for your small business natural. You wanna find the best person for the job odds are that person's linked only. Lynton jobs makes it easy to match with quality candidates who make the most sense for your role Lynton jobs. He's knowledgeable hard skills and soft skills to match you with the people who fit your role the best people come to Lincoln every day to learn an advance their careers. So Lincoln understand what they're interested in and looking for which means we knew us Lincoln to hire someone you're matches are based on so much more than a resume posted job today. A Lincoln dot com slash broken record and get fifty dollars off your first job post. That's Lincoln dot com slash broken record, terms and conditions apply. I don't know if you notice about me, but I have strong feelings about t shirts and underwear for the same reason, by the way that I have strong feelings about light switches people spend a gazillion dollars on the house of dreams. Building in extravagant features at the world will never see who when it comes to the light switch which naval touch multiple times everyday for the rest of their lives. They're like, let's just get the hideous way plastic ones. No do not hideous white plastic ones. Get the brass one. That makes a satisfying click. There is nothing in the entire house. Us more often same thing with t shirts and underwear. I mean, you wear them next to your skin fourteen hours a day every day of your life men's spend more time choosing neckties which they will never wear than they do on a word robe essential makes sense. Which is why I shop online with math. Well, the most comfortable underwear socks shirts. Undershirts. Hoodies and sweatpants and more you'll ever wear numerals anti microbial sober underwear which eliminates odors. They've got socks you can build a life around the best t shirts, but not some manic collection of hundred fifty t-shirts know who necks V necks tanks in white and gray and your size. And you know, how some clothing websites are so complicated that you practically need GPS to get around them. Not MAC Wellman elegant, simple clean. Wait. Wait. I'm gonna buy me. Samak Walden socks right now as I'm doing this some air nets with mesh better airflow and little anti odor magic and compression foot bed. Now, he's running. I'm done for twenty percent off your first order. Visit MAC Weldon dot com and enter promo code broken record, a checkup. We're back with more. Rick Rubin and T-Bone Burnett. What was your entry into music? I don't know any. I don't know. I mean, I've known you for so long. But that I I know you as T-Bone Burnett. I don't know how you became debone. Well, my my my first century into music was my parents had a great seventy eight collection, and I used to sit down and listen to all Louis Armstrong records and Ella Fitzgerald. The saw the great American songbook records zinn, Texas. Yeah. In Texas and Fort Worth. And and and I I was I was moved by the way. There was a song. That was a Cole porter song. I think called begin the begin you know, that tune in and listen to it not be immediately transported to some tropical island somewhere. And I was amazed at the way music could create place could create an atmosphere and environment. You could close your eyes, and I would no longer be in Fort Worth Texas, which was to me great relief. For it worth at the time at a very low ceiling in it felt like it felt like anything that was happening in the world was happening somewhere far away. And there was no way to get there. But music was a window or a door out and to into these other places into the world and was at that wasn't the music of Dave. Oh, no. That was all you were listening to older, even then it was old Museu. Yeah. It was all music, then it was what was the music of the day when he rea- well, it was like Elvis Presley, and and Ricky Nelson, I loved Ricky Nelson. Let personally I loved Ricky more than Elvis because he was on television. And he saying a great song every week. And I didn't I didn't really understand Elvis. See seem seem broad to me. Yeah. Whereas Ricky was cool and understated in. So I my my aesthetic sorta went that direction. I learned to appreciate Elvis, of course, much more later. Yes. When I when I got. When I got way into the special stuff, he did with Sam Phillips who was also wasn't saying Philipson greatest ration- to you. I mean, I feel like you know, he was a guy who like you didn't recognize race boundaries. He was a he was Sam Phillips was great civil rights leader. Actually, you know, he had the first all woman radio station W H, E R in Memphis, and he brought he brought hell and wolf into the studio when Helen of mine it scared the pants off of most white people at the time. He was a big strong black men in the south, and but he but Sam embraced him and embraced Ike Turner. And brought all these incredible musicians into the studio and opened up the the world to them and them to the world. You know, absolutely and admire that you've done very much the same thing. You just you've crossed those boundaries in just natch. Though, I have clicked dictation. I follow my taste that it's not there's no political underpinning snow. It's just the all we also had Sam. Yeah. You know to to start a started that way. Yeah. John M and before John Hammond. Incredible John Hammond was a uptown New York stablishment guy who went down to the village and found built Billie holiday, and you know. Music's always done that though music. The thing Tony Bennett, you know, has art school. And he says the great thing about art. And he's a good painter. He's very good painter says a great thing about art is either good or you're not good and done matter where you're from. Or what what your ethnic city is any of that? It's just good or not good. And it feels like the the. The relationships that I have with artists have had nothing to do with anything other than our love of music, and doesn't doesn't matter with from what the background is doesn't matter. But this not we're not talking about that. We're not about music, that's right and re on the same page or not. And that's all and that's good to like, whether we are not it's all ones. Exactly, I met trying to convince anybody of anything. Yeah. That's right, Willie Dixon. I worked got to work with Willie Dixon and one of the things. He would say is if that's the way you like it. I like it. Yeah. And I love that. Yeah. That's that's generous. That's a deep general. You know? Yeah. So and he was so so Elvis is on the radio and Ricky Nelson's on the radio. You're listening to seventy big band. Seventy eights stuff like that. What was your first music related gig? And your first instrument. Oh, well, you know, I was I one day I was at a friend's house, and there was A Gibson guitar much. Like this one win against a wall and hit the eastern. Like that. Oh, just just something about heading that one note was like a key that unlocked door that is that led me through my whole life. And once I started playing guitar when I was about twelve I started listening to Qatar players. That's when I you know, I learned how to play while would flour by the Carter family, which may Bill Carter is essentially the mother of rock and roll guitar, you know, every every rock and roll guitar player. I know learned to play while would flour. I or very soon thereafter. And so I started listening to the Carter family, and I started listening to Hank Williams and that stuff because it was on the radio. And there was a lot of interesting pop music. There was Peggy Lee was interesting at the time if she was really killer. Great. And then the Beatles happened to know, and that changed everything that that really did that change the world. I look at those. I look at those clips now the Beatles playing for audiences of young girls and the girls are screaming and some of them look like they're screaming at a horror movie, and I feel like there was that. There was that confluence of events of the Kennedy. It says the first Kennedy assassination and the Beatles. Coming out in the wake of that. That was was once again them metallica's. Yeah. It was it was them. Yeah. It was a Tharcisse them mythology ising this horror for us in an beautiful way. And and singing these joyful songs in the wake of this. Of the truck great tragedy. Tremendous and begin all unintentional. Yeah. Minute nether these like again looking back. We can see you just happened in. This was we can call it a reaction. But I don't think it was a intellectual Riyadh all know that happen. Nobody was connecting the two at the time. But I think in retrospect, it's hard not to connect yet. Right. It's fascinating. Right. So yes. So those those things I mean, sometimes we see around corners. I know you see around corners occasionally, and you think oh, I see where this fits in this works. I've had that app a couple of times. But most of the time I certainly didn't with raising sand. For instance. I didn't see around that corner. Just thought this is something to do was cool. Yeah. Yeah. These two sound good together. Absolut? Absolutely. But so did you did you join a band? Yeah. Then I at that point. I was already I was already in a little band, and we were playing mostly surf music at the time because I got electric guitar melody maker plan, flats flat wound strings on a melody maker. And there were all those great surf tunes that had they're all in the big, oh, I left out Jimmy Reed who Jimmy Reed for me was that's actually probably ground zero. That's after I learned may Bill Carter, I learned Jimmy Reed. And then that opened up a whole other world of our in be debar and be and and how old were you about this time, probably twelve or thirteen. You know, and the Beatles actually, one of the things I loved about the Beatles. Was they sounded like Jimmy Reed. They played the low strings on the guitar they played flat wound strings on the bottom of the Qatar like Jimmy Reed. And and he and he also it was also just the groove. You know, the pocket they played in a similar pocket to him. I feel like they must have listened to him. I certainly once I got into Jimmy Reed. I devoured everything. Everything. I learned every possible song and Chuck Berry as the that was the other get swing of the Beatles. Undeniably. Yeah. People don't really talk about it. Yeah. Yeah. The the songs are killer. But you know, and Ringo was you know, he played with sister Rosetta Tharp when he was the house drummer when he was the house drummer at the cavern club. He played with all the R and B X that would come through. So he got a real he he had he's probably just in eight with him. But he swung so hard. And I was watching Ron Howard's documentary of days a week felt the Beatles. And I realize oh the three geniuses up front were killing, but Ringo was supplant was Bali electricity was coming out of Ringo. He was blowing. Everybody's mind without us, even knowing. Yes, now looking back on it is after all these years of of listening to everything I can I can see at the time. I couldn't why I knew a love the way. I love the way he attacked his. Hi hat, for instance. Yeah. He just had going solid. It wasn't. It was. You know? So that's supplied a lot of electric city and excitement, but also just his just his put his whole self his, you know, he would hit the bass drums, Boone, you know, just like kill it. And the other cats were killing it too. But he was just he was the really electric part of it. I thought and but so yes, so when that happened, and then, you know, they're other guy before the Beales was buddy. Holly who they also wanted to be you know, we were playing also from Texas was there this feeling of definitely he was one of the cats that that made me feel like, oh, I can get out. I can get out from under this low ceiling as buddy Holly could do it. Yes. You know? It's it's possible. Yeah. That was T-Bone Burnett. Talking with my co host Rick Rubin at Shangrila in Malibu his new album invisible. Light Kucic space is out now and available wherever you get your music. You can also Bizet our website to find Spotify playlist for the album can also play list for some of our favorite T-Bone. Productions broken record is produced by Justin Richmond and Jason Gambrill with help from meal. Abell Jacob Smith. Julia Parton and Jacob iceberg special. Thanks to my co host, Rick Rubin, and Bruce headlamp are broken. Record. Theme music is by the great Kenny beats be sure to check out his new album with rapper Rico nasty. Also, be sure to check for next week's episode with Linda Perry, she talks with Bruce of being the first woman nominated for producer of the year at the Grammys and fifteen years that's next week. Bush can industries. I'm glad well.

T-Bone Burnett Rick rubin ROY Rogers Dale Evans producer Sam Sheppard Beatles New York City Los Angeles Bill Carter Marshall Brickman Elvis Costello writer Sarah Barilla Monkees Sam Malibu Woody Allen Jimmy Reed
Introducing Bear and a Banjo

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02:31 min | 2 years ago

Introducing Bear and a Banjo

"Hey friends Here's a new trailer on movie crush that I think you're gonNA love Calbert into Banjo and this is the one no work done members talking about t-bone Burnett Dennis Quaid. This is that show show. It's really cool because it's a fictional show about a fictional band but they worm their way through musical history by rubbing shoulders with real bands. It's a lot of defined. You're GONNA love it. Check out the trailer right now a new podcast from iheartradio and Jingle punks bear and a Banjo here. This is a story about the two most important musicians in the twentieth century that no one ever knew but that's about to change because now it's my story. I'M DR Q. And I've spent the last thirty years tracking down there and Banjo coming up on the season of Baron a badger boys get to New Orleans rather mysterious sound food. It is to to get into this then. I'm already did this evidence as to the identity of Killa the face off of Robert F Kennedy when there are some into a house committee trying to break up the mock so I ask you again your name named Jay Banjo is agile given name and I said yes I gave it to myself and I want you to know that I never even received so much as I think you know can can you believe it and try their hand at Turnham us into a weapon for the US an earworm sometimes known as brain run is less horrifying that it might saw the Guy Johnson the Johnson come quickly. You have to hear this podcast narrated by Dennis Quaid featuring new music produced by t-bone Burnett Ridden by Jerry Houston and Grammy Winning Songwriter poobah bowling but the new song featuring original lyric by Bob Dylan step inside of the world to musician to change it off fine Barron a banjo on the iheartradio premiers October third.

Jay Banjo Dennis Quaid t-bone Burnett Guy Johnson New Orleans iheartradio Robert F Kennedy Bob Dylan US Barron Baron Jerry Houston thirty years
New Mix: Billie Eilish, Lucy Dacus, John Vanderslice, T Bone Burnett, More

All Songs Considered

44:39 min | 2 years ago

New Mix: Billie Eilish, Lucy Dacus, John Vanderslice, T Bone Burnett, More

"This message comes from NPR sponsor Comcast business. Business has always been driven by innovators. That's why Comcast business is helping you with technology that provides better experiences. Comcast business beyond fast. Hey, it's guy-roger here. And on the next episode of how I built this how one man reinvented airline travel again, and again, and again to create one of the most innovative airlines in the US, JetBlue checkout. David Neil, laments amazing story on our podcast. How I built this. You know, everyone tore the the Super Bowl performance apart. And I thought it's about as bland as they always are. I don't know why this one deserves special criticism at felt like it was just as unremarkable as they very often are had this great exchange with my friend, and basically went like this. She said are you watching the game pretty much knowing that you knew there was a game right of some kind. And I said yes, it's in the third inning. Right. And and she wrote back and said, oh, I'm really surprised you're watching the game. And I said that was a joke. She wrote. Oh, yeah. Right. It's quarter. Right. Yeah. Yeah. Could you weren't watching? No, no. It's the RPM challenge. I make an album every February and love it. Right. So this is your first full week. Boy, right out the gate because we have right? It was the first thing you just hit the grabby. I went to see cautious clan Friday night and skip making music, but Saturday all day and all Sunday made music, and I'm so thrilled. I love at danger painters as Banda plan or long distance file exchanges. And jeez. Nothing. Nothing makes me happier. I think great fun. You know, when you've you discovered that better oblivion community center song Dylan Thomas and you're obsessed with it. And you couldn't stop listening to it. That's how I I've been about all the stuff. I wanna play on on this. Yeah. I start off with the band called tender. Do you not not TI? Indie are tender T E N D R. This is two guys from London James, Colin, Dan, Cobb and make this really fantastic. It's like synth pop. But it's not bubbly. It's a little dark super introspective and reflective lots of interesting sounds going on they recently put out their second full length record. It's called fear of falling asleep and the song that I'm obsessed with it's called handmade ego. And I'm just gonna play it. And then we can learn a little bit more about it afterwards handmade ego from tender. John. Oh, my. She. Mine's me a lot of like perfume genius crossed with maybe youth lagoon like if they had made a record together as such a fantastic drop in. I'm sucker for that kind of a beat the baseline that walking baseline and nice and fat. I don't know what those samples were. But they were at least I assume the Sinti sounds were were simple, ample based. Yeah. They they do a lot of that. So the called fear falling asleep. And James Colin says that he just was at a period going through this period in his life where he was afraid to go to bed every night. Because that's when the demons came out and started all his anxieties would start creeping up when you have those moments of solitude and silence. He says he never really knew if anyone else felt that way until he did these songs and started hearing from people, I think that's a pretty common occurrence. Yeah. For sure. Anyway, this record is out now fear of falling asleep from the band tender. The song went to play from many rooms, you know, many have. She was so amazing. We saw at south by two years ago. Two three years ago on a hunt dot an EP that we covered well back in twenty fifteen is when we cover the EP so long now and many rooms with the texters and so forth in in brianna his music. Remind me a little what you just played her songs are atmospheric as much as they are melodic, and they're certainly thoughtful she put out a beautiful album called there is a presence here in twenty teen. And now she has a new single not from that record more premiering it here and all that brianna hunt introduced the song ninety nine proofs by many rooms, the song ninety nine proofs has a very special meaning to me. I recorded the song with Corey Kaufman, Charlie Neal from the Bank lemur in definitely has more expansive sound than a lot of my earlier work. The Qatar tone is inspired by a song called bang bang by Nancy Sinatra, and we really tried to get that Wardley almost eerie sound. I wanted to write a song that sounded like joyful him to misdirect listener a bit into thinking. It's a worship song when it's actually a lament mourning the people who've been mistreated by the capital C church and a call for the church to become more self aware. It's about my frustrations with a whole culture religion. That's more about power and control than people in love. But also, my desire to forgive into, cultivate, change. Thanks. Fhu. Okay. Slow. She threw. The. Good. She. Play. The song ninety nine proofs by many rooms and now walking into our room from many room. She could have walked into is Marissa larusso bring us a song back again bag again. So have you to be here? Awesome. So have you ever heard of the concept of the big freeze? I just had it when I walked outside the morning. No kidding. Okay. But actually, I had never heard of this concept until recently when I was sent this explanation. So it said if gravity is strong enough at the end of time are universal collapse. Pulling all of existence back down to infinitesimal size like before the big bang, but if expansion outpaces gravity eventually the universe will be cold an empty all light, heat and connection will be gone that possibility is called the big freeze. So I was sent then. Oh because the big freeze is the name of Laura's. Stevenson's new record which is coming out at the end of March. She's a songwriter from New York. I I saw her a couple years ago at this big festival that was put on I think by Don Giovanni records in New Jersey. And it was the kind of thing where I watched her perform, and I thought oh my God. I can't believe I've never heard her. This is exactly my kind of music. She has this really powerful voice. And especially on this record the big freeze. You really hear the power of her voice and her guitar playing. It's really wonderful. So this song is called living room, New York. Our one no week of from along sees at sea to you fall back to sleep on a you is how long no wake of from our one sees. Moving hands. Sheikh. I am push. Joel. Supersede? Yes. Monday. Sweden. Will be. Didn't just to. Shane living room new. So. Gouzer. Wow. That was beautiful and powerful her guitar just soared into another space, and it was just since ational for for an album called the big freeze. This song is so warm. Anything else that we know about this? Yeah. Laura. Stevens album is out at the end of March. Don, Giovanni, it's called the big freeze awesome. Thanks mersal Russo. You know, what same Orissa didn't say? Well, I mean, she didn't necessarily have to say, but you don't really have to worry about this whole big freeze thing that she's talking about the university expanding and collapsing on 'cause I are our own star will start to grow and swallow the entire solar system and all the planets in long before the big freeze ever happens. I mentioned this to be the good news is our our our stars way. Too small to go. Yeah. Well, it's going to expand. It's not gonna blow up it'll get bigger and bigger and then. No, you'll be swallowed up. Yeah. And and then it will collapse on its off and just be this dead rock. I mean, we're going to be closer together than ever. Think about that. You thought it was a relief. But now, we're we're always this little Raleigh jar all the same atoms were were are Adams are transferring between us you realize that as we speak so like fluids from both our bodies not fluids. Now. We've I might not told that one just stick with the atoms. Say that reminds me of I've got more great music. I wanna play didn't you say at one point that the show has been around so long eventually were just gonna we're going to be playing music by artists who've never known a world without also considered because I've got one who was born in two thousand one Billy eyeless. She's seventeen years old never known a world without all songs considered. It's amazing. When you think about it? She is. But she's incredible. She's from Los Angeles. She records all her songs with her older brother finance O'Connell in. There's probably nineteen nineteen or so I and they they still recall record all their songs in the bedrooms in their childhood home in Highland Park in LA and back in twenty sixteen. Billy eyeless released this song on soundcloud that she'd recorder on put up there called ocean is completely blew up. And she ended up getting signed by dark room Interscope records that song has since been streamed hundreds of millions of times, and she still recording at home, but she's about to put out her debut record called when we all fall asleep. Where do we go? Got a sleep thing going here and the song I want to play is called Beria friend. It's from this upcoming record when we all fall asleep. Where do we go from Billy Irish Beria friend the? Don't you? Why? Why do we go? Come in. Bidded? Oh, what is it exactly pay is the amount painting new out? And my said his to Lincoln about things that the way in can you don't like one, John like up on the staple your tongue? Bury a friend try to Waco. Class killing the shun. Friend. I wanna end me. Why don't you? One. Please. Do we go? This keep you in the dark. Would you expect to my start and get you connected in the park becoming collected? Well, we knew from the start to fall apart because I'm so expensive. Something. I would be. Security keeping. The hatchet. Oh, God so much. So I can't say, no. No. Careful. Very afraid. Try to cook. I wanna end me. I wouldn't. Don't you? Fun. We offer. Oh. Very much a nursery rhyme east thing going. That's funny. You say that because it is such a dark demented twisted. Nursery. Rhyme is how it comes across to me. You know, it's very distinctively different tone from that tender track, but very similar themes. And that's the idea of battling your inner demons that the haunt you. And keep you up at night. You haven't ten stream do have intense dreams. And they just wreck me sometimes I will. They'll they'll be so vivid that all the like a movable disoriented the rest of the day like everyone. Everyone knows what happened right because that really happened. But detail, I'm not going to go into any of it. But the detail that you describe I just I as one who does not remember at all blows me away. Like, you just I'd be exhausted. It they're definitely days where I'm just kind of in a weird mood for the whole day. Because of it, you know, especially if you have a dream about somebody you've lost in your life or something like that. But Billy I says that and I'm quoting her here. She says when we made bury a friend the whole album clicked in my head. I meeting new what it was going to be about with the visuals. We're going to be everything in terms of how I wanted it to be perceived. It inspired with the album is about Beria friend is literally from the perspective of the monster under my bed. If you put yourself in that mindset, what is the creature doing feeling? I also confess that. I am this monster because I'm my own worst enemy, and I might be the monster under your bed too. So there's. Pretty terrifying. Video for the song where she is literally the monster underneath somebody's bed. And it's interesting that she sings from the monsters perspective because you hear her on the song say over and over again, I want to end me, and it seems like really messed up until you realize she's talking about she wants to end the monster. Inside her the has kept her up at night EMMY the debut album when we all fall asleep. Where do we go as out March twenty ninth from Billy will you later continue the theme of sleep. Maybe maybe we'll see. How about you? I'm going to take a some or you just kind of like, there's really no point playing anything else at this point. I've just so completely dominated the show. Oh, no. No. No, okay. I got good two T-Bone Burnett. I love handed remember, so we not brunette is a producer musician songwriter composer produced series t-. You know, true detective soundtrack, oh, Brother Where Art thou which is probably inspired so many people in the world dig into the music of bluegrass and gospel in American roots music, great film. But also this soundtrack was just inspiring to so many musicians. And then of course, there's in different capacities working on films such as the big lebowski cold mountain, the hunger games, he has a new album that. I'm not even sure where to begin with this. It's clever ration- with musician. Jay, belrose, the great Collier, right? And keep CNC who is a musician and an artist and I asked he Bonet. It's it's part of the trilogy's working on the song play. And this first album is the first out in this trilogy. And I wrote Tim. I see the press release stuff our stand it could you please write and help me here. And he writes back, and he says Orwell George Orwell feared that the truth would be hidden from us Huxley all actually the writer feared that the truth would be drowned in a sea of irrelevance feeling very timely. Right, right. And T-Bone Burnett goes on write and says they were both right. And yet the reality. And he's just he's helping me understand the here and the song. And yet the reality if I may use that word of life in the twenty first century is so much worse than the worst distortion nightmare of my youth being there. The name of the song is a prayer that we overcome fear. Compliment these other songs. Yeah. Yeah. So a play I hope Billy Isla. She's listening. Not here. Is the. Stays. Faye faye? Nothing. Here's quite say. A free be none of. Twitchy trigger figure with the bed. Stead figures. Fifty three. Hopefully. She was a victim of life. Circumstance was objective. Several. Prince of hidden meanings sideways treachery failed romances, he was panicking. Dirty being there there. Make a future where we. Let's make him. Crate mix sounds on that accordion that sounds like it's coming in from another world is perfect driving musically night. Oh, yeah. Oh my God. The trilogy is called the invisible light trilogy. This is the first three albums to call the Kuske space and certainly plays with acoustic space. Yeah, I'm hoping to learn even more I wanna just sit down and talk to T-Bone Kibo. Have a drink and talk about this. Because I want understand more. This do you know who singing on? That's sad. It a lot like Macy gray. And I think they've worked together in the past could be her find up T-Bone. Drink at me. You know, he so he has this is I record or while he doesn't do a lot of stuff maybe more for the where does with other musicians. And that's true. The next artist I wanna play John Vander slice is who is back after a bit of break about five years ago decided he wanted to step away from making music and just focus on a studio tiny telephone in the bay area any is worked with some incredible musicians as his studio they're like Saint Vincent and spoon. Deaf Capra Cutie. Anyway, he's back with his own album. Now new music. Glad you're playing. Yeah. This is called the album called the cedars the song. I wanna play called. I'll wait for you. And John can tell us a bit more about it. He says he likes complicated Nair narrators songs narrators who are unreliable who you may not really like very much. And he says the narrator in this song wait for you is saying that his girlfriend is in jail. And he's saying I'll wait for you. When you. Get out. But if you come back clean, I'm going to choose drugs over you. That's what John Vander slice Assane with the narrator in the song await for you. And he'll explain it a little bit more hope so and I think that for me trying to make that character slightly sympathetic is hard and is challenging and is provides the kind of tension of the song. There's a lot of dissonance and harmonic tension in the song. But for me, it's important that the lyrics. Also, there's something to work out for the listener. And he is honest. And if you think about how much it hurts to be lied to sometimes brutal honesty is better than anything else. It's a miracle. I'm not a drug. Shame still hard. Damage sure to. She went to this. Can't get you. Because I'm always going. You can't. Stays. That. What else can do? That's where. It's a miracle. I'm not a truck. Still. It's true. But they. Stashed away. It's good to have John Vander sliced. Yeah. I I'm so happy to have this new record from him the whole albums. Great. Some really interesting cussin' on that song is John mcentire of tortoise and seeing cake couple bands also known for great rhythms. But I love how John Vander slice. Never really does anything just straight. You know? Everything's just a little off in his dream kinda like dream. Yes. Exactly. Great surprise from him is I record in five years. It's out April fifth. It's called the cedars. I'm gonna go out on Lucy. Daycare who made my favorite record twenty teams came out with a song. She's doing this sort of project just the twenty nineteen to it's a series which will put out songs that are related to dates and holiday eighteen. Yeah. In twenty nineteen this case, we're Valentine's Day. She does a cover which we're gonna play of Edith Piaf love, y'all rose. And then. I I understand there's well there others one of my I think might be a Bruce Springsteen birthday song that I'm not positive song for his birthday. And there's an independence day holiday Christmas mother's day. One in this twenty nine hundred series. It's a great idea for for series. But I'm gonna go out on this beautiful version of lobbying rose, which does both in English and the French peel had done it. And she really amps it up on this in this version it's much faster. Boy, and I like the mood shift is that she she turns love into more of a celebration. Yeah. In this first and owns owns song, much more. Yeah. To and there were no tour's Edith. This is thanks to Hilton good to see again. Thank you up from music. It is all songs considered. The dan. Stay some good. Don. That. Key. Close. This year. See? Then. See? Spee. Seems. And.

John Vander John Billy eyeless Comcast Laura Don T-Bone Burnett Dylan Thomas Los Angeles NPR US James Colin David Neil New York Edith Piaf Highland Park Interscope
Introducing Bear and a Banjo

DISGRACELAND

02:04 min | 2 years ago

Introducing Bear and a Banjo

"A new podcast from iheartradio and Jingle punks Barrena Banja this is a story about the two most important musicians of the twentieth century that no one ever knew but that's about to change because now it's my st is less horrifying than it might saw podcast narrated by Dennis Quaid featuring new music produced by t-bone Burnett written by Jerry Houston and Roy I'm Dr Q. and I've spent the last thirty years tracking down there and Banjo so I ask you again your name j Banjo is that you'll given name and I said yes I gave it to myself and I want you to know that I never you Miss Johnson Johnson come quickly you have to hear this Grammy Winning Songwriter Poobah board but the new song featuring original lyric by Bob Dylan step inside of the world to musician to change it it all fine they face off of Robert F Kennedy when they're some into a house committee trying to break up the mock my name is jade if you're listening to this then I'm already dead status evidence as to the identity kills coming up on the season a baron and Badger boys get lured to New Orleans rather mysterious sound booth it even received so much as a thank you note can you believe it and try their hand at Turnham US again to a weapon for the US and earworm sometimes known as a brain room.

iheartradio Barrena Banja Dennis Quaid t-bone Burnett Jerry Houston Roy Robert F Kennedy New Orleans US j Banjo Miss Johnson Johnson Bob Dylan thirty years
Introducing: Bear and a Banjo

The Bobby Bones Show

02:04 min | 2 years ago

Introducing: Bear and a Banjo

"A new podcast from iheartradio and Jingle punks Barrena Banja. This is a story about the two most important musicians of the twentieth century that no one ever knew. But that's about to change because now it's my st is less horrifying than it might saw podcast narrated by Dennis Quaid featuring new music produced by t-bone Burnett written by Jerry Houston and Roy. I'm Dr Q.. And I've spent the last thirty years tracking down there and Banjo you Miss Johnson Johnson come quickly you have to hear this so I ask you again your name j Banjo is that you'll given name and I said yes I gave it to myself and I want you to know that I never they face off of Robert F Kennedy when they're some into a house committee trying to break up the mock Grammy Winning Songwriter Poobah board but the new song featuring original lyric by Bob Dylan step inside of the world to musician to change it it all fine even received so much as a thank you note can you believe it and try their hand at Turnham US again to a weapon for the US and earworm sometimes known as a brain room coming up on the season a Baron and Badger boys get lured to New Orleans rather mysterious sound booth it my name is jade if you're listening to this then I'm already dead status evidence as to the identity kills.

Miss Johnson Johnson US Barrena Banja Dennis Quaid t-bone Burnett New Orleans Dr Q iheartradio j Banjo Bob Dylan Robert F Kennedy Grammy Jerry Houston Roy thirty years
"Broken Record"

Bear and a Banjo

12:56 min | 1 year ago

"Broken Record"

"Tony. Hey there. It's jingle jared before we get started i. just wanted to tell you about one of my favorite music. podcasts broken record from Pushkin. Industries broken record is the PODCAST for music fans, legendary producer Rick Rubin Author Malcolm Glad Well Former New York Times, editor, Bruce, headline and Justin Richmond get the musicians love to open up about their their inspirations and their craft, and usually they'll play a song or two as well. Past guests have included quest love Pentatonic Rosanne cash and David. David Byrne this season. You'll hear from Jack. White and the raconteurs Brandi Carlile and Tanya Tucker Tyler the Creator and more. Our very own t-bone Burnett was also featured broken record where he and Rick Rubin have an in-depth and honest conversation about process artists, progression and Audience tvos tells Rick by producing Robert Plant and Alison Krause's grammy winning album, raising sand as well as other artists. He's worked with Sarah Relics. He even plays a few never heard before songs. Here's a short clip. Are you the point now where you know sort of where the songs fit, and is there ever a calling to like? Say in the end of the second act? We need to add a song. Miss Spot, and this is what it needs to accomplish in the story the up in fact I just wrote. We did a twenty. They call it a twenty nine our reading. which is you get all the? Actors up on their feet, and they read the parts and You saw it. You do it without costumes or without sets, but you get the you get the. Gist of it, the tempo of the. And I realized after the last one that I didn't have a beginning song for Roy and I didn't have an ending song for Dale. Some I went back and I. Did that I wrote a road? A good song called out of nowhere for Roy to start off with so you meet him and strength, and then Dale needed a saw a song at the end of heavy duty number at the end, so yeah and I'm sure we're GONNA we're. GonNa Open it in an Atlanta and twenty twenty in the fall of twenty twenty, and I'm sure once we get into the process of really getting it up and getting in front of audiences. They'll be a lot more changes to come yeah. Beautiful. I loved the The peace and surrender lines really good. Right good. Yeah, thank you and I love the tagline. The Hook Line is Great. Everybody wants to live forever, but nobody wants to get. Good? So. But when I accepted this commission you know to. To write these songs or abuse ICAL and done a lot of work with Sam Sheppard he and identify things for plays and. But A- musicals different because every line has to be intentional, you can't write just a cool soundary. Yeah, he's its narrative yet is narrative. And Planet became a it was A. Sobered me up quite a bit and I started read I. Read Times, Books and I. Started studying frank lesser who I think was the greatest of all the the Broadway. Composers and Lerner and Loewe and these cats. and. It became clear that I was going to have to dance or get off the floor so. I started waking up every morning at four in the morning for about a year. Solid and riding when it was quiet. And then when I got through riding the twenty songs for the musical. I couldn't stop writing so I. I I've written now, I don't know how we recorded about two hours of music. They were GONNA start putting out at April twelve is the process of writing a song for a musical different than writing a song otherwise. Yeah, it is because yeah, because it does have to move the story along. But, but but you start with music I or do you start with lyric US starting with the lyrics, because it's as you say, it's part of the book, it's part of the narrative, so you'd read it like a poem basically yeah. A melody in your head Yeah Yeah, you know melody is really just codified inflection so your as your storytelling, no matter what, and so the every sentence has a certain melody to it. and I was. So I was doing that I was writing, but I would have a sense of melody is it was going down and then you know I wrote We're putting out. We're starting to put out records putting out three double records in the next year this year. Now I'm GonNa Kinda work hip hop because I see these cats. They just put stuff out constantly, so we've recorded a lot of these tunes that have come afterward. Yes I stopped. I really stopped producing other people for the most part although interesting. Just made a record with cerebral. That's really beautiful up to you that she's a beautiful singer, unbelievable and She's also gone through the experience of writing play. She wrote a musical of waitress. And it raised the stakes for her to her. Riding has become much more resonant, deeper and higher. It's interesting to hear her growth through the process. House a collaboration with her different than her the records. Would he say we did it more live? which is what I mostly do? That's the thing I like most. The thing I love about making records. Is when people are playing and singing all at one time and you get they get finished, and you say yeah, that's Great. You know it's such a great feeling. It's such a There's something about people playing together that. No amount of getting it right yet. Counters the energy of the interaction. That's really playing. Yeah, perfection is a second rate idea ashore, and the computer is able to put out perfect music all day long, but it's not nearly as interesting as like those johnny cash records. Ubaid with him just sitting in a room with some people. TURN HIM ONTO A. You know and turning the then turn the whole world onto the song the same way. So that's that's the process. I liked the most and I think. The band was great. She does the same essentially same band that was on raising Sanjay bill rose played drums and Dennis. Crouch played string bass. Oh Played Guitar I. Love that album so much at raising Sanae love. Isn't that a beautiful wrestle beautiful. It really took me by surprise. I. Don't know I. I wasn't expecting. It'd be so beautiful and just. Blew my mind you know. Both the both of them have mystical beautiful voices, yes, and and it was interesting to hear him softened up yet, but on paper. It wasn't necessarily a must-listen fading. And then hearing, it was mind blowing also didn't I didn't know most of those songs so that so I didn't know that they weren't original song, so they were original for most people, yes. Yeah. But It's got some of that same butte. Sarah's record has some of that. Say That one come together Robert Nelson is really I think Bill Flanagan. You know flannel you, don't you? Flanagan was doing that show crossroads. And I think he wanted to do a crossroads with. With Robert and Allison. And it ended up being a record, and then we did a crossroads later, but I think they met. from that idea, Flanagan pitching them on doing it. They met, and they did A. They did a tribute to lead belly or sub or somebody up in a in Cleveland I think, and they enjoyed it, and then they called me up and said you WANNA. Make a record. I sent him those two Gene Clark songs as the first two things I sent through the morning through the night and polly, which I thought had those that chain had that dark mystical vibe that they both have. You know syncing now to to hear Robert Sings, low and soft like that and go back and listen to led Zeppelin beautiful. Showed another side and felt like a side that just the timing of it was right for him. You know like to hear him. Sound like that was a revelation. Yeah, wave sound like a grown man, yeah, made sense when before I mean he says himself in his early led Zeppelin records. You sound like Strato or something. You know. He was saying so I. Yeah, and it imagined that when he sings like that now it's more like he's imitating the old him. As raising San sounds like more believable now. Yeah, I don't I. Really Don't think he could sing their songs. He couldn't sing him in the rain. She used to sing a man you know. Same with Elton, Elton's voices dropped at good octave. Irs like that and he's got this beautiful resonant baritone. Now you're. Listening to some of the old records, he says he's on helium or something after after getting used to his voice now and loving it. and Go and back in here not that they are. Classic and Great Food Same For I. was there any reason you didn't do a second one with a follow up to raise and? I think we may do one of these love. Maybe we should do ray. We should do it together. Let's do it. It's such a beautiful album. Yeah, I I would love to do do again. We we went in and recorded some songs, and having been through all the success, so to speak the stake seem different when we went on the in the second time. and. It didn't feel I. Don't think any of us felt the same kind of freedom that we'd. Isn't interesting how how the stakes changed the whole process. Yeah, yes, but but I think now it's been long enough, so we probably go in and. Play you. That'd be great. You have ideas of songs I hadn't thought about it that much I mean there. I've I've just. They're just been rumblings about about it, so we'll see we'll see where it goes. Have you done any other collaborations like that? where it's been to artists who don't normally work together I don't think I have. Have you done that? When I see it remember I've done. I've done quite a few. You know the Rolling Thunder Revue, which was yes. This studio was part of that whole time. Yes, that was a beautiful experiment, and it was a master class in art and show business I mean there was every Allen Ginsberg Waldman, were they Sam Sheppard was there? There are incredible musicians. Joni Mitchell's their job by us. And how He Wyeth and David Mansfield one great musician after the Mick Ronson from me for Mick Ronson was part of it. Yeah, people from all different parts of the world in different disciplines different places. But everybody came together and collaborated, and it was it was. A tremendous learning experience I've replicated or tried to replicate several times with like the Roy Orbison, black and white night show. Incredible to that was a beautiful evening, rentable and I saw at the other day I was watching it Leonard Cohen, was in the audience. I'd forgotten that. I think that idea of like. Aerosmith and run DMC. Did you have anything to do with that? I suppose. Yeah I forgot. It's hard. It's hard to think you know what I mean. It's hard to think about projects. Yeah, I know exactly I'll just sort of. It's hard to even look back at all for sure and I I. Rarely do me, too, but but that was certainly one of those that changed everything. Yeah and Beastie Boys Change. Them doing I'm down, he had. Did you ever hear that oh? Yeah, I never name out. It never came out and never did no. We couldn't get permission. It was supposed to be on. That first album licensed to ill. Might have been the last thing we recorded for it. We couldn't get permission of it never came out, but I think it's on like youtube or somewhere I. I heard it. Steve Rabovsky played game. When just when? Yes? In Our guy yeah. I'm really D- in. Fully fully fully. Fund so Funny Man They were cutting up. Yeah, I did that. I did the Guitar Solo in the Organ Solo neither instruments that I really play, and it's really shows you like. Season Three of broken record is out now. Find Broken record on apple podcasts, spotify or wherever you like to listen.

Roy Orbison Rick Rubin Bill Flanagan Sarah Relics Sam Sheppard twenty twenty Dale t-bone Burnett New York Times Pentatonic Rosanne David Byrne Mick Ronson Miss Spot jared Jack Tony. Pushkin David Elton
Bear and a Banjo: Live from Winston House

Bear and a Banjo

47:17 min | 1 year ago

Bear and a Banjo: Live from Winston House

"Iheartradio and the US census. Bureau wanted to do something special for the class of twenty twenty, so we made commencement a new podcast with boards of inspiration from the biggest names like Palsy. While we can be sold a lot of things, we will never buy a dream cash. Becky G and pit bull generational change the world listen to iheartradio new podcast commitment in partnership with twenty twenty census speeches available now on iheartradio APP or wherever you get your podcasts, remember you can do something that will affect the next ten years so if you lived in a dorm, don't worry. Your school will count you if you didn't visit twenty. Two Thousand Census Dot Gov to be counted. We're all living in the ripple effects of history. A butterfly flaps its wings in China in the nineteenth century, and your Uber driver misses the turn, the airport or an eccentric genius Vince air conditioning and changes the course of American politics. I'm Sean Braswell host of the thread and I'm back with a brand new podcast presented by ozzy called flashback. A series of stories of unintended consequences listen to flashback on the iheartradio. APP Apple PODCASTS, or wherever you get your podcasts there in a Banjo is a podcast production of iheartradio. End Jingle punks. Hi. Jared good stat. The writer producer director and Co Creator of Berna Banjo this is special bonus episode that I'm putting together to. Share some of the music and a little bit of the story about the genesis of this project. We've been really really lucky over last. Year since we started working on this project to not only be able to make this thing, but also put it out. Have People find the stories? People find the music and really all of the great press that has come out since we started. This journey has been more than I ever expected, but. Many people don't realize that this project really started as a Labor of love was working at. Jingle punks company that I'd founded I was looking to essentially find new and different ways to make music and have music be discovered, and after this fortuitous meeting with Pooh bear who's one of the biggest writers in the entire world, known for writing all of bieber songs. Like where are you now? What do you mean d'esposito and the new song that he just put out with Bieber, which is all over the place, not only ten thousand hours with Dan Shea, but also yummy. He and I quickly. Got Together and essentially started a fake band. We really it was a rare cases. Both of us feeling the grass is greener on the other side and he said Oh. Wouldn't it be cool? If I got to write music for TV and film and I, said Oh. Wouldn't it be cool if I got my music heard by a lot more people and become a big, you know pop songwriter like. Poo, bear and ultimately. We started making music for. roots the miniseries immediately after we admit so the day after we had met drunk at a bar the next day he shows of my office. Crystalline executive from history channel. Calls me and says hey, there's this project, but you're likely not going to get it. I know that you've done all the music for history channel in the past I'd done pawn stars, American pickers top gear and she's like. Do you think you could pull a rabbit out of a hat and find a really really big urban pop songwriter? I said I think I have your person. She came down to the. Jingle punks and immediately met who bear WHO's. an amazing person and really great in the room. When it comes to pitching projects, she said if you guys can turn around and you know twenty four hours forty eight hours. I can quickly put it into the conversation because quest. Love was the music supervisor on that Project I. Reached for the most. I guess. The word is. Lo Fi instrument or I guess antiquated or Antebellum instrument that I could think of because routes obviously takes place a time when America music was not defined yet, and it's this Really really. Dark period of history and I wanted to create something sparse and dark I picked up. Banjo and he was like that's it. I picked out three or four notes and he's. Start, singing, this beautiful melody, and at which point is Krista I? Think we're writing a song, so we're GONNA get down to it. Few hours later I realized that I've met my match when it came to not only speed, but also precision and execution of writing songs and After we finish the song, he said Oh. Yeah, we're a band as well. What do we call these bare and Banjo, and that really was the beginning of how this whole thing started, but Along the way. Barron Banjo as a mini division. I guess within the world of Jingle punks started knocking out these huge brand projects including work with. Him and I wrote a song for Rhonda Rouses. Final fight with the UFC and Jeez performed it and then him, and I worked with pro bull riding, and all of the songs were pretty much the same vein they were. DARK AND THEMATIC MELODIC! And really utilize the two sides of the coin that who bear an are known for him, and his amazing words analogies in me with how to work within the world of brands and you know guitar is my weapon of choice alongside. Drums and those simple elements almost became this lo fi modern urban mishmash that I couldn't quite put my finger on, but the more we kept on making music for other people. The more I realized that we should be continuing to make music for ourselves. Several months into slanting landing all of these projects every time we would have one we'd record one song for client and one song for us one song for a client one song for us next thing I know. I have. Six or seven songs. Meet t-bone Burnett and start playing him some of this music and he says this is great. We should make a whole album, and at which point it validated what I thought in my mind. That Poo bear is amazing voice, but also a true. Inroad to the past of music end the present and the future. He is all of those things, but he's already told his present music and his future music with all of his amazing pop collaborations with every other imaginable, but we've never. Seen what who bear sounds like when you strip away all of the modern production and you don't pick up. These. Instruments that are coup stick. You know for me. It's about the simplicity of the story, and how his voice tells the story, so I'm really there as accompaniment and. after we got this project together I, then scratch my head and I said we have these great songs took us. Several years to assemble not only poo bear's music, but the production that we then t-bone for most of the production of the album t-bone improve air. Never even really met each other. It was like playing telephone talion record bits of a song in. My airstream and then I would take it to village recorders where t-bone would be. Working and we would build these tracks up under his. Production and oversight, and then I play the tracks back for Poo bear and I'd say hey, what do you think and eventually we all got in a room and realize that. There was an amazing project here, but we also were missing one crucial piece which. Is the link to all music. In my opinion, the Bob Dylan of it all and I asked t-bone whether or not he thought it would be possible for us to get a lost basement tape. lyric sheet that Pooh bear could take and do something amazing with and I truly thought that. Connectivity of the worlds of t-bone myself as you know again jingles. Part of American music. History, and and there's a huge. Heritage and Through line that goes from the church. Good Jingle Writers Tin Pan Alley that take you all the way to people like you know Randy Newman Neil diamond. Some of the greatest songwriters of our time really do start in that place, and I've always diminished the role of jingles by even having a lackey name like jingle, jared, but all of these things coming together and then Bob Dylan. on top of all of that I realized that there was a unique American musical story. That we could tell and I thought of. Nobody better than Poo bear as a melody and top line person to take. Something significant like Bob Dylan lyrics and turn it into something brand new, and essentially I'm telling you all this because. It's a new model for how bands and how music and how? Storytellers can converge to do things that haven't been done before in the music business and a business that seen it all done at all and every fat in the world. I had to look backwards to look forward and a big moment for US believing. This was going to go into something more real than just us. Making songs was the first time we ever played them. Live in this special episode is all about. showcasing what that music sounded like the flash point in the genesis at the point where we were performing at Winston House. We didn't know that there was going to be a podcast. We didn't know that it was going to be an album. We just knew that we were having amazing time making this music and it was our first showcase to the world to get people interested in what we're doing and I don't even know if we could have ever predicted what would happen Months and months later that it would turn into something much bigger, but we did know that there was a high concept idea here. We did know that we're feeling a little bit of the strain of the politics of American we want to make an album reflected race class culture, and could look backwards and look forwards at the same time, so this is. doing our first ever performance at the Winston House and if you've never been to the Winston House my friend, Cory Maguire is founder of it, and it's an amazing secret, little place in Venice where anyone may show up on any given night and perform music in the past. They've had everyone from tiny emerging acts that you've never heard of all the way up to Ed, Sheeran and Justin be reforming there, and it's really cool to see music being brought back in a significant way in La especially on the west side because. It's typically not known for that And this performance. Is Three Songs Poo Bear Ni- performing alongside Gabe. Witcher from the punch. Brothers, who has also really amazing connection a T. Bone. He's worked on some of T-BONE soundtracks for his biggest projects, including true detective and I think he recently worked on peanut. Butter Falcon, which is an award contender for this year, but the interesting thing is that t-bone set in motion so many things from ecosystem from us, meeting the punch brothers to meeting Dennis Quaid through an introduction from Cuba, and that he is this awesome silent producer connector that that made this happen happened. He was supposed to be there that night, but because of some unforeseen circumstances was not there. And without further ado, this is the first ever performance of Barrena Banjo live from Winston House performing three songs off the podcast and EP. FIG It. Ever forget. Nobody. Aren't amazing. Guys welcome to Winston House if this is your first time, inch core wires. I would love to say low so. Biathlon show. Well. Special night my buddy jingle, jared give it up. It's all in the name. It's all in the name, but he is the king of all jingles. King all jurors. So for those of you, that do not know. We do these shows every single Thursday night. We've been doing it for the past few years and the whole idea behind it. Was that well I? It'd be cool if there's music on the west side because there wasn't any, so we started doing it ourselves, and then second of all. We're meeting so many talented young artists and going to create a spot for them to hang out. Ensure their music. And so. Everybody's the beginning. She's only one excited about that. So, this project is called barren to Banjo. It is being debuted here for the first time right here first time first time. So. I already introduced jingle jared. We have who bear many of you know. We have a t-bone. Burnett produced the record and they're actually going to be doing a song. They wrote with Bob Dylan. and. Amazing thing and so I guess about further do going right. Right. Here. Through there. Guys get which is gonNA. Blow your mind over here on the Banjo. Give it up for Gabe witcher. Alright without further ado, bear and a Banjo. Becoming out. Show. CARE. Thanks for? His first song. was inspired by myself. Times. I just don't have surveys. Bothers me because. Was So committed to Pan our bills every month, so it was like. Why can they be there for us? And then when they need the moment. Lack of goals showed. Years from the followed. Feel. See? God No. Way. We've. GotTa show. Thank God. Knowing dancing. John. I'm. John always borrowed. Four. An it career at Gd. It means owning the opportunity to play a crucial role in transforming how agencies operate, join Gd it for challenging and impactful work that advances your career apply now at Gdi, T dot com slash. Careers ged equal opportunity employers. iheartradio and state farm know that the graduation stage is the first of many, and while grads may not be walking across one this year. They can get the send off always dreamed of with our new podcast commencement, featuring inspiring speeches from the big names like John Legend I'm honored to have the chance to speak to you to share in this special moment Katie couric. You'll need some very important life skills to move forward. Perhaps the most important one is resilience Chelsea handler. Scare you if you can embrace the unknown and fully jump into what life has to offer you. There won't be much to celebrate and much to enjoy and cash reflect on the work you've done and celebrate moving into your new face, these iconic neighborhood all coming together to celebrate you. The class of two thousand twenty listened iheartradio's new podcast. Commitment brought to you by state farm speeches are now available on iheartradio APP, or wherever you get your podcast and remember state farm will be there for this stage and every stage after like a good neighbor. State farm is there. was inspired by her art. Dear, president. No it's all love with below. This is a whole lot of a lot of stuff that's been going on a lot of a lot of hatred and. Unnecessary is uninformed unfortunate, but you know we're here to society and I just felt like Oh. We should talk about it and I kind of wanted to make a song. Jerry that reflected you know how I feel and. Hopefully I feel like this feeling is mutual. I shared. You've got though. God is not America. So many cruel intentions. No sense of. To, demonstrate! PITCHER! Spain way. We're turning into the state's. Best Mayor De. Curve. That's that's man. No Way. Rationality is says let's embarrassing. Your hearts made of coal by can Paris. Your ideal family is faded away. We're turning into the. steaks and then. That's not man read. That's not. A. That's not a man. No way whereas. You needed. Why can't we help each other foreign changed whereas all the? The whole when the needed. The point of. The. Play. Man. That's. A. That's. A. That's a not man. No Way. So many cruel. No SANSOM value damn stray. Pitcher free. You don't pay no way. Into the events. No. Man! That's odd man. Oh, no, no, no, no! That's not. That's not. Only. Thank you very much. Next on is really really special I would never and I'm GONNA say Kazillion. Very time I never kazillion ear would ever thought. that. We would be able to have with by live. The greatest songwriter of our time. We had honor. You know to work with them. Over. A collaboration. Hope that we didn't let them down. You know that's like. Makes me insecure because I don't WanNa let Bob Dylan down. So, we hope. We hope you loved his body. Song is called gone, but not forgotten. Harvest Power. But not forgotten. Crime wouldn't make stay. ME. Really one. Way. Not. One own Beasley. Own. Twenty. Swag my town. Running neither going where I have to go. For No. One. Go the San Antonio. Grind when make stay? Early one morning and Walter. Davis and then the other women. Some of the first dog. Butter Street takes a walking. In. Stock and Looking now gonNA window. While the rain for three days straight. Two thousand one. How Long My baby may me Wade? Not Forgotten. Know crying wouldn't make the stay. Nandana. A. Just got. An along the way. There my heart. Don't WanNA. Know. Owning! Way. Yes, she's. Dead. And Trying to make stay Nano. Let me. One Just got Says Jonbenet. GUMMING UP A gun. No No, no, no! No No, no! Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah uh-huh! Thank you. After all you've been through the class of twenty twenty deserves a proper sendoff, which is why I heart radio. doritos brings you commencement the podcast featuring speeches and dedications icons. We admire most here from Halsey since we were little kids. We've shown the world while we can be sold a lot of things. We will never buy a dream and pit bull. Who Guys? Stand up. You guys are generation. Make a difference. You Guys Generation Gold change the world, techy g John Legend Kesse Angie Martinez Khalid and many many more all have something to say to you. The Amazing Class of two thousand twenty, so choose firmly choose willfully and choose confidently listen to iheartradio new podcast commencement now on the iheartradio APP or wherever you get podcasts with a special Doritos Valedictorian episode where Doritos takes graduation speeches to another level by naming five Valedictorians giving them each fifty thousand dollars in tuition assistance and sharing their speeches with the world. You are the ones that's GonNa make a difference. I'm Jensen Carpenter. I'm a comedy writer. Die Hard sports fan and I'm terribly missing the athletes and sports. I love so. I'm checking in on them with the podcast called the no sports report with Jensen Karp. Your favorite athletes commentators legends from the sports world are revealing what they're doing. Now that the sport they love is suddenly gone and they're stuck on their couch just. Just like the rest of us, are they staying in shape? Our their kids heckling them as they attempt to home school. Did they almost burned down the house trying to make bread? Are they sleeping in their jerseys at night like I do oh, just me, okay? Listen to the no sports report now and subscribe on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts wherever you get podcasts so. The cool thing about Winston houses that it's a place for discovery, and not only did we get to play our music there? But afterwards the crowds stuck around and corey the founder of Winston House typically does questions and answers with the artists, and this also really set the stage for me. Even conceptualizing what this project is, and it's not that often that. Artists get to not only played their music, but explain what it is in a much more comprehensive way. It's almost like. MTV storytellers, but for a band really at the time with no profile just. Some folks who want to reform it hands. Over here, this was the. I'm very excited as you can hear behind. They're talking about the first show of our tour. A little that I know that when informing at South by southwest few months later opening for Tim McGraw Playing With Aloe Blackett. Sundance and getting to these occurred by a lot more people over the coming months, but this was the conversation that ensued power through the music, but Questions when it's quiet. Start. You guys how this project come about. Well we, we met at a bar at the Nice. Guy And I heard about him because he's a legend what he does, I was like. Like one day. And I really wanted to get into his building so that the television states. Movies We were introduced randomly back Areas Justin Bieber. And He didn't realize I was wasted. Didn't even know Justin and we ended up saying hey, man, you know how people do the minute music industry. English tastes numbers. He never really call each other. It's like the normal music industry, so we actually off each other. And the haters the chance. I get on this route soundtrack the mini series that came out in history channel that you, Kristin and That from there. Those two songs one song that we did it turned into. This sound right here that we're doing. And it'd be cool to like pretend like a playgroup like a play band. Pretend band. We're not really serious and just expectations and the ways feelings hurt. So we, we place the one song in the credits. And then they were like leaving or not like one more song, so we ended up doing songs, and then they got even weirder. His Dan Lewis to New Orleans video. Let's turn into saying yeah. We were officially abandoned that point when we're in light doing these videos out of the blue and premiere. As it's like you know, we're like. No, let's get together once a week on a Saturday maybe spend you know seventeen minutes out of our lives and have fun, and would no pressure noise potatoes make music. That's like this folk Americana Sound. For me, it's like a secret love. I've so many hours of music. So this is like my. Pleasure. have an audio. Dropped Pu into. Banja And it's like you know. He's been modest because like seventeen minutes out of the week for him when he's not writing with little or Justin Bieber. Any of the artists working with J Galvin for us to find free time really is like the craziest thing, so it really was a passionate thing. Over the last two years we'd go to my airstream in front of my house. We'd even go to a real studio and record in Lake a tin can. And then really the craziest thing, was we. Needed to track down Steven Tyler for a project we worked on and I was stalking him on Instagram, and I saw that he was working with t-bone. Burnett and I remembered. I was also drunken met t-bone. Burnett at one point so I was like man. We need to get the Steven. Tyler and he's. Yeah and he's like come on the studio, so we went on through and we sold Steven Tyler a song that ended up being something. We were GONNA. Do for record, but it was something that ended up being the theme to proble riding, but then. Other, random. And now is a whole other experience. That's GonNa, Pro Bowl riding together, but we met t-bone, and that really was the glue that made this thing because it was a bunch of demos that we played him off our phone and he was like Oh. This is the guy who like Oh. Brother out. HOW CRAZY HEART! Two Time Academy Award winner. Grammy's was like I. Think you guys should pursue this as a project and slowly, but surely the two years we've finished. Six songs seventeen minutes out of the week. Very breaks down. About two years worked for sticking up. That's how you do the work some. Time So, actually by the way to several knows obviously t bones name keeps coming up. He's the producer on the record, and he was meant to be your at some personal things came up. He's really sorry couldn't be. But obviously you just shared. I met t-bone drunk fixed prize from time at. Drunk. Yeah I'm sorry I. Think not actually that's not true. You're sober. Really Yeah, that was probably the beginning of the second. Let's talk about the sound of the record. Obviously work on someone like. Has a big influence on that, but. Where did that start? Think it goes back to no PUN, but to lose to the root. Of Us, just that that was like something. We kind of stumbled on in like no build us the standards, world. Who has many by things that's not care. We'll eat and let's just no masters records and I think the sound is released came from a student at those. I root zones that were Americana and relentlessly to this man. Go, and is sanctions on and. Kept long we stayed in trying to make some happy versions of it. Some versions of the. American. Cellphone anthems bike, and just thinking of all these little things. Where you know hopefully, we have big plans for this I'm we want to tie it to a Lotta great brands. Kind of opened up the door and do something new change. And you know for us like having the bones of amazing songs like you know a song is good. If you can play the campfire, three chords a great melody, and you know we're not really in the pressure. When we're writing on this to like, come up with the hit song. We're trying to come up with what's pleasing to us, but then sitting with him, I know he hates when I talk about him when he's in front of me, but like arguably the greatest songwriter of last year's biggest songwriter, currently of all time, but and then biggest producer. Of all time, T I feel like just like as a passenger a fan. I became that in the project, being able to like love the songs. Take it over two t-bone side where he was the ultimate pacemaker and listening to him school us on everything from like the Mississippi, Delta to bluegrass music and real taste maker Shit that gets overlooked nowadays in music. Wherever make it sound like healthy wonderful, but that's not the stuff that we're making in our spare time, so I mean for us to have something like. Maybe no one buys the record fine, but I to like the songs and listen to him in my spare time, and you know when I'm drunk, my cottage up in Canada last. Like cool, we made that. So I think what you're saying. The moral of the story is makes you go out and drink and you'll get to work with and t-bone Burnett. That is the worst story. Young. The business. I gotta ask. How did you guys get building this? That's insane. So I'm a pussy, motherfucker and I knew that you know t-bone had been the musical director for Bob Dylan for. Years Years during. The Rolling Thunder Revue era and been. Charged with taking the catalog and doing new things that he had done the basement tapes a few years ago, with Mumford and sons and I said if we're doing this project day one I want to figure out how to get. Involved in Steven was like. Sure sure sure and we asked enough times where eventually he was like Oh yeah, play contracts with some part of the whole t-bone of it all. He plays Lob Punch brothers. You WanNa tapes. He's done everything like yeah. Amazing stuff like one of the best bluegrass players like in all of North America on everything from fiddle to Mandolin, but with t-bone we asked enough times and I think the moral of the story there is if you're just persistent and you keep asking even if you're a little bit embarrassed and you don't want you know look like a fool in front of your heroes like just keep going eventually. He's going to say yeah. Let's think about this. Let's consider it, but the day we got the lyrics sheet I was in Canada and I called Poo at. They were like Bob Dylan Google. Do you guys and he's in? And I just pictured Bob Dylan sitting on a tour. Typing into like an old typewriter access the Internet. and. I don't think. Did you believe me, I, I told you that. Tell a lot of stories. got. And he came to my office and in like an hour. We just like we just do like work at the desk. To at five hours. To. Thirty minutes. Seventeen minutes. Longer. My theory is longer tastes to do it, but it's not getting the sack you're trying. You're reaching in some. Flow happen naturally. But yet, thank God thank you. Bob, Dylan They care. The year? Years. We have. Guys listening that was exciting. It's the first time we've ever played the songs for anyone so. We Rehearse to actually we actually rehearsed. We're band. We're actually. I got one more Kinda. Hummel Brad for you and guilty pleasure question. What is it like to have the biggest Song Planet Right now? That's the CTO. Very extremely awkward because. This. Questions like this. You know it's okay I, love it, but I would have never thought in years in the million that one that I would have. I mean I've had hit. I've hit records in mind in my twenty two years, but just my biggest song. My career end justice is happening. Be Maturity. Latin so since little. Little strange little awkward when I'm grateful, and it is clearly it opened up doors for those is crossing over so now. No, you say come easy of other smash songs. Committee known it's. It's really like amazing to be part of it and I could say that my wife knows I wasn't really that excited to. Write anything in. Secret like when I don't care I. Really don't WanNa do something usually turns out to be really massive big. Turn like figure out ways how to turn off my feelings and not get my feelings hurt by out here and really mean it, but came from me, not carrying. It's amazing to be a part of that record. Amazing to be part of history I'm really extremely grateful and I. Thank God for Justin in. The. Play and you lose A. Version. Band. So yeah that. Aruna Banjo live from Winston House. He's really build this amazing community on the west side of music, and it was just so cool. To debut our music there, because to be honest as they music creator in an entrepreneur. I live between several worlds. I WanNa build things I want to make things that make money but I also my heart has always been in the live space and I believe that the world of podcasting is going to experience this live boom where people want to hear unique stories unique music in a way that they haven't before in a world where everything is available, twenty, four seven on your phone and everyone's experience are becoming more and more homogenized. This was something different I mean. Maybe when we were starting at I thought this would go over a lot of people's heads, but clearly. To the passionate few who have been following our story, our music, the podcast, and for all the folks that Iheart who have supported it and the brands that have been part of it, I just wanted to say. Thank you to everyone for tuning in the season and I'm. So glad that you were able to discover the story and the album itself is going to be coming out as a bonus package where it's all the eight songs from the episodes plus bonus Zach Brown remix of. Can you hear me now plus? New Beginnings which is a Remix of what we've done for roots, the miniseries, which was one of the first songs Pu, and I ever did, but we have remixed it and put it out for this album. Plus the three songs, you just heard which are live from Winston House very proud of the set of material. We've created and I think people will be really excited and surprised to see what comes next as we. Promote the binge experience of getting people into not only the podcast and re listening or listening to the these episodes for the first time who knows people might listen to music and discover the podcast or the other way around, but the full binge experience of the podcast is available now and Iheart. The record is coming out shortly thereafter with all the songs I just mentioned, plus we are hoping to continue to tell more stories whether it's in the form of books audiobooks, a TV series animation Barron Banjo for for me. This amazing world that I. AM lucky enough to have created alongside poo. Bear Dennis Quaid t-bone Burnett. Bob Dylan and all the amazing writers who worked on season, one Bill Flanagan. Tom Piazza. Jimmy Jelonek and several of the episodes that I wrote alongside Nick, his lotto from detective, just one of the shout, every single person including all the jingle punks helped produce this thing, and it's been an exciting ride, so thank you for everybody who was part of Barrena a Banjo season one. I am jared good stat. And I am Outta here. Dog. Mayor and a Banjo was created executive produced and directed by Jingle J.. Executive produced by Dennis Quaid, t-bone, Burnett and Jason Bear both. With original music by Jason Poo, bear bored jingle jared. Barrena Banjo and t-bone Burnett with lyrical contributions from Bob Dylan. All music from Baron. Banjo is produced by T. Bone furniss. All episodes edited by David Gillick Additional Score by Jeff Peters and Jeff Judah story editing by Connor ratliff in associate produced by. deuce by Tom Piazza Noah Brown Ron. Wallin Jesse. Corwin and Dan Demo-. co-produced by in Clark Kent. For Episode Music, please visit the iheartradio, APP or wherever one found goodness. Baron a Banjo is production of Jingle punks in partnership with our heart radio. Especial thanks to John and Grazia Victor Management Game Rela Mono means. Cristallini from Maine Creative Gail. CONNEL burn in the entire heart team. Extra special thanks to sue. Turn being bearing banjos heads of torch security. For full list of production credits behind the scene for source material. Please visit Barron Banjo, DOT com. Jingle punks is an anthony. Renowned Buddhist. Author and teacher Jarvis Masters steadfastly maintained his innocence since he was sentenced to death almost thirty years ago on a new podcast. Dear Governor Jarvis poses the question. By the execution of one in. From the confines of his nine by four cell in San Quentin Jarvis will share his riveting life story. How is managed to maintain a sense of optimism? In the most dire circumstances are Paulsen lost their mind by now I think I'm was survivor. Provide, the details of the bloody murder and trial landed him on death. Row! Alma women I would get charged. Here details from inside the courtroom is attorneys fight for his final state appeal with newly disclosed evidence that bolsters claims of innocence. Will the California Supreme Court exonerate him reaffirm his death sentence listened to dear governor on the iheartradio APP, apple, podcast or wherever you get your podcasts. Some podcasts are light, fun and Fluffy My. Isn't. I mean unless you think of podcast about a teenager. Picking up dead bodies for living is light and fluffy. I'll tell you this much. Growing up in a funeral home is killing me. My name is grant, and these are my funeral home. Stories listen to season three of my funeral home stories on the iheartradio APP on Apple, podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts.

t-bone t-bone Burnett Bob Dylan Winston House Justin Bieber Jared Barrena Banjo t-bone producer Steven Tyler US twenty twenty iheartradio Gabe witcher Dennis Quaid executive America John Bob Dylan. apple
Jarrow March began - October 5, 1936

This Day in History Class

06:11 min | 2 years ago

Jarrow March began - October 5, 1936

"I'm Dr Q. and I've spent the last thirty years tracking down there and Banjo the two most important musicians of the twentieth century Twat podcast narrated by Dennis Quaid featuring music produced by t-bone Burnett written by jared goose did and Grammy Winning Song around Poobah bowling with the new song featuring original lyrics by Bob Dylan. Listen to bear on a Banjo on the iheartradio APP or wherever you get podcast this day in history class is a production of I heart radio everyone. I'm eaves and welcome back to this day in history class. A podcast where we unwrap wrap a piece of history candy every day. Today is October Fifth Twenty nineteen. The Day was October Fifth Nineteen thirty six around two hundred people began their march from jarrow zero to London as part of the jarrow march they were protesting the unemployment and poverty in Jarrow a town in northeast England on the South Bank of the river tyne none of the marches goals were immediately met but in the longer term it did contribute to changing attitudes regarding welfare and social reforms and when the Great Depression the UK in the nineteen thirties industry declined and unemployment increased the economic downturn was particularly bad in industrial and mining places like southern Wales northeast England and parts of Scotland were hit hard because of the dominance of the coal whole iron steel and shipbuilding industries so the places that had flourished do to these industries took a huge all during the depression throughout the Nineteen Twenties and Nineteen Thirties people organized hunger marches to protest unemployment and poverty in the hope of improving their conditions one of those places he says it greatly affected by unemployment was jarrow which had an economy that was largely built on coal instant building eighteen fifty one Charles Mark Palmer established published a shipyard at jarrow with his brother George calling the company Palmer brothers and Co by eighteen sixty five the company had expanded to include an iron iron rolling mill and blast furnaces in the early nineteen hundreds. The company was a major builder of warships for the Royal Navy cargo liners and tanker thinker but when the depression hit the company suffered losses and shut down in nineteen thirty three since Gerald depended so heavily on the shipbuilding building industry a lot of people were unemployed about seventy percent of the local workforce was out of work by nineteen thirty three in a speech she gave in the the House of Commons in November Geral's Labor Party. MP Ellen Wilkinson said that only one hundred men were employed on a temporary scheme where eight thousand Rosen people had previously been employed Wilkinson who was elected as Gerald compete in November of nineteen. Thirty five was sympathetic to the struggles of unemployed loyd workers. People Jerrell were eager for the government to do something about the unemployment. They organized a meeting with a cabinet minister but they were told hold that Gerald had to work out its own salvation so the Gerald Borough Council decided to present a petition to parliament for help establishing word in Darrow throw the petition got eleven thousand signatures it would be March from Jarrow to London to be shown to the House of Commons. They hoped the non-political March would get a lot of publicity and earned the sympathy of the public so that industry would be reestablished in the town unemployed men could work after attending an ecumenical dedication service two hundred men deemed fit set off on a three hundred mile journey to London on October Fifth Nineteen thirty six they had the support of Wilkinson and Gerald's Mayor Billy Thompson on October thirty first. They made it to London a group of of blind veterans also organized a march to London to arrive at the same time as the Jerrell March a national hunger. March also coincided with the Jarrow. March Wilkinson infant presented the petition to the House of Commons four days later but no immediate help was given to Gerald or the protesters who soon headed back to their hometowns though they got a warm welcome when they returned the marchers felt that their efforts were unsuccessful. There was no immediate increase in employment but the Second World War soon brought industry back to the town. Some historians have said that the Jarrell March and other unemployment protests help shape later perspectives of the nineteen thirties and that they contributed to support of social programs after the war. I'm Jeffcoat and hopefully you know a little more about history today today than you did yesterday and give a warm warm birthday shout out to our producer. Alexis who works very hard and it's also very awesome you can find us on twitter facebook and INSTAGRAM AT T. I H C podcast if emails. You're thing sinister yeah no at this day at Iheartmedia. Dot Com thanks again for listening and we'll see you tomorrow for more podcasts from iheartradio visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever are- listened to your favorite shows. I'm Katie couric and I'm back with my new podcast. Next question with Katie couric next question aims to make sense of our are chaotic complicated an ever changing world one question at a time. I look forward to figuring this all out together. Listen to next question with Katie couric couric on October tenth on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts.

jarrow Gerald Katie couric House of Commons London Nineteen Twenties Ellen Wilkinson Jarrow Dennis Quaid t-bone Burnett Bob Dylan apple Gerald Borough Council London Charles Mark Palmer Royal Navy northeast England jared goose UK
Does Our Solar System Contain a Primordial Black Hole?

BrainStuff

08:05 min | 2 years ago

Does Our Solar System Contain a Primordial Black Hole?

"At IBM problems inspire us to push the world forward that's why so many people work with us on everything from city traffic to ocean plastic smart loves problems. A. B. M. let's put smart to work visit. IBM DOT COM slash smart to learn more come to brainstorm a production of iheartradio. Listen to bear in a band you're on the iheartradio APP or wherever you get podcast after the Big Bang density fluctuations in the early universe what have rapidly formed black holes of all masses these ancient objects would have been flung throughout the cosmos and over time they would have slowly evaporated via hawking radiation smaller ones popping out of existence I but let's back up a step why does goals are the most gravitationally endowed objects in the universe after all primordial black holes are the most ancient kind of black hole there hypothesized to a formed right of something in the outer solar system there's precious little direct evidence for Planet Nines Existence Enter the Black Hole hypothesis in September astronomical techniques are rapidly advancing many tiny bodies in the outer solar system have yet to be found planet nine thought to be a rather more substantial object however with average distance at which earth orbits the Sun that's ten to twenty times the orbital distance at which Pluto orbits the Sun So if exists planet nine takes between ten thousand scientists think that some extreme object is out there in two thousand sixteen planet Hunters Constantine but Teagan and Mike Brown of Caltech announced their discovery of a group a tiny worlds beyond the orbit of Neptune the object is assumed to be a hypothetical world called planet nine which has extremely far-flung orbit around the Sun and causes all it's caused a bit of a stir no this kind of black hole does not pose danger to the rest of the solar system it'd be too small for that but in the distant regions nineteen astronomers Jacob Schultz Durham University and James Unwin of the University of Illinois at Chicago published a new study describing their alternative hypothesis the gravity system's reveal that exoplanets between the masses of Earthen Neptune are relatively common why our solar system doesn't contain a world with this mass range is a puzzle a very distant Trans Neptune objects the were all strangely clustered moving was similar orbital alignments their orbital alignment was also weirdly tilted but a planet nine really is out there it would be profound historic discovery that would reshape our understanding of the system of planets that orbit our sun suffice to say personal weirdness in the outermost reaches of the solar system isn't being caused by planet at all instead they pointed to the potential presence of a primordial black hole a theory in twenty thousand years to complete just one orbit the possibility of a large world orbiting the Senate such a huge distance is captivating studies of other stars so it appeared they were all being corralled by gravitational interactions with a larger planetary body but no other large planetary body exists in that region so kinds of gravitational chaos out there in the dark but as the search for planet nine wears on and astronomers have yet to so much get a glimpse of it some researchers are pondering the object could be might not be planted at all could it be a primordial black hole the solar system is a big place and while if it's out there planet nine should be emitting infrared radiation energy leaking from the planet since its formation but so far apart from the gravitational effect massive around five to ten earth masses scooting around the sun at an average distance of four hundred to eight hundred astronomical units or a US since one a you is that solar system it's impact would be significant the only evidence we have for Planet Nines Existence are the gravitational effects it's having on Trans Neptune objects and Black Teigen and Brown hypothesized an as yet to be discovered planet was out there and so the hunt began while many theories of cosmic evolution any planet with an orbit this extreme would be very difficult to spot but astronomers are scouring infrared surveys with hopes of seeing distant object slowly crawl across the sky analysis of these micro lens events suggests that there's a population of small black holes out there with no other visible clues except for their gravitational impact on space time suggest that primordial black holes should exist we have yet to directly observe one though there is some compelling indirect evidence take for example microloans what's the transient brightening of stars caused by massive object passing in front of them causing a brief brightening by the curvature of space time creating sort of magnifying lens in the population of Trans Neptune objects this could also explain why little optical or infrared observational evidence for planet nine exists a primordial black an extreme orbit around the sun sure enough their models suggest that primordial black hole with a mass within this range would cause orbital turbulences like the ones already observed searchers therefore suggest based on their findings the experimental program needs to be expended including searches for high energy cosmic rays like x rays and gamma rays coming from moving sources while this is an interesting avenue of steady replacing hypothetical planet with a hypothetical type of black hole may be overcomplicating the mystery mm-hmm Shilton unwin took a fresh look at the Trans Neptune object peculiarities and simulated. What would happen if a black hole with a mass of between five and ten earth masses had Cole would generate neither signal in fact if a black hole is nearby and may also be dragging around a cloud of dark matter that could be generating different types of radiation the planet nine we spoke with Mike Brown he said could blackhall explain the gravitational effects we are seeing in the outer solar system absolutely all we know is there is a six earth mass something out there and we don't know what the something is Brown points out that planet would be the most obvious something but as long as it has a mass of a few earth's could be anything but the plausibility of it being anything other than a planet is extremely low to say the least with tongue in Cheek Brown updated today's episode was written by Dr Lia Neal and produced by Tyler Clang brain stuff visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows added it might be a six earth mass hamburger or a Burrito but yes it might also be a six earth mass black hole the physics of course don't care one bit what the six earth mass are made of you could equally well hypothesize that every exit planet that we only detected by the radial velocity method is a black hole is it possible yes does it make any sense in the unit when is a planet and not a primordial black hole astronomers just have to keep searching and there's a growing consensus that will be discovered in the not so distant future we'll keep you I know while investigating other gravitational sources of what may be messing with Trans Neptune objects is good science. It's more likely the planet the doctor and I've spent the last thirty years tracking down there and Banjo the two most important musicians in the twentieth century podcast narrated by Dennis Quaid production iheartradio's how stuff works for more on this and lots of other topics that are surprisingly dense for their size visit our home planet has works dot com in for more podcast with my heart radio in Hebron's Lauren Bogle bomb here there's something big lurking in the frozen hinterlands of our solar system that appears to be tugging at the hiring new music produced by t-bone Burnett written by jared goose did and Grammy Winning Songwriter Poobah Bowling but the new song featuring original lyric by Bob Dylan.

IBM Mike Brown A. B. M. Dennis Quaid Hebron Bob Dylan t-bone Burnett Cole Dr Lia Neal Lauren Bogle apple Poobah Bowling Tyler Clang jared goose eight hundred astronomical twenty thousand years thirty years one bit
Show 366: Feat. Pianist Peter Dugan from L.A.

From the Top with Host Christopher O'Riley

1:00:08 hr | 2 years ago

Show 366: Feat. Pianist Peter Dugan from L.A.

"Support for NPR and the following message come from Dulles International Airport with the highest on time takeoff percentage of any airport on the east coast. I a d means I'm already departing more at fly Dulles dot com slash fast. High end thanks for downloading from the Top's podcast. I'm pianist, Peter Dugan and this week we're coming to you from a studio in Los Angeles rather than from a concert hall, and this was a really special experience. The kids got to work with audio producers and heaven exclusive behind the scenes look at the way, things work here. And it was a very intimate way to hear an experienced the music. I hope you enjoy the program. From NPR. It's from the Tom celebrating the power of music in the hands of America's kings. Here's today's host the superb multi genre pianist and from the top alum, Peter Dugan. Hello everyone. And welcome to a very special episode of from the top this week. We're at the Hollywood scoring studio in Los Angeles, California. One of the great recording studios in L A that produces film scores TV themes and incidental music for the booming media industry here and we've brought a fantastic group of young musicians from all over the country to come to L A for a four day residency. They're learning about the art of studio production. They're getting a behind the scenes look on. How music is recorded for film and TV. And of course, they're here today with us in the studio recording today's show for NPR. We want to extend a special. Thank you to the bulge foundation for making our work in L A possible. Our first teenage musician is here with us today. His name is James POE from Palo Alto. Cal. -fornia james. It's been such a pleasure rehearsing this piece with you tell everyone what we're about to play today. We're going to perform Cigane by rebel this peace means gypsy in French and growing up. I've always wanted to play this piece because I thought it sounded very fleshy and impressive. So I'm very excited to share it with you guys today. It's very flashy. But it's also soulful. So when you're ready, let's take it from the top. James POE, nineteen years old from Palo Alto. California performed Cigane by MAURICE reveal and I had the great pleasure of joining him at the piano that was a wild ride James. And it was so much fun to play together with you. Thank you. Thank you. I wanted to talk about your grandfather. I know he was a major influence in your life. And wondering if you could talk a little bit about that. My grandfather used to listen to me play a lot when I was young when I was five years old. He would often come visit me when I was practicing. And that's when I heard me play later on as he grew older, he moved to a retirement home, and I often visited to perform for him and his friends, and he was always very proud of the fact that I did this, and he really they all really enjoyed the music so much that he left me in his. Will. Sum of money for me to buy a new instrument. Well, what an incredible gift, and when you perform that was that wasn't here in the US, right? No, no. I lived for few years in Taiwan. Uh-huh. That's when I began to spend more time with them in my teenage got it got it. And you've performed I mean all over the world in some amazing places, including Nepal. Yes. Yes. What brought you there? I was originally on an orphanage service trip in Paul, and I didn't expect to play music at all. Actually, I just brought my violin along to practice. But on one occasion, I whipped out the violin and the orphans there had never seen such an instrument before. And when I started to make some noise on it. They said can you play us some Justin beaver well. So they hadn't seen a violin. But they share had heard of Justin Bieber. Yeah. Yeah. So what did you do? So I played a famous song from my time called baby. Yes, baby. Yeah. I'm familiar with it. And they absolutely loved it. And this was just an experience that really moved me because they they didn't speak my language. I had never been exposed to their culture. Yeah. And just through music, I could transcend both of these barriers and be able to share some. With them that could make them smile and laugh and have good time with me. That's awesome. And I, you know, that's why they say music's the universal language, and but speaking of Bieber and pop music, I mean, this is something that is actually pretty serious deal for you. You have a substantial online presence with with some some pop covers so talk about what what you do on your YouTube page. Yeah. I I started making pop covers of of just songs that my me and my friends enjoyed middle school. And these covers are from artists ranging from John legend to more recently. Ed sheeran. I made a perfect cover that. I certainly has that just got over one thousand hits cool. Yeah. I just I really enjoy being able to create a type of music that the mo- more modern generation can also connect to classical training. That's awesome. What's what is your most viewed video? It's probably my cover of all of me by John legend, which has over one hundred thousand views crazzy, that's incredible. And I I I happen to see that video. And I know you've got an amazing person who commented on it. They said, maybe you haven't seen this someone's. You don't all your YouTube comments? But someone said that they used that version as they walk down the aisle at their wedding. Yeah. I mean that is so beautiful. And what a compliment I think the nicest thing I've ever had on one of my YouTube videos was coming that said, this video should have more views. I need to take some YouTube lessons. I think I've gone that one to before. James? I particularly love your cover of location by Khalid. I was wondering would you be so kind as to let me sit in on that with you in JAMA little together. Yes. That's that sounds really cool. Let's do it. Okay. Peter. That was amazing, man. No. That was a lot of fun. We we have to do more of that. Yeah. We definitely should. Well, thank you so much for being with us James that was James PO from Palo Alto, California. Over the last thirteen years from the top and the Jack Kent Cooke foundation have awarded over two and a half million dollars in scholarships to talented young who have financial need. We still have more to give go to from the top dot org to learn more. Hi, my name is I'm seventeen and that's my incredible Frenchman teacher Auchan Royce this to now. Can do in Germany. He was actually born in the same town as Paul Hindemith and played with the radio Symphony Orchestra as the principal player and guess played with the Berlin Philharmonic. I'm from Georgia, and I had never been out of the country before. So when my teacher told me that the Berlin Phil would be playing mother too. And he was going. I decided I would set a goal to go with him. So that I could hear the piece I just been introduced to the peace and had begun falling in love with it. At first my dad, wasn't gonna go. But he didn't want me to go alone. So he had to as a sixty three year old. He got his passport for the first time and. On ever forget the flight told me to sleep because I'd be messed up with time zone got there. But I was too excited to sleep. I was crying baby on the flight. So I was basically up the whole time. But I know it's not the baby. Berlin is just so full of life. Everything seemed to be moving even the champs are amazing going down the middle of the streets. And we were there before Christmas. So we went to the Christmas markets. My dad isn't a frivolous type. But even he was blown away by those markets, and we're speaking everything like a little kid and Kenny shot. And the women in Berlin are like supermodels just walking around the streets. My dad liked that to my southern grandma joked with them. Now, don't you bring back no Frawley line? I can see why she was concerned. But the biggest thing was going to be hearing the Berlin fill, of course, when we first got to the harmony we met up with autumn, and he took us to the performers entrance where we met Stefan door, the principal horn of the Berlin, Phil. And he took us backstage we got backstage passes, and we went into the horn room and everybody was eating cold cuts, injuring in Germany. Now who is kind of heaven just partying with the the big stars of Costco music. Then I heard them do Mahler second. I'm sitting in the audience and the finale comes and. As soon as I start hearing, the foreign lines that almost made me cry few few months ago when I first heard the piece. It was almost uncontrollable just being there with my dad and with autumn and. Just being in the experience of the beautiful hall and all the players that I've always have up to. So I have my teacher outcome Royce to thank for that incredible experience. And also for introducing me to the piece that I'm about to perform with pianist, Peter Dugan. We'll be playing Robert pl- annouce piece legend. you just heard Zachary pots age seventeen from for Saif, Georgia perform trays of Leon by rubber plow long with me. Peter Dugan at the piano and Zak is one of our Jack can cook young artists. If from the top sounds a little different you this week. That's because it is instead of coming to you from a concert hall or performing arts center where coming to you from the Hollywood scoring studio. I'm guest host and pianist, Peter Dugan and today's young perform. Ears have come to this fantastic. Soundtrack scoring stage in the middle of LA to learn about film recording and electric production for a long weekend. And of course, to record this special studio version of our show settling into place now in front of the Mike across the room. For me is the excellent seventeen year old cellist Davis, Hugh from Palo Alto in the bay area up in northern California. He and I are going to perform the skirts from Frederic Chopin's sonata for cello piano in g minor. Davis you age seventeen from Palo Alto, California, performed the Scherzer from Chopin's sonata for cello and piano in g minor that was yours truly at the piano and Davis. Let me just say what joy that peace brings me. I have to tell you. I I've loved this piece my whole life. And this was the first time I've ever actually got perform it. So thank you for doing that. Oh my gosh. That's soaring. Melody was amazing. Yes. It very much is what does it feel like when you get to when you get to that middle section, and you get to play that melody, that's so gorgeous, it feels like a very romantic serenade. And I have to think of the wildest things in order to be able to come up with an idea that matches such beautiful melody, and I've actually I feel like there really isn't anything that that can describe that melody so just invest myself in making it sore. Yeah. There no words. Well, you know, one thing that I noticed playing this with you is how sensitive you are to what I'm doing over at the piano, and how to new are to to the to the group. And in fact, you I know the chamber music has been very important thing for you lately. So talk about what what chamber music does for you. So I feel like chamber music is a really good bland of the group element that or Castro playing provides. But also, the soloist element that playing by myself would provide it can be a really powerful bonding experience to play with a group of maybe three others, for example. I'm in string quartet right now. And I feel like it's actually the rehearsals are we bond the most we we tell stupid jokes and stupid stories and make a beautiful these product out of. Yeah. And make memories too. Yeah. I mean music it's can be so great. It can it can. Bring a social element to your life. It's how you make friends, and it's also how you get to travel. Right. So you've been to some amazing places, but there's one really wild place that you got to go to can you talk about that? So in two thousand fifteen I went to 'cause Don for the Klay costs key competition. And it's it was a totally new type of country because it's rapidly urbanizing and trying to become more of a European country. Even though it is located in Asia. And so you have this this fantastic east-meets-west kind of fusion concede that in the architecture, well, which. It looks almost like Las Vegas in terms of how spectacular is Davis. Thank you so much. Thank you so much for being here for your gorgeous playing. And so great to talk to hear about your adventures. Thank you. That was Davis you age seventeen from Palo Alto, California. Support for from the top comes from senior helpers, an industry leader in Alzheimer's dementia and Parkinson's care providing families with personalized in home care, helping your loved ones remains safe and independent at home at senior helpers dot com. Support for NPR comes from this station and from epic records with Sarah Berra's new album. Amidst the chaos produced by T-Bone Burnett, featuring the singles armor and fire Sarah Burrell's. Amidst the chaos is available at apple music from Glenmede an investment and wealth management company who believes an investment in arts education today will impact and enrich our lives and those future generations and from the William T grant foundation at W T grant, foundation dot org. From NPR. It's from the top celebrating the power of music in the hands of America's kids this week. We're coming to you from Hollywood scoring studio in Los Angeles, California coming up a rhythmically driven piece by the contemporary composer, Valdo gully Hof performed by a teenage pianist from nearby Burbank. California today show in Los Angeles has made possible in part to the generosity of the bulge foundation special. Thanks to Yamaha artist services, New York for generously, providing the CF X concert grand piano for this week's broadcast here again is today's host pianist and from the top alum, Peter Dugan. Erc Wong is setting up in the studio now, he's superb fourteen year old guitarist from San Jose, California. Eric thank you for making the trip down the coast today. No problem. It's a pleasure to be here. And you've brought music from the top has never featured on the program before. Would you please introduce it for us? I'm gonna play bacteria three and one from the five bag Till's by William Walton. It's the only piece that William Moulton forgive tour and he worked for Julian grant. Great. Let's hear from the top. You just heard Eric Wong age fourteen from San Jose, California perform the third movement. And then the first movement of William Walton's five bag tells Eric that was incredible. What you do with with the guitar all the sounds you make all the colors you make especially those very delicate sounds I really really enjoyed that performance. Thank you like most people, I really love classical guitar. But you know, I'm pianist, and I have to confess I don't know a ton about the Qatar music that's out there. But as I was getting to know, you Eric, you know, I was thinking this is someone who can help me I want you to guide me be my tour guide through guitar music and helped me create the perfect Spotify playlist for guitar fans. Okay. Who's your favorite guitarist, my favorite guitars would probably be David. Russell, david. Russell see. Now. I'm not. Familiar with with him. But you've brought some of his music for me to hear. So let's play a track. And I want you to tell me what you love about this. That is grand overture by Morrow Giuliani. What I really loved about TV Wessels playing was how. Warm and deepen clean, his Tony. I've probably never produced a sound like that in my life at all. He's probably one of the greatest keytar in the world and his take Nique is. Incredible. Yeah. He also really brings out how majestic the pieces self right because he plays it with such incredible pacing in addition to the sound, which which of course is beautiful. Okay. Check. David russell. Great beautiful. Okay. So any other guitar tracks that you're in that I should know about. Well, I really like this brother serve you dare. They played a piece called to heels, which is probably my favorite peaceful. I really like how the beginning mysterious, and then how transitions into fest peace and. Really exciting section. It's not really traditional classical music. But it's I think it's really cool. Do you? Do you ever see yourself playing piece like this? I hope so like perhaps one day with my sister. I could play it. Sisters guitars to Yemi sisters class. How cool is that? Nice. Well, yeah when you do play it. I wanna be there to dance. Okay. Because I love his music is so much fun dance. Great. Eric it's been so great to meet you. Thank you for teaching me about some things about classical guitar. Introducing me to some classical guitarist, but to tell you the truth. My current favorite guitarists is user. So I'm looking forward to hearing you play another piece at the end of the program. Thank you from the top musicians wanna change the world for the better. And we're here to support them. That's why from the top offers leadership training to Oliver young musicians. And we're out there with them doing in community engagement projects across the country. Learn more about all our programs that from the top dot org. Podcast from the top featuring bonus content. Not heard on the radio. Broadcasts are available every week at from the top dot org. Today's show is a special studio version of from the top recorded at one of Los Angeles's premier audio houses for film and television music the Hollywood scoring studio as mentioned earlier the kids on today's program are spending a weekend with us learning all about studio production, but our final performer today is a pianist who basically grew up around places like this. She's from just around the corner in Burbank, California. And her name is my apprentice, Maya is eighteen and we'll hear her perform now a piece called levonne by Volvo Gullit Hof. That was Levin Tei by Volvo gully Hof performed by my apprentice, eighteen years old from Burbank. California my own my gosh, this whole place is just shaking right now that was on fire. Thank you so much, Peter what a cool piece before you started. I mentioned that unlike some of the other performers on today's show recording studio like the one we're in right now is actually not such a strange place to you. Can you talk about your very LA? Parents. Right. Well, my parents met in paramount recording studio where they're both working at the time. And my dad continued to work in positions like that and worked for Sony, even built consoles and install them. So take my sister. And I to studios growing up, and we spend time just, you know, at the console sometimes have pictures when we're little of just. Messing around. So cool, and what is your debt? What comes your dad working for? Now. This is this is pretty interesting. We were just talking about this. Well, he works for Disney, but he works mostly with marvel entertainment marvel I've seen a lot of those any have you gotten behind the scenes look at what it's like at marvel. I have every time a new film comes out. My family will go to the crew screening. They have in Westwood. And which the film goodbye before it goes off wish the film goodbye. Yes. That like we sing a song before the film starts to wish it good luck before it's released until the world. Wow. That's so will you will you sing as what have song? 'cause nona. Hey, hey goodbye. You've got a nice seeing voice to it's almost like you're into different art forms. So from what I understand. That's like your thing is kind of combining multiple genres and types of art. Yes, I'm very interested in multimedia club ration-. And I do a lot of singing, and I played a little bit of cello, and so cool, so cool. And and didn't you get to play for Julie Andrews one time? I did. Yeah. That like that was such a special experience for me come about. I have doing a program at the time, and I was working with Martin for who's the consummate stir of LA, Phil. And he asked me to play with him for Julie Andrews, which I had three days notice. It was super last. And it was it was incredible. I mean, we played my favorite things after we played our little classical set, and I just remember her throwing her head back in laughing. And she was so happy when we played it. And it just made me. So if maybe feel so incredibly fulfilled to have played that for her because just made her someone I'd allies feel that way. So that's unforgettable lifetime experience. Yeah. You mentioned that you're into this multidisciplinary approach to our and didn't you actually start a club or something that your high school? I did I had a club. That was a collective all the different performing and visual arts and sort of like a safe space too. Because everything was so separated, and it was really nice. And it's something that I've continued at my school now where I'm at and experimenting with different people in art forms. And I've been compose. More. And it's been really interesting connecting like film with music and dance. It's. What you can portray using this types of media. Maya thank you so much for being with us. We all had a blast listening to you play. We were just grooving and loving every minute of it. It's been great to meet you my practice. Eighteen from Burbank, California. Check out from the Top's online video series to see fantastic young musicians. Collaborating with artists from across the musical spectrum. Go to YouTube dot com slash from the top. We're going to wrap up today's studio experience with another performance by the youngest musician on today's show fourteen year old guitarist, Eric Wong. Hey again, Eric. Hello. What are you going to perform take us out of the program? I'm performing a to number seven by the Lobos from his twelve etudes for guitar a sublime way to conclude our time together, I want to thank all our young performers and thank all of you for spending this time with us. This is pianist Peter Dugan, please join from the top next week. And now, Eric you can take it from the top. From the top is written and produced by Tim banker and Tom vaguely with music director Aaron Nolan the Torpey is David Balsam and the production managers map Teichmann. The executive director is Gretchen Nielsen today show from Hollywood scoring studio was engineered by Adam Hollick with help from Sean Garrick special. Thanks to Noah Gladstone, and Alex Seaver. From the top independent non profit organization based in Boston. Our home is New England conservatory where standing young artists inspirational teachers, transforming classical music, if you'd like to appear on our program apply online at from the top dot org. From the top is supported in part B award from the National Endowment for the arts on the web at art stock of. Support for NPR comes from this station and from the Jack Kent Cooke foundation providing scholarships to high achieving students with financial need J, K C F dot org. From epic records with Sarah Burrell's new album. Amidst the chaos produced by T-Bone Burnett, featuring the singles armor and fire Sarah amidst, the chaos is available at apple music. And from the Arcus foundation, dedicated to the idea that people can live in harmony with one another and the natural world. Thanks for listening to this podcast. You know from the top is on NPR. It's not actually owned by NPR. It's an independent nonprofit company based in Boston and every year it takes a huge push for us to make the show happened financially. So I ask you to please consider donating to our organization that we can bring you joy podcast after podcast, go from the top dot org and click on support. Thank you.

California Peter Dugan Palo Alto NPR Los Angeles Hollywood Eric Eric Wong Justin Bieber Davis Burbank T-Bone Burnett James POE Eric it bulge foundation YouTube Jack Kent Cooke foundation Auchan Royce Berlin America
Episode 1016 - Dennis Quaid

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

1:23:25 hr | 2 years ago

Episode 1016 - Dennis Quaid

"Hey, folks, go hit up. Our longest running sponsor just coffee to get some WT f roast order it at just coffee dot co up. And if you're in LA head over to co opportunity in Culver city, this Wednesday may eighth from ten AM to two PM to try free samples of the W T, f- roast and meet some of the just coffee team, pow, I just shit my pants. Let's do the show. All right. Let's do this. How are you? What the fuckers what the fuck Knicks? What the fuck stirs? What's happening? I just switch it up. I switched it up. Did you notice I switched it up? The what the fuck things trying to keep it fresh. I'm exhausted fucking exhausted. I was in and out of sweep all last night. Had some weird dream that involves Jeff Sessions. I don't what the dream was. But I I heard a voice in my left ear. I'm only heard that one other time that clearly as if it was waking me up it sounded like this climb. Crime. And the only other time I heard that voice was when I was strung out on cocaine in Los Angeles having a psychotic meltdown hearing voices in my head. And in the same ear of voice said get out. How far out can I go? I asked it you've gone far enough crime. So what does that mean? How you doing? You're right. How's your night crime? Dennis Quaid is on the show. Yes. That Dennis Quaid that we all sort of grew up with and he's grown up with us. I've been seeing him onscreen since breaking away. He's here. I was excited to talk to him because he's one of those guys were odd. We I've seen a lot of his fucking movies. And he's got a new movie out. It's a I don't know if you call it a thriller or horror movie, but I watched it, and it was pretty scary. The it's called the new movies called the intruder. It's in theaters now, and he's also a very different film where he doesn't play a psychopath. A dog's journey watched the range of Dennis Quaid. So that's coming up. I'm talking to Dennis Quaid. So let's read some emails because that's always fun. Let's white ended up subject line ha far talk. Welcome to morning radio. Mark. This could not have been more appropriately timed. I'm about. To pick up. My college age daughter who is proud with the owner of the nastiest gas as a mother I'm constantly reminded that this younger generation doesn't have the same hangups as ours. And this is such a funny example, thanks for the laugh, I'm going to replay the intro just for her, Angie. You matter. I'm so glad that I'm bringing parents together with their kids are going to have a good laugh. Maybe both them. We'll start farting in the car and. Don't get into an accident. This was fun subject line interviewing older ladies country music have listened for nine years. Look forward to Mondays and Thursdays. Because of that two things one when you interview older women EG says he space, Jane Fonda, you interject a ton more yeahs a Hans or just general grunts while they're talking. I'm guessing it relates to your impatience when talking with your mom, it's obnoxious police cut it out. To this. Where he tries to save it Merle haggard. If I could only fly album, simple and beautiful. Maybe give it a listen. Like, he's he thinks. So I then in with me like, I'm going to attack your style. And then like, we're still buddies. Right. Thanks for what you do Scott. So I wrote back I think if you listen, I do that. With everyone sounds like your issue, maybe with your mom. The I went ahead and hit send on that one. I send you how they say. Take a pause. No pause, boom. He wrote back. You never know. What's going to happen that could open up a portal to someone's innards that could go on for paragraphs? But Nope, Scott just hit me right back. Well, played you damn fucking. Right. It was Scott. I went and saw play that's a P L A Y. I know I say like pray play. I went and say play last night called the wolves here at the echo theater company in Los Angeles. I don't generally go to theater in Los Angeles. But I did. And I'll tell you about that just as soon as I tell you about securing your home. I mean, come on securing your home feels harder than it should doesn't it? Your home is your life your shelter your sanity. It's dramatic add rega-, but most security systems are expensive and complicated. They make it hard to protect one of the most important things in your life from crime. Not simply say folks, simply safe offers great protection with security monitoring that keeps your family safe twenty four seven and twenty four seven means twenty four seven because this security never quits protecting you from crime. It'll keep working when the power's out and stay connected, even if your phone lines are out, or if your WI fi goes down, plus simply safe designed to make coming home a breeze you cruise through the door press, your key fob, and you're done alarms off in a week. You'll forget it's there with simply safe there are no contracts or hidden fees. It's just fifteen dollars a month. No BS. Simply safe is seen. That's editor's choice. And the New York Times wire cutter says simply safe is the best home security to learn more and get yours today. Go to SimpliSafe dot com slash W. T F that SimpliSafe dot com slash W Tf because cry. This is crazy. So. I went to play, and I don't go see a lot of theater here. And I do enjoy going to the theater, I this is about a I think it's a young. It's not on third young. They're teenagers right teenagers soccer team. And it all takes place on the field over the course of several different matches with some interstitial stuff, some blackouts interesting moments with the actors, but by didn't know what to expect. It was a little theater. There's no intermission now as an older gentleman. You do worry about the P problem. You know, like, I I guess I'm at an age now where Mike should I drunk? That's soda like how much of my night is going to be ruined. Because I can't go pee. I almost peed in my car. The other day. I'm not proud of it. It happened in England and it happened here. I tell you about that. Did I tell you about what happened in San Diego with the p thing? I I gotta be honest with you sometimes. There are moments in life where you realize I'm not afraid I have courage. I'm not gonna take any shit. I don't have to take any shit. I was driving to San Diego, and it was getting dicey. And there was nowhere to get off. There was traffic heading in. And I'm holding in P. This is not an it was not. I don't think there's a physiological problem. I just had a p and I was in a car, and and there was nowhere to go. And there was traffic. So Mike an gun in it to where the hotel is. I don't know exactly which hotel on that yet. And I just park in front of this one. And I it wasn't the hotel. I was staying that. And I walking because I figure I can get away with this. It's a lobby situation. Where's the men's room? And they're like you gotta use the one in the restaurant next door. So I go through and it's connected to the hotel lobby opened the door. The restaurants not quite open yet. And there's a they're they're setting up the waiters there, and they go, dude, where's the men's room? And he's like, hey, it's only for customers. And I looked at him. I said I'm fucking going. He saw it in my eye. He saw it. I'd like to think he was afraid of my power. But I just think he was like this old guys in trouble. And I I'm not going to step in here. So I went, and I peed, and I got out, and I I went to hand them a few bucks. My here take it, man. Take it if if that's your trip, man, if whatever you just did there, if that's the extent of your power. It's for customers. Only. Why do you think you think I wanna be in this situation? I'm grown ask fucking, man. Do you think I wanna be like, you know, at the point? I'm at now with you for customers only have here. Here's a couple of bucks, buddy. You know what I mean? Thanks for for not getting in my way. 'cause you you could could've just you could've stiff arm me. You coulda. Tackled me. No, no. It's for customers. Only in a Mike is two eight. Now, you feel that wetness on your leg. That's because peeing in my pants. And you're on top of me holding me down who wins? You take a couple of bucks, buddy. One take a couple of bucks. No, man. You have to do that. All right. I'm just trying. You know, thank you could have gotten ugly was I talking about. So I go to this theater thing. It was great. It was moving getting nowhere was going to go. It was you know, I it was it's one of those plays where it's sort of like is this the way it's going to be this whole six to eight women talking like they're kicking around a soccer ball, or however, many what I don't know. But in they're talking, and they're talking about things that teenage girls talk about, but they're also talking about genocide, and they're talking about periods and they're talking about boys, and but it all just evolves in a very subtle way. It all takes place around, you know, kicking around and soccer ball waiting to play. And it just evolves into this thing that becomes very deep and very moving, and it was beautifully performed by all the performers and there's a twist at the end where it just kind of fucks you right in the head and right in the guts, and you're crying, and it was really tremendous. And look, it's it's I just wanted to give you heads up because it closes today. So, but it was good. It was good. So if you want to tell your friends about it, you can tell him that I said it was good. No one really. He has time to go to the post office. You're busy. That's why you need stamps dot com. Stamps dot com brings all the amazing services of the US post office right to your computer in your house or at work. Whether you're a small office, sending invoices an online seller shipping out products or even a warehouse, sending thousands of packages a day stamps dot com can handle it all with ease. Simple. Use your computer to print official US posted whenever you want for any letter any package any class of mail and send it anywhere. Then once your mail is ready just handed to your mail carrier or drop it in a mail box with stamps dot com. You can get five cents off every first class stamp and up to forty percents off priority mail, not to mention it's a fraction of the cost of those expensive postage meters. I'm telling you from experience people, you save money using stamps dot com. When you combine that with all the time you save two. That's a pretty good deal. Right now. Get a special offer that includes a four week trial, plus free postage and a digital scale without long term commitment. Just go to stamps dot com. Click on the microphone at the top of the homepage and type in W Tf that stamps dot com. Enter WT f. Wow. Am. I nap ING I feel like I just took a nap was I wake through that. This is all dream. Did you hear a guy say crime right near year? Crime. Are we all dreaming? Nope. Hey, I'm gonna talk to Dennis Quaid. This has been a stream of consciousness shit show. I hope you enjoyed it. Dennis Quaid as an actor. You might know him for many movies, the the rookie the right stuff breaking away the big easy. The long riders. Remember that one were all the brothers were in it. The Quaid brothers to carry deemed brothers. Christopher guest has a brother. They brought him in welter he'll movie I'll ask him about that. The new movie is the intruders. It's in theaters now, and he's also a very different type of film a dog's journey which opens on may seventeenth. This is me and Dennis Quaid. He brought his dog. He brought his bulldog. That's the first time a guy shows up in my house with his dog. He's he's that. Okay. I'm like, not really. I've got three cats in the house. I don't think I don't see how that's gonna work out. He's not just we even somewhere weavers somewhere. Mike. I don't know. And then I realized that my yard is actually enclosed, and I could have a dog if I want and we put his dog out there, and it worked out was a bulldog kind of a small mid sized bulldog. I guess they come in sizes BULLDOGS, you can order small medium rewards, his was a medium sized bulldog. I think it was called that what kind dog is that it's medium bulldog. You can get it in small, medium, large extra large. Those are the ones that they can barely walk because they're they're they're hobbled. And like, isn't it adorable? I dunno it. Looks crippled is that adorable. Anyway, this is me and Dennis Quaid. It's a little odd. Ted what people up into the house, you know, past the bedroom. And you know, what it is man. Yeah. What's the future entertainment? That's right. Well, so do you now that contain now? Yeah. Did you have you done? Some other home Homebase podcasts Willem actually executive producing and narrating a podcast with the T-Bone Burnett and Bob Dylan, and I just had T-Bone over here. Oh, you did. Yeah. Yeah. And endured good stat Jared. Good set. Yeah. He's a single Jared jingle heard of him. No, wait. But you're going to do it with Bob anti bone will Bob is contributing a song a PU Baird, you know, Pooh Berra's now who's at -sition. I I feel like I should know. Dave Mason, mostly a writer producer these days. He did the American version, but like this besieged. He has a couple of other real hit songs with Justin Bieber, okay? Out of his his record. Yeah. So like T-Bone he was one of the last guys out in the garage before I had to do the construction. But his ex wife not Sam. Yes, it is. Yes. Sam Phillips Sam Phillip lives around the corner. I just ran into her. No kidding. I ran into her husband yesterday introduced myself himself thrilled, and she grew up here. So he like knew the neighborhood. Incredible. His daughter lives over here. Yeah. They had a daughter together. He's about late nineteen twenty something like that. All you all your kids are getting older. Yeah. Okay. You have young kids too. I have eleven year olds in twenty seventy but T-Bone back for forty two forty three years out to LA who's one of the first people, I met, really. Yeah. He was helping my brother to audition for the buddy Holly story for the lead yet for how. And then later on I married. My first wife was PJ souls who used to be married to Steven soles at who is in the alphabet. Yeah. With T-Bone the backup band for Dylan at the time rolling thunder. The alphabet. Yeah. And the rolling thunder revue. So we used to go to a lot of Dylan concerts, had than T-Bone was the producer of great balls of fire music. He did that whole movie. Yeah. Were you play Jerry Lee Lewis? Yes. Did you have to deal with Jerry Lee Lewis on a daily basis? Now, we're recording by the way. I hope you're good. Yeah. I mean like what year was that? I mean, I can check. If you don't remember that was nineteen eighty six or seven, I think, and that's why I remember that movie good movie, and it's a tough role to play because he's he's a deep dark. Well, yes. And and like, but there's also the pop star side of it. Yeah. And you know, the beginnings rock, well and the the. The movie was done to to be like a summer a release movie. Yeah. Yeah. But then you really start thinking about it. And they kind of made it into, you know, very kind of pop music, Gary accessible type of thing and stayed away from most of the dark stuff. Yeah. You think about it? You're going to drop your kids off at the theater. Does the story about a twenty one year old guy? Marrying a twelve year old girl. Right. Yeah. In this other way. Yeah. Yeah. And that's kind of a tough ask I think, but the film, you know, looking back at it. Now it. It's kind of infectious it grows on you. Sure. I well. I mean, I I was sort of fascinated with him the fact that he's still alive and he's still making records and some of those guys like there's collections like they. They never stopped recording. There's hundreds of recordings. I don't know where they found the time. Right. Well, of course, they all they always find the time musicians that they're always recording. Right. Rather record then go on tour. So they're just in the studio hanging around the studio, just whatever comes to mind, they'll go in and covers do cover songs they'll go in. I mean, these days it's very collegial. Everybody's working with everybody else. Getting in just like social media. They're getting it on your social media. The you know, the invite somebody who's up a coming. You vite old established guy to into your song give you street credit or whatever. Right. And it's also easier without the without tape. Yeah. Yeah. You know what? I mean. Everybody's got a studio. Just like you in their house and do good qualities. Yeah. Right. So when you okay. So like you've only done that a couple of times, I guess where you actually play a real person know whole bunch of time. Really? Yeah. I'd say maybe a quarter of my roles have been real people. Like, it seems like like Goro Cooper and play. Doc Holliday drain Morris. The pitcher in the rookie a real guy Colladay you can't hang out with. I mean, you could hang out with glare. Right. And you could hang out with Jerry Lewis. Yes. But when you're hanging out with Jerry Lewis what I mean, he must have been a pain in the ass on some level. Not. Yeah. I say this because you know, he it sometimes it almost seemed that there was a little bit of the fourteen year old bully schoolyard in there. But that's him. He has you know, a a a learned sort of? I won't call it suspicion. Right. You know, he kinda checks people out. Yeah. Yeah. And but he's also just very generous human being he was one of my teachers. Yeah. And we we did a video together. I have such respect for him. Did he teach you how to play like Jerry Lewis all ova? It's all about the left hand. Right. But he was also on the set every day at he was over my shoulder growing. He gave wrong sand. Yeah. That's about right. So we're like it's weird. When I got interview guy who I feel like I grew up with, you know, in the sense that like very familiar to me, you know, from all the roles going back to like breaking away. And then like, you just always sort of their you're always been there in and now like these like, it's these insurance company commercials issuance. Yeah. Kinda funny. The surprisingly painless they are why the the sort of inside idea of it. Yeah. Like, you're like show lift the veil to be transparent. Yeah. But the weird thing is is like in a time where you know. I don't think a lot of people are watching a lot of television. You're like all over the place. Like, you know, like, you're all of a sudden this familiar presence to everybody on very immediate level. You know, every I think that's you finally at the end of the day, there's someone from just about every generation. It's kind of trains generational for a different movie. Right. Could be Dragonheart orbi dreamscapes going further back, you know, for the that. I have my parent trap kids. Yeah. The rookie was another one. And in the company, what was that other one that good comfort company love that movie? Yeah. But the certain generations that were kids with the solve the kids grow up, right? And the sched- you got. Yeah. Right. And they remember you forever. It's had better memories than adults. Right. And it sticks in there. Yeah. Yeah. But like where do you come from originally? I come from Houston, Texas. Really? Yeah. I twenty years in. Yeah. So your family's I- Texan. Yeah. Or Houston sometimes referred to as west Louisiana. Uh-huh. Oh, really? There's a lot of people. That's for sure. And are they from Louisiana your people well going way back with that? But my dad was from Oklahoma. He he grew up in Oklahoma. I five years of his life fact, boys oil more reservation type, and my my cousin is, gene. Autry, really third. Cousin? Yeah. He was my grandfather's first cousin. No kidding. Yeah. So this what he's the singing cowboy right? Yes. That's right. He was also on the angels at and KTLA. He's probably I would say, gene, Autry dollar for dollar. You could make a case that he was probably the richest man in show business all time for a relative to you. He wrote Rudolph the red nosed reindeer? Okay. Just that as frosty the snowman he wrote along with a couple of things, and then he. He had a very successful career as a singing cowboy and then he bought KTLA channel five here in Los Angeles. And that was back in the day of early television. When there was no east west coast hookup. Sure. And so channel five broadcast to the entire western United States. Yeah. It was basically a network, right? It was huge. And of course, he owned all land to that went under it out a bunch of land in Anaheim. And I built the angels play there, and he owned own that, no kidding. So if you take it for dollar for dollar, you meet the guy I finally met him in the opening of wider became to that how old was he by the time. I think he was in his nineties, maybe live very long time. Yeah. Great great human being and it was your grandfather's first cousin. Yeah. This wild, and you're and they're from Oklahoma. But then. Yeah. People from Louisiana and then people from Texas. Yeah. Ben, and what you're what you're what was the family's business. My dad was an electrical contractor and had his own business. Yeah. He, but he was also frustrated actor and. Andy was crooning around the house. All the time is Elvis was being Crosby. Oh, really had. Yeah. Yeah. Dean Martin and Frank Sinatra. He never really he didn't actually perform he didn't like he wasn't a guy that he would go down to the of the piano bars. You said. Yeah. You love loved you that he was always doing routine introduced my brother, and I to acting really by pointing out Akers on television, and alario and hardy and all those bets, you know. And that's probably we got what we got the bite. Yeah. Oh, yeah. You think and what's the difference between you guys three and a half years? It's not that my that my mom's from east taxes, which means that would be the very country east Texas by my grandfather came to Texas in nineteen. Oh, one at a covered wagon really from Tennessee from the south like, it's all right across. Yeah. Yeah. And what what was he doing? What did he? Well, he was said Abeid, basically kind of scraped all his life. He was a he was a rough neck oil wells. Yeah. And which is a very tough job. Sure. You know, because my his wife had died. My mom's mom and had to. Scrape scrape it together with the kids, and he was a cotton farmer for a while. He was a tent preacher for awhile. Sold bibles door to door. Last job was a guard in an Austin is insane asylum and been his wife's his second wife. Father died left those kids some land, and he hawked his Buick and he used to be a rough neck on on oil rig. Yeah. And he knew what was around during the late fifty. And what do you know, they struck oil, of course. And he went to being worth, you know, zero to two million dollars just like that just because his wife's kids inherited the land. And. Yeah. So let's let's take a look under there. You've got to be something under that. Well, he actually they wanted to sell it. So he he bought the the oil oil rights to it. That's that's a good story. I think it's interesting that there was a time where people could just decide to be preachers. They it didn't require. It's you could still in fact, even more than ever was social media. Yeah. Yeah. You could decide to be appreciate you can make a go at it. You can make a living. If you were entertaining. And right that it was really a performance trip. Right. Yes. And you can even call it yourself. Dr. Dr. No, no. He didn't know he was not. So you guys are I just like Tex I grew up in New Mexico. But it's definitely not Texas. And I like Houston like Houston's become kind of a weird eclectic city. It's very spread. It always has been really really, you know, it's always had that Cal town stamp on it or whatever. But it's it always has been a very it was a great town to grow it in for music. Oh, yeah. You had all kinds. You know, it was a big city. So you've got a lot of different kinds of music different influences music's important because he play right in the east. And so you you get that Texas rock rolling that. Sure. In western swing thing. And you lose the Anna invites you get your yes. And then it's cosmopolitan. So my dad was singing and Bing Crosby Dean Martin. But also, you get some of that Cohn who told music the aquarian Mexican. Yes. Exactly. Yeah. Yeah. So it was. It was a great place to gerrad for for music like a music Gumbo down and you're a Qatar player. Yes. And we're did that start before the I think. Yeah. Of course. Yes. Yes. It did. When I was about twelve my grandfather actually bought me my first Qatar. It was like twelve dollars Qatar from western auto from what we're not up on strays. And I tried to learn a light my fire. Was that was the first. Yeah. To try to learn it. Yeah. That's nice. You tough at actually fear. I learning. That's not a great one two of those are kind of radical. Yeah. Some Clarence or right? You hit there. You're you don't have the muscles that IT where he in rock bands. We had we call them combos back in the sixties. You know, like from seventh grade I had combo back. It was a way of getting girls. That's so that's what a lot of people say it wasn't. It wasn't a big enough to be in on the football team writing. I really worked out wound up the drama room, basically. But what about so your brother was was he also in the music? He was more into stand up comedy really as. Yeah. As a kid growing up and fact had a really great with Trey Wilson, remember, Trey Wilson, he was in raising Arizona. He was raising finished furniture guy. And he's great. He was also Sam Phillips in great, right? That's right. We will we we're all university of Houston and had a standup Kwaidan Wilson. They were team incredible. Yeah. And they came out here. And they would be at the comedy store when they first came out. Out here. Really? Yeah. This is back early seventies. Re. Right. When the comedy store was, you know, in its heyday, I get I guess so. And that's how he got in. Yeah. Was doing standup. Yeah. And he had a little apartment right behind them. The comedy store were there on sunset. I had no idea that Randy Quaid was a comic. Yeah. But he didn't come here for that. He but he did. Yeah. He they were they came through taxes with he did last picture show casting because I wanted local casting for the Peterberg arnovitz off authenticity. Yeah. Accents and everything. And they went to the colleges and ran it was at the university of Houston, and he was doing parting was. Yeah. He was he was the acting act the acting pro. No. I remember the part he played this sort of Dorking ridge kid. Yeah. I last Acer. And yeah. And then by Donovan which called him up a year later and said come out here and had do this a little roll with Barbara, Streisand and rhino Neil. And what's up, doc? And that was his, you know, take it out to LA, and you were stayed and you were and you were just get starting college I seat. So I was still in high school when he got death rose. Yeah. How's he doing by the way? He's doing. All right. Yeah. He's doing fine. He's doing ok, okay. I'd like to see him work. Yeah. That's what I like to come back and do some more work. I think a lot of other people would to he's a great actor is one of my favorite actor. No. All the time growing up, you know. No, he was he's always been the last detail is one of the great moving credible. He's great net. Yeah. Well, as long as he's okay. So okay. So you saw he had success with it. And then you just decided to follow suit or you're already heading that way. Well, I was kind of torn between music, and and an acting. Yeah. But you know, I was in high school, and I wasn't really we're I'm Barbara. I like I said I tried to. It's a right of passage to go out for the football team in taxes, and you were to I was basically I was kind of ladder like one hundred thirty pounds because he seemed pretty athletic now. Now, you know. You know, played football baseball players shape. So, but I I would definitely wasn't gonna make it. And so that's how I wound up in the drama room, all the girls, and it was at the last time like in terms of continuing to study because I was talking to my producer about this. It's not a lot of guys like you who are around anymore who can do sort of anything, you know, as an actor like, you you, you know, your your own thing. But you get your ranges insanely you. Also gotta give it a the younger guys time to, you know, age mature, and rob and get get experienced. It just comes through experience. I never had any strategy in my career except to try as many different types of things as possible. But in terms of training, did you continue to work on that stuff? I mean, you know, what I was at the university of Houston. There was this great acting teacher. Which was the reason I was there. And my brother was there to Trey and a lot of people because of Mr. picket. And he taught acting as a craft. Uh-huh. And I was torn between music and an acting. And and you know, I so my brother's success which made it real that you can actually get jobs out. Yeah. It wasn't some faraway world would right mind was and I was a series of high school. But then when I got into Mr. Piggott's class within the first week, I knew what I wanted to do with my life, and it's a real gift for eighteen nineteen year old kid, and that what what was so inspirational about that guy because he taught acting as a craft, and you know, I was very much into human behavior and psychology, and that's really what acting is. And he's sort of made that apparent by being observant of people that of creating a character of some sort of from the outside in the outside. We'll tell you what's going on with that person on the inside. That's how it works. Yeah. That's that's just one of the things. But you know, it wasn't like a method method classy wasn't like that that basically for the opposite. Yeah. Any Eddie had. You know, constructive criticism could be brutal. And but it taught it as a craft that gave you a space to really learn and and fail. That's really the space to fail rather than being out here getting jobs and failing right odd camera right now, you get to fail an a an a class doing a scene, and then come end and work on and come back into it again. And you learn by trial and error and. Grants you work from the outside. So is that stayed with you that kind of outside in because like I believe that's true that if it's on the page, and you do what's on the page. You'll find who you're supposed to be right. Yeah. Well, that was another thing that he thought is you know, what what does the playwright say? Yeah. About two character does the character say about himself. What what other people say about the character? You know, what what are is actions and as motivations, basically. Yeah. And how does that fit into the spine of the play or the story that you're the story about sort of always thought sort of like mythic, mythical, right? And every role of taken, you know, no matter how silly of part. Yeah. And it's become over the years. I mean, I used to write everything down and at but over the years, it's become more like osmosis. What is gonna seeps in there? What did you write down? The. I would I would write all. Stuff. Like that. Like a backstory. Yeah. Yeah. You know, a whole history and stuff like that. Now, it's just something. I just kind of I don't know it just got so much a part of me that it's like I said it's just like osmosis sleeps in and I just find myself doing it. And I let go a lot more than I used to well this like this role. I don't know that I've seen you in the intruder the new movie, I don't think I've seen you be this horrifying. That that part was just let it go to tell you the truth. Of course, I may have had I may have had about two or three people. And that you know, that I've met in life may have had them sort of in my mind. Yeah. But but like, yeah. But it's still be back. There actually can I have a nice laugh to tell you the truth here. But I mean when my wrong, isn't this the most evil fuck that you've like, see, I guess. Yeah. I guess so as the warm and fuzzy guy, wait some slimy. Straight up psychos who was that. Who is wanted more slimy characters you played for the guy the traffic, the lawyer, a lawyer traffic for sure yeah. Yeah. He wasn't necessarily Ville. And he was you know. The Siamese bag man, right right comp morally compromised fella, but this guy in the intruders, like like menacing and horrible fucking thing. You were doing what your teeth? I don't wanna spoil anything like what was that? You were. There's a moment where you're on the bed, and you just kind of looking at your before. Like, oh, yeah. The the humans just obsessed. He's OC date OCD OCD. Oh OCD. To do with really kind of making. Sure, everything which is fries you clean, even though. He lived in filth. Yeah. But so that was just an impulse. You had. Yeah. Just check it. They just needed. They needed all like some stuff. They shoot him hearing, you know, and his space. It wasn't even scripted. So just right. Like made it up as we went along. I noticed it, and it was creepy that. Yeah. They don't show it. But I actually had my hair like a Hitler haircut. Oh, right. They didn't wanna go overboard. You'd think that wanted to pull back from because you know, I had this tendency, I I'll go out there and just go big because it's much easier to pull back than it is to to add is what I kind of thing. And so I would have, you know, actors don't really know what's too much. Sometimes that's what a directors our and Dion such a great director. And just you know asked him at the beginning. Please just pull me back. If you see me going a little too far with us because it's easy for this part. Right. Because you got a lot of leeway, your psycho. Yeah. Yeah. What? Yeah. You're the pound gorilla. So going back, though, what what were the first movies for you like the before breaking away? There was a few before breaking away. I came out of here. And I spent he's right after college you come out here. Yeah. I come out. Well, I I didn't even finish college. How about two and a half years there because I was going to be an accurate that reason I went, and you got enough you're get it was not really going to do me much. Good out there. Hollywood matter. You felt like you learned enough. Oh, yeah. Yeah. And. It was time for me to go. So I came out and set my picture to every agent in town and got turned down, and the so I started calling casting director were you living with your brother for the I was on his couch for about the first couple of months? In fact, then I my very first movie set I was on. Randy was doing Missouri breaks, Mani Brando and Jack Nicholson, I remember that you know, why he just woke up 'cause I cut your throat. Yeah. Oh, that was my first Senate was I'm watching monitor Brando and Jack Nicholson, it's a pretty good movie like Brando is like out there, man. And he's dressed with the old lady has had that man can do the script. I know all out of and I would go to dailies every day and watch Marlon Brando DA, do they do ten takes of a scene, and he would do it ten different ways. I'm trying to remember your oh, your brother was one of the guys. He was chasing. He was. Yeah. He was in the crew got an excellent you had a great couple of scenes, especially you know, we're at the campfire before Marlin kills them. Right. So that's how you got introduced. Yeah. And then you know, I got an agent after about a year. I caught was calling up casting directors, and you know, just out of variety where it said films in the future. And I've just go into an ask for an interview. Just because you know, because they the ones that Cass film and and nine out of. Ten would say, no one would say, yes. And said go in and Finally, I would look at my shoes for the first couple of interviews because I learned how to do interviews that way right now? And after about nine months of that one of them called up one of those ages turn me down, and I got an agent and then about two months later got a job. Did you meet Brenda? Oh, yeah. Yeah. I actually taught Brando a couple of chords on the mandolin for in. Had to do a scene where he's playing man to let play guitar, right? End up. They said the Marlins got to learn to play mandolin anybody here play mandolin. Just oh, I do I play mandolin to win. Of course. It played. I didn't play mandolin. Is it just I play mandolin the same tuning? No, it's different tuning. And so I. I just went to the winds that music story got like a chord book and learn the three chords that were in that song now and. Until I got to spend an hour in his trailer with them. How's that was like a big thrill of my life? I could barely talk. Just put it that way. It was it. Was it weird? Well it as far as being starstruck. You know? Sure. These days. I definitely don't get starts drug over too many people. Right. I I mean, he was my idol icon, you know. And it was before he wants to loopy, right? He never went totally loop. Now. He no he he never did. He may have seen that way to the outside world. But he he was not he was a brilliant genius. And he was Abe is also just a very sweet, man. Uh-huh. And you know, get spending our trae there with them. Yeah. Yeah. And did you did you talk of a hardly remind arly revisit talking about. I can hardly put a sentence together. But you're showing mandolin. Had something like. Something real defunct gonna hold onto. I guess that's a good point though about about the. What people in the world know about somebody. And what p like e you know, it is sort of strange assumptions we make he's he was an odd guy. You know, who you know, was gifted and got old in got the, you know, sort of like he seemed strange to in the, and, you know, there was a certain ex- of alienated from the business because I was back in the day sorta invented the idea that you you don't go to ward shows, right, right? And he turned out and had you know, what was her name that that accepted the Academy Award for him. And so that that put him in the kind of sort of oddball category. A lot of native American. Then bounty was that was it sort of had was he was in Hollywood jail for a quite a few years for about twelve years because that movie gone over budget. And and they, you know, they pinned it on him, you know, and every other actor I'd. Allies, and because he basically invented modern acting. I know which movie was it for you that kind of like made you like oh streetcar named as are crazy. Yeah. And how on the waterfront like an incredible. So you get so you're out here like a year, and you're meeting you're showing brand new out of play mandolin. That's exciting. Well, yeah. I mean, that's that's enough for a lot of. What was it? I got my first movie was called nine thirty fifty five the date. Yeah. It's the date. The James Dean died, and it's a fact that it had on on these seven college kids in Arkansas, and it was James bridges was the director at the paper chase in China syndrome. You might remember him from. But a great director. And he was from Arkansas so orders kind of basically his story. Yeah. I remember the first time the camera came in on me. It was really quite intimidating. You know, and they had big cameras back then and maybe they own bam huge lights. Yeah. Is the right before? I I take one of those big cle- lights are that are about as powerful as the sun. Yeah. If it owned the wind it just falls over about four food frozen. And you're already for your kind of spooked you like a dog. That's been checked. You gotta give them what? And but there was a great way to start. Because Jim was you know, he was very protective of everybody. And you know, it was bringing because all their actors was our first movie Dennis Christopher's first movie had to come out because I don't know that movie. I should know came and went. Yeah. At the time is very personal story. It was you know, a movie of the seventies right there. You know, and you were like dark too, you know, and I was twenty one seventy seven twenty one. Yeah. And that led to breaking three house Twenty-three. Oh my God. Yeah. The you know that another nine months got another job, you know, kind like drive in movies did a couple of those and AIG, you know, and then breaking away came along. And they're really changed my life and my career, and you were you playing teenager. Yeah. All right play teenagers up till I was twenty seven up until I play Gordo Cooper. I was I was still playing teenagers. Go breaking away was a huge movie because it was movies where you know as a kid you go see it. Right. And it was such a surprise to is basically, the I think, you know, had they had those kind of would turn out to be the brat pack in the in the eighty right youth movies. You know? I think breaking away was really the first of those. Yeah. Because there's you Dan stern Daniels darn Jackie Earle Haley. He he appeared for a while. And then he came back who's fantastic. Wow. I was so proud of him for that. When he was out for a while. Right. Yeah. Do you guys talk? We had a reunion about three years ago. It was like the thirty year, reunion and debts Christopher Steele has the the bicycle from there. No kidding. We got together. And I haven't seen much. Denison. I've stayed in touch through the years. He played the guy was obsessed with the Italian, right? And Daniel was Daniel. Right. And you know, it's weird as I can't really remember. Yeah. I can't remember the other team at all. I can't remember the jockey guys. I know you guys were sort of the working class the long, right? We were the local right? The Lory were you know, in we felt like strangers in our own hometown, right sickly retreated like that. I remember there's that scene where you're swimming in the quarry and you hit your head, and it's so hard. Yeah. That Corey actually that we were at the that was the Corey that they built the Empire State building from realit- very quarry. Yeah. I just know when I went to look at that college, which I did after I got out of high school. I was like this is where they did. Lovie one hundred feet deep down there choir. I know I went to the quiet. There's a couple of them out there. Right. And they built the school out of that too. Then booming ten right? So that's where it starts. So then all of a sudden and also Peter Yates, basically taught the four of us film acting. He had me how to be the that wasn't a stage. You're the cameras in close, and it will read your mind. You don't have really have to do anything. You don't over you it. Well, you always have a tendency to want to like act, you you think other people can't see it rise. And also when you see yourself on film, especially for the first time, you don't you can't tell anything, you know, any right? But he he was you know, I'd been cast for a reason because I looked and sounded like the guy he wanted to you know, the character. Yeah. And so he taught me how to be small. You're the troublemaker kinda guy. I was the guy that tried out of like probably the most pissed off. Yeah. Because you know, my days of glory had come and gone high school football, right? That's right. Yeah. Right. Yeah. But it's such then when it came out, I remember driving to theater, my brother was in the front seat. You drive us there. And he goes looks like he got a hit because the line was around the around the block that was back in the days when they'd have lines around the blogger at people would just show up. It was kinda mysterious. Yeah. To show up. Yes. Far as openings, you know, like on Ani's could smell movies back. Then I think these still canditate the truth. What's weird? I just talked to Irwin Winkler like two weeks ago about the right stuff specifically and about like, the sort of jarring experience that you, you know, everything leading into that movie and everything about that movie should've been a huge movie. Yes, it should have it. How you the box office. It was made two million dollars tenets for opening weekend. He couldn't figure it out. Oh, I know. Exactly. Why you do? Yeah. There's a couple of reasons why was it something it was it was an election year. John Glenn was running for president, John Glenn. And none of the astronauts had anything to do with the movie they wouldn't get behind it though. They wouldn't get behind it. And I I it just like they wouldn't get behind the novel. And I know why because Gus Grissom the way Gus Grissom is Tom Wolfe turned him into a literary device. You know, because they had this whole thing about the top of the pyramid. Right. And Gus you know, we gotta who went up there. What had dimes in his pocket? You know, like he's at souvenir. Yeah. Sure. Yes. He did it everybody else did too. Okay. Okay. But to make a thing of it. But it was about the hatch. He was in the second flight. Yeah. He, and you know, what he landed the hatch just blew right right that and they lost the spacecraft or went to the bottom, and he did not get the parade that that's all trapper dodger. This is all true. And, you know, not even go to the White House. So. So he was disgraced. So that's what wolf would have you think? But that is not the truth. Okay. For one thing that was the first time that they'd ever had a hatch on a spacecraft before that they were just bolted in and the astronauts at all insisted that they have an escape hatch that they could blow with explosives. Yeah. And and had a window and also a window. And so because they were pilots I they wanna control of it. Right. This one has some and, but so they sent it up and on his fight, but they had not take into account the pressurization effects on those hatch lows of bolts water and effective splashdown hit the water and the thing just did blow because of it wasn't designed right? And he almost drowned is, you know, suit filled with water, right? He was about three seconds away from actually going on feet down. Like spacecraft right because it was gonna be dead weight. And he was saved. And if he was so disgraced if he was such a. Head blown it so much than why did they give him the first Jim night flight? And why did they give him the first Apollo flight where he was killed there on the launchpad? But the re I think he would have been the first man on the moon Tae the truth because he was the best pilot that they had he was very calm and cool. He had an engineer's mind. And he was he was the one that was really most of all complaining about because it was so too hurried process getting you know, getting to the moon. Yeah. That you know, they skipped a lot of quality control getting there. Sure. And he was the one that was complaining about the most back. He was complaining about the the wiring that they had in front of them in an option oxygen rich environment and at metro. Round up. They that's how they got killed. So so basically, the the brotherhood of astronauts were like fuck this movie. Well, I would save it would be so much. Fuck this moving at. But. Well, Gordo Cooper. I was I I was lucky because it just because I'd read the book I grew up in Houston, which is space city. Gordon Cooper was my favorite astronaut was kid. I was right in the pocket of that age where the rolled in the TV you. So I'm going into space replace wanted to be a cowboy or anything at Gordo Cooper was my favorite astronaut original seven because he was the youngest of sort of like a rock and roll. Yeah. Yeah. Really liked that name Gordo grand? And then I wound up in the book came out and said if they ever do a movie this. Give anything to play him. Yeah. And then I went into auditioned for and what are, you know? I got it. Yeah. It was like the dream of a lifetime. And then guess what his like this scourged everybody from contacting their astronauts, you know, or whatever why. But Well, I I guess either what either liability or sued or NASA wasn't behind it all the rest from the get-go because they weren't NASA wasn't behind didn't really like the way, Tom Wolfe. I betrayed everybody as well. Right now. Tom Wolfe was trying to create a novel right with things. And so he needed alliterate devices with this whole theme of the top of the pyramid. But turned out go to Cooper la- three miles from me in LA come on over the valley. Yeah. So I call them up and say come over. He was the most generous wonderful, dude. And he's. From him. I learned to fly because I I was telling me, I should learn that radio voice. You guys got, you know, like learn fights y'all to learn to fly. So he sent me over to bud wall on aviation their advantage. And I got my pilot's license while we're doing while. We're doing the film on the sly. And but I got he's still fly. Yeah. I fly jets citation jets. No, I kept. I kept it up after you know, that must be fun. Yeah. Well, it's darn convenient. Yeah. Put it that way. But we have a plane. I've I've had three y that I had a bonanza single engine which I really miss, but it just got to be I would fly four hundred hours a year, which is a lot. Yeah. And for dirt reasons, but it just got hours working so much, and you know, this and that that you know, that dwindled down to late ninety hours, and it costs you're right hangar than it does to you know, to fly. So so. So hang out with Gordo did. So you got a real good sense of that guy. Oh, yeah. And I flew with Yeager in in a bonanza over over the lake bed. We're used to we're ponchos was and out there at Edwards Air Force base. And just he was on the set every day. It was like having John Wayne. I guess I love that's my favorite moment. Really oddly of that movie is your moment. On the press conference where where you know when they asked who's best pilot? You ever have that moment where you like your thinking of Yeager, right? Yeah. And then right? You're looking at right. But like that beat that beat. Yeah. He's going to give away the unsung hero. Yeah. It was the guy that could make it because you didn't have a college degree number one. There were college degrees. And you know, Yeager was the best pilot and and shepherd was so good. If I was really that. He was so he and he and yeah, you're like hung out like every day they'd be over there you look over. And you know, they had the hood of SAM's truck open the Gord over the edge because Sam doesn't fly he was afraid to fly. He had a thing. I guess he'd had a bad experience. But he did fly. He drove everywhere. Really? Yeah. So he had his truck. Yeah. And maybe over there, and that's Yeager was from West Virginia. You know, basically started out repairing lawn mowers. That's how we learned about engines. So you know, they loved and they just they build. They're talking to engines all day long. I always believe on help to you know, his stick Biman's. Yeah. Stig abatement. I might have me stick. Is great. I think that's the first time. He did he acted too. I think the first well, the coal miner's daughter. That's right. Was that after before that was before? Now. Memory now. But, but I I love that movie. And I thought the script was great. And I thought the comedic elements were great because there are like the thing. That's great about that movie is it's it's a great heroine story. But there's a lot of comedy in it, and it's become a classic as since. But the original thing was why did it fail at the box office. Right. So John Glenn was running for president at the time. And I think that had a lot to do with. They were then Walter Cronkite actually did an interview right around the time that it was coming out. Yeah. And you know, he was with the astronauts and with NASA and all that and the way they portrayed the astronauts was this boy scouts, basically, they could do no wrong. And you know, they were they were human beings who are out there doing things, we probably should we wouldn't want our wives or right? Sometimes franson. Oh. And that was you know, the press went along with it back, then you have pop. Right. You're following your every move one to you never made. There's never been Janati and managing the image. Yeah. Everybody's in Walter Cronkite. You know, these guys were heroes put their life on the line. They weren't used to being celebrities are and so. Walter cronkite. This the movie based on based on based on that and show too much of their humanity in a way like too much behind the scene. I guess he thought it was a little too one-sided about, you know, the sort of extracurricular thing and also the way, but really basically the way it treated Gus Grissom, and and rush I agreed with that tell you the truth the where they had because that's what people will remember. And he, you know, he gave his life, right? Really for. He gave his life. They went in there knowing that they basically had about a fifty percent chance of dying every time. They went up me up. That's interesting. Because like, I don't know. I don't know that Irwin wingels to any of this. You know, they probably did because they saw they saw it from, you know, just another movie, and you don't you can't blame them. They're they're out to make turn a book to film. Right. And it was a perfect timing for the for the film. I thought to it was right there sort of when it came out at the you know, sort of the beginnings of the of Reagan administration the right time for it to succeed. Yeah. And I think actually. One of the the towards the shooting that I think that's when the one of the shuttle's blew up was it that early. Yeah. Thought I went down to I remember going down to NASA for that was just the research is great. You got to go all the stores say authorize per so they let you in there though. So, but they weren't supportive of the movie, but they still let you go down there. And yeah. Yeah. Yeah. That's wild. Yeah. You know, we we skip. The we didn't talk about the long riders which I was fucking excited about I remember because I was in high school still, and it was like all the brothers. Yeah. It's fucking Walter hill that yeah, it's like you and your brother, and is there a third Kwait? Well, we have a half brother named his buddy. Was he no he was he was just born above. It was oh, the key hasn't accumulates. Yeah. The teachers. Yeah. It to and then carry brothers three carrying brothers. Right. And the Chris guest had a brother who's gassed you. Sure. Yeah. And at his brother, I just love the whole idea of it. I remember being a pretty good movie. It was a really good movie Walter hill, directed it. And he knows about the James game. And those are one of the last of the great ones of that particular era. Sure when that when when westerns were going out of style, he's still see some good ones. Every every once I just read a book about there's a new book about the wild bunch about the making of the wild bunch Peckinpah and that whole trip down there. It's just crazy, man. Yeah. Just going down to Mexico and just you camping out and like the risks. They took and like just how sane it was. Oh, yeah. And like most of the guys he had just he was tapped into that whole crew stunt dudes. And does they do anything they'd come in? You know? After a hard night. Oh, yeah. And they just Sam just a recover would say go Bill some track. Go build some trapper dragging shot knew that would take at least an hour and a half. So get get rid himself. Right. Yeah. Did you ever meet that guy? I actually owned Sam Peckinpah and and Warren Oates owned piece of property Montana. Yeah. And Warren, I Warren, and I did tough enough together. And we became good friends, and I owned a little piece of property in Montana. They I'm, but then and Warren, and I it became kind of like if kind of fatherly in a way, and he had a heart attack at age fifty one in died with his boots on there. And I bought his half of the place with pack and Paul and then peck about died about ten years later, and I bought his half from his from the kids. So I had their place in Pekka bus cabin. He warms down the bottom, and it actually plumbing. Yes. Out beautiful place. And then Sam was up three miles up in the mountains. No running water, no plumbing. No electricity. You know, it got everything out of the creek. And he had his bookcase up there. He built the bed the bed, and he built it and the table big huge wonderfully may crap of such craftsmanship. Sure. Did not a nail in it, all pegged. Oh. And then this bookcase was there and yet, and and there was a nineteen seventy two playboy magazine. There is a the holy bible open up the holy bible. And there's a couple of Polaroid's in their of, you know, some stunt guys and warrant and then this picture of Sam in his long Johns on the side of a house. A got he's got his holster on, you know. He's he's he's got he's got his gun in and great. And then there's the holster sitting right there. And then there was Mason jar full of moonshine that that's the way he lived in Montana. Yeah. That was his vacation house. Yeah. Well, it's nice. You got an opportunity to. Oh. Yeah. Well, I never met Sam. Oh, he didn't know. I never did. Because every time I go up there. He would be in town. I guess at the brewery hotel. He liked play poker? But real care. We're great friends. I had that place for twenty five years just recently sold it. Oh, yeah. I I love those that I I used to do like Peckinpah film fest every year and just go through all the way from your ride the high country right up, you know. Yeah. I mean, like they're really why they're really trippy fucked up man Murimi the head of a freight fucked up the war notes his favorite where he's just talking to the head. He's driving with that wrapped head, right? And he's talking about, but my favorite is the wild bunch. It was just it was a. As far as that that era of the sixties early seventies. And yeah, that movie along with buying CLYDE of really ultra violence that was in that film was as art and because in even compare how weird western man, but it's so risque n-, you know, it was risque risque at the time. But now you look at what's happening, right. It's nothing. Yeah. And what we see on television every day, you know, and and reading the book about it. I didn't really take into consideration. A lot of the kind of like this. These were guys in a transition period in the west they were old timers, right? Trying to. Yeah. You. Yeah. You see a car? He always put it like an automobile. And and a lot of his movies. There was an that was sort of like about the end of the beginning of something else. It's like the ballot of cable Hogue with Robards. That's all about a car showing up Iraq. It seem end of their world. Yeah. Exactly. Yeah. Trippy man on why keep saying trippy. But it's like it's deep stuff it's deeper because it's trippy, man. Yeah. Man. Well, then. Okay. Well, we'll just I'm just going to pick and choose a couple because we're kind of moving through it. But I remember the big easy because you you put on the full the full drawl. Yeah. You really locked into the accent. Well, I wouldn't call it a drawl. But. That that. Yeah. That was that was a blend between a Cajun like, you know, patois of accident. And and you know, what they call a yet Norlin JAT Roger. Close to like Brooklyn. Thank in a way, they talked. He's you put them together. I, and you know, kind of comes out like that. And I met four people that were like that in in that had that accent in New Orleans, and it's not very common. But that I met for people three pull different. I just got to put them together. Yeah. It just came out without nev-. I I I'm kind of fascinated with the kind of darkness of New Orleans. I guess a lot of people are, and I thought that that was a manageable way to to move through it. Yeah. It was you know, had a lot of charm that we to it. And you know, it's Tennessee Williams can describe it has has had a rapist charm with an, but there was always. A latent violence would be darkness there. There's definitely something. There's something about the swamp in about the weird kind of mix of peoples and how they've combo, and that's where the Kuwaits actually came from you know, because they were in Canada, and they came down in their their backup swamps Louisiana because just to be able to get away their French-Speaking. Yeah. And the the there were the native Americans up there, and it all mixed together. Right. And also a Spanish who leftover Spanish, and in fact up until up until the nineteen thirties. Yeah. Your first language if you were born there was French it wasn't Huey P long. When he became governor Louisiana built the bridges over the by us. So basically they were secluded from the rest of the world up until then right in. I think that's what's interesting is these these kind of people that kind of different types of people that kind of became one people. Right. I it only happened. It didn't happen in a lot of places, but it sort of happened there. Yeah. It's really kind of a bore of what America is supposed to strike that any other region. Yeah. Yeah. Had black white. Native American at Mexican and just everything. So you've got some native American in in your family. Yes. Yeah. Yeah. He tracked that back. Yes. It dragged it back up my grant, you know, my grandfather and then back to that. They they actually the Quaid's deduced. They let Louisiana for Oklahoma. I think to escape civil or or two sub dra- thing. I I it's got a who knows? Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. I really wasn't their fight. So that's probably wound up in Oklahoma not gonna die for this one. And then you've all right. He played dot Colladay. Yeah. That that was casual that guy because my favorite characters that replayed. Yeah. That was good one of the most difficult, and that was with that was in the white and that was with kosner wider. Yes. He directed. Maybe cut a half all the stuff that was shooting buffalo and everything. Oh, caffeine directed that thirty. Yeah. He tried to western twice. Yes. Well silverado. Yeah. And. Whiter? I think he tried to pack too much into Silverado. I think he tried to pack too much into a wider today. That trove. Yeah, I I of felt like it was too long. Yeah. And it was also being made at the same time as tombstone. Yeah. Which I think is actually the more accessible movie, it's a shorter movie. Well, it actually tells the story, and you know, tells us to Saint that's current Russell Kurt Russell. You guys are like you guys are too like he's actually offered that one to two doc. I was offered tombstone and and prebolly on both. Yes. What did you think of AL's a very I was very good? What was his little tag? Bay about your by Huckabee, blah. Huckleberry? Really? He really went over the top with it. I liked it. I really liked his performance, you know. And and then he could just get means. He really had that right about doc. I mean, I learned everything about dog. I I really kinda fell in love with a guy because he was he was one of those guys Gary had to Burke yellow sa- said, you know, he he gonna die. That's the reason it was out west. Yeah. He was a dentist didn't threes west. So only place he could breathe. Yeah. Yeah. And he knew he was going to die. So in a gunfight he could he could stand there and become and aim and fire, and that you know, because that's usually what won the day not being fast how because he didn't. All guns. They just freak out scared. You're scared shitless. And you're just you know, you're shooting everything. And it's the guy who could keep his head and aim who would and he could keep his head because he knew he was going to die. Anyway. What did he care? That's why and favor the rookie or the baseball player. You learn to play ball. The Jimmy Morris was on the set for all of that to which I really appreciated and thank God. He was left handed and great story, and which sort of reflected my own life at the time which because the movies about second chances. Right. And that movie was release the ball really rolling for me. I may start with the nineties. I was kind of my career was kind of going through a valley. Let's put it it parent trap sort of started a new thing. Yeah. And and but then the rookie really cemented that and also came out. Back back performance in far from heaven. Yeah. That's right. I mean, that's the thing. Gay guy. And a am as you approach everything the same way. Yeah. Terms as an actor, you kind of like human behaviors, I very always been very interested in about what makes people tick. Why are they the way they are? And do do you do you. I guess you answer it with each character. Yeah. Yeah. What would I do if I were that character? Yeah. And you sort of live in their shoes and there's skin, but he's always you. Yeah. You can't get you can never get away from playing yourself because you always are playing yourself. And it's just that we all have everything that every other person has all the same emotions all potentially the same reactions through those motions, or, you know, the these cliches about life because they're true and. But you're always playing yourself. Yeah. Right. I I guess that's true. I I mean 'cause I I've been doing some acting myself, and I'm always sort of wondering about that. But you're gonna do some version of your it's go to see like a veto curly on whatever, you know, you tomorrow, and Brando. Everybody knows that's Bali brand. Oh, he disappeared. The characters. Marlon brando? Just his doing a great job of that. Right. That's true. But some people seem to go through a tremendous amount of process in order to get places. You know? Yes. But that's part of like learning of learning acting. And you know, there's still like, I know actors that are still I got Bill hurt is very studied. And everybody has their own, but he's white ticket or method the method everybody has their own way of doing right? But the funny thing about hurt is is no there's no more a person that's more painfully Bill hurt than Bill her. Yeah. Like what exactly whatever he's doing? He's always I like intensity. The pace is going to take it. He's going to like a simple question. He's going to take some place. Have you worked under? Oh, you have worked with twice. I just worked. In fact, I love the guy. I really totally love guy. I love his point of view of life and. I love his quirks. I eat any. He's a brilliant actor. Yeah. And he just feels so deeply about everything you have very sensitive human being. And what was it like working with like on that that crazy Oliver Stone movie with Oliver with everybody, you know, I knowing Oliver's reputation. He would back where you played a quarterback that room. Yeah. Yeah. The Jamie, FOX is the uncover right? That's right. Great. I think it's the best football movie ever done. Visceral. I really feel. Yeah. What it's like to be in the game. Yeah. You know? I thought I'll restall mule given his reputation which was just a reputation a lot of ways, right? That you know, a lot of people were going to get hurt doing that. Then. Nobody did. Yeah. Yeah. Nobody did he take care of everybody. Really well, and he made an incredible movie. Yeah. It's weird that with that comes up again, this idea that the the general public makes judgments of people based on the information, they get. But once you're sort of in it. Well, work that joke, we call it. We call him taco because he makes great Dorothy as we call him this because he does that. And what do they call you with you? Fuck one goat. That's true go fuck. Your the goad fucker. All right, man. Well, I, you know, it's really great to talk to you. And obviously there's there's more to talk about. But I feel like the dog's gotta eat. She's coming on I guess your contract. But it's out there. It's sub. But they taught hinting I talked to him years ago to that. Todd Haynes that guy who did. Oh, yeah. From heaven when really brilliant guy, but when you work with somebody like that who's got he's a very unique directories got very specific vision for that movies making sort of his version of reckless Cirque movie up like, I in the process of working with all these different directors, e you know, do you find yourself? I mean what what does the experience from director director? I always there as an actor. Yeah. This is what I learned early on is the accurate is actually there to serve the direct, right? Because even though it may have been written by, you know, from a novel by this or whatever you are. It's still the director is telling the story, right? He's directing in fact, that's what it means. He's directing where the camera is what the cameras looking at. Yeah. To tell the story. Yeah. And so on there to serve him because I can't be making different movie than the director. That won't work. Right. You know? And I'll look like an idiot. Yeah. So you have to trust your director. So that's I've been very tried to be very good about choosing direct strong directors. I like strong directors in fact who will take me out of my comfort zone because actors have a general tendency, you know, to either have the same haircut they last fill, you know, or do the same things that they know will work. Sure, that's their money. You know, it's my smile yet. But director who will take you out of your comfort zone and make you do things you're not comfortable doing that the best. That's the best. That's when you are the best to well. Like like, you're right there is you have a very specific Dennis Quaid 'isms. But but even this new movie, it's like all those become so malignant awful, even the things that. Yeah. Your smile is. Just basically the first part of the movie playing the parent trap dead. Yeah. And then go bad things. Go back. How do you stay in character generally over time? Is it just I just turned it on and off? How really I got. I started to learn that with the work with Meryl Streep in postcards Samaj, and she was just like, you know, the great Meryl Streep. Yeah. And and she is, but she just like she'd be like goofing off, you know, just talking about I've let you know. We're just like having a good time on some completely different other subject that has nothing to do with or the emotion appropriate motion. That goes with your the scene that were doing. Yeah, they say rolling and we were steadily. Okay, action, right. Right into it. Just like that. And then cut right out of it. No kidding. Yeah. Now, not walking around in as it as an I tell you what it's actually easier in the long run to work that way because number one you don't take your work home with you. Right. What's the last time? I did that was great bolt fired. I wound up and rehab doing that. But and never do just drop it like a hot potato, and then so that you can you can go do what you ever have to have to do in your life, and you come back, and it it'll be fresh in other words, it's I actually like it when I don't know what I'm gonna do. Yeah. You know what I mean? Yeah. Because you'll be in the moment. Yeah. More that way, if you're not living. Yeah. Like, I I don't learn. My lines may read the script about ten times. But I don't learn my lines until I tell it today. Sometimes dirt will most of the time during rehearsal, really unless they have a really long law notice story, and you know, the characters listen, listen to the other characters saying so that the, you know, the response, right? Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. It makes it more in the moment that way for me. And I don't have to like make up something. Yeah. I forget just of he take all that stuff that you learn. Yeah. As you know, as an actor acne, can you learning about all those basics? Sure. Had then you want them up and throw it away. And just let go right? Are you sober guy? Well, I don't do cocaine anymore. That was that was my drug of choice. In fact, nineteen ninety you know, thirty days play days there, and I I quit everything for like ten years. Oh, yeah. I did what I did what they told me to do. Yeah. And but then I I I started having a drink. Yeah. About the year two thousand. Yeah. Alcohol was I don't like the feeling of being drunk, right? So you can manage it. Yeah. Another band 'cause I you know, I just like that. I'd be a little buzzed. But feeling drug. I never I feel so sluggish and I don't like that feeling and cocaine was crazy. Can you know, I would do until you it was all done there. And you know to ask you if you had someone I had plenty of three days. Yeah. It's crazy drug, right? As an older, I'm fifty five year old. And then me, but like the thought of doing it now is just like, oh my kids. I would look back. Yeah. Up for three days talking about nothing body. Yeah. Or are you do like the first sniff of it? Then it's been the next twelve hours trying to get that feeling again, you know. Yeah. The stuff and you got to be at work in an hour of word out. Really great. The worst Bill subtract. All right, man. Great talking to you. Thanks, a lot of fun. Yeah. That's that. How is that? I love that guy. It's like, you know, it's sometimes I'm in this chair. And I'm looking right at a guy, I've looked at on screen my whole life, and he smiles and I'm like that Dennis Quaid sitting right there. The new movie is the intruder and he's also got a dog journey out there which opens on may seventeenth. Don't forget simply safe offers great protection with security monitoring that keeps your family safe. Twenty four seven. It keeps working when the power's out and stays connected. Even if your phone lines are cut simply safe also makes coming home a breeze, just press your keep Bob and the alarm is off. Simplisafe is just fifteen dollars a month. No contracts or hidden fees to get yours today. Go to SimpliSafe dot com slash W Tf. That's SimpliSafe dot com slash W Tf because of. I'm going to play some echoey guitar. I'm going to bring some more pedals up here. Apparently, I'm going to be here while I will get some more paddles. But I'm just going to do this. Now, I am the three chord wonder that are is good superhero. Name three chord wonder here. He comes with his basic blues. Power. Harry comes basic ability to play three quarters in a thoughtful kind of ethereal way look out everyone's going to take a pause because I'm three chord wonder, I distract them. The right this song going anywhere. I don't think. So. Oh, no. We've been tied up by other superheroes. Yup. I did it again. Enjoy. Marla?

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Who Wore High-Heeled Shoes First?

BrainStuff

06:21 min | 2 years ago

Who Wore High-Heeled Shoes First?

"At IBM problems inspire us to push the world forward. That's why so many people work with us on everything from city traffic to ocean plastic smart loves problems. IBM A. B. M. Let's put smart to work visit. IBM DOT COM slash smart to learn more come to brainstorm a production of iheartradio. Hey rain stuff lauren bogle Bam here although these days wearing shoes with high heels mostly coated feminine the original Wears High High heels were men so what's the history here when where and why did people I begin wearing shoes with elevated heels we spoke by email email with Elizabeth Mohawk senior curator Toronto's Batta Shoe Museum who says she has yet to unravel this mystery. The exact origin of high heels remains needs to be discovered. What's clear however is it. High heels. Were not a European invention heeled footwear only emerged in western Europe around the turn of the seventeenth century but had been warn for hundreds of years prior throughout Western Asia Similar Hawk said evidence for early Western Asian heels as far back as Tenth Century Persia suggests a strong relationship to horseback riding and may have been connected to the innovation of the stirrup the store profoundly changed horseback riding and in particular made military campaigns on horseback more effective as as an enabled riders to steady themselves in dramatically improved the effectiveness of weapons such as the Lance and Bowen Aero. He'll seems to have been a further development of this technology as it allowed the wearer to hook his feet in the stirrups better angering him to his steed eventually heeled footwear for men spread to Europe likely three political networks works and trade but the exact evolution is complicated so why did heels only become of interest to Europeans around the beginning of the sixteen hundreds civil heck said the answer lies and things it's complex European world exploration and the destablizing the textile trade to the rise of Persia under the reign shot a bus the first from fifteen eighty the eight to sixteen twenty nine and both Persian and European concerns about the increasingly powerful Ottoman Empire in particular it was the power of Shah boasts the First Mountain Military Terry who wore heeled footwear that may have made heels appealing I to European men and ultimately to women as the he'll entered into upper class men's fashion and there was a concurrent trend in women's fashion to adopt certain aspects of men's attire some hawks said that the women who played with this trend were often quote the butt of ridicule the end there numerous offenses included their adoption of men's military inspired fashion including broadbrimmed hats ornamented with plumes doublets carrying weapons and wearing heels in the heels that both men and women wore in the early years of the seventeenth century were very low but they would rise for both sexes as the century progressed the the majority of powerful and privileged men wore heels through the seventeenth century and into the early eighteenth century in France during the reign of Louis the fourteenth from sixteen forty three to seventeen in fifteen wearing red high heels was a principal signifier of political privilege limited to the king and his courtiers beyond France red heels for men were at first associated associated with French sophistication but by the end of the seventeenth century they were increasingly seen as effeminate especially in England similar. Hawk said fueled. Oh by nascent enlightenment thinking and increasing nationalisms men's dress began to undergo a radical transformation at the end of the seventeenth century. It was in the early eighteenth century that men abandoned abandoned the he'll to women's fashions and the he'll became a signifier femininity. Those shifts included a heightened division between men's and women's tire as as well as March differences between French English men's dress some will hawk said since the Seventeenth Century Western culture has shown extreme sensitivity to men in heels especially if it's deemed that the heels are being used to increase height she notes that this negative view only increased Darwinian ideas of survival of the fittest became came translated into racist and sexist notions of natural male physical and mental superiority but heels for man made a brief comeback in the middle of the twentieth any of century SIMILAC explained the he'll began rising in men's fashion in the nineteen sixties and in the early nineteen seventies reached unprecedented heights in direct response. I feel wheel to the burgeoning women's movement the heels and men's fashion however we're not borrowed from the female wardrobe they were block and high like Louie the fourteenth and were touted as a way increasing one stature masculinity and confidence in no way did they reference the Longstanding Feminine High and Thin Heal these days however however heels on men can be construed to emphasize a lack of height rather than compensating for it which means quote that heels on men function like a bad to pay they reveal insecurity and that in our current culture is deemed unappealing iconic footwear designer Christian Lubaton concurred to a news publication a man and heals. That's a prosthesis but I sympathize. The men need help but a man and heals is ridiculous clearly. Mr Lubaton doesn't watch the cowboy channel those BRONC and bull riders look pretty good or as someone hack puts it cowboys continue to own their heels and wear them with confidence today's episode certain Kerry Tatra and produced by tyler playing brain stuff is a production of iheartradio's. How stuff works ruinous and lots of other topics our home planet has networks dot com in or podcast. My heart radio visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows Hello I'm Dr Q. and I've spent the last thirty years tracking down there and Banjo the two most important musicians of the twentieth twentieth century podcast narrated by Dennis Quaid featuring new music produced by t-bone Burnett written by Jerry Goose did and in Grammy Winning Songwriter Poobah bowling but the new song featuring original lyrics by Bob Dylan listened to bear in a banner on the iheartradio APP or wherever you get podcast.

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Jeff Bridges

Oprah’s Master Class: The Podcast

33:56 min | 2 years ago

Jeff Bridges

"Today's episode is supported by state farm. Your life is a story in the making. And when it comes to insurance state farm agents are here to help whatever chapter of life year and go right with over nineteen thousand state farm agents in neighborhoods across the country. We're always right around the corner ready to help with home and auto insurance. So talk to an agent today. State farm here to help life go, right? When you say the name of his most famous character you can't help but smile Jeff bridges is a versatile and philosophical actor one who audiences affectionately think of as the dude from the big lebowski. Jeff got an early start to his career. His father the legendary actor, Lloyd bridges love show, business and encouraged Jeff to act alongside him on television. When Jeff was just a kid since then Jeff has been nominated for six Academy Awards. The first was for the last picture show. He was just twenty two years old. And it was his first made. Role in two thousand ten he won the Oscar for his role as a country singer in crazy heart he shines in his ability to play a wide range of characters and always at the center of Jeff's, emotional performances is shaggy charm. Maybe that's why he so identified with his role as the dude Jeff embraces zinn like appreciation of life. He's naturally curious and tunes into what he loves or digs as he says, whether it's his artistic passions or his beautiful wife and family. Everybody has a story. And there's something to be learned from every experience. Use your life as a class. This is masterclass with Jeff bridges. Funny. You know, we we kind of become our parents a certain way. You know, that's our touchstone. That's who we know Katamon. I certainly went into my father's business. Always felt very connected with him. So when I was about seven or eight remember my dad saying, hey, Jeff you wanna comply with dad. You know, when you play sure what do you? What do you do what you wanna do is? Well, coming do do a C hot with me. You know, my show. I said, what would you mean is get it'll be fine. Come on like got school and everything it's just what you get get out of school. You know, come on. Let's play. And so he would always encourage all his kids to get into show biz. He loved it so much and whenever there was a part in his movies for a kid or as TV shows. He would always, you know, put us up for it. I mean, I think I am a product of nepotism. I don't they I would have had the profession that I'm in currently acting. If it wasn't for my dad, he's my acting teacher taught me how to act told me on the. Basics about how to, you know, make it seem like it's happening for the first time, you know, do a different ways and all this kind of thing. But I think the thing I learned from him most it wasn't something. He said to me a words who would just observing him and noticing how much funding was having. And how much he enjoyed what he was doing looking back. I did experience in the early se- HUD days. But I remember most I think when I got to work with them in two movies while I was an adult in Tucker and blown away these two movies. I remember him coming on the set, and he was just filled with joy and notice how that affected everyone. You know, everyone just got lighter and more relaxed, and I find when when I'm relaxed, and my best stuff can kind of get through all my tightness in my fears and stuff, and I just kind of flows out. That's probably the biggest thing I learned from my father is his. Approach to live and work. Was so joyous. I try to follow in his footsteps. I remember early on. I had some difficulty trying to figure out whether I wanted to take that acting path or not and I actually had quite a bit of success. I was nominated for an Academy Award for last picture show did a couple of movies after that. And I was still wondering if this is what I was gonna do be a professional actor. There's a lot of fear behind him. And I get a call from my agent. He says, I've got great news. John frankenheimer. The great director wants to hire you to be in the iceman come of our movie versions can have Frederick March. Robert Ryan Lee, Marvin is going to be wonderful cast. And I said, oh, gee, Jack on on Bush, man. I'm just so I'm gonna take a pass tell them. Thanks a lot. Bye pass on. He's really. I said. Yeah. Okay. And about five minutes later Lamont Johnson, the director who had. Just worked with unless the American hero. He called me up low, boys. Who said I've heard you turned down the opportunity to play in the iceman coming. I say, yeah, I'm I'm on Bush Lamont. He says you're Bush, you're an ass. Hung up on me. And I thought well, this is kind of Andrews day, I really don't wanna make movies right now. But maybe this is a chance for me to explore the idea of becoming a professional actor. I understand when you're a professional. You've got to do when you don't feel. I certainly don't feel like it. So let me just jump into this. And maybe this'll be the final nail in the coffin of the acting career. So I said, okay, I'm doing it. And Robert Ryan most of my scenes were with him. And I'm a big fan of Robert Ryan, we had these long scenes that were about ten minutes long. We are about to do on him. We were table they're sitting opposite each other and Bob took his hands off the table just hands on his lap. And I noticed these big puddles of swag. Whereas hasn't been I said keep up after all these years. You're still you're still nervous. He's at all. Yeah. I'd really be scared about wasn't scared. I said God. So that's not something that you you get. Rid of. I thought they'd are the more you do it. You finally. Get over that stuff. But to think that never goes away seeing these old pros, you know, guys, we've been doing it for, you know, fifty sixty years how they dealt with all the same stuff. I felt with all that fear in that flop sweat as many I contend this acting thing after all. I remember it being a younger kid having the fear of the dark. What's out there? What's under the bed? What's going to happen matters? You get older. You just say, you know, you kinda poo pooh-poohed that fair, and you say just concentrate on where you're going. Everything's fine is but there are times when it doesn't go away. It's just amazing the mind the power of the mind, and these stories that we can tell ourselves that aren't necessarily true again. It's this these opinions that we can make very concrete, and that can be very unlovely or it can be kinda chances to grow at to open and let it dance with that. Funny feeling there's a chance for that to be a wonderful gift alone men have feared marriage, right? I met my wife nearly forty years ago. I was making a movie in Montana. Call the Rancho did locks and we were shooting a saying. In a place called Chico hot springs outside Livingston, Montana. Beautiful place called paradise valley. We're sitting there doing this scene. A can't stop looking at this gorgeous. I didn't know if she was a guest at the hotel waitress may or confer at what she was she had two black eyes in a broken nose to. I just couldn't take my eyes off her. And you know, that thing that the guys do where you have got magazine or something up there. And then you use those kind of shield till, you know, steal shoot bus me every time. But finally, get the guts to go ask her out as you can go out tonight. You know, you know, oh, it's a small town. You know, maybe I'll see you around. She says I say wrong K few nights, later bar and sure enough there she is. And we danced that was about it, man. I mean, I was head over. He I I was head over heels. The first time I saw, you know. We've been married about ten years. And I get a letter from the makeup mad of Rancho deluxe this movie I met sue on. I hope it happened. He says going through my files, and I came upon this shot. I took of you asking a local girl out actually what he pretty tired by in then out of this evill falls. These two pictures of the first words I ever spoke to my wife. I have my pocket there. My prize position to have pictures. What are the odds of that? We lived together for about three years. I have a very tough time pulling the marriage that, you know, ask you to marry me really tough time with that that that word ambivalence. That really that's something that I can relate to often in my life. I feel often a mixture of feelings, you know in. To me. I've this theory. I dunno it holds water again. It's just my opinion, man. But the fear of marriage is really the fear of death. This is the woman that's going to be my whoa. In for the rest of my life. As closing a lot of doors. You know? And if death is the kind of the end of the story that marriage is a giant step in that direction. We're living in Malibu the time to you know, can't be one day. So I know what you're ambivalence. But I'm going back up to Montana because I feel my clock going all I want to get married and have kids and stuff. I can feel. I know you love me. I know it's not that. But that's what I'm gonna do. I'm just letting you know, and it was no pressure. She just telling me what she's gonna do. And then I said oh God. I can't let this woman go, you know, I had this vision of me as an old guy thinking yet God there was that girl from Montana now, why did I marry I couldn't let that? I'm picturing like a handful of sand. And there was a little diamond in their let guy I can't do that. So I thought down my knees or you marry man she says, okay when I said well about Thursday today's Monday about Thursday. She is what about Friday's, okay? I'll Saturday what about side. Okay. So we just we call up our friends, they came and we got married. Finally, I got with the program and realize how wonderful marriage is when a great opportunity what marriage gives you is you open a doorway to the marriage all its hall filled with all these doors. On either side, you know with kids and all kinds of emotions that you'd never experience. It'd be what married, you know, joy and fear and all that stuff you're gonna feel all those things in marriage. But the context of it saying, we're going to do this together, we're gonna learn and experience all kinds of joyful things and sorrowful things, but we're going to do it together. More about conversation in just a moment. Support for this episode comes from Lincoln the first step in trying to find a new job is knowing where to look thankfully linked. In is connected to twenty million jobs. Maybe you're just starting out. Maybe you're switching to a new type of role or maybe you're completely starting over unlinked in their jobs. Like software engineer project manager, associate veterinaran, robotics, engineer, HR manager, associate attorney and much more. There are all kinds of open jobs on linked and you can search for and people ready to help you make the change. You're looking for they'll give. Career advice help you learn new skills and introduce you to keep people at companies and organizations that are hiring. So you can find a job that makes the most of your interests and experience find the job meant for you at Lincoln dot com slash jobs. That's linked in dot com slash jobs. What is impressive about Jeff's family, isn't that? There are a Hollywood dynasty. But that they found joy in working together. Jeff has appeared on the big screen with his brother, Bo and his father, Lloyd and his mother Dorothy while Dorothy may not be as well known as the rest of the family. She played a starring role in Jeff's life. She gave him one of the greatest gifts. A mother can give time before I was even conceived. My parents had a child Gary who died the first year of his life from SIDS sudden, infant death syndrome. So that was sort of the mood that I was brought into my parents were going through that terrible tragedy. So it was kinda frightening for them to invest that much love again. But my mom was up for it. As may of my mom. Just tell you about some of the different things that will were remarkable about my mom every day. She would ride in this journal. And when each of her children turned twenty one each of us was giving a biography of our lives from our mothers point of view in her own hand. So she would go through her journal. And every time might name was mentioned, she would transcribe that and gave that to each of us. So it's wild to read my life from my mom's point of view is a good example. She used to do something called time with each of us kids, and what that was was every day for an hour. I can count on my mom having time with me. What that Matt that? She wouldn't take any calls from her friends. We're friends call off the call you back. I'm having time with job and time we'd be in anything. I wanted to do with her. Let's go into your makeup our make you a blanket clown. You know, you're the an astronaut under this table. And I'm the monster from space, but it was just totally focused on winter. I wanted to do and I never got the sense of it was like a duty or chore for her. She genuinely dog having time with each of her kids so much we had such a wonderful relationship. Many many years ago. I was watching TV I was on his interview shows, and they were interviewing couple of doctors talking about reaper -thing, and I had never heard about rebirthing kinda fascinating. And there were saying basically the way people dealt with their birth, which is sort of the first problem getting out of there is our same strategy for approaching all of our challenges in life. And I said, oh that sounds interesting. So my mom, and I are, you know, we're very close. I said so mom, I told her about this rebirthing thing. I saw took tell me what was the birth. Like, you know. And so we sat very close to each other. And she proceeded me to come in the story, and she's driving to the hospital and on the way to the hospital. I turned and this victim. Convulsion in my mom's will they get to the hospital and get right in there. And it was in the days where they used to strap the women down on these metal tables, and then shoot them up give them big spinal. And she said, then they gave me the spinal, and I had a terrible reaction to the spinal. And the doctor came in was very very concerned inside the slap. My mom across the face saying wake up wake up, and my mom was trying to struggle, but she was also drugged. So the doctor received that she wanted to set up, and he undid the straps in sadder up here called the baby's coming in. Boom, and I came out. And that's basically how I was born. Now listening to these these doctors who are talking about rebirthing, they said now, the next thing you do is you take that birth story that you've learned from your mom, and you superimpose that over your first memory of pain or struggle or challenging you're live or sadness, or you know, some kind of turmoil long on and I thought well, the first thing that I can remember about a maybe three or four years Ol- standing in my living room waiting for my mom to come home. And my mom used to have long hair down to her waist. You know, just beautiful beloved to, you know, being her hair and so forth, and I hear the door open. I'm very excited. She opens the door, and there she is all of her hair is short off, which is kind of pixie cut. And I want. In Iran and locked myself in the bathroom now, the next assignment for this rebirthing thing is now you put that over how you deal with problems on your life. And sure enough when I do that that's me just turning around. You know, just say forget this. This is terrible. I'm outta here. So I just say. Screw it. You know, let's go bowling. You know, basically, just say no like as much as I I hated this birthing process being born in say, I don't to become out gone, man. I'm glad I did that happen. I'm glad to be alive and to live in that that wonder in that space. It can be frightening. But it's also well, it's the only game in town. That's for sure. But it can be absolutely joyous. When doing the big lebowski, I thought about how the dude might vol-. So Steve, Bruce semi and John Goodman myself. We met with this expert. He was you know, world class bowler any head an assistant with him. Who was also an incredible bowler. He's teaching us. You know, how to ball so forth. Then I asked them I said, well, what might be an interesting thing for the dude, you know, when he's preparing to bull here. He would take so much time to make sure that his body was in two. Tune with the universe, and it would take a long time. Your mindset has to be. So maybe the dude would be into that. And as I'm describing this the assistant of this world class bowler starts. Like that you can't control himself. Let's you what's up. He says nothing dominating very I said come on guys what's going on. And the master bowler says, well, it is true that you're so connected with the moment. What's in it that if that moment, isn't right, then those pins aren't going down. So the moment has to be right. And I would take a lot of time. I'm talking is the Matt the bowling master guy says I would take a lot of time in the assistant said. Yeah. A long time. He's hell are you said, oh, maybe five or ten minutes. You know, he says it was held during the turnament being up there and all the guys in the on the bench. We'd finally say. You know, I had to go to a therapist shrink in figure that out. You know, he's on I'm good now. I say, so how do you? How do you do it? Now. He's just throw the ball. I said what do you mean? I just get up. I think I throw it. Late teens early twenty. I was thinking cheat. I'm kind of into this music thing man, I really love playing music, and I'm not sure about want to do the acting thing. You know, I remember having conversations with my dad about him saying chaff don't be ridiculous. What's a wonderful about acting is that you can incorporate all of your interests of live into that profession. So you know, they'll you'll come. You'll have a chance to play musician. Yeah. Somewhere down the line. Glad I listened to him but all through high school, you know, I've played guitar and taught myself out of play in a they give you those little graph. There's dots on where you put your fingers. You can teach yourself pretty well. That's what I did. And then my brother, Bo, he was doing a movie called John and Mary Dustin Hoffman may affair and Quincy Jones was doing the music for it. In boa pitch one of my tunes to Quincy and said, hey, you ought to check out. My my little brother, you know, he's sixteen but he's right. Some pretty cool tunes. You know? So that was my first recording with Quincy Jones in about sixteen. And then the whole music thing, you know, it never really stops kind of moved on the back burner for awhile. Yeah. And then crazy heart came around. I remember when I was first given the script which was quite a few years ago originally turned down because there was no music the script is. Okay. But there was no no music involved. I thought while the if you had crummy music to this day, it's not going to be any good. So I'll pass I ran into my good buddy T-Bone Burnett, and he said to me, so what do you think about this crazy heart scrap yard? I said, why do you ask are you interested? He says. Yeah, we'll I'll do it if you'll die. I said, you're kidding me. He said, no. So I said, oh, well now, this is even going to be tougher to turn down because my good, buddy. I know he's got the talent to bring this thing in. Now. Do I have it. You know, I kept getting that image of that the wide receiver, you know, going on for that long ball and just praying that you're gonna be able to catch this wonderful ask this right into your hands. But of great opportunity so out of that, you know, there was an album for crazy heart came out. And that wonderful saw the weary kind written by Ryan Bingham had a great time doing that movie. So so much music involved. And then after that, I figured well, we're kind of on this music thing called up T bone and said, hey, you wanna you know, kinda parlay that Neo and just keep going. I got some tunes. I'd love to realize with you. And he said, yeah, what you got, you know. So I put out an album called Jeff bridges, but I must say it's a little odd to be realizing my teenage music dream. I've got a band together here in Santa Barbara, the abide IRS, you know, it's lebowski a reference. So that's what we are than we just put out a live album and we tour just got back from Canada touring at sixty five. It's so hard to be living your teenage dream. But what the hell, you know, never. Too old to dream, man. Twenty years ago, we got shook on L A with a big Northridge earthquake. We know being a California kid, I'm familiar with earth quake. But this was something different. We're living on the rim of Santa Monica canyon. And we later saw a map of the different faults in the earthquake. And we had a fall like run around our house, we were surrounded by and that thing it started to shake and then adjust it got more and more more, intense and your mind tries to wrap around trying to figure out what it is. I hope we being vacated the I I thought it was like bombs from some other country attacking as the thought. No, this is out of space. This is like stronger than anything any bomb or anything. And then I looked out the window. And I see just you know, the ground just like the ocean. Yeah. Just flowing. Oh my God. God. And I sleep naked. So I'm now I'm running through the house with broken glass all over the floor. You know, I didn't know where the gas was soon newer was my wife being the courageous champion of a song. She says, I'll get it. You know? So she I'm I'm in the doorway with the girls, you know, ensues down in the basement turning off the gas thankful the marriage such a strong woman, then the aftershock camping out another one you say, this might be this might be the end of this thing. And then you say, well, what are we going to do what we're gonna just go sleep out in the front lawn because our house, we couldn't, you know, our house was pretty trashed that was the last night, we spent our house, so we got some sleeping bags and just spend the night out on the lawn thinking or any moment, it could just open up and swallow us know, we count on the ground, no walking, and, you know, gravity, and these kinds of things we just take a totally for granted the have. That just the tossed in the air, and and make everything make no sense it can trip you're pretty good. You get your mind gone, man. Then you wake up next morning, and they see guys. Robert on their bikes and just denial is kind of a wonderful thing. You know, it can be you know, sometimes I think there wasn't a certain amount of denial. We wouldn't get out of bed in the morning. One of my heroes in life is Mr. fuller. He's probably most famous for the geodesic dome. Wonderful inventor wonderful thinker on his gravestone printed. The words call me, trim tab, the trim tab is the very small rudder that is attached to the huge runner of these ocean. Going tankers the engineers found that took too much energy to move this enormous ship with this big rudder. They've found it very simple answer to that. By having a little tiny rider that moves the big rudder. And then the big road where was the ship Bucky told us that this is how an individual works on society. My mom and dad were very much into giving this idea that, you know, the family of man, and we were encouraged not to do something like just make a jet a gesture to sort of scratch the guilt. Ditch, you know, give ten bucks and say, okay. I did my. Part. You know, we were encouraged rather to take a look inside. And see what we might be willing to do that would kind of fit in with our daily lives. And I said I thought well, I'm I'm an actor. I deal with the media all the time. I do stuff like I'm doing right now. So I got in cahoots with a wonderful organization called share our strength. And they're no kid hungry campaign is all about ending childhood hunger in America, and you're hungry. You're not going to be able to learn in school. I having wonderful success. Kids are getting better test scores are tendencies improving, of course, you know, they'll grow up to be a lot healthier adults because of that we're all trimtabs. We're all connected to very powerful people, and we affect the large groups of people that we may not even be aware of. But then I something that try to keep in mind. One idea you hear all about the the middle way. And when Buddha became enlightened and their guys gathered around him, you know, you know, he's an enlightened cat. He's going to tell us how to do. This thing says how do you become enlightened and Buddhist says, well, it's all about attachment desire. You know, go out and try to not desire. So they guys go out there trying not to desire. But then they finally come upon this thought so what we're desiring not to design it, and they came back and told Buddhist we can't because we're desiring to not desire who you kind of kind of getting the idea just do the best. You can there's a word that I put on some of my scripts aimless conduct conjuring up for me to back off the result so much. We have an idea of how it's supposed to be to kinda back off that new a general direction. That's maybe that's right on Culas dance that the his going to happen here. And again second. Probably. Yeah. You see on that lovely horn. Now. Why do we want to edit that out? See we wanna take that sound. That's kind of a beautiful set your this isn't that beautiful. But see we want to clean we wanna perfect. So we take all of that out. You know, but why we don't have to do that. You know, this idea of who we are and where we're going to abide. These are all just opinions, you know, and. This land of non abiding this this emptiness of not knowing that's finally where we've shown up here. We don't know what's going to happen. We don't know when that trains gonna come by. When your mother is gonna walk through the door with her hair shorn off, or you know, what's going to happen. So we abide, man. And, you know, another co on is, you know, how do you get off a one hundred foot pole? Interesting. You know? Sit with that was thinking about that the other day, and I thought well, maybe you just dig you just dig it. You know, there's a zen story of you know, being chased by tiger. And you come to a cliff you're gonna get off the clip I gotta get away from the target leap off the cliff you grab onto this vine. And that's hanging off the cliff kneel down you see another tiger back there. He's waiting for you to fall the tiger tiger belong. Then you notice on the bind just out of reach or two little mice in. They're nibbling on your bottom line. And you say is gonna end selling your then you look over. And you say oh, look at this beautiful scrawl berry. I will what else I'm just gonna eat that strawberry there. You know? I can sit here in be scared to death row. I can just enjoy where I am. What's what's cooking on now? Pace that thing. So dig I guess I like that though I like that word sit here and enjoy where I am. I love that Jeffs ability to be present is infectious. Jeff is continued his parents legacy. He loves performing whether it's in his dozens and dozens of movie roles or onto her with his band. Jeff find happiness in doing his work living his life and not being concerned with how he'll be remembered. He understands there will always be ups and downs. Life has twists and turns strikes and gutters. And it's really all about the journey. Like the dude Jeff strives to simply abide Jeff bridges for that. You are a master. My experience in life, but just going back to the daily yet. Yeah. Strikes and gutters mad. Highs and lows. That's that's it. That's how life is. Even though we're so different were all related. We're all connected. We're all part of this. This human family notices that. There's a lot of love going down. I feel it in myself. I feel it in the world. And there's a lot of a pain in struggle. And that's also has to do with love. I could think about my dad. I remember having a conversation with him. He was quite old. And I remember telling him I said that you don't like we're just in a relay race. You know, I'm, you know, I'm just you know, right running right behind you you hand me that time taking him carrying on your stop. And so I don't really think of made going anywhere, man. I think I'm just gonna you know, it's not like a legacy something I'm leaving behind. It's something that you know. Just being a part of the love this going down supporting that nurture that and I guess the legacy kind of takes care of it self legacy. You know, it's like a snake charmer once in a while just grows out of the skin leaves on the side of the road something in picking up sale. I'll look at that beautiful bell or something. I guess that's kind of a legacy. But I don't think too much about it. I'm the snake. Can we just grew it on you know, and got a wonderful lady snake made some baby snakes, you know. Yeah. Nothing about the legacy too much. I think that's gonna take care of itself. I'm just trying to be the best channel for LA like him be now. And that's about it. I'm Oprah Winfrey. And you've been listening to masterclass the podcast. You can follow masterclass on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook, if you haven't already go to apple podcasts and subscribe rate and review this podcast. Join me next week for another masterclass podcast all your favorite hits shows are available now with the tap of a finger. Download the wacho nap and every week string new episodes of the shows you love including classic own series. What what you want when you want wherever you want? We watch now on the wacho nap.

Jeff bridges Academy Awards Montana Lloyd bridges Katamon Robert Ryan se- HUD John frankenheimer Tucker Oscar Lamont Johnson Bo bowling engineer Bush Lamont Oprah Winfrey LA Ryan Bingham T-Bone Burnett
30 September Movement assassinated Indonesian army generals - October 1, 1965

This Day in History Class

06:15 min | 2 years ago

30 September Movement assassinated Indonesian army generals - October 1, 1965

"A new podcast from IHEART radio and Jingle punks Barrena Banja. I'm Dr Q. and I've spent the last thirty years tracking down bear and Banjo Ngo the two most important musicians of the twentieth century podcast narrated by Dennis Quaid featuring new music produced we've by t-bone Burnett but the new song featuring original lyric by Bob Dylan Barron avenge premiers October third on the iheartradio APP apple podcast gassed or wherever you get podcast this day in history class is production of iheartradio. Yeah well come to this day in history class where we bring you a new tidbit from history every day. Today is October first. I twenty nineteen. The day was October. First nineteen sixty five a group of Indonesian National Armed Forces members killed fixed high ranking Indonesian army general's in a failed coup Jakarta the army linked the assassinations to the Indonesian Communist Party and for the next several weeks the military terry detained and killed hundreds of thousands of communists alleged communists and their sympathisers the coup led to Indonesia's first President Sukarno being on house arrest in general through Harto being appointed to the presidency President Sukarno had begun promoting the system of guided democracy since he believed parliamentary democracy was ineffective in Indonesia as he began implementing a form socialist populism he attempted to balance relations with the military communist and religious groups he supported the Indonesian Communist Party and the army me which was largely anticommunist though many in the military did support communism land reforms which the communist party pressured Sukarno implement for a major source of tension between the party Muslim religious leaders and the people who controlled the lane as the Indonesian Communist Party party gained more influence seeds of doubt grew among army members who were suspicious of the party's intentions and religious groups who were unsure of the party's Beuys Sukarno became more anti-imperialist and championed economic independence for Indonesia but the economy declined due to a lack of effective policy western nations encouraged anti Communist efforts against the Indonesian Communist Party Sukarno and the left and in nineteen sixty five the Indonesian communist party had three million members and was the third largest communist party in the world but by this this time there were rumors that senior army generals were planning a coup against the cardinal in the early morning hours of October. I The thirtieth September Movement Matt Kidnapped and murdered fix of Indonesia's top military generals the movement members announced over the radio that they had seized power to protect the president event and prohibit a military coup the leader of the movement Lieutenant Colonel Into told listeners that the president was safe that generals had been arrested and that there was about to be a new revolutionary government but the coup was crushed quickly. The army claimed the Communist Party was responsible for the coup attempt at the time there was not much evidence that the party had any involvement in the action against the military but General Harto commander of the Army Strategic Reserve served capitalized on anticommunist intimate and quickly launched propagandistic attack against communists he shut down a communist and leftist publications nations while pro army publications flourished the pro army press circulated stories that the murder generals had been tortured and mutilated through this campaign the army inflamed anticommunist feelings and convinced people that the party was complicit in a huge conspiracy the military he took the opportunity to eliminate the political power of communism in Indonesia which it perceived as a threat the army police and civilian militias imprisoned and and killed a communist and their supporters into Carta Central and East Java and Bali as well as parts of other islands. The death toll has been estimated estimated at at least half a million people. It was later discovered that some leaders in the Indonesian Communist Party did play a role in planning the coup but most the people in the party did not know about it. There are many conspiracy theories around exactly who planned the thirtieth September movement and what its goal was the Communist Party was banned in Indonesia in nineteen sixty five and has been ever since along with any public discussion of the massacre the military dictatorship chip that soon took over lit by Suharto rolled Indonesia until nineteen ninety eight with Western support Indonesia became pro western and the the downfall of communism and Indonesia benefited capitalist countries. I'm Eve code and hopefully you know a little more about history today than you did yesterday. If there are any upcoming days in history that you'd really like to cover on the show. Give us a shout on social media at t's the I eight hundred podcast. We'll see you're here in the same place tomorrow. For more podcasts from iheartradio visit the iheartradio iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows hello hello everyone. My Name is Steven Satterfield here with some good news from iheartradio in the makers of whetstone stone magazine comes point of origin in all new podcast about the world of food each week we travel the globe in here from the keepers of our food traditions so listen to point of origin on apple podcast the iheartradio APP or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Indonesian Communist Party Indonesian Communist Party par Indonesian Communist Party Suk communist party Indonesia Communist Party army Indonesian army President Sukarno apple Indonesian National Armed Forc iheartradio Sukarno president pro army Army Strategic Reserve Barrena Banja t-bone Burnett Dennis Quaid Banjo Ngo
The Story Behind All Those Nazi / Clown Memes

Behind the Bastards

49:42 min | 2 years ago

The Story Behind All Those Nazi / Clown Memes

"I'm dr q. and i've spent the last thirty years tracking down there and banjo the two most important musicians in the twentieth century blah podcast narrated by dennis quaid featuring music produced by t-bone burnett written by jerry goose did and grammy winning violating my osha guidelines i'm robert evans the host of behind the bastards the podcast we tell you everything you don't doc them out of the air much like a pinata but fleeing into the air however since i can't direct the device objects to go where i want them to go twine wrapped around this entire box of thomas brand english muffins with the the original in cranston crannies yeah yeah this is the very worst people in all of history today my guests cody johnston katie stole hey guys doing great oh yeah where where he sophie so if he wants to know you wanna be giving them it's not gonna work well this is not a democracy democracy give me eagles are quite a few of them did some damage to the the other recording room when sylvia was in here and we talked about the falwell family one of the things i've learned one thing ling shepherd slim it's it's it's a weapon from the ancient world that a fan of ours a fan of mine made very generously specifically to throw bagels but we're out of counts for lots there's not a lot i i did not bring enough michetti not defend you from a bread product but i'm sorry i used to read the very helpful guidelines the creator of this object left me and instead of just been recklessly tossing things and i think step one fling you step one thing realized that i couldn't control the direction of it i also realized that the best thing to do would be to play a little game where i fling packages of bread based food products at y'all and y'all have large knives to try to folks that i've assembled on the table here willy got okay we got some english muffins wrapped in twine we've got a bag of mini bagels worth atop what are we talking about today what are we talking about today have you guys noticed some clowns i hate around the internet haven't learned about how to use this is how to make anything i throw go in the direction i want to know how to aim that's it appears to be impossible weather step step to watch didn't they advise that you never use it indoors yes now so when i started experimenting with this yeah he's everyday night standard miss standard and that's not to mention all the various snacks and beverages that are also on the table but i think these are the items you were referring to i'm a machete that's billy davis podcast machete got a large knife yeah kitchen knife on self got play i gave sophie my walking around sympathy most in the active community tend to land in the middle advocating a diversity of tactics and for years one of the most prominent tactics was cloud-based mockery yeah okay quite yet what we call i don't know what we call that i'm not aware of other podcasts that do this while you're the only podcast i am roots at one end are the black block in the antifa who become the boogeyman and women breathless TV anchors these people say fascist need to be outnumbered overwhelmed and sometimes even confront there's some goes back at least as far as two thousand three what a small group in the UK formed the clandestine insurgent rebel clown army for sir they trained cadre of clouds that's actually a couple kinds of clients so in our modern era of shiny new fascist movements tromping through the streets in various guises the kind of folks who don't like fascism have found themselves at a bit of a cross ear we're live we just recorded worse you're ever in our according to this we did and i made a little very subtle reference guide now you wanna tell us a little bit about the did with physical violence in order to force them off the streets and on the other end of things you have folks who believed the best action is no action if we ignore the fascist they'll go away confronting them the street only earns who would show up at the frontlines of protests and confront right police with seltzer water honking red noses and that one weird scarf trick clowns do i presume now knives in between the recording of worst show ever for user sophie oh clowns in edinburgh scotland alone in cadres performed in other cities in europe and the united states so that's cool cool sounds nice still clowns still your purpose was mostly to boost the spirits of activists dealing with police violence washing mace out of their eyes and cringing away from trenches and such at their height circa had around one hundred and fifty profession is that matters is how much steel is their size does matter give me the machete i mean i have not decided who gets what you guys i feel like whoever gets the michelle gets machete machete president of the united states shared a video themed after take on me that at one point has one of the people he's talking to in clown for some strange reason added to hold a parade on the capitol steps olympia washington it was to be your standard nazi affair a dozen ish guys in uniform waving flags trying to trigger people the extensible goal of the march was sounds more or less okay with those clowns you might say that a guy like vermin supreme today it's kind of like the modern incarnation of attitude towards clowning at protests where it exists to kind of james instead of shouting or worse attacking protesters dressed up as nazi clowns to mimic the rally ever see a nazi clown goosestepping it was like springtime for hitler david newark new jersey that happened to today's about why are the clowns all over the place these days what what fry krugman which the group could sorely use a year or so later the national socialist movement would barely be able to scrape together eighty people from across the entire united states so according to the seattle times is covering fascism since forever says after time onlooker seemed to forget about the deflated white nationalist entirely that was the most striking defeat i've ever seen delta neo-nazis newark kind of holds the design that's the most effective way that you can you can confront these people in the streets that's pretty good in two thousand seven a group of fascist calling themselves of inlanders decided to hold a march in i figured the safest thing to do would be arm everyone in the room was a different kind of bladed object naming stand in different areas played well it's also the best deal that's bill tennessee they were confronted by a clown block made up of members of the group anti-racist action or a are a again the clowns pantomime nazi salutes and goosestepping basically goodness yeah yeah it's it's the i think it's a complicated issue discussed on that yeah now into doesn't five the national socialist movement looking radicalize wow so we're not going to fling objects around the room with dangerous weapons and everything in january two thousand seventeen more than five hundred swedish nazis from the nordic resistance movement held a rally in the city of falloon on international labor day there were confronted by the activists and this is a silly time this is silly time we have some fun with it yeah but also the thing fascist the most is being mocked and not taken seriously they hate it we're going to get to that w. CNC the message from us is you look silly were dressed like clowns and you're the ones that look funny yeah not inaccurate not an accurate was the most potent weapon against fascist extremists angry people they know how to meet anger they know to meet hate and violence but they don't know how to meet humor we could see they were very troubled by having us there we're we're going on a little bit of a journey with this one so hope you're all excited alcon bottled history of clowns as organiz parts of active holding their own clown themed version of the rally when the nazis chanted white power the clown shouted back white flour and then threw fistfuls of flour there that's fun that's fun yeah by two thousand seventeen the idea of confronting fascist with clowns was rather popular with activists all over the globe from an optics standpoint the sort of activism was certainly successful mainstreaming now midget said that his clown rally was directly inspired by the ongoing activism of clown congress in finland who had shown up in clown block to counter the anti-immigrant groups soldiers of odin for years sources were markedly more positive towards activists dressed as clowns rather than in black even when the activist dressed in black didn't do anything now justin bates is from charlottesville virginia in the wake of the two thousand seventeen rally that killed heather higher or in which heather higher was murdered by a nazi he started to get racist robo calls from scott roads if i had carolina drew about fifty supporters making it one of the more sizable gatherings in the group's history several hundred clowns showed up to counter protests outnumbering the nazis five to one by some accounts again distress everybody the things distract people a sense of a de-escalating sort of like make like this where but they were so mad but they were all this pissed off alex linder the rally organizers so much that he charged at the clowns and attempted to assault them he was arrested by tossed white flour in response to nazi chance of white power this counter protest was organized by the latin american coalitiion their youth coordinator lacy williams said this did it gave her a sticker sorry throwing sling away no more new sticker also by threat to offend you today you can use it as much as you want buddy all right well when the police come later to tell them you said i could use it as much as i want ladies woody harrelson now yeah so he starts getting these yeah she asked for once i brought it and i didn't want to give it up before i forgot i was listening okay he's cradling looks get them and then the violence and then they get speaking of triggered i can see that sophie and katie are passing notes i don't know what's happening just give me a really cool story florida politics dot com UK news dot yahoo spokesman dot com blabbity huffington post bonner county daily b fun idea and unfortunately i've actually found no evidence that scott ever made this happen somebody does find it i would i would love to be corrected on that but what's interesting to me is that all the coverage ed rose's home quote he targeted my hometown so i said okay if he wants to use his first amendment rights to spread his ridiculousness then i'll use my first amendment rights to spread my own ridiculousness and you know what this year when somebody from cheers would come in the season comforting the american fascist cinematic universe yeah yes and then every the police immediately again the clowns dealt a startling blow to roughly a dozen nazis that's that's pretty good make them look silly make them angry trigger them opened this spring nonetheless it's interesting to me how much media attention he received for this idea that didn't actually happen versus how much media attention is received by rallies uh-huh calls these very racist anti-semitic robocalls from scott roads of idaho now bates decided to counter this by organizing event where people would dress as clowns and play accordions group we are to learn on many of whom showed up yet again dressed as clowns ivan midgets representative of the counter protesters showed radio sweden that he'd come to believe humor because for one thing it does not seem to actually dissuade nazis from continuing to march and may of two thousand eighteen the nordic resistance movement marched again in beka sweden again with around five hundred people clowns oh you guys remember scott roads wrote a power talked about him during the fun guy when i love when these colorful characters up again yeah it's like it's like in free why not do it in front of his house move along as possible because if he's going to torment my friends and neighbors and their homes and businesses with his stupid shit if he wants to get into a stupid shit competition oh when that every day vouch for you thank you crime save lives beautiful in two thousand twelve the national socialist movement again held a rally this time in charlotte that's outside somebody's house here whether or not one side is just as dangerous as the other because yeah they're just very straightforward supportive of the silly things at the time focused on the idea in video he made of like a clown bates announced in two thousand eighteen that he planned to do this next spring but as far as i'm aware nothing newsweek in k. h. q. all those all those people covered it with like man's response to neo nazi robocaller sin clowns that's newsweek well yeah now dyer than all of that is the fact that in recent months nazis themselves seem to have found a way to adopt aspects of oedipus i've seen who've gotten hundreds of thousands of people to show up like nobody cares about it here's a short list of the sites that covered bates's not a clown stunt stunt didn't whatever one's racists you know just because i say this and they know how to handle that but they really it doesn't stop them doesn't stop they don't but they don't handle it very to permit the police reported the organizer for contravening the law on public order but again these guys kept marching after being confronted by clown there's more follow through because the media seems interested in this story that they can latch onto and they're not gonna fall into the trap that they always do the false logoff yes like burn your computer walk outside peta cat but if you spend time on those plays you've probably run across strange images of a green fraud online personalities in far right white nationalist online circles or attempting to attribute racism and anti semitism to an image of a cartoon character pepe the frog depicted poorly drawn as a clown it's racism rallied against them and they drew more activists than ever to show up and clown block which proved to be a problem because for the first time the clouds drew in enough numbers that they had to have a permit to march and since they hadn't oh no and people's posts and like twitter profiles online people dressed up like clinton some clowns around addicts decision has happened in olympia right it seems to be effective in in certain ways but yeah but not not a silver bullet scared of clowns vinnie amount founder hilarious way to troll the racist robocaller like the it got a lot of coverage nothing ever happened weird interesting maybe a sign that it actually is a good tactic this tactic for themselves and this brings me rather unfortunately to the hong cler meme hawk ler honk ler yeah that's right if you're trying to make the case at a stop them can go a long road to go there even though there's some evidence that can be very effective and contribute them to you know make a bad all of the nazi shit they want him to do but only did some of it micro not nearly enough not not being explicit about it either yeah yeah and their lives still sucks winstons the things like that it's just like no here's yeah let's just what's going on not like they're not making a judgment really yeah whether or not someone should violent one yeah interesting lessons there now uh so it's hard for me to judge the actual efficacy of the tactic of confronting nazis with clowns hardcore nihilism that's currently sweeping the ranks a very online fascists see they were pretty optimistic for the first couple of years of donald trump's election i'm thinking that he was going to do ah that's a choice quote it's a good quote it just as stupid expletive but i i think stupid shit yeah that's real good now that does sound like nicholls online and a slow inching forward even towards more radical elements of the movement now that might sound a little bit weird but the more radical view is a sort of you know what's not piss earth what oh i do i bet oh i think that has just prompted me to when we come back finally tossed these crannies in nooks story the machete is up for grabs people just grab the weapons yeah yeah that's that's literally yes you spend a lot of time on twitter or or any of the other foul corners of the internet they are products hey y'all i'm julie and i'm brenda where the hosts of insider's guide to the other side and that effort has gained notable tracks in recent months far right proponents want the broader internet to believe the character directly represents their world view but the situation in the whole re represents an attitude shift in rights like i am yeah they're not katie they aren't in if they were katie they wouldn't be nazi they wouldn't something to that just like they know the dressed as a clown the bay this is honcker he's essentially a peppy meam clown face i'm going to quote from an article by jared holt from right wing watch and other woo woo stephan things we hope that will make you laugh so hard UP little but mostly find peace insider's guide to the other side launches on october sixth the tip of my tongue i can't think of products and services sophia's getting ready with the knife and you may be wondering what exactly qualifies us to guide you around the other side while you did write a book about ghosts and spirits i think that qualifies but side on the iheartradio app apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcast and we're back we're back is a problem for them so a lot of these guys have begun to lose hope of ever instituting the murderous ethnos state they so desire and so all of these clown reference supposed to be framing issue and because if it's a serious thing dan what are they both saying they're both the same as one his are a reference to the fact that they believe modern society is a clown world where racist intermix genetically superior specimens themselves go tragically on fox and that that is oh five to take our listeners for a spin every week into the spiritual realm or we definitely promise it will be a ride a ride flow psychic communication humor and lots of story from them now in february twenty nineteen racist and antisemitic variations of the character named honcker began appearing unfortunately poll image board additionally the characters associated with the term right now i think the way to do this is to swing above my head and oh it went sideways very violently closer i are we not done and there's a an arms race going on cable i couldn't stand up everybody got to arm themselves get something to hit these these nooks and crannies thomas is out of the air i don't oh how to do they know how to deal with anger because that's where so much at the them comes from yeah and they know like oh triggering you then i'm gonna stay calm and i'm gonna be like what the world is cloudy show and if we keep the clown world going into what is it piss earth is another term this area yeah there's a whole bunch of them gene that is fifteen days before halloween so tune in every wednesday after that listen to insiders guide to the other what direction they're going to go in one up for me one is for anderson she has thought search for katie stapler okay is happening it went backwards behind him when he was most opposite honk pill which is often described as an absurdist alternative to black pill nihilism allowing a person to appreciate the humor in an absurd universe interpreting existence as a cosmic joke it's like oh good memes the honk ler and clown world memes evolved in a decentralized fashion the website know your meme has tracked its entire evolution i'm going to quit with the message what emotion does this image of oak from you almost immediately users hit upon the idea of using them as yet another dog whistle to signal national socialist beliefs so the iran you're the best kind of guide you know a guy to someone who is an expert that usually is indigenous to that area is like your homeland you know since birth i think that we're both one of the first response is is someone saying hong kong equals h h heil hitler if you honk your honky taking back the rainbow mocking the the parentheses that means something jewish clown world clone world insiders say this world created by the jews and then somebody quoted that and said why hong kong as you can see this is hong you've seen this guy floating around twitter yeah so the guy says that and then ooh isn't that a pill great bill i wish someone should go back in time to the witch ascii sisters and be like don't make it a pill don't don't make it so ready for when deep fakes allow us to replace that scene in the matrix with with cannery getting an enema the actual honcker image was first posted on four chan that january i played i oh i'm just very sad that happened very quickly yeah unfairly jumped on that yeah they really were like yeah let's turn this into this literally the only thing we do anymore talker i mean he can't do it the second time honey leave each your worst there's no way to know it'll be okay i'm gonna throw it yeah yeah yeah that's interesting you've been honk and i just be honked i dea as to its origin from one of their posts they will adopt our child in post honcker on social media under mainstream memes already in circulation there will come a time when we must take him back of honk layer with the the rainbow wig on in front of a gas chamber so the next okay sign then someone else said taking back the rainbow brother doesn't belong defense sodomites and trans freaks hong kong tiller and they have a picture of yeah very frustrating that we have to care about this i would love to ignore these people would that'd be great if you didn't if they weren't a concern chan's poborsky launched operation honk with the goal of spreading the honk their meam across the internet their goal was to get it into general circulation hopefully convince normies to start spreading around without any either of the honk or not we must perpetuate this name to show the world our ideas stoop so dumb whether honk or not all these shootings if they if a if a detectable fraction of them didn't shoot up random walmart's it would be nice to ignore them like talk to each other and talk to each other in everything's a pill these days i don't want to take any more pills yeah takes them so much old of other incredibly shitty people one of those people was noted actor james woods celebrating james woods on april eighth ah ah sophie podcast thank you very get each other to yeah it's cool stuff honk facebook page was quickly created in the mean rapidly spread outside the confines of the chance and into the whitewater it is make things nazis did not have to clear my schedule nothing else going on on february eleventh users it is there needs to be someone behind me i need to be surrounded in a forest of knives so that i can go the safely no don't be china against the next ad breaks somebody has to hit it with a blade all volunteers yeah well this is this embarrassing i thought it was lovely around poobah bowling with a new song featuring original lyrics by bob dylan listened to bear in a band you're on the iheartradio or wherever you get podcast sir i know this is a fine from narrative standpoint in one thousand nine hundred nine but we're all going to regret it like it's like an animal related canton's no visual okay five times notes so it is it your first day cody katie for non contract plaguing podcasts sing it's on he posted this little gym to his facebook page now what does that what does that what does that look like y'all the bottom one looks like bob hawke ller it is honk ler was in front of the african american lady that's not quite all of the subtext do you recognize what leave that james woods is as for changes would say jew pilled right which i don't think he understands entirely what he's saying she said i'm ready to go to motherfucking c. l. war clown war over this you're not going to take a symbol of happiness and acceptance and multiculturalism and turn it into something racist in antiseptic in homophobic in this but then his responses get really weird because like woods spent the rest of the day like watching more and more of her footage and like it seems like he actually i'm not kidding i mean there's the clown stuff and the nuts liberal stuff but she's likable i don't know why i'm still smiling started out making fun of her video but now i'm really curious about her so i mean that's charming and it's a clown world because of that and then on the explicitly nazi site it's the jews are the ones making it be that way and that's why it's all right it's always like that little leafy demand yeah ah but the two different ways of taking that is the like not explicitly nasi way is that like well these SJ ws these liberals are just so absurd recently did start to enjoy her stuff started posting positive things about her she's my newspaper person on twitter i mean she certainly committed to her position about things she's willing to go to war okay and wh- specifically why he posted declaring war with hashtag clown lady and the clown lady in the picture the woman who the attaran klein is looking at is a is a youtube churchyard in his car that's what it is a church shooter britain tarrant as honk lyrica i n front of a youtube personality jeez yeah no idea if woods new like he knew what the clown world because they couldn't world's taken onto meetings both of them are that the world fundamentally absurd because of all this multiculturalism bullshit it's actually not it's just because the world is so nuts and it's like that you're held yeah helping their buddy yeah it's very frustrated it's very frustrating i don't believe yeah that's and that's james woods sharing a member of the christ church mass shooting you think he knew that it was first shooter hard to say because like you guys and i mean i've seen doors tim pool yeah yeah like he's done videos where he's like people say the honker thing is like about not as he's old he's old and not smart internet stuff like stuff like someone conservative thing and he was like what it named lil lunchbox and she provoked the ire of the right wing when she complained about the hong rim and particularly complained about the appropriation of rainbow imagery by the right with green skin and a rainbow clown wig turning her into a honk ler was you just sort of the way the internet works when it does stuff like that but i will say i don't think james james woods has some access to an relationship with people who are sharing these nazi things he's not going on chance very excited to see someone is relatively mainstream james would share it and they immediately then started taking pictures of little lunchboxes face in photoshop he also might just have been backtracking someone was like oh you you spread terrorist propaganda rosy fuck deli but like yeah yeah didn't that's part of why instant the oh yes the car that is that image that we know to think of sharing some but yeah i guess i have scene yeah pretending that it's not a problem and that there's nothing nothing going on and there isn't a community of people that actively do this on purpose and makes me think twice a bathroom where a woman is half dressed and then the hongkongers low face peering through the wall any schmidt he's semitic yeah and transphobic so that's like that's the reaction they wanted that's the reaction they wanted and james woods is declaring a war on her work in national politics but here we ziegler nazis tricking famous people in sharing their yes yes yeah that would be that would be good if negative effort ever welcome to the best of the yep yep yeah i honestly have no idea what the message of that as even supposed to bake i guess so keeping tom kind of thing thing going on you are so connected to these communities that's the concern it's like whoa how did you see this racist thing and why did you connect to it and and re tweet it like stuff it's like he's going oh yeah these clowns is is clowns right donald trump tweeted that HMO hillary clinton with the star of david on it that is oh she's she's dressed all sexy yup there might be some insult shit there it's really hard to say yeah happen and famous people reacting to it by generally saying i guess i'll defend nazis now rather than admit that i got tricked it's i really love twenty nine twenty might just be a pretty good year comparative best year of all of them that seems oh i was lurking on the same day this happened and so i was able to watch them react to this because they had created the original image that then got chopped up of tarrant as hong lead like that women this products that support this podcast i hope i hope they don't they don't good we've had all of our products danell saying this pulling versions of this team that i really don't even know what trying to be conveyed there it's clearly based off the shining you got yeah an acts coming through heart radio app apple podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts well we're the break down time to get my stapler out brooks the same day that james woods made that post although i think it happened earlier than that and i just didn't choose to save those images but here's here's a here's here's an example of one of the more woods quite knew what he was doing no it's yeah it's what happ- it's like their goal he's not looking at this and going oh yeah the terrorists and hitler back famous sports teams in the past we want to understand what made them stand out above all others maybe they were famous because they were the best or maybe they were famous because they lost or maybe hey everyone i'm jason smith and mike harmon join us as we unveil our new sports podcast special teams it's you didn't know about each episode will feature different team and we'll also do a deep dive into what was happening in popular culture at the time what teams are we going to feature well if we could we tell you they were just more fun than everyone else it'll be things you're definitely expecting to hear and some features and interviews you might not be you'll remember the big moments and hopefully become aware of but were deeply involved in preparations special teams podcast debuts with two episodes on october twenty third listen and follow on the back in because we're coming back from a break i'm going to attempt to properly fling the thing with the sling and enough of direction that somebody with a weapon is able to hit them oh smart smart now i i don't know what was going on with james woods and i won't pretend to but i do know that the ship posters on eight took to honk their me all right all right yeah no you're getting better oh yeah they're nazis goals it's types out and sets up setting it's a it's it's not great it's not the way i would prefer things bush up daniel daniel said not enough employed good job well we'll have to change that men who like dildos just women's right we were the women you know what doesn't kill it out of the air and make these now rather crumbled english muffin bursts like opin yada filled with gluten gluten yada yeah and it worked oh you're toss her about your top boy i hope nobody relies on these english muffins for breakfast oh good is it get idea well i feel safe thank you to buy them now i thought they were gonna are women but everybody should get ready conversation between fascists as early as two thousand seventeen which is well before the game although they seem it seems to have just been a term they were using rather than sort of a medium in and of itself teams like a duck takes to racism when i started writing this episode i looked through my giant document saved eighteen posts in the first honcker me my found on there was from april eighth which was yeah causing papers doesn't have quite the i love tyson i'm just a toss fan i'm a toss he didn't think that was a starve someone else hates hillary fuck yeah right yeah he didn't take that much time definite it's it's the the fact that you the involves references to clowns aimed at making the point that our modern world is social justice and treating women like people fundamentally absurd has actually has its origins back before the honk for me i self from that i mean ducking that's right if i had offers safe for almost killing her katie i'm sorry for almost killing you so this is one of the things that's confusing about this that way that women not just the clown world i found clown world references on archived discord right so i'm going to read a little conversation from the vibrant diversity chat room which was frequented by many of the people who marched and organiz the bloody to seventeen unite the right rally in charlottesville cruel camp and carl to the enemy horatio kerry LOL vanguard seriously they should be put in front line service horatio kerry no i doubt it there's dildos on the shelf though so i bet they'd call her a stacey or something right like there's there's mixed messaging yeah it's unclear or maybe they're just saying we're going to kill him arching right next to this terrorist cool quite something so these posts came after a long discussion about whether or not transgender people should be able to serve in the military very woke takes yeah take a lot of things in consideration horatio kerry honestly putting trannies on the front line is i don't know what that means but british people get us something to do with go swift tax go swivel utah sir reverse way sign because that's it as is usually the case the clan world and honcker memes quickly traveled from the most extreme corners of the internet to more mainstream now cannon fodder campaign carl just don't waste any armor or weapons on them horatio carry tranny core northern underscore confederate LL such either way it means somebody with a tendency to show off or bragged in excessive in an embarrassing 'cause i bragged about my i was trying to get so big i don't have any choice but to accept your apology you need it more than i do now the machete had been there you could have hit the the bagels talk hosts express racist and antisemitic views a staple of their programming with guests that include david duke christopher cantwell and patrick little nevertheless they are ultimately nihilistic about the state of the world and british utah sir i thought it was something else i mean it might be about anal angus is that what you're referring to others people do terrorism's sure sure weird that a lot of doing terrorism like statistically significant have done it went to where it was the same this link eventually but initially world thankfully our president all caps in ARE has a simple solution to trannies no so that's good that's good that was unpleasant to listen to you really why i reference i can find a clan world in like one of those really clear discussions i hate it thank you for hating it and it is a job robert by kind of like the middle of this year early you know yeah quarter first quarter of this year the end of that quarter so my guess is that the channels behind honk it's yeah it's unfortunately it's ironic the good chris cantrell directed halt and catch fire because the bad chris can't well i would not have a problem if he were to haul fire nationalism and detached way in embodied the same increasingly nihilistic attitude among the white nationalist and white supremacist movements in the united states conveyed in the reputation of the word clown world are you telling nazis to get outta town you'll be declared domestic terrorists as true it's the same i love our system is helpful it's good it has no flaws love you did not done that might guide you really no way that i could have defended ability to change it without mass organized action reminiscent of the violent writings of james mason in his book siege yeah so feel bad i in every couple of months you see terrorism done a suspected terrorism done and you're that person looks familiar oh here they are marching literally next to this other so were you are you yeah i'm not gonna waste food that's good thank you thank you for praising your good the hawks i'm gonna read from right wing watch again create and clan world memes were recently incorporated into go talk a new but growing web based white nationalist podcast the shows hosts advocate white mhm say the guys on fortune and the fact that folks associated with them had latched onto the honker me is evidence that it had essentially spread to the uncall- sections of the nazi right by by this point toughest hurt myself with the dollars that you would have cut them in half we were like oh it's amazing how damaged there thanks charlie brown somebody pulled a fucking football out from under kids that kids clowns you yeah i was expecting oh you're you're

heather higher dennis quaid t-bone burnett virginia justin bates congress jerry goose finland charlottesville fifteen days thirty years
April 12, 2019: Hour 2

Here & Now

42:11 min | 2 years ago

April 12, 2019: Hour 2

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from Fidelity Investments, taking a personalized approach to helping you grow and protect your wealth. Learn more at fidelity dot com slash wealth. Fidelity brokerage services LLC from NPR and WB. You are. I'm Lisa Mullins. I'm Peter O'Dowd. This is here. Now in our top story today, the fate of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange who was arrested yesterday and the Ecuadorian embassy in London after living there for nearly seven years. Let's bring in Vaughan Smith via Skype. He's a friend of Assange and a freelance journalist and von I understand you visited Assange just a few days ago. And he knew his arrest was coming. Well, it the relationship with the Ecuadorian says on south really, and it really happened after the election when Moreno became the president he adopted a very different policy tools America, mainly, and this is the seed as America's will June this Chuck towels but during the during the lost year. Got very difficult for Julian. I'm he lost his internet access the surveillance on him in the embassy was doubled. There were two cameras in every room. And he was gagged he wasn't ob- speak to the press. Well, to that point the Ecuadorian president was apparently not so happy with Julian Assange as a house guest he claimed that Assange and apparently attacked guards that he may have accessed the embassy's security files. I mean, do you think the Julian Assange is partly to blame for his eviction. Well, Jillian was my house guest thirteen months. So I know what it's like, and I'm afraid I'm not going to side with the Ecuador on this one. They gave him a sign them. So I feel what they're trying to do by. This is justified the facts that they withdrawn asylum somebody which is a legal under international laws. So I do feel this is the extra ones trying to excuse that behavior on this one. I, you know, I know this is not the most important part of this story. But I am very interested. What life was like over the last seven years or so four Julian Assange living in. Side the orien- embassy will what did he do? Well, there's not much to do. I mean, it's it's an imagine living in one or two small rooms London flats where you can have the world outside the come participate. Imagine being to wired about surveillance. You wouldn't even open a window? The thing that I think calls him most distress was the solitude. Now, what happened was invited me wants to come and see him on a Friday evening. And I wonder why the Friday because I wanted to on says, and I knows his the embassy get quieter as people left to go home. I could see his face change. And I realized then what is it of solitude meant for somebody? So look, I think it was very very difficult sunny west in prison a prison has a regime where yo- Nomex spectrum get some medical health. He only have a doctor or dentist to carry whatever they needed in because the British government wouldn't let him have access to it. And you're saying it was worse than prison ES on one level. But at the same time, I think it's important to note that Julian wanted to maintain the asylum, but. It. Yes, it was less comfortable than a prison. Can you describe his level of involvement with WikiLeaks while he was living there? Yeah. I mean during the first six years he was clearly running Wicky the good incident access. He's able to do it. It was very few people very small budgets, and it was able to never a great impact. But in the last year when he lost the internet access. He wasn't able to stain that he doesn't run WikiLeaks. And it hasn't run WikiLeaks for some time. Now, look he has many supporters you among them, but he also has many critics, including news organizations, like the Washington Post the paper's editorial board said yesterday that he is not oppress hero that he violated journalistic standards because he didn't vet the information that he released and now allegedly used illegal methods to get it. What's your response to that? Well, I think there are some in that curses in that festival. He has a different view to us. We in the trainers journalists. I'm a quite strict about reductions on things like this. And I believe that's right. The reason that the files were released unredacted was actually a product of US government pressure and somebody who stolen from him and release them by mistake. So it wasn't deliberately dumb. So I just think that's a slight in actually. But it's not unfair to say that, you know, there's a debate about reductions and that he is on a scale. But it is wrong to present him. The other point you make the hacking full. I mean, that's very interesting because obviously this niece we tested in court. And I don't think that a newspaper should judge this for it has been tested in court. But however, my understanding is that what Jillian allegedly did because I don't I was that was actually supports manning in knots being traced, I he protected his source, obviously, these things might seem quite similar, but the fine line between the might be very relevant in this case he is now in a serious legal battle. What are what are his next steps? Legally speaking in. Under his supporters next move. Well, his next obviously he's in prison. Now, I understand spell must prison. And it looks like the American expedition thing will come into force, and that will lead it's cost, but it could take up to three to five years. I mean Britain does have very weak extradition gnaws with the state. So we are inclined to send people to states rather liberally and American doesn't necessarily return them on the same jurisdiction is he afraid of that how free and is he using he absolutely phase going to America. He thinks this is about vengeance. And I can see why he thinks that because you know, Americans just have a record of not forgiving people. And actually, it's quite normal for a powers. I mean, you know, when Britain was a superpower we used to send gunboats if anybody annoyed Noida, British NATO abroad, Russia it goes to Salisbury. And it tries to kill people poison them who wants make an example of I'm not wanting to directly compare America with Russia because American it doesn't kill people about what it does seem to do. And this is what jillions fair is is that what America wants news dissuade others in a vengeful way by making an example of him and present prison for life. That's von Smith, a journalist and a friend to Julian Assange, thanks for your time. Thank you very much. This has been a historic we consume. Dan, the military ousted the man who's been president for thirty years. Omar al-bashir by shears accused of war crimes and genocide. The country's defense minister will be in charge for the next two years. Angry protesters are still rallying and demanding a civilian led government. Not a final was born in Sudan she lives in Omaha Nebraska. She's interim membership and communications director for the association of Sudanese American professors in America, not a how has your family that still in Sudan a suffered? If at all under the rule of president al-bashir. My dad personally had his own business that was thriving prior to Beshir's government, and he's been Lombardo by significant taxes and his inability to get things done because if you're not part of this government, and if you're not loyal to them is really hard for you to get anything done in the government offices, other family members have been active in that opposition to the regime and they suffer from detainment, but overall the whole country, including my family has suffered from the economic crisis this ongoing known student and the severe inflation and increase in the prices of all commodities. So what is lifelike there? Now assume that you're in touch very much with your family. That's there you have a significant family. They're still in Sudan. What are they saying about the most recent pressures on them most families today now relying on their relatives who? Abroad like myself to send them eight in the form of money. So that they can keep up with inflation in the country. However, the the main issue this been going on is just severe oppression, and that's just impacted everyone. And that's why there was such a sense of optimism among protesters in Sudan as well as you and other family members in Omaha who thought that this was the end of the old regime and the start of a civilian lead leadership in Sudan. That's not the case though. So the fact that apparently one of the associates of Mr. pressure is going to be taking over at least for now is going to be military control for about two years. What's your reaction to that? So this like, you just stated has been a mixed reaction and democracy of Sudanese weather incident or abroad have completely oppose the military coup that took over a mainly because this is basically another Faye. Face to el-beshir's regime now repackaged and be produced in a different form. So it's kind of like new boss same as the old boss and the new boss tell us about him. Yes. So the new boss who's our they've now he was the minister of defense and was recently appointed by president al-bashir after restructured his cabinet. So he does not nearly hold a good record when it comes to human rights. So the protesters completely rejected him the Sudanese professional association, which has been the orchestrator of these protests since December nineteenth issued several statements asking the protesters to continue their position in front of the headquarters of the military and not get fooled by this apparent military coup. You are so far away from Sudan, even though I know that you feel very integrated in what's happening right now aside from sending money to family members. What is the one thing? You think the u and other Sudanese in the United States can do of consequence that could make a difference from this distance? I think the most important thing would be raising awareness and advocating against the human rights violations that are happening incident and these have been done so far by multiple Sudanese all over the country by sending letters to the representatives asking for congress and other government organizations to put pressure on el-beshir's government. They're multiple other organizations such as the association Sudanese American professors in America that I'm part of an we declared our commitment to rebuilding wants a democratic regimes that chieftain in Sudan, this is not the first dictatorship that this. These people are able to overthrow an I'm very confident in the youth and the women who became the icon of this revolution that they're able to make a change and help Sudan achieve a democracy again. Not a foul of the association of Sudanese American professors in America, speaking with us from Omaha Nebraska. Thank you very much. Thank you for the opportunity. The legendary Grammy award winning T-Bone Burnett is out with a new album, and it is dark. Sala was no. Verse. There were so many light and the south the invisible light acoustic space is a departure for an artist who's worked most of his career behind the scenes as a producer for the industry's. Biggest stars. He produced the soundtrack for oh, Brother Where Art thou. He won an Oscar for his work with Jeff bridges in crazy heart and he made the music for the TV shows Nashville true detective, but fans will hardly recognize the electronic trance that rumbles through his first new album in eleven years T-Bone Burnett. Welcome to here now. Thank you, happy to speak with you well in it's a pleasure. But I have to say after I spent some time listening to this album. I'm a little bit worried about you. It's very dark, isn't it? It sounds dark. But no, I'm in pretty good shape. There's wits call the invisible light because there is inside of all is starting us. There is light. You just have to listen into it. Okay. Well, let's start talking about the music because you definitely are taking your audience on a journey. We're gonna listen to man without a country where at times it feels like a trip through the underworld. My man. Without a country. And other times it felt as if you're sitting next to a pre celebrating mass. Tell me what you're trying to do here. T-bone burnett. I suppose what I'm doing is rather than write a memoir are being try to put down all of this this experience, I've had creating receptacle for my fifty years of gathering knowledge, and especially about the areas of behavioral modification and condition responses in this and the electric media. So this is what I'm I'm doing. Really? I'm talking about these things I've learned and of of a fifty year study, I'm seventy one years old now so show business has nothing left for me. I don't need anything from life anymore. So I'm just going to put back out everything I've learned in this way. And you're doing it in a very unique way. Let's let's listen to another track. This is called being there. They're here. Is the. Esteems only Scott. Why are you using this style spoken word singing, it's it's all throughout the album? Well, I still consider myself part of the beach in ration-, and I've I've fell in love with beat poetry went up at the same time in the nineteen sixties. And I've loved hip hop music since the seventies. When it started in earnest and of always use spoken word in my records. I think every record I've ever done is that some spoken word in it. But this is almost in its entirety. Yeah. There are melodies here and there, but I feel like we, you know, I don't feel the need to write signs. In fact, I'm not sure I've I don't want to I don't want to write songs necessarily right now. I just want to get this this knowledge out in the cleanest, purist way, can I don't even want to lull people into a melody at the moment, you mentioned that there is hope to this album, and I wanna play the seven second track called Topi chant Chantiers. We want you to know. By the way, that's Casandra Wilson chanting that. So the the whole chant is we want you to know, you can learn anything we want you to know, you can learn anything we want you to know. And that's going to recur all the way through all of these additions that come out that was the happiest takeaway from the album. If you ask me. Well, it's I feel that there's a there's a mirth in that there's danger and thread in it. There's mirth in at too because we have to laugh at the devil. All of this is so different than what many people know you for for the country and roots music that has been a part of your career. How is it that you're you're comfortable shifting through these ideas, and these genres where most musicians wouldn't be going here. Right. Right. Well, you know, of course, I I actually started out in experimental music in the nineteen sixties. I was lucky enough to get access to a studio. And I started playing with electron EQ music and sampling, and it was all done on tape in those days, but we still sampled and turn things around and distorted things and turn things upside down, and I've actually been doing this my whole life at the same time. One of my closest friends was a guy named Stephen Bruton who was a great bluegrass musician, and I fell in love with folk music and Ralph Stanley in the Stanley brothers. And so all of this stuff is a part of what I've been doing the whole time. And I've you all you know, as soon as you put a microphone in front of any instrument Appiano revile or guitar becomes an electronic instrument. So I've only been dealing with electric music. I wanted to be behind the scenes making records in the studio. And that's where I've been most cover. Able and that's where I've lived my absolutely. In fact, you have worked with some of the biggest names in music behind the scenes Elton, John Elvis Costello Robert plant, Alison Krauss, our own Robin young spoke with Sarah Burrell's recently about her new album and Sarah told us that you helped her overcome her fear of recording with other musicians. Let's listen to some of that I have similar timidity as piano player, and I worry about making mistakes and one of the great gifts of working with T-Bone Burnett is that he's really not about perfection at all. He's all about capturing a moment. So you really encouraged me to make music with the band, and it's the first time I've ever done that. What do you think perfection is a second rate idea? There is no perfection and striving for it as as a waste of time. And it's part of pandering. It's like put what isn't a racer main like when you're race something does it a race. Some party yourself that that's not good enough. I totally agree. I think about that on the radio all the time. You know, you have to sort of just allow yourself to make your mistakes and move on and realise that you're not perfect. That's right. And and that's even more beautiful. You know, the the universe is not perfect the solar system. It went. When you first hear about the solar system. You think there's some order to the planets and the orbits and all that. And if you look at it, it's all ski, it's it's all scattered out all over everything. Well, I don't know what you're going to say is imperfect about this next song because I think it's pretty close. He won an Academy Award along with Ryan Bingham is singing the weary kind from the film, crazy heart. I had to have an excuse to play that song. Onto I love that some. I wanted to call that movie. The weary kind thought I said to Scott Cooper rider in the director of that. After after we wrote that science said, you know, this movie should be calling weary kind. You said who I don't know any any hemmed in Auburn, we didn't change it. And then last year, he came to me said, you know, we should call it movie the wurley. Yeah. It's a great title for it. Sounds like a great classic movie. We'll it did pretty well with crazy heart. But I you know, what are your thoughts on the state of country music today. I think country music is changing. I think there's a new establishment being created with Chris Stapleton and sturgeon Simpson and Casey musk grave, and I think it's we've been through a time like Steve Earle said modern country music is hip hop for people that are afraid of black people. And I think there's a there's absolute truth in that. And I think country music for a decade is been pandering. Also, the songs are about the same thing. It's a put it they call it identity, politics or something like that. It's about trucks, and and blue jeans and beer, and that stuff, and that's identity politics right there. It's all about this false notion of who we are Americans. And this is what I think we all have to grab a with our cultural. Inheritance is important to all of us. But we're behaving in a way right now that will destroy our cultural inheritance, unless we're smarter than we're being which brings us back to the album that you've just created even though it is so different than some of the work. You've done in the past. Here's another track from invisible light acoustic space. It's called beat the devil. What you want to? I want to tell me what you want to. I want to I'll play a dog is fear. Sphere. Just final thoughts on this album T-Bone Burnett. I know it's the first of three but what after. You know, actually, I don't know if it's going to be three it's their three additions. We've already recorded there may be several additions after that. I'm not quite sure I'm just gonna continue to put down everything I've learned in my experience in this form until I stop T-Bone Burnett. The new album is invisible light acoustic space. It was a pleasure to speak with you. Thank you very much. A great speaker Peter able to see through guys and all. This message comes from here. And now sponsor ember wings ember wave the revolutionary personal thermostat. That is designed to help you feel cooler or warmer at the press of a button ember wave can put you in control in places like you're freezing office uncomfortable. Airplanes restaurants, trains, cafes and more named one of time magazine's best inventions Twenty-eight teen. Learn more at ember wave dot com and use code NPR. The safe fifty dollars a checkout ember wave control your comfort. On the verge of going public. Uber has issued a warning to potential investors. The company may never make a profit. Michael Regan is senior editor at Bloomberg news. Mike, welcome. We're just a few weeks from Lubar shares going up for sale at one of the most anticipated IPO's of the year is it normal that a company would issue a warning like that? Well, it theoretically Uber actually did have a profit last year. But it was because they sold a stake in some overseas businesses. If you exclude that they lost about three billion dollars. And no it's not that uncommon for companies to go public on the stock market while still posting losses. But that three billion number is pretty big it's unusual to be losing that much money and go public. But that wording, they gave is really sort of one of the things you have to out lay out. It in these filings to the SEC it's sort of the worst case scenario, certainly people expect them to be prop profitable down the road. It's still a huge valuing the company at about one hundred billion dollars, but Mike that's down from previous valuations in large part because of what happened with lifts IPO. You're right. And lift a lot of excitement about that Pio, but the stock has fallen about twenty dollars from its IPO price. So there's kind of two ways to look at it one. Is that investors are seeing Uber coming down the pipeline and not as excited for lift as they were. So what happens next is Uber basically goes on what's called a road show where the managers and their investment bankers try to sell the stock to mutual fund hedge fund managers and pension funds. And I suspect what they'll try to do is differentiate themselves from lift and show that they're a more diverse company with ubereats and their ambition to be. Be sort of in the freight business and their ambition to really be a leader in self driving cars, and that sort of thing the last time that Wall Street had this many money losing tech companies in the midst of an IPO was back in nineteen ninety nine and two thousand right before the dot com. Bubble burst. We've talked about this before Mike just another symbol sign of potential concern that people might it's certainly raising some concern people call it quote on quote late cycle. Meaning that, you know, this this bull market in stocks. And this economic expansion has been going on a long time and these things never last forever. And if you look at the total amount of IPO's that are expected to be sold on Wall Street this year. It's estimates are roughly a hundred billion which does match sort of the biggest years we've seen nineteen ninety nine being one of them two thousand seven, but as a percentage of the stock market currently because remember the stock market is much much higher than it was in two thousand as a percentage. Of the stock market. Currently it's it's barely a blip. So from that perspective, it's maybe not as learning as just the raw number one hundred billion. And I think it's important to point out that Amazon never used to make money. They went public back in nineteen Ninety-seven. They were losing cash. They lost cash for a long time. Now look at him on. So, you know, there is a way out of this. It's not entirely bad news briefly. Absolutely. And I think that's sort of the story that we would like to tell is that they're investing heavily in future growth and their sales are growing strongly. So to them hope it's just a matter of time before those profits are okay mic. Reagan senior editor at Bloomberg news. Thanks very much. Thank you. Moyer's from the city of Chicago or going after the actor jussie smollet in civil court. This comes just weeks after an Illinois state prosecutor dropped felony charges against him. The complaint lawyers found yesterday says Chicago detectives worked eighteen hundred thirty six hours investing alleged hate crime that smell reported back in January police concluded the incident was a hoax, the overtime amounts to more than one hundred thirty thousand dollars. So far smollet has refused to pay it here. Chicago's mayor Rahm Emanuel at a press conference last month, he told reporters then that smell it should pay up given that he doesn't feel any sense of contrition, and remorse might recommendations. When he writes, the check in the memo section. He can put the word. I'm accountable for the hoax mayor manual says he doesn't know why prosecutors dropped the criminal charges against Millette and called it a whitewash of Justice. Meanwhile, jussie smollet continues to maintain his innocence. He says he was the victim of an attack motivated by racism and homophobia, he spoke after the chargers dropped. This has been an incredibly difficult time. Honestly, one of the worst of mine tire life, but I'm a man of faith. And I'm a man that has knowledge of my history. I would not bring my family our lives or the movement through a fire like this just wouldn't does he smell. It's attorneys say they'll mount a vigorous defense, and that the city of Chicago owes the actor in apology for dragging his reputation through the mud. Well, nearly a decade ago. Lawmakers in Illinois said yes to a sweeping expansion of legal gambling. It's brought tens of thousands of new video gambling machines still annoy but politicians also promised to help people who become addicted to using those machines. And apparently that has not happened and investigation by propublica. Illinois and member station WBZ in Chicago found the amount of money spent on gambling addiction treatment has actually gone way down WBZ's. Dan, monopolist has the story. Three times each week about fifteen or twenty people get together in a red brick office building on main street in downers grove in this room. This is a safe place because everybody understands because we're all addicts. I am a compulsive gambler. I lost my mortgage payment. And I got to tell my spouse. This is an leeann as members of this Gamblers Anonymous group, they know what happens to people who cannot quit belly. They're going sane. They will kill themselves or they'll go to jail a compulsive gambler. Those are the three options unless we have recovery and fifty eight like others here. She asked us not to use her last name and says she became a gambling addict after her husband died, suddenly and she plays those bad bets night at casinos, but video gambling parlors places in strip malls with names like bettys and stella's, you know, these people that go to these places these these people that have this addiction are some. Mhm low-life. These are your mom's your sisters, your brother's people go there because it's convenient. It's easier than ever to gamble here. The state legalized video gambling almost ten years ago. And now, there are more places to bed in Illinois than in any other state, even Nevada instead of having just ten casinos in Illinois. There are nearly seven thousand places where you can place a today with as many as five video gambling machines at each of those locations. That's what made an addiction spiral out of control. The casinos wasn't really a big thing for me. But it was the baddies in the stylus because it was easy access. I could be gone for an hour to and so I would lie about where I was or how much money I had or didn't have. There's just a lot of lying Chicago does not allow video gambling. But you can find the machines in thousand other towns across the state, including many suburbs and downstate communities. Remember, the guy who gambled away his mortgage money? This is leeann again goes little gambling establishments and every corner now and every restaurant every gestation every parking lot every plaza Newark out a loser and going on your whole disease which has gambling when they approve video gambling lawmaker said Eleanor would spend an extra million half dollars every year to help people like Leon an an, but the politicians quietly changed the language in the law. So they would not have to put more money toward gambling addiction. After all the state actually spends less now and helping addicts than it did before video gambling came online and vastly expanded the opportunities Tabet nelin, OI because you have these machines cone up all over the place. You're gonna have people that never thought they had an addiction all the sudden having addictions and there's nowhere for them to go. There's no help for them. There's no money for them and state officials failed Gamba. Alling addicts in another big way since they brought in video gambling. They have not put in a crucial safeguard that helped many problem gamblers, stay out of the casinos and Leon and others in the downers grove group have placed themselves on what's called the casino self. Exclusion list, thousands of people with gambling addiction voluntarily ban themselves from casinos. But if you're on the self exclusion list and get caught sneaking back into the casinos, you'll get arrested. That's exactly what happened to leeann. A few years ago, the forty two year old business. Analysts says security guards nabbed him at the casino in displays they took me in the back room, they ridiculed me embarrassed me made me feel like a total loser. There. They called me an idiot. He said, we'll kind of will come back knowing that a self exclusion. You think we weren't gonna catch you then they took Leon's jackpot eight thousand eight hundred and fifty dollars many gambling. Addicts say the fear of getting busted is what makes. The self-exclusion option. So affective leeann even tried getting the video gambling companies to ban him from playing on their machines to I called the corporate office. And I said I'm self excluded. Gambler from the casinos. They're like, well, no, we don't do that. We don't have the same thing. Just don't come. I'm lady Tele heroin addict, not to put noodles in his arm. They don't get it. Leeann and other addicts say state officials can show that they get it by creating self exclusion program for video gambling places. We found out regulators with the gaming board repeatedly have considered doing that in internal memos dating as far back as twenty fourteen. The head of the casino. Self-exclusion program has told top officials that starting a similar program. For video gambling, quote would not present too many challenges for the gaming board and officials privately acknowledged back. Then that video gambling would cause an increase in the number of compulsive problem, gamblers and Eleanor. So we asked Dan, Tracy, the chairman of the gaming board. Why there's no self exclusion for video gambling places. We have explored the possibilities. We probably need to make it higher priority. But nothing's been. Done in the internal memos. We got one state official said starting a self exclusion program for video gambling would run into a quote, lack of political fortitude on the part of elected officials facing growing budget deficits. In other words, the politicians are afraid of losing money from video gambling, but most of the money from video gambling actually goes to the industry and not to the state and that industry is tight with Eleanor lawmakers those days. I saw stark example of just how close the industry and Eleanor politicians are when I traveled to Las Vegas there during the annual gambling industry conference. The Eleanor video gambling trade group treated a group of Springfield lawmakers to dinner at an expensive Italian restaurant. One investor in a video gambling company. Here arrived at the less Vegas dinner in a Bentley. They would not let me into the restaurant, but outside I recognize the man in a white Guevara shirt German burials, then with loveless from Chicago public media. It was Joe Berrios until recently various was the chairman of the Cook County Democratic Party and the Cook County assessor now, he's working for the video gambling companies were industry destroying strong. People are playing the games and people are enjoying the games. And we're bringing a lot of money to say as a new governor takes office and. Looks for new revenue gambling industry interests are pushing for more video gambling and also sports betting and new casinos. But in all those gambling expansion proposals. There's no mention of providing more money help people were addicted to gambling. For here. Now, I'm Dan myth Lepas in Chicago. One. It called. And Dan's reporting was done in partnership with Jason grotto and Scindia combo party from propublica, Illinois. They are. This weekend will be bittersweet for fans of game of thrones. As HBO launches the long-awaited eighth and final season. The first of the final episodes airs Sunday, wrapping up a story that spend nine years with countless characters woven into a complex narrative. NPR TV critic, Eric Duggan's knows all about this television phenomenon Hayek. So first of all it's worth noting that in an era when we have so many choices HBO has been attracting an average of more than thirty two million viewers episode and the United States alone. So this is a hugely popular show. It has spawned a squirrel, Ian, cultural references, but beyond that, you think it's going to go down technical term. Right. It's one of those Nielsen terms, but we'll go down in the annals of TV history as an important TV show. Oh, I think without a doubt. I mean beyond the fact that it is drawing level of your ship that very few TV shows get to this day and age, especially on cable, especially on premium cable where people pay an extra mount of money to see it. It has brought epic movie level filmmaking to television, reportedly the budgets per episode for that show have swelled from five million to something like fifteen million dollars at and so they have brought together the world's filmmaking and television and a new way, and they set a precedent for what is considered epic filmmaking on television that producers will be striving to meet an exceed I think for many years to come. But is it sustainable? I mean is this is this maybe why attending because it costs to produce in the first place. No, I think this is India. Impart because a story this complex can only go on for so long, and we've seen this with a lot of sort of complex serialized TV shows they really can't go much beyond five six seven seasons. And so it's interesting that there's still so much a love for the show now so much excitement that it's coming back even those been gone for a long time. I think HBO's ending it had just the right time. And the the story starting to get so complex that even the fans won't be able to follow it anymore. And that's when you know, it's time to to bring a series like this in for landing. So as you said it's been a while since last episode of game thrown so tell us where the series is picking up from now. That may be the toughest question. You ask me today. It's a really complex story. But basically overall there's two big crises that are affecting this sort of Lord of the rings kind of world one of them is that there's this huge zombie army of undead people that are coming down from the north to face and threaten everything that's living that we know in this universe. And in addition to that, you have all these warring families that are trying to get control of the iron throne, which is the royalty that that rules this whole continent of west roast. So as you said, it has a lot of subplots meaning a lot of characters some of whom are real favorites. Among audience members. I wonder who you think audiences will look forward most to seeing this final season. And and even if they will see them for too much longer. Right. Y you know, kid Harrington's character. John snow the character that we heard in the previous clip might be a lot of people's favourite. He's. Been sort of positioned as the hero of the series when we met him when the series started. He seemed very humble someone who is the legitimate son and not destined to be anywhere near being royalty. You're being on the throne. Now, we learned that he's actually the product of a secret marriage between two people who had the strongest claim on the throne. So he has the strongest claim in the throne. We don't know how he's gonna react if and when he finds out about this in the final season, there's a great sort of soldier characters that I love they're working stiffs game of thrones. That guys who just, you know, want to get out there and make a little money and make it home at the end of their shift as were, and there's one character named broad who I liked lot who fits that Bill. But I suspect a lot of people would say that Peter Dinka just character. Tyrian Lancaster might be their favorite. He's the wittiest character. He's the smartest character. He's also the Muslim pathetic. He's a little person who sort of the outcasts on of the richest family in the realm, and they're the ones. Who sit on the throne right now, and he's actually been in conflict at war with them throughout much of the series. He he's also very rueful about how everyone in that very macho very athletic physical world makes fun of him for his height, and he has a little bit where he talks about what it's like to have people crack jokes about your height when you're a little person in that world, and we have a clip. So let's check it out. Everyone who makes joke about two of hype thinks he's the only person ever to make a joke about a tight the height of nobility. A man of your stature someone to look up to. Euro making the same five six jokes. It was a long time ago. It was. And how things been going for you since then. So people who joke about him in that way. They tend to get their come up. So it'll be good to see what if that if that pans out in the final season, and Peter, you know, even if game of thrones is coming to an end, he always ends up doing something interesting. Oh, yeah. Yeah. I mean, he's an amazing actor, and he's been able to show it in so many ways on this show NPR. Tv critic Eric Diggins are big star on the show. Thank you for much airi'q. Nice detecting. Always a pleasure. Here in those production of NPR in WB, you are in association with the BBC World Service. I'm Lisa Mullins doubt. But boy, do I wish I were Peter Dingle. Mrs.

T-Bone Burnett Julian Assange America Chicago Sudan Illinois president NPR US WikiLeaks Lisa Mullins Jillian Eleanor leeann Nebraska Mike Scott Cooper Peter O'Dowd
Cryptids You've Never Heard Of

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

59:48 min | 2 years ago

Cryptids You've Never Heard Of

"This is Julie Rieger author of the goes photographer and Co host of insider's guide to the other side and I'm Renminbi. I may now have written a book. But I mean Julie's book and you are the most gifted on the planet listen to insiders guide to the other side on the the iheartradio APP apple podcast or wherever you get your podcast from. UFO's to psychic powers and government conspiracies. History is riddled with unexplained events. You can turn back now or learn the stuff they don't want you to know. Production of iheartradio's. How stuff works? Hello welcome back to the show. My name is Matt. Hi Name. Is they call me Ben. We're joined as always with our super super producer. Paul Mission Control Deck. And most importantly you are you you are here and that makes this stuff. They don't want you to know a little bit of a personal story. The guys would enjoy to open up the show today. I was at our local bar named anniversary of creativity. The local I guess we give them a lot of business and I realized about twenty five minutes into what began as the light. Conversation became impassioned debate bait about bigfoot and crypto zoology. In general. It's like wow yelling at someone about crypto. Zoology in bars. Just very on brand and for me. It might be the most granting I've done in the past month how it level of yelling where we are we talking here just raised voices what corporate America would call a healthy conversation. Yeah well you wouldn't Elevate the level of a rant. There was no agro really there. Were disagreements but it was. It was a respectful exchange Enj- of Intellectual Perspective City Fair. The if you're in a bar it's a little noisy. So a certain level of voice raising already acceptable as a baseline of communication. Yeah but if the music comes down in your life but the sheer surface area of the forest oh you were there. Yeah it did. It did good due to a thing where Or got it to a point where he said you know what let's go outside and we went outside to the front porch area and continue talking beautiful. But this this this got me thinking that we have we've explored so many different types of Cryptos In the past and we've explored Bigfoot SASQUATCH SASQUATCH Mothman allegations of dinosaurs in parts of. What was that western Africa? Yeah we we've talked about some worms that were really creepy. Remember the Mongolian death worm. The I love that. Were like the ones from tremors. Do you think these seem i. It's almost as if the ones sounds from. Tremors are based somehow on that idea They're not as big as the worms. From tremors the Mongolian death worm Scotch. Yeah Yeah what about the sand sand worms from or or from Dune. No those those things would be. This would be the largest Organisms to exist on earth will be cool. I if there is a big if there is a bigger thing than a whale I would hope it was not a worm. But you know we'd all be in the spice business anyway. That's true that's true we would. But we've since we discussed the concept of cryptos Walji an in earlier episodes. We don't need to go into all of it today. We can just give you the quick and dirty recap so here. Are the facts crypto. Zoology something we very much enjoy on. This show is is the study of and search for animals that are a lot of times considered either extinct or legends. Enjoy the the legendary mclamb that we've talked about before. It's technically the mission of crypto zoologist to evaluate the possibility awesome -bility of the existence of something some animals existence. So a Lotta Times their specialization that occurs. Yeah and that's I I love the point out the the technically that's their mission because one of the criticisms that crypto zoologist and there are many Is that they are setting out to prove something they already believe. You know what I mean like with an agenda I know in my heart. The the four tooth waffle full snapper is real. Yeah relic population exist in the Alps or the Pyrenees. Or what have you. And I'm going to prove that I am correct. Rather than then through the truth and a lot of that has to do with the popularity of I'm just GONNA use one example here of something like squashing like going out scotching to find a SASQUATCH which is you know it sounds silly But it is that what you call a really gotTA squadron doesn't even go squashing and that's Israel cerebral squash pretty sure there are discovery channel shows where people go squashing on the regular so if you are a fan of the search search for bigfoot sasquatch related creatures. Let us know with that. came organically from your community if a producer at you know discovery made it up. Who knows all I know is that I think that concept of someone going out to prove the existence of something they already believe in? Maybe it's tied into that. Yeah Yeah and the animals that they're looking for the life forms have not been conclusively proven to exist are called cryptic words so cryptos Wallace cryptic words. They're popular types of CRYPTOS. The greatest hits we all we all know. We love him like the Elvis of trip did kids are the Jisi of the WHO's another musician Nas the nozzle cryptic words Cisco go the different job. He diddy the PAS. Oh No he cancelled a t-bone Burnett. He's quite famous in A. It's more of a big name. The Alexander Hamilton there. Yeah he's the doctor. Dr Franken Furhter trip kids. Who is not the right name from Rocky Laura? Yeah he's the Paul Decade of Crypt. It's bigfoot all all the Paul Simon. Even I'll tell you and that would also apply to things like the Loch ness monster in earlier days. The Jersey Devil should be more of a Garfunkel all of cryptos. I would argue that. There are different bands. We're GONNA hit a lot of Garfunkel cryptic words today in other words the the Lesser Paul. Actually a Told US he created this file as be team crypt it's And I wasn't joking is very serious man. It's it's reminiscent of our team superpowers episode. We did right. Yeah which was still stay so interesting like the fact that magnetic people just at very afflicted skin and they ended up on the team new ended up on the B. Team. They were the Great Lakes avengers comic fans out there. We already talked about this on air. Reagan the Great Lakes of injuries. You believe so. There's one guy's doorman power. I just have to mention this for anybody who hasn't occurred this because I'm still fascinated by door. Man Has the amazing superpower That allows him to Sousse when he's standing next to a wall people can walk through him and then through the wall. That's it it doesn't. He can't teleport port he can't you know be intangible he can just become a door but he can become a door and then go on the other side right so so technically. He's a hand go through walls don't know he could open up. He could walk up to the wall. Become a door and exit on the other side. That's just walking through awesome out a super convenience that superpowers more of a super helper than he is a superhero kind of a super furniture race. All right superheroes aside yes. Let's jump back to use CRYPTO. Zoology right okay. So here's the strange changed thing about cryptos. Although it is often called as pseudoscience although you know most people in the academy capital a dismiss it as pure malarkey poppycock Or in a lot of people in the the world of the layman see it as the very least controversial traversable entertaining may be more like reality. TV junk food. You know what I mean rather than some serious pursuit but but the truth of the matter is the ugly truth of the matter for people who hate cryptos. Zoology is that researchers have actually verified the existence or rediscovery. We should say of multiple real animals that were once thought to be myths or legends or extinct. And we've got famous examples of those like the ceiling Guerrillas is worth thought to be mythical for a long time. Yeah just to jump in. That seal was a fish that we thought for humanity thought for centuries this this thing had been extinct and then just showed up again and if nobody was looking then it may be maybe it would have just come back and we wouldn't have known still but thank goodness. Use for Ye crypto zoologist yet and also we have to point out in both of those cases With this discovery comes about because western Europeans finally saw these animals that the local people in the region had known about four years. Yeah the the local community where the silicon was rediscovered set i. They were very unimpressed. With the fish and not think the big deal and their reaction was very much like a big whoop because those things tastes like trash. Yeah what are we going to do with it on on an applicable level Cares yet and we know that crypto zoologists successes but it also has some baked in flaws. Some things that make it very very difficult for let's say zoologist to take crypto zoologists seriously and one of the biggest problems The most prevalent problems in the field. You'll of CRYPTOS. Zoology is the potential to miss identify. Some of these things we see it time and time again it can happen super easily. Most people for example haven't really seen seen a bear in the wild let alone right up. Close If you had that the The adrenaline rush. That comes with the initial sighting of said creature sure and you know the the fallibility of our memories as imperfect human beings despite what we like to tell ourselves right And of course additionally you've got just hoaxes plenty well you know and this is a really great point here. Let's just say we make an example out of it The four of us in this room. Plus you we're. We're all walking around in the woods. We've got all our gear to find our squash. We know we. We don't believe it's out there but we WANNA prove that it's out there are not and and we happened upon something on a ridge high above us. It seems to be Brown the color that Oh sasquatch might be that color and I can just see some. It looks like for up there moving moving around just this example that we've given here of of a bear if we all observe this thing and we're unable to get up there to get our eyes on it and it sounds like there's maybe a weird noise occurring up near this location wha-wha-wha-wha-wha-wha-wha-what sort of three stooges kind of sound we got. So what is that. Oh my God what is happening up there. It may be within us to at least a few of us would probably believe perhaps you that that was a sasquatch. Even if we can't prove it was or not but another percentage of US would say. Oh that's just a bear guys. We didn't see anything and that that in I think is what we're talking about here. Yeah and there's another weird twist. We're in a immensely fascinating. Time for Cryptos Oualadi. Twenty nineteen is the best time for cryptos qualities since the past few centuries really since back in the days when people were still exploring the edges of maps and it leads us to twist so the human population is growing more importantly Despite concentrating more and more more in cities in urban areas our civilization is reaching out to police it had never reached before and when we combine in this with our weird obsession with making surveillance technology. Our species weird obsession with making surveillance technology and monitoring everything's through satellites Those two factors mean that we are more likely than ever before to discover previously unidentified or lost organisms. And you can and find these kind of inspiring list It's it's a sad irony because a lot of the reasons we're discovering these these other creatures as is because we are in the process of doing their environment glittering them creating some sort of of some sort of analog log of genocide right we are rendering them extinct and this means that we might as we go forward we might still find stuff stuff you know what I mean like the colossal squid. That's another trip. Did that was proven to exist. And when it comes to CRYPTOS IT turns out. There are way more more than bigfoot way way more and we'll get into specific examples after this word from our sponsor this episode of stuff they don't want you to know is brought to you by ADT guys. I often wonder what is real protection. Mean to the folks who listen to this show. 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S. button so if you want that level of real protection why not give an ADT home security system a try today to learn more visit adt not dot com slash podcast that's adt dot com slash podcast. It's here's where it gets crazy. We found examples of you know we. We don't have every crafted opted ever mentioned in this episode but we found some examples of some obscure wins. It seemed pretty interesting. So we're going to explore those and then maybe talk a little bit about whether or not they can be real pros okay so first off. We've got okay practices pronunciation off See if I can get the Incan Yamba nailed it green. Thanks Man As a legendary crafted from southern Africa that lives by waterfalls and most commonly is seen at a place called Howick falls in South Africa A- and it has a reputation for looking like a snake except for the head which of course like it looks like a horse. Moore's head that seems like a very very non-functioning creature would it uses weird horse head to kind of drag itself along you know. Use it like a weird foot. I don't know you know because it's aquatic back. It makes a little more sense. Just because it would have to drag the head around do you think it's amphibious. Though is the question. Let's let's let's let's move forward here so yeah like you said Ben. The Incan Yamba is aquatic and lives in lakes and near waterfalls and to some It's suspected of being a species of giant. He'll will rather than a snake at all and it's distinguished from similar creatures due to its Odd Size which is over twenty feet long. That's ridiculous Gillis. Yeah too much feet long with a giant horse looking head hanging out underneath a waterfall. First of all no thank you. Don't so chasing those. Yeah well you know you hear a description of something like that it makes you wonder how many times and how many sightings have occurred to get that kind of Specific description of something you know like the Horse or horse shaped head. Ed is so specific to me. Well now you heard of the water horse right. It's a film about a small Nessie type creature. Yep I just wonder if the name you know what I mean. We've got a sea horse. Yeah we've got which has long gated head and with a snout and things like that. I went okay if it's based on that kind of maybe it doesn't actually have as looked like a horse per for says Netflix for and literally transplanted horse head. Looks more like a you know just have as more of an elongated shape. Okay okay horse like yeah. Yeah so I. According to locals people believe in its most active during the summer months of This leads some people to believe that it it is migratory or that it's been around so long in the local culture that they believe in a supernatural abilities causes houses seasonal storms to come. But if we look at what this actually could be if this were a thing Then we could say maybe it's a large species of freshwater water. You'll like the Angula Muslim Beka or the gala. Murata both of those. Here's the problem with these. These are large. These are freak you out if you saw them in the wild probably But they grow to about six feet instead of twenty so is this giant version version of an existing thing. Maybe the problem is that we usually see we know that fish. Maritime animals can grow grow to unusual size but we usually only see the reach that size when they're out in deep oceans so with this lake be deep enough enough that something could grow to like more than three times what it's supposed to grow to It seems unlikely. But there's something really fascinating in particular with scripted. It is that it was found in has been found in cave paintings from from native tribes. There are some tribes within the KwaZulu Luna Tall province that That had these cave paintings of these things or allegedly of these things and supposedly they had some kind of supernatural troll power. Perhaps like they could influence. The weather may be or would give good or bad tidings would bring bad tidings. Wha what am I trying to say here yeah it would. It would be It would be bad for you to see one. Did you generally would be a bad omen bad omen. Yeah Yeah Woo betide those who crossed the ICAN Yamba also add. This is zoned out just for sake and when you said a tribe called because I totally orderly thought you're going to see a tribe called quest. Oh Yeah I know. I almost did almost said that But no you just. It's that was actually several tribes within a province And that makes sense too because this is a very regionalized creature right yes. There's a lot of these come to us from the African continent because for a long time The members of the Ivory Towers and the academy's had no idea what the what that new Very well polished idea of what the ecosystems the biomass were like. And they were just here. Crazy stories rely on Disreputable sources us or just legends local legends or just legends. Because according to some people. especially if you're in the Congo area you may run into Gigantic creatures these undiscovered on the land as well and that brings us to something. I'm surely mispronouncing. The melon took. It's apparently around the size of an African Bush elephant. She's Yeah no it's true the MELA and took around the size of an African Bush elephant which is An average of three point two meters tall weighing around six tons or thirteen thousand two hundred thirty pounds is Brownish or grey in color sort of gradation with a very heavy tail and embody quite similar in shape and look to that of a rhinoceros including one longhorn that comes out of its snout. But here's here's the difference. It has four short stump like legs and is described as having no frills or ridges around the neck and the animal is alleged to be semi aquatic and feed on Mulambo or other leafy plants The Amelia and took is claims to utter a very specific vocalisations described as a Variously as a snort rumble or growl. So what what the heck could this thing be as sort of like a a weird pygmy Hickman kind of cousin of the Rhinoceros. What are we talking here right? And why is it. Is it a hippo with a Horn because it's semi-aquatic I I hope it's dinosaur. Whatever I said it was larger uptown loan? Yeah just something. That was leftover or maybe an in-between somewhere along the evolutionary very lines. Yeah Yeah like that. that guy. We mentioned that previous episode. docker Roy mackel. One of the people is searching for another similar. CRIP did call all the member mckellen bobby. He was looking for reports of this creature and then he ran into reports of Melon L.. And Toca you'll hear folks say that maybe it's a relict population of a dinosaur. Maybe it's far enough out in the wild that it's just too expensive expensive to search for it you know but it's it's the same thing we've been talking about before where there were reports that I believe it was in nineteen thirty three when the West I heard about this because there was a writer rolling through town j e Hughes and he wrote the sinkhole eighteen years on Lake Benoit wu-liu way Lou and He was talking about within this book that apparently he was hanging out with tribesmen or he had heard stories at least of some tribesmen who slaughtered something. That kind of met this description. And you know maybe this thing is actually real and then then the guy. You're talking about Roy Really P. What's his name Roy? MONACCO tackle. That dude was saying you know also. Hey here's some eyewitness accounts going back to this thing but we don't have any any pictures of it. We don't have any official pictures. We've got some bodies. Yeah that's yeah. That's the problem with this one because it's supposed to be slightly larger than an elephant and it's supposed to hunt elephants. Yeah I mean you would. You would think that someone would have have discovered this or had a a taxidermied version of it in the British Museum or you know especially from the age of colonizers right you think something something would exist or even just maybe the horn. They're talking about that one specific horn or the skull or something. You'd have something somewhere in my opinion but maybe not. I don't know how this is going to work in the edit them all but we took. We took a really quick break week. And no you went and got some water. And it's true. Yeah I'm now quenched. Fully stole the Pumpkin snowy prayed. They'll have a pumpkin kind of changed the vibe in the room though I know good for the better yeah yeah. I'm feeling more hocus focused did did you talk about How this could be something of a Combo between a triceratops and a a strategy Soroush strack source? I don't even know that one. No No. That's that's a good point because we behooves US staff some specificity. You're right I just got excited and said dinosaur but seeing dinosaur is like Sane Gene Chair or cancer it describes a rough concept of a thing correct but there are so many differences no with the Camila new Toga we also see the we. We see descriptions of the date back pretty far but not as far back as is the descriptions of our earlier Super Eel. The Incan Yamba. So the Incan Yamba may be exaggerated story about something that was real. The milit- in Tokyo is a little harder to explain. was somebody like in all the drawings that you see of it. It looks reptilian right. All all the depictions of course spoiler alert there no photographs so going to earlier point all it. It has a horn it. has you know rough skin covered with feathers so could they just be Seena Rhinoceros again in the wild panicking and freaking out because I would. This is what I WANNA bring up. Yeah when is the last time you guys saw with your is a rhinocerous. A number of years ago about six guess must've seen one zoot up somewhere but I can't recall which which zoo like Diego. Maybe really picture in your mind the last time. He's all right awesome six years ago. It was that zoo to. I wasn't just like on the street. Yeah those things are just odd. They don't feel unreal. especially if you live anywhere near a city like anywhere. It doesn't matter where on Earth if you live near a city probably aren't going to see a rhinoceros very very often true and if if you just really behold one walking around it's an it's an odd experience so I'm just saying uh-huh to your point then what you're trying to build off what you were saying you to just behold one May throw you off. especially if it's far enough in the distance it looks even bigger than maybe it is jeff just compared to the surrounding foliage. Or whatever it's near I don't know if you saw one in the wild to like most of us since the majority of human beings live in urban areas. Now that's true that's a change that happened during our lifetime. That means the majority of us will see Most of the wild animals will see are going to be in the animal. Jails that we call. Zoos released an protected. -tective reserve somewhere. Okay yes which is better than his ear. And that's not adding on zoos and being a little bit unfair to them because zoos do tremendous conservation Asian work and the Atlanta Zoo. Actually has I think is huge force in the community. I think they do do good work as well. And they just expanded and they have Savannah Savannah section. Now which is you know who haven't been yeah. I haven't either. It's down my house so I've been seeing the construction going on for quite a while But I have not been since it's been opened opened up so it'd be interesting checkup Super Anti Zoo which I understand but I also understand that many of these animals would not be able to survive in the wild and that's why they bring them in care of them Zeus. I don't know we've talked about the poaching problem that is severe rhinocerous services and take the example of tigers. There are I think more tigers living in captivity in Texas than there are in the wild across the planet And that's that's a that's a few years ago. Conservation efforts have upped. The Tiger population actually get notifications about tigers on twitter. Nice doesn't always. He's just come up with some sports stuff. No I I Right now and following something called a tiger Tuesday. She didn't know is the thing it's where people I just Point just post pictures of tigers. Oh wait some sports stuff creeps in. But I'm there for the animals. Gotcha I should ed better hoppy skies. But so we've been talking about large creatures in the African continent and again as you can tell the big question for us this is how could something be this big than remain undiscovered. But let's go. Let's go across the water. Let's let's explore the story of one of the cryptovest. I'm surprised we haven't done a full episode on. And that is the Thunderbird O. K. Fabulous thunderbird. Yes okay so quick story to get us into this driving around with the wife and kid A couple of days ago and we're just to stop sending my son looks out his window and and just kind of says What's that and it was two huge? I believe they were Turkey. Vultures okay so much larger birds than any of us are used to seeing just in the wild at anytime. I couldn't say exactly hotel tall. They were maybe three feet tall. Something to that effect grief eat is probably about three feet tall. But as my son is remarking about about them they put their wings out and fly upwards and seeing a bird of that size up close was intense. And I mean no you would have you would probably Pee pee myself or at least jumped out and tried to attack them just to get them away no PPO EPA and then possibly gone into an irreversible coma. Oh well we'll we would've taken measures. I don't think you understand. Take a fear. I have towards large birds. Yeah forget it forget about it well. So here's the thing. Could you know described. Describe to us what it would be like to thunderbird. I'd rather not but I s I will give it my all so the popular hot spots. It's for seeing these very large bird like creatures would be In Northern Canada and Alaska. Then did you happen to catch anyone. You were vacationing in Alaska. Vacationing on serious. Yeah I saw Moose Now is enough for me because those those things are huge. There's a problem is since Pumpkin. Here there's a problem in Alaska for people trying to celebrate Halloween because when they carve pumpkins and they set them out on their porch orch depending on where they live It's like candy to a Moose. Shirk they make me a mile away and they just come to and you can't stop them with yeah But Yeah I would have freaked out. I saw something larger. That moves right. We're thunderbird absolutely. It would have been that and then you can even see them down in Central America. Erica but in Canada You actually there's there's like totem poles that are in the shape of thunderbirds. A place called Thunderbird Park in Victoria British Columbia. I'm where you you can see some of these very things and they are the stuff of legend a mythical creatures in fact sort of Eagle like birds that are known own for having very powerful talons and very much present in native American culture various tribes in The American Midwest and as we said in Canada the Sioux Nation The brule Sioux From South Dakota on the reservation known as the Rosebud is bud reservations Their own thunderbird legend called the walk in neon Tonka Also known as the great thunderbird so so if you're imagining these things it's like a large feathered tarragon or pterodactyl like huge and. I'm going to show you a picture here and I want you to describe this picture because I have a feeling if you came across this in real life you have a reaction look at this picture here. I've seen that it looks it looks it. Looks like a giant corvette kind of which friend Thebenz the world over Ver van cans them sort of flocked to him and they bring him shiny things. We work together. It's a symbiotic relationship but this thing think twice as tall as that. Guess why tallest this gentleman posing with this with this taxidermied car. It's not real. It's not really it's it's imagination. It's an imagining of what a thunderbird how it's been described okay. Well it's been. The Wingspan would probably be in the neighborhood of. I don't know how about twenty feet. Yeah that's that's crying. And the thing is the thunderbird evolved from the the word we use news now has taken meaning that evolved from the original mythology. It is present in a lot of ancient native American mythology you Find Very Old Sandstone carvings confine paintings in caves. And so on. And the you know the the Totem Pole's you mentioned earlier earlier but now and in the recent in the recent past the freeze thunderbird has been used to describe any large flying nine unidentified organism in the US or the quote unquote new world. So you'll hear people late like the common thing people say is like well it flew but reports didn't see it had feathers so it's obviously a pterodactyl or you know a relic population of something. You a you know some creature like that a flying reptile. But then you'll hear other people say no it's It's it's essentially a massive eagle big enough to take your children eldridge and also say but those territories did have feathers dude exactly exactly so. This animal more is this cryptic. I should say is almost too famous for our Never heard of lists it really is yeah I think just wanted to explore it a little more because growing up if you were ever one of those kids who read those time life mystery books they all had but names. Were kinda similar like mysteries of the unknown on unexplored unknown mysteries paranormal. You know what I mean A.. They would always. He's trot out stories about the thunderbird usually the same one. There's a story about these guys who've we'll save it when we if we ever do episode just on the Thunderbird story about these guys who you shoot and capture one and have the body so habeas Corpus and all that so the the eight for a month will they take it back. But then as as we hear a lot of those stories stories of giants from that time stories about The tech cod on these other things. For some reason season the proof they had the tangible proof disappeared and you can see those Reproduction photos right. That may may be out now hoaxes sixes but we have to ask ourselves if there was such a large creature now especially with the popularity of aircraft. How how on Earth? How on Earth have we not seen it this win? I would say it's possible that it was. It was an ancestral memory of a very large creature but then again the big birds that we know about at least in this continent from from what I understand. The big birds renew about the continent as early. Humans were flightless right. They weren't like the big bird from sesame street. Yeah pretty much I mean he. He's got a temper when the cameras aren't rolling he's got a dark is a real monster and while we're on the subject of terrifying vying things let's stop for a moment for word from our sponsors. No you know were joking here about your fear of birds a But you know there is something that I am genuinely afraid of and that is when I'm online when I'm using my laptop or my phone or something of connected the Internet. I'm afraid somebody's GONNA come through. And maybe look at or steel. What I'm doing fine my passwords and stuff? You should be over. A hundred million people have had had their personal info. Stolen some sort of major data breach. 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It is exactly what it says on the Tin Huge spider with allegedly six foot wide leg span. Yeah six feet and supposedly. It's a fan of eating monkeys. Birds Birds Yes And even small. Antelopes humans obviously horse mentioned the the besides their absurd pants. You would say cartoonish Fortuna size. They're Brown And said to be a darker the older they get which is interesting fact Or known cy called faculty scholar that Tale And they have a large purple mark on their abdomens. So sounds like a a poison boy right. Yeah I've got some sort of shape mark And they're black That doesn't sound good right. Nature's way of saying back off right there said to live in Similar are to the much smaller trap door spider conditions Where they burrow into the ground right? Yeah but that's terrifying. You mentioned something that big. There's burrowed into holy cow. What's what's that whole way to go? Sanguine eight pass. Yeah makes me. It makes me think of the the scene in the hobbit the giant spiders that she lob and is that Lord of the rings it's the habit resolving Yeah I remember from the ranking now rankin bass the Rankin bass the animated one with the weird singing that gray fantastic. That's there's a part where the spiders get Bilbo and crew. He is Lord of the Rings. Both it's definitely in. The habit is heavily in the animated version of the Hawk. That's what I'm talking about. Okay Okay Gate remember you know. He's traveling with the with the with the doors and they get abducted by spiders and spider. Wraps them all up and It's a whole thing. Yeah I remember that. He's he's got the little little the Little Sword Sting. Yeah I'm thinking I'm thinking of the book I'm thinking today takes him license with that scene in the book In in the book it's Shayla the the spider the evil Spider is in Lord of the Rings. You're absolutely correct about that. And I don't think the spider in the animated inhabit had a name spiders But that's the one that made the most indelible mark on me when I was. Maybe tolkien had a thing for spiders. Maybe like they were scary to him. And that's why I put it in. He would have loved this Juba Fathi and also makes me think of George Martin in the The came flung fire. Nice books. Talks about you know the the winter that lasted years or whatever and the spiders the size of hounds is what they say. Well we do have a possible explanation for this and it's just as creepy it. It's worse yes. So here's the thing reports of this. I have been taking place since the eighteenth century or since the nineteenth century and the western Europeans found out about it in one thousand nine hundred thirty eight because people from Europe started claiming they had seen these massive spiders and given the the politics of the time. Essentially what happened is that other European said okay all right well if someone who has seen color skin as US said said something maybe we should believe them which is just the opposite of critical thinking right and because of these descriptions in because as they matched so well they were consistent from different populations. They were burrowing trap. spiders like you said no Because of this people treated descriptions of these animals with a little more to give them a little more credibility than they would ordinarily but there has been one theory advanced about the Chaba filthy. That's as maybe they're the misidentification of a another type of animal that has proven to exist but not in a way that makes a better. It's called coconut crab It sounds sounds delightful. Sounds delicious. Like something you'd get like at a a Hawaiian joined coconut crab. Little might apple dipping sauce on the side. Bring it on but but we'll just for just for scale. I'm going to show you a picture of how big the coconut crab is that is a full-size trash candidates on giant trash. Can it looks sorta like like a creepy lobster. Yeah Yeah but on land just hanging out a lot of times you see him rolling with coconuts for real rolling around with and and they're huge. They're the largest land crab the also they make an impression to their terrestrial hermit crabs in. Oh and say excuse me. Not just the largest land crab they're the largest land. Living arthropods overall in the world got got it and we think that given the environment of our current age They are at the upper limit. For what an animal animal with an exoskeleton can grow to be. There's big as it gets in less the environment literally changes it makes total sense and this also gives us some arguments against the existence of this great spider because spiders also have limits to how big they can grow zero due to what they could structurally support from their bodies are. I won't say designed from the way their bodies happened. In the way their bodies evolved they also have a respiratory system that limits. What they can what they can grow grow into but did they exist in the past? Yes wars you know. Oh perhaps brands but the the coconut crab exists. Yeah that definitely. That's that's a real thing now. It's a real thing. Are you uncomfortable with coconut cry sink. Am I you know. I think one coconut crab is fine. I'm okay with that slut. If coconut crab has maybe her whole family around lunch yeah yeah. I think I'm okay with that. You know they They live probably over sixty years. WHOA suit could could get one and maybe bond with it? Well this is same with most crystal out of crustaceans right. They have X.. Absurdly long lives like the LOB that lobsters. I believe. That's correct. I learned that from the film The lobster. 'cause the Colin Carlson Director Fair- Fairly van to become a lobster because it lives a very long time. Aribert yeah that was was such a mix Sweeney's type of movie. Yeah I'm Big Hetty New Yorker type stuff right. I'm check right now whether or not you can get a coconut crab as a pet. It looks like their conservation. Status is undecided. Data's deficient so let us know if you live in an area where coconut crab around or if you've seen one whether you think it could be mistaken for a militia spider. This is my favorite. Just the name alone. Oh we remove it on. I think we should all right. Let's do it we don't have to. You won't talk more about crabs. No no just take us okay. I'M GONNA I'm GonNa take form I'm going to take you there with two words my friend. Okay Okay Rhinoceros Dolphin. Finally that's what I say. So we've been asking for this time. It's like a cryptic wail with the two Dorsal fins and nineteen twenty off the coast of the sandwich. Islands is a thing And New South Wales Azul Rene Cosstalk Quay Eh zoologist and anatomist in addition to his pal. Joseph Paul Zsamar who is a naturalist spotted added was seemed to be never before seen species of dolphins and Forgive me French folk. We don't have the benefit of Casey peg rim on the the case with us today but Koi Or quad quite coy. What do you think Ben Koi? I would go quite so you know why I would quoi because it's funded funding and gaming and Gemma Gemma shows to call this. This new underwater Powell the rhinovirus Dolphin. It's official name being rhinocerous. There have been a total of nine rhinoceros. Dolphins cited swimming side by aside In in a pod in the Atlantic Ocean. That's the thing. Yes so. These are credible witnesses who saw multiple instances of of what appears to be a difference. They're up to that point undiscovered creature and they were probably like a lot of us listening now filled with an immense. This sense of relief. Because you know I think we can all agree The crappiest most irritating depressing thing about dolphins and rhinoceros authorises. That they're not lumped together in one species yet. You know you see a dolphin and you're just like Fifty percent there but I cannot approve of this. Ah that fifty percent rhino. Oh yeah well. And that's that's the whole thing with these These Rhino Ray. Nostra's dolphins is is that you know you've got these experts. Viewing this this pod. Essentially right hanging out there. They're used to seeing perhaps Wales. Perhaps dolphins perhaps killer whales and they see these things and they noticed a couple of things are different right. It's not that it's not the same. Coloration is a lot of dolphins that they've observed in the past. These are yeah I think there are white and black like the white spots on like a black body Similar to a killer whale but or at least in the two colors and the notice fit rather than a single dorsal fin. Like you'd see on any Dolphin Fan too right. Yeah one curved fin near the head and one curved often on the back In that Second Finn has placed a little further back than where dolphins fin would normally a B and they also thought from what they see that the pectoral fins were larger than average. And do we say it's nine feet long. No we didn't is feet long. A two hundred fifty pounds. But although that's that's that's a big boy. It's Big Ocean Blaine. It's also an estimation from being on a ship sailing while you're observing these. He's not with a sample size of nine. Yes and we're having experts so this this is Is Interesting case because if there are any undiscovered crypt IDs or large creatures as we've seen everything we know tells us that they are are going there most likely to be discovered in the ocean. Yes and now so now we know that just because of that fact that fact alone alone this one has a little more likelihood of being a true case of a of a unapprehended or undocumented unproven scripted that is a real out Amal but we have to ask ourselves. What can it be? We have to play the stick in the mud. Police here I it. Could it just a group of dolphins that had a deformity in what I mean. They were the dolphin. Version of a an inbred hillbillies clan. which which I know sounds dismissive? But what we're seeing as they could have just been a A group or a pod that over time had passed a mutation onto one another. Okay okay okay. Well there's A. There's another idea here that possibly it was a different kind of whale that they saw that actually actually looks a little bit like a dolphin called the blades. Villes what does it blame blame. Villes Beaked Whale K. E. D. Whale. Doesn't that that Sally so if you buy at a grocery store yeah exactly the names beaked whale. Well you can. You can look up pictures of these. It's a very different different looking wail and that dorsal fin is pushed. It looks like it's pushed way back towards the tail and they've got a horns too right. Yeah it's it's a very different creature and if you had never seen one before in let's say eighteen twenty Maybe you believe it's just list that different looking creature. One other theory was proposed by Marine biologist. Richard Ellis I. He said what if the what was called the Rhinoceros Dolphin was just a normal dolphin that had a sucker fish or Amora attached to its head again. The problem of observation Either way hey this feels so. They saw the two creatures like together in concert and thought it was a super creature. Yeah maybe they saw it from far enough away that they it must be the rumour for being another Finn God but there's a problem with that because they saw nine different again. The the thing is they saw nine different in instances of this So this would mean this would mean we have to ask ourselves. What is more likely? Is it more likely that nine nine separate room Maura matched up with nine separate dolphins and attach themselves to the same position on their body or is it more likely that there or is a you know a different explanation that they were supposed to have these funds. Still that gives this is probably our. You're strongest example of something that might actually be a real thing unless of course you're into the the idea of an enormous octopus okay. It's been a journey of discovery as a notch. Gentlemen WILL NEXT WE'RE GONNA continue that into into the Into the depths with the Koro Conway The native I knew people of Japan have long believed that Volcano Bay which is off. The coast of Hokkaido has a population of giant octopuses called a coral conway and they've been cited supposedly purportedly gently rather For for many many years yes yes there was a British missionaries name. Was John batchelor. He was working in the area in the early. Nineteen hundreds and he wrote down a sighting in a book he had called the I knew in their folklore and he said that a great sea monster monster with large staring eyes had attacked three local fishermen and their boats imagine those old woodcut s- of boat sailing and then a Leviathan like creature creature wrapping its tentacles around the mass of the plane. It was like that. And he said the monster was round in shape and emitted a dark fluid lead and noxious odor the three men fled and dismay not so much indeed for fear they say but on account of the dreadful smell however that may have been then. They were so scared that the next morning all three refused to get up and eat. They're lying in their beds. Pale and trembling so the Japanese story giant Diana Octopus. I feel like that could absolutely be true. Yeah I mean just now that we know of the giant squids exist I feel like the Jain Oughta pussies just waiting. Waiting to be found really wants to work with there was a sailing recently. There was there was some some reports out not too long go about some giant giant squids. Very least yes squids I think that's what we're talking about Yeah but octopus would be a little bit different Afr- and I think a little more exciting because they're so intelligent squeezer or relatively intelligent though Arthur printers I pods as well. But they're not like the octopus is the the brains Creme de la creme the brains of their heist game of the tentacled. uh-huh dwellers exactly I think leaked up with Rhinoceros. Dolphins that'd be that'd be heart behind mix tape makes six days. Yeah that's a good. Look I N now. We're going to draw to a close because we we've touched on some. That will hopefully be new. I know that we've I know that I've definitely mispronounced some of these things because they don't speak some of these languages but we hope this was enjoyable nonetheless. We want to throw it to you. How likely is it that any of these creatures we we just explored might exist We can also you know. There's a whole list of cripples we didn't name Troop Macabre Mantis man skunk gape swamp ape giggly all these wail which just sounds like fun. It's a giggle inducing. That's so do you think any and these creatures could be real animals. More importantly does your local community or region have a cryptic of its own is something that people like us as a the joke or is it something that they take seriously. Tell us about it. You can find us all over the Internet. Do you live in Maryland. Tell us about the goat. Man allegedly in Prince George's county. There is the Goatman and I want to know about it. Every time you hear Goldman for some reason I have a parody song of soundgarden spoon man playing in my head but Alan go Marie. Yeah so you can give us a call if you WANNA tell us about about any of that stuff we are one eight three three as St. Dwi T- K.. That's S. T. D. W. I. T. K.. That was a good one because a lot of somebody wrote in not long ago saying I couldn't understand what you were saying That is the thing it just stuff. They don't want you to call the number leave. A message might get on. The air will hear it'll be awesome. It's that easy if you don't want to do any of that. Just write us a good old fashioned email we are conspiracy iheartradio dot com Aw stuff they don't want you to know is a production of iheartradio's radio's how stuff works for more podcasts. From iheartradio visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows Public official who discovered corruption in his own department. He was stabbed in the heart in front of the building where he works Michael Frankie's killers were never brought to justice. And you'll find out why this season of murder in Oregon listen to murder and Oregon on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you got your podcasts.

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"Facebook/Off" (with Megan Hilty)

Keep It!

1:24:43 hr | 2 years ago

"Facebook/Off" (with Megan Hilty)

"Z Gallery sponsored desert oases. I don't even think we're supposed to have AIRBNB in palm springs a sh okay it's just between us AIRBNB you know airbnb offers more than just homes but my God do they offer homes whenever I go to palm springs and I have an Airbnb I wonder have I stayed in this place before are these all animals let me repeat that AIRBNB DOT com slash animals to learn more named Hamish spot exclusive Arctic foxes in Iceland paddleboard with an adorable corgi named Mr Beaches. That's crazy name for Corgi. I don't know about that learn all about eighty-five danger African penguins and Cape Town Study Dolphin Behavior was scientists in Florida and take a scenic desert height with fifteen goats leading the way BNB experiences and I'm not talking about the zoo that's where animals are often kept my God improv legend Ira Madison you can have a tea party with a naughty sheep told him before it was official and it's rare that you hear genuine gay scream in the wild but it was like a full on stop the restaurant for a Moment Noa's arc is shook while you know I love succession So I went on this great airbnb experience where I was sailing US experience took a volleyball Yeah uh-huh didn't name it Wilson 'cause copyright infringement exactly that would have been contrived yeah so check out airbnb dot com slash yeah and they're played by Megan hilty joining us here today and also Jessie Mueller who played carole king famously on Broadway won a Tony for it and you have to take photos on a sailboat really did you play Christopher Cross as you did it I did how did yeah the full Singly Water Journey what a wink oh my she sounds so much like Loretta Lynn it's weird she's so good they're both they're both so good but when we found out we were casting Meghan I went onto dinner with Iran and we're back all keep it never return now she's playing Loretta Lead in this movie so we'll talk to Megan about how great she is in this movie Jesse Mueller's singing as Loretta what a freak for instance there are people on the simpsons who do several different voices and you can kind of hear it yeah you would never guess that both these people are voiced by the same person so while she's so good I'm glad on Broadway and she was just certain people not only have great voices their voices like channel people like they find characters and I'm very excited that you're here because you know I always adored you as a writer and now you have a movie coming out Saturday patsy what you guys first of all I voted for you oh yeah are WPA overlord camera solidarity brother is of course I absolutely I would put it and you in the ranking of white excellence our weekend Alvar and with succession yes but and also I think next week I'm just going to give a list of top ten I mean it's just such a gift the fact that she could do Lewis could do carol king and Linda yes no she was in at the end of this episode so listened to the whole thing we'll be right back into and it doesn't really like like crank until season two so bike hang on hang on it's I will say the finale beautiful uh-huh and we wanted to talk about our evil overlords Oh God mark Zuckerberg motherfucker he's up to no good I former got style co host Angelina Burnett high happy to be here thanks for having stars Hartson is I love Angelina so much she's wonderful anyway we have got a great show for you guys said I veterans me pretending Ed Sullivan basically that says the shade begins now because it does when you listen to keep it it's just the truth journalism we also have a brunch themed sweatshirt which is last week nine Democratic candidates participated in CNN's LGBTQ plus equality in America the show is excellent you have to think of it as veep lake it's an hour long drama comedy Yeah Jesse came on at the last moment and I I'm ashamed to admit I didn't know her work but she is unbelievable yeah you just follow up with her both of them we added some new keep it to the crooked store thank God it was about time Wow Lewis Tom what it is we have a bright pink shirt that is adorable who was a very short list it's bar but you know you're up there with like the new vampire we have sizes that higher than the pods America Oh my God yes the eraser ends now apparently eye-popping leash it where Sandra Bullock and the net when you need and also we have a very big adorable has a Magenta and orange motif on it and it's black yeah you can get yours at crooked dot com slash store and excellence oh sure bligh's assume successional be number one unfortunately succession has now reached that point where I I started I watched the first four or five episodes of the first season he done in terms of talking about LGBTQ plus rights and in terms of some of these candidates we need to move on in hall that recently happened On the eve of a new debate you'll have already watched by the time this year it was thrilling Major Cable News Network and in attendance were the big four his Bernie W me I see awesome great showings at the town hall on a few touching moments it sort of made it clear that there is a lot of work I I'm concerned about trump's celebrity marriage by the way he's married to Marino who was on that show the league there in attendance and seeing Joe Biden onstage like an person and not just on t. v. he seems to be doing a great job on this show yes everyone is the oldest brother honor oh I'm so ashamed I didn't know his name he's just cameras synapses don't fire as fast as they used to this is not oppression this is science the man is old his brain doesn't work as good as it used to are we fucking kidding with this I've seen so much of the dialogue about it and not that it's really annoying but I've just read so much of it that I almost feel like coming in now there's nothing left for me but that's that's that's go home go home buying so let's talk about Joe Biden Biden an Anderson and she is guiding along sharp as attack yes Joe Biden on the other hand is not there were so data on lifetime it is so good and if you couldn't guess by the title is about Patsy Kline on the redland and they're rather very famous friendship yeah I was like go home he truly needs to go home and like I don't mean this in like a I I do mean one named Tom Steyer I don't know who this man is dozens of potential vice presidential nominee and while there gay culture gay people why is that important to bring up now that's not incite now unit I mean starter Yeah uh-huh so if you look at it as a comedy it's the best thing on TV alright and by the way no one is talking about Allen Rock who I always root for he seems like a nice guy telling me how do you know these even pronounce her name correctly but she was on the food was one of our first guest right yeah of Gay Culture and he said we talked about this and San Francisco it was all about you know gay bath houses it's all about round the clock sex the real friend Cory Booker Mayor Pete Beto Global Char and townhall which was put on in conjunction with the HR see the human rights campaign it was the first time in history and event of its kind was hosted by what time also maybe I don't want a president who was old enough to be in Grad school during Jim Crow old do the job speaking of someone who was not yes Elizabeth Warren Dream Boat I love her so she was a clear stand out at the town hall not only did she have a comprehensive LGBTQ platform she also came to have a good time she was jazzed university. Elizabeth Warren is in the is is a plank stress we're white women have a longer rifle expectancy than white men to with like she is in her seventies eighteen fifties to tell you a tale of its Oh you women might not remember Haight Ashbury like do remember he did that a week ago fucker you talking about what is talking about were in the middle of an international crisis like shit is fucked up we need someone with mental acuity bare minimum being is clearly not functioning at a high level this is a job you have to be functioning at a high level do this the number of times he gets in front of a microphone and wonders back to the nineteen insane moments in this debate which was your favorite were he's just trying to talk about how far we've come in a Septum Is this even a fucking conversation go home a part of me thinks now I mean if you're going to be in your seventies I have to have the confidence that you can do a plank you know you've got to be in the share you we got a great show for you to Frank Sinatra's now we are going to jump into the LGBTQ town super Appearing that I did not know a competitive silvery it was weird so I was actually he displays over and over again that he's just too fucking slow to do the job and I can't believe that it's somehow a problem to say that out loud let's fuck and say he's too in conversation yes you also can't have the conversation that trump seems like too old for the office without having conversation that by for the office seemingly Char Oh yeah well that she has one preplanned thing to say yes and maybe that just means that was I was like did she listened to some beyond say before she came out she had jokes and not not preplanned jokes now here's the thing I'm not saying that at one point among straight people that would have been the pseudo dialogue occurring around beginning of it when she says well I'm going to assume it's a man because that is a patriarchal beliefs at its core I think I thought that she good very well And I think that at this point when you have someone like this in the race it yes and he is all and he seems confused at I hate that we keep having to have this conversation it was like it is age us to bring up the fact that her walk when she did it was some original kings of comedy show I was like are you Bernie man they thought about it that way I'm not as infuriated by old people running or whatever but it's just like to even bring that up as a talking point shows that you're I think behind on the that's wrong it's not true I was I didn't drop into the first season and I I was Gonna I was Gonna bail on it and then release into so much I watched the finale of season one in jumped in and see at this get the most it's the most important job in the world the most powerful job in the world scientifically we all know that the myla nation in your brain starts breaking down of these rich white men I'm so sick that the entitlement of keeping into this race at the last minute is it's bonkers like it's the amount of orange better at delivering material could be that she famously had this one remark when someone asked what what happens if someone comes up to me and says my religious beliefs are that it's between one man and one woman she replied I guess you have to assume it's a guy who said that and I'm going to say like being a black townhall being well I remember when you can eat it this diner yeah right yeah two separate water fountains S. of when she was asked about her previous stance on whether Jenna reassignment pink with that was appropriate and she says I was wrong erased an eighteen page plan saying he would undo the policy to block military veterans from receiving insurance coverage for gender reassignment surgery and at Non Binary gender options he is long-winded he's ready he wants everyone else to read log things too right trumping too old is like the least of his problems but it's not you know again you started with Elizabeth Warren it's not too old he he personally as a human being money this man is flushed down the toilet it's it's go away and there's rumors that Bloomberg says he's not done by this goes against Elizabeth Warren sense that she has a shot at actually shifting system yeah what was interesting was seeing time because obviously he is which is so encouraging to all of us I love an underdog billionaire you know what I'm saying right well if this white man is taken out by a woman while one hats too right Many of the candidates were interrupted by transgender activists all of whom felt the town hall was not doing enough to draw attention to the many murdered Black Trans Women in America and one of them was a friend of mine blossom brand and she took them from an audience member while Beto was talking and she said Mary One woman I'm cool with that assuming you can find one now when she said assuming you can find what she waited a beat and the lean and he's tally when you're getting to the end you have someone like a Tom Steyer is like if you are being placed last give it up or she's forced to come around by the reality of the Democratic electorate either way that's massive that's that's a massive shift she was not daunted by empathy and anyone just three years stunning actually when you really stop and think about how fast we've moved on this issue and the fact that at seventy year old woman whether she's coming around legitimately I ask them they cut the question Yeah Ashley Marie Preston WHO surrogate for the Warren Campaign says that she was originally going to be asking a question to replace habits like highlander it really is a testament to how formidable she is all these rich folks are the scared of her it means she's they can testing and she stopped by the cops and there was this moment when blossom got up I think it was I think it was blossom when Anderson Cooper said you know there's this history in the behind India more from post and she I don't know if you could hear it on TV but she responded to hit when he was like it's great you know she just says point late I was wrong on that and also by the way I mean that's heartening that she can be that frank about it but secondly also everybody was wrong about that Blatt transmitter dying our lives matter I am an extraordinary Black Trans woman and I deserve to be here and there was some other protest during repeat and Kamla and a game add that's true so I've heard before the town hall he released an eighteen page plan nobody had asked a question and not have a question and I think we've moved so far forward that the tactics have to evolve there was such an opportunity there was weird to be that there was a town hall and not a single Black Trans woman asked a question during And I I mean allegedly one schedule aw I you know a a a good friend of mine who I love a lot is running stiers campaign and so I I I want to be very careful but I'm so fucking sick the moment like this happens they're able to take it to the next level because this you know there are not cops at the door stopping them they were allowed to there's if you don't have that pressure I felt like it was an opportunity I do think it's interesting though the way Anderson Cooper responded to it because on the one hand he was at least sort of giving lip service to the idea that these people are welcome and he wants to hear what they have to say but in a way I wish he had taken some of Blatter and Anderson was like it's great to see everyone sort of like applauding this because we have a history of protests etc and India like shot at like we weren't applause goes holy fuck something's fucked up what White America saw was saying hey you're here we welcome you this is great and that's not going to push movement forward so I'm thrilled at happened but I and government documents actually really interesting on that if we talk about worn again briefly is I just liked the matter of fact if you don't have that moment on screen where you know your moment of of the dogs and the and the and the hoses in the streets of Birmingham you don't have that moment where White America Season a black trans woman who ran for president of the eighties and at the end of the play she goes to the Democratic National Convention in New York and tries to get on the floor to to reading it's like we're not we're not like here celebrating the spirit of protests like we're protester celebrate these women and lift them up and I'm thrilled they did what the speak to this issue in a meaningful way and that I was so excited when she stood up and it it stopped and I hope that the next time their messaging which was kind of apparent and looped it into what was being discussed because what I think he did was actually just controlled the tone of the room without actually you know I'm GonNa go out on a limb because I that moment was really fascinating I just went to Chicago to see our friend Gerald mcrainey play MS black fur president about in the in the LGBTQ community of this kind of protest and we welcome it and it sort of stopped there and it was really interesting to was being in the audience I was media establishment has gotten real smart about branding protest and branding resistance so how do we evolve beyond that yeah that's what I feel like I was saying India's that was cut yeah which reminds me you know as much as I enjoy doing some work with hr see they still have a lot to be doing did and yet they came with a form of protest from an old time and I watched blossom be handed Mike and and talk about how well you know and if Anderson Cooper was you know trying to keep the town Cuomo Chris Cuomo progressive when in fact what he was doing with shutting them down and so they just we all have to be prepared to like find the other way in because we've all everyb- the that sort of cooperating those people which is what he said he was doing absolutely and that's exactly my point is they lip delay let this guy co op there moments to look like he and his organization you know so I'm not saying that like excuses certain lines of thinking but it just we've again when it comes to transgender people I mean how much dialogue has only occurred in the doing something he is he's a comedian now he thinks he's still funny is so hot and what's so dumb mystics knickers with a suit hosts double dare although Anderson Cooper about what we can do to push these candidates for to have it be a national conversation to discuss the Pronoun moment with Kamala Harris she and she incorporates it so brilliantly into her plans well and even to speaking about that topic then I think one of the biggest highlights of the event was that I do constantly wonder and continue wanting to have conversations with Black Trans Friends of my own and Beto responded to her that he would love to have that town hall and he wants to make it happen which on a cynical motherfucker loves an opportunity he apologized for it on twitter eventually but just a general glibness about actual struggles people are going through I I mean I the actual joke is I think was frankly missed yes black trans women are dying at an absurd rate and then what what is the how do you force these candidates on this stage Oh for you I will note that blossom tweeted about that moment and about the fact that there should be some sort of town hall specifically on Trans Issues What I think we're almost okay takes all kinds to make a world I guess I didn't love those sneakers he was wearing but you can call me that our languages somehow structured in a in its core nuts and bolts around gender. Why does that have to come up when I'm referring to you he people because when that first protest happened all the Trans Women in the room stood up cheering her on and like chanting black translates and getting married and women getting married and doesn't include you know people know you should just use the term marriage equality right right right so I mean thankfully he what I'm talking about anything and the idea of saying constantly at the debate same sex marriage which implies man we did use the term transgendered one point that was not as awful as Chris Cuomo when Kamala Harris came on of this type happens and any sort of political event it's like Oh we plan this protest to remind the play is fun yeah did you like did you like our show we put on gotta go somewhere better love a town hall on the Papa's Spicy Chicken Sandwich Song Pay Nelly and Kelly Rowland well I'll take your word for it but when I am facing a dilemma our lives and are having to make a mental jump that's what I what I don't have patience for is actively making a choice to Dick about it so I can be empathetic if you stage and said that her pronouns are she in hers Cuomo said Mine Too it just spoke to Johnson was it was it was it was the fact of this in the spirit of protest this is stonewall arm and it makes it seem now like every time a protest I am often wondering how to take the next step in my career I looked to my friends family and mentors for support and I've learned a lot from yeah mine too just call me she right stop also I believe commonly responded with it was so surprised pod one acute joe but also my favorite thing about that statement is the if you don't want to deal with the feeling of pain and shame inside so I absolutely respect the challenge for the vast majority of people who did not grow up with this issue in grew up pronouns or you say transgendered by accident like we're all in a learn as you said earlier Lewis like this has moved very very quickly we're all going to have to adapt and some people are gonNA screw up these people but there's one piece of advice in particular that really really stuck with me Oh and that was listener Lincoln's new podcast view wow do you know what other awesome advice Kelly Rowland had the songs stole my read it if you want advice and lessons through which you can springboard your life college is for that comment but God it just it just not hard to not make a joke about and I think there's a lot I mean I say this is somebody who's who's WHO's struggled with this shift and it wasn't something I spoke about public because it's my problem not anybody else's problem but there's a there was a hitch and there's still a hitch in my brain and then you have the moment I I'm a I'm a writer and I love words and I love language and you get into habits right it took me a minute to get my head around using they in there and that bag that we both had that is brick red in color why because we are that's right tough as nails now they offer a range of essentials that solve real travel problems so all you have to think about is hello Monday with Jesse hempel which is back for season two that's what stuck with you on the show is also filled with this kind of advice the kind that stays with shame and guilt and so it turns into this little perpetual fucked up oppression machine in your head where instead of just being like I have to deal with my shit and learn how to shift you externalize it I mean it tells you how to make sure that your hands are the same as Marilyn Monroe's outside Mann's Chinese theatre show sometimes I worry that people aren't thinking about Kelly the prosecutor humor she's GonNa lock his ass appearances are one of a kind activities hosted by locals you don't need to stay in a home to book an experience now there's a new way to meet animals responsibly with where you're headed next because getting away getting more out of every trip to come away knows that everyone has a different travel style that's why they make their carry on in an array of colors two sizes and have to be kind and patient and forgive each other but you don't have to be an active asshole that's where I draw the line especially when the payoff is wasn't that fun not a good Joe Yeah Right Roland barely top forty hits enough each week Jesse sits down with featured guests to uncover lessons you can apply to your career find hello Monday with Jesse hamble on apple podcasts are were ever you listen to podcasts? A way creates thoughtful products designed to change how you see the world they started with the perfect suitcase crafted with features that make travel more seamless Sir when I'm facing a dilemma at work I think it's actually dilemma and I know that because I familiar all right when we're back making those yeah into materials a strong yet flexible polycarbonate and an antidote aluminum while I love the way carry on because as you know I am international the travel often and when I do I use the carry on while not WanNa travel internationally but when I was in San Francisco last week I used the carry on really just about women in country music whereas every story I feel like we've seen before has been very much focused on her marriage the melodrama and like men Schiller we're talking about icons and legends in all of that but at its core it's about two women who love and support each other that's it and we rarely see film and television centered around two women that support each other I whoever makes the decisions on catalogue I was absolutely aware of what I didn't know was how incredibly fascinating she was as a person like I didn't know her personal life Excite Megan hilty and also I'm so glad that guessing this week is my friend I certainly didn't know about her friendship with Loretta so all of this felt like such really like a blessing in that I got to learn is that we watch seems to think that audiences only WanNa see women tearing each other down in constant conflict but this script proves that you can have and removable laundry bag to separate dirty clothes from clean clothes but if you're traveling somewhere that's a little bit longer than a weekend you can use the it's not for you you can return any non-personalised item for a full refund no ifs ands or asterisks well for twenty dollars off a suitcase visit away travel dot com slash keep it twenty and use Promo Code keep it twenty during checkout that's a way travel dot com slash keep it twenty and use promo absolutely no you're you're absolutely right and that was one of the big reasons why desperately wanted to do this was because this genius script Yes oh keep it twenty during checkout for twenty dollars off a suitcase there so Tanggula I am so customer service team will arrange to have it fixed replaced a sap there's a one hundred day trial and everything away makes take it out on the road and live with it travel with it get lost with it if you decide so much about one of the most powerful women in music period and then Kinda try to step in her shoes and walk around for a couple of weeks in them what we did your interpretation of Passi is just so so live it you know like obviously obviously I love Jessica bigger carry on which is sized up to make the most of the overhead Ben Oh these suitcases are also designed to last a lifetime but if any part of your suitcase breaks away standout like watching it it doesn't feel like Patsy and the movie itself I appreciate that passing. Loretta focuses on their female friendships and I started you know every song ever released did you know nothing what did you know I was familiar with who like that. She was a person and that she like her iconic women who love and support each other and not without conflict certainly but it's still interesting and and I I can only hope that this kind of lets people know that that that we can do and should do more stories like this I was GonNa say Angelina so when you wrote this I I assume you're the daughter of t-bone Burnett your step mom is Kelly Corey watching it is is kind of going into a going okay let's see we'll see that's just kind of something that we accept going into it how familiar were you with Patsy Kline when the Angelina who wrote Patsy on the radio which you are phenomenal oh my gosh thanks great warm blanket I mean she really took care of me I think regardless of intent all storytelling political funder fundamentally because you're either later in life but patsy Patsy took care of me you know I had of God bless my mother I love her very much but I'd have tumultuous Childhood and the Patsy Loretta scholar period so I was like well we'll see and then now you brought it we got thank you so much we all kind of assumed that everybody thank Lewis while we were both watching separate hubs I was thinking you know going in I'm like you know what I've seen sweet dreams Lang a lot of Nashville area so I have you been familiar with the story your entire life oh for sure yeah I grew up Patsy I didn't really come to Lora his music for years and years I fall asleep to Patrick light every single and it she she heard there was there's something about the tone and the quality of her voice that is just like this reflecting the world back as it is and saying this is acceptable in the way it should be or you're undermining and saying either this is bad or there's another way to look at it and every single store you tell working girl but it's all this there can be only one mythology and we have to accept the fact that we tell that story over and over and over again we in analyze it I believe it's true I spent much of my twenties thinking I have to be a chick who can hang with the boys the only way I'm going to get ahead as if I'm like dude can be put through that filter all about eve is one of my favorite movies ever made it's a true masterpiece by the way as a showgirl which is really just a remake of all about you and you come out the other side of that you're kind of empty inside so I saw this story this incredible opportunity a true life story but women who took care of each other yeah were there is very little room for women in country music back then and now it's worse for women now they will not play women back to back on country radio the won't read you it how fun it is two thousand nineteen and you're telling me you can't play Miranda Lambert and Reba mcentire back to back are you fucking kidding me casually in a wikipedia sense what people know about Patsy Kline is that she had a couple of very famous songs and then died young and it's sort of like the movie judy and that awesome country you don't hear a woman now now it's madness I also what I like about this movie to is that for instance like I think Ooh we had to discover Casey bus graves through the Internet Lord Have Mercy I've been in Uber or lift and like even an l. a. were the drivers the Patsy cline museum they re posted this photo of her when she was twelve in like the seventh grade or something like that and they're like so patsies on the second row did their hair or something just like women looked older so she was thirty years old she also even from a young age looked very very mature is so funny I follow declined differently because I've seen this movie by the way I think people might not know that she died as young as she did patchy clouds sort of you know like in the sixties like the way people all right well let's take this other sector of her life which was arguably more important arguably you know people don't know about and it really is it you know what I mean I think of you and she took care of all the women around her as well Loretta was not the only one that she took under her wing which I found incredibly in acting to me that and and I've heard you say this before that that her voice just took care of you because she was forced to be a caretaker from a very early age and I think that's a role that she just fell into naturally and she didn't really complain about like that's just who she was she she took care of her family she took care of her siblings she took care of her friends the people in and I was like of course she she looks like the teachers you're cannot mistake hurt there was something and she was forced it's so it's so roy like this as opposed to you know I love the initial parts of Nashville that relationship and I also in popular culture because I feel like just for so much now it's always going to be you pitted against Katharine mcphee that story was two women fighting hiring this is one of the many parts of this blessing that I'm I'm calling it the of of getting to do research on this remarkable person many women came for by far the easiest decision because I'm I'm I'm just so deeply proud to be a part of this story and what it means for all of us which keys my songs are in so that I just all of these things in a stern but loving way home you know this that's just who she was x-factor voiced how do you go about tackling how how long does that take to achieve what you consider you know a worthy tribute or imitation it'd be a part of it it's it's funny ever since my I had my kids my mind has kind of shifted in how I choose what I'm going to do and now it's well are they going to be proud of this you know how will how will this affect my daughter how will this affect my son you know and this this was it's just so specific I would compare it she's like countries Karen Carpenter or something there's something where it's like you feel it in your spine when she sings so when there's somebody with that kind of obviously stand you Meghan from smash which is a great show homosexuality general first thing even a little cameo of Jim Carter years before she married Johnny Cash just in that circle of women country speaking of women country I want to shift a bit because we mentioned Kelly directed it and you know it's it's so interesting seeing a stir writing yeah which is why it was important for me to do something like this and on a side note I've never played a Brunette before that's very exciting I'm also I mean something that should be noted I don't know if we've hit this yet you sing the songs in this film and I it sounds incredible thank you we're just talking about the quality of Patsy cline not only she great singer but there's just that Angelina touch on this when she says you can talk yourself into bed to it there's something like arguably one of the things that made them so so wildly popular was how genuine they were and to Senate enough to play other roles where either played a person or something that someone else's made iconic already so the bar has already been set like Gordon said Oh yeah she took me under her wing and told me how to handle myself in business how to dress how to make sure I got paid how to speak to my musicians and thing to take on if you think about it too much metric is I just don't think about it I I've been fortunate Shen Patsy Kline Right first of all I cry and cry and cry until I don't know it it's an extremely daunting personal level than the audience certainly won't so it's this constant balancing and it was deeply fascinating fancy to compress their voices to auto tune anything that dehumanizes her they had some people call it a primitive way over that's just it like some people will just never be happy the other thing is is at the at the crux of these two women both both Patsy in Loretta according but actually I think that's what allows singers to come across and actually reach you in non physical space that that she does so luckily she pop everything like there's so much in there in just how how she freezes things that I think that's why she became a wildly no I am I am not a mimic so that I have to be honest with myself about that and give myself a little bit of a break but I also don't want to be a mimic I don't Ed bring myself to it and there's something in the middle where the performance lies you have to let go of the research after a certain point absolutely because I if if I don't ah but what does it feel like being able to do this patsy in the Reta and the fact that it's going to shift what people see you as Steve that you can't just go and mimic them first of all I'm not a mimic like I that's not what I do I would I would assume you're somebody who could just up and do was singing in a time where they didn't put all of this fancy shit on their voices and make them sound like a computer you know you're hearing all of her and and in doing as much research as I can of who she was and and what her essence is and try to capture that on this side and then on the other side dealer so quickly because the combination of those two things it physically resonated deep inside of us and her phrasing spoke to everybody you know I did not know that part of that journey how this was a really big deal for me yeah no that's exactly what you're saying is is why it was important for me make it my own and and bring myself to it it's there's nothing human about it is just me trying to be someone else if I'm not there and if I don't connect to it on a per the I'm sorry I'm talking too much but this this gets me just so excited she also something about her freezing that she so she was so ahead of her time because she combined so many different genres in one phrase you can hear country jazz soul want to just simply try to do things exactly how she would do them because that's not honest you know there there's a very it's a balancing act in doc differently in front of an audience as we all do but she particularly was terrified that people would hear that she wasn't educated and so she and I lift directly from alive performance of hers and if I close my eyes I wouldn't know the difference between me like Shh you nailed that moment the about her tone that physically resonate s inside of us in a in a different place than than other singers and at that time they didn't have anything and so there was pretty much nothing to go off of for what she would sound like talking to her friend in a more comfortable setting so a lot of that yeah speaking just even about entre in that you know you're also a fantastic a theater actress thanking when you know like technically speaking as a singer listening to her voice and listening like really kind of analyzing what it was about her and and there is something that the only recordings I have her speaking are in a performance setting and it was told through many biographies that she was she and something like this is that is realizing that like I'm I'm not like when I went into wicked shortly after Kris Jenner with left is like well I'm not Kristen early holiday obviously but it's a lot of her talking between the songs and she kind of uses her singing voice to two as her talking voice and it feels like was guesswork you know like how and and luckily I'm performing myself and I I understand the differences in me and my my other performer very wild swing to me and I'm glad she did it because it super specific but I realized also that's so hard to realize to figure out what somebody talks like through what they sing yeah probably it probably would have been better I don't I don't know if you've heard Audra McDonald in this play called Lady Day had a very like careful way of speaking when she was in front of an audience or on the radio or an or on television and I mean and and you could argue if you if you wrote down the things that I've done the one through line is that somebody else already made it really really really famous I'm just it's just researching as much as I can and then at some point trusting that it's there and that I've got the rest of it you know ask about and so there there's there's something about that that I can understand but but yeah there was a there was a if I had more stuff mm-hmm yeah I could go on and on but it was fascinating I wanNA give Megan a little credit because well yes you're not a mimic and you capture voice in your own unique beautiful way and it's point where I almost forget what she had seen so many times he sounds like but there is a moment there might be two there's one moment in the movie that I lifted directly the lie wait wait we wait too high for me to even think about touching so know that you're going to disappoint a lot of people you're not gonNA make everybody happy each other and we became very fast friends on the set and and once we realized that like Oh we're going to be like besties forever you really just sorta prepare yourself for a theatrical role versus something like this especially since you're talking about you know you're playing like Patsy on Broadway that hasn't really been tapped me and Jessie did not know each other before this we'd met like socially like quickly but didn't that's the only recording I have to go on the doubt that will would was a particular tricky thing about this was you have to that's where I I had the the really big hard lesson I can't be a robot I can't I can't just do the things that she did because it's not uh not the first person to like do the Natalie maynes really find as a high compliment she's one of my favorite vocalists also Angelina as you for me that's like okay I'll try it after they perfected it sure but it goes back to what I was saying earlier is that that's what helped me settle down women support one another What do you feel like is missing from the theatrical roles that you're offered or is there anything new you'd like to see we're like we were trying to think of all the things that we could do and where we couldn't think of any musicals that we could do you know what I mean like right romantic opposite of Man Yeah and I've been very fortunate that most of the stuff that I've done is very female centric I mean with wicked and but the monocultures blasted you know what I mean like such a different culture now than it was fifteen twenty years ago when they you know said what most of us were thinking we talked earlier about the kind of roles we're looking for and specifically about how it was so exciting to do something so you know female friendships And how and you know you I'm working the theater I can agree with the other parts how the you know what are you learn what are you talking about you when they're when they're when I saw those dailies I was like Holy Shit it's Patsy but here's the thing about that funny it sitting in me you know and then with nine to five playing I mean it's not Dolly Parton but is you know like the door league is already put walking in crazies hard crazies heart I feel like that shouldn't be touched you know what I mean I feel like Pe- and people intas or it's or you in theater you know you're usually stepping into a role that maybe someone has done before too yeah last question you know you mixed so many of the songs that use Sung in the past you know from your roles intellect Oh I feel like walking already always be there because it's so fun and my band is amazing on it and but there's all people want to hear it but I don't what I love about how it was done in our film is that it's a very specific scenario that we never I mean it's Dolly you know comedy roles Jane Fonda Stand Too so yeah yeah so yeah it's that's that's the thing ever feel like you know our our did beyond say outlook over the Hump of the past of how the another one that I wanted to do Oh she's got you which is one of my favorite I mean her the deep dive into her catalog right absolutely pilloried yeah for the young folks out there they they went to England and said that George Bush wasn't there president and and people in Texas started setting their albums on they are they are they back are we are we excited for the Dixie chicks like are they able to enter back and now I don't know everything you need them her sing in you know we're guessing how she would sing that song and arrange that song for a memorial instead of singing it at one of her concerts which actually takes a lot of the the worry and the burden off of my shoulders to try to match the perfection that's already there like how do you so ah I I like Jessie Mueller Emily or Marty. I don't know my hometown by the way Ktar when you do like a live in concert befo yeah what Patsy Song are you most excited to continue gosh well undefined very female heavy shows but we even put our producer Neil Merrin who is a Broadway aficionado you know like he just knows every it was a song that I always right but from that same album her own joe lean three cigarettes and ashtray fire any other woman in country we've forgotten that we should mention before we start crystal Gayle's half the way one of my favorite songs yeah movie starts with her husband Charlie Dick it is her movie it starts with him you walk with him in to the dance and you see wicked which has alpha and Glenda for good and safe but it's so many roles I feel like that you would take on as a woman in theater patsy for the first time through his eyes and I got so furious that the opening of our movie is a direct response to that it's the exact same barn meantime though well nobody sells millions of records anymore but like I don't know that they'll ever be welcomed back into country music in the beloved way that they were uh-huh drum your fingers like does strike me as very ideal project just saying you guys have fun I liked is one of the greatest pieces of quote unquote research that I got to do that was just a joy it's Dovan after Angelina being really think of a a show for us to do and it took him days to to come up with something so we just have to we just have to start coming up with new probably GONNA have to Rice yeah I don't know what I think my dream product is free on me right now you should be a dixie chicks by Natalie names I think it's like oh I'm so glad we took the time with its incredible woman to watch her her stocker show up at the dance are we had out it is very crazy that to speaking of the sweet dreams the Jessica Lang that is reportedly and mar out of Marylebone mouth the one role she regrets not getting and what's yeah no and and to see it actually takes away from it it's that old like hitchcock thing like it's actually more powerful if you don't see it because in your mind your mind and you start in patsies. Pov and she sees him and I did that really specifically because at that moment pissed me off and then they just then he just beats the shit out of her about that as she looks like Patsy cline you think they would sort of like cast her as anyway still think about the same director who did French Lieutenant's woman directed Merrill Sweet Dream I do not forget the passing the Rutta Airs on Lifetime Saturday at APN quite right by Broadway no okay that's such an interesting case because obviously we have a she plays Billie holiday and a and it's a play but she sings a bunch of songs in it we have tons of recordings because it has a lightweight and durable shell that's made to last for a lifetime of travel and it includes an optional injectable battery to keep your phone charged and traditional markups well they want you to know what you're paying for and why so they tell you their real cost add are radically transparent experience the

AIRBNB Patsy Kline Angelina patsy Patsy Z Gallery Trans Women Elizabeth Warren Florida Iceland Hamish Mr Beaches Loretta Cape Town crystal Gayle Haight Ashbury Jessica Lang producer t-bone Burnett Ira Madison joe
A discussion w Bear and a Banjo creators Dennis Quaid, Poo Bear and Jingle Jared

Bear and a Banjo

1:01:33 hr | 2 years ago

A discussion w Bear and a Banjo creators Dennis Quaid, Poo Bear and Jingle Jared

"Iheartradio and the US Census Bureau wanted to do something special for the class of twenty twenty, so we made commencement a new podcast with boards of inspiration from the biggest names like Palsy while we can be sold a lot of things we will never buy a dream cash. Becky G and pit bull generational change the world listen to iheartradio's new podcast commencement in partnership with twenty twenty census speeches available now on iheartradio APP or wherever you get your podcasts, remember you can do something that will affect the next ten years so if you lived in a dorm, don't worry. Your school will count you if you didn't visit twenty two thousand, census dot Gov to be counted. Hey, classic, twenty twenty. We know things have been kind of out of the ordinary lately, not going to get a graduation ceremony so iheartradio some people to write commencement speeches just for you. John Legend. Hillary Clinton. She's into over twenty of your favorites from Dj. College to coach Katie Abby Wambach to Halsey. Listen to iheartradio new podcast commencement out now iheartradio APP to ever get your podcasts. Welcome to this very special episode of Barrena Banjo, this is the making of the podcast podcast. This is a conversation with my collaborators. Dennis. Quaid, who you all know from his amazing film, TV and music career as well as my music, collaborator Pooh Bear and in case you know him. He's worked on some of the biggest songs of all time including all the songs off Justin Bieber's purpose. Where are you now? What do you mean? d'esposito remix was a global smash. His ten thousand hours is currently the top country song in the and you worked with. With Ed Sheeran and Bieber on the last song they did call that. Don't care, but more to the point. He created this amazing Americana Music with me for this project and I really wanted to bring people inside how we got from an extremely interesting, but somewhat esoteric idea all the way from it just being a concept album to being what is bearing a Banjo. We start the conversation in my airstream with Dennis Quaid and then we go across town to Black Star studios where Pooh bear works for us to complete the conversation and talk about the music. I hope you all enjoy, and we really really appreciate the audience that is following us on this journey. Thank you so much and here's our behind the podcast podcast on Berna Banjo. That's that's kind of our. Actual friendships started through music. That's a weird way into this podcast, but that is how we met how. t-bone cheekbones house about two years ago. Yeah, I get a call I'm sitting on my couch. I'm drunk on my couch and goes. Hey, anytime. t-bone goes to you. Hey, do you WANNA meet somebody? You always say yes, because you don't know who it's going to be. It's either going to be used or Elvis Costello Elton John or nick his lotto, but that's how we met. I came over and I was like I. Don't know who that is that since Quaid. I'll let Zach. Set this up because the way to set this up and. I do WANNA. Say who you were just hearing right? There was Dennis Quaid on the guitar and vocals. Jingle Jared Stat, chiming in with the story, the t-bone Burnett Story of course who plays a big role in the podcast. We're about to talk about so is let me just welke me right now to a very special beyond the podcast of sorts. My name is Zach Selwyn and I was. Very lucky to play multiple roles in this show bear and a Banjo. which is a hit musical podcast? I believe you can call it. At this point. It is climbing the charts and lucky to be joined right now by. Lead actor Dennis Quaid once stars of the show and executive producer. And executive producer as well as. The Creator Yeah I. Think you warming titles for? You have a lot on this as jared Gustad. Who's also here with me? Who is the Creator musical manager? Your musical man? That's when you're thanks. Musical man musical director out, say with Poo bear your partner who were also going to be very massive little man, because I Barron Banjo would not exist if it were not for. Jingle Jared. In the craziest experience of my life, but I mean. Just meeting all the people surrounding this thing is. has led to us doing something just totally different in the world of storytelling I guess that's what we're doing. Today were telling people a little bit about this very complicated story of music storytelling history facts made up facts. And their. Well we're all make. We're just making it up as we go along. This is a podcast I had never listened to a podcast myself being sixty five years old here, but podcast are really growing but We met. Jared, IOT bones house. He wanted to get us together because he thought there was something there had to do with music and. He's doing this podcast with bone and Delhi started bear record before even that like when we met you I was just a record, and just finished the yeah. No strange because. We met and then a year to the day we were on the phone and I said Hey. Do you Wanna fly with me to LAS VEGAS BECAUSE I? Just two things had happened. I'd finished. The record didn't know what to do with it. And there were these eight songs that Pu Barron I did with t-bone. One Song of the week collaborated with Dylan and Bob. That's. Idea to release a record as a podcast so I I was sitting on my couch a year after we met one Christmas then the next year I'm sitting here and buster. SCRUGGS IS ON TV and I get a text from someone who works in my company and they go. Hey, one of our biggest clients iheart just bought a podcast network, and as I'm having my second Martini ago Oh shit I wrote a podcast musical I call you I'm like what are you doing in January? We're going to vegas at your like for what we're. GonNa pitch a podcast. Yeah I remember. I was on the four zero five. When you actually call me when you first hear that, are you going? What I? What the Hell's the? Secondly well between the time I had met him and. then I kind of. Knew what they were okay, but all I really close US I can was what I used to hear on the radio out here which were Oll. Radio plays replayed on Knx ten seventy and. The other fun to listen to. But I also thought I thought podcast maybe were just interviews with people. Or they they were sort of just a way for people who had blogs to just get on, and just talk about themselves or whatever they were interested in like what we're doing here right now. Yeah, what's the what's interesting and you sort of touched on it? A second ago is that this is a one of a kind show I mean. People are saying in the press everywhere. You read that this is the world's first musical dramatic fictional podcast, which is cool. You've created your own sorta nature here which is using the using podcast to release and promote a record. What a great idea! I've been what I did think of when. We were forming. This idea was red headed stranger Willie Nelson's album. which has a continuous theme through it, and that was back in the days. When we all read the liner notes and we'd, we'd hold that record. You know the vinyl and. Usually asleep inside. Read all about it. Who had done it and Sometimes, it was a podcast on print the way they would come up the matic lead to release on the sleeve of the record. You know, but one on your case in point, the Beatles I buried Paul, but I live with all live in the music like. Tommy this morning, and if Tommy was out now, because the way, the record businesses, it would be because I guess. People gave the audience a little bit more credit with the music back in the day where the music would speak for itself, and you sort of you know through the press, they say Oh, this is about you know a person and you know the pinball wizard. This person can't see and can't talk and can't hear. Nowadays were in a very noisy world wherever there's Netflix Hulu. There's NBC CBS. There's five Dennis Quaid movies a year. All of them crushing. Six percent a TV show, and but that's the hype. When we got into the podcast conversation I looked at everything that was out there and I saw you know I love, and this is a shadow to Malcolm. Blad while I. Love With Malcolm Glad well does I love it. NPR Does I love. New York Times the daily and probably promoting things that are off the IHEART network back. But I said the one thing that no one has done yet. Used music in an audio format so when you and I went to. This is the best thing is that Dennis thinks Hollywood's a place where he will call agents and managers, and it actually is a fairly bright I, it's it's actually a fairly accessible place. If you just do it the right way. I call him and I go. We're going to Vegas. We're going to pitch an idea and Dennis. I was like I. Want to do this with you I don't want you to like be talented, and I wanna make it with you. And we went there. And he goes. We fly out to LAS. Vegas Yeah. We have this. And he's like what's it about is like? Let's just doing iheart event. And we were there for CBS and he goes. Do you notice about it? I was like well. It's sort of like Cohen Brothers also like you know Lomax, and it's and we. We do all I knew that it was a history history of music. and you know when. Those guys spread out from New York where there mobile recording devices and recorded the Carter family and Jimmie Rodgers and all those people that were early part of radio, because radio was new and so i. Thought in my head that that it was going to be about what if the Lomax is in the recording machine had passed by the Carter, family farm say fifty miles and recorded someone else. Instead the Carter said missed it. What would music be like now as it might be different? Yeah. And that truthfully by him, saying that in the room like so, that's all right there. We go the night before we had this amazing awesome dinner with all these executives and Evans. We're in town where pitching a podcast that sounds like something that you say when you're in the media and the next day on the way up the elevator I'm like Oh. Shit I don't actually know what. Have A. Killing time before Dennis gets, Daddy gave me a chance to warm up the room to be like it's going to be about thirty minutes each I was late and we. And we played. It was in the same hotel it wasn't. It was like an. Echo across going across the freeway, we. Offer, the wrong entrance and they couldn't find the place somebody this time. Our meeting, he's got. He's got eight minutes left and he's been vamping the entire. Guess. Again. One bead of sweat forming on my. Walks in goes Dennis Quaid is here. I and then everyone forgets the fact that we're GONNA pitch. They're all very excited Dennis Quaid as late late. Late his. We all love music and at the end of the day. We knew that it was. Just too in Caveman speak. We knew that it was about music. Yes, fund foundationally. We knew that we wanted to do something like elevated liner notes and Connell God bless him help us. From! I get it. It's liner. Notes brought to life. It's an album you have that. It's read Henry Right the thing find me a writer, and then I don't know how to furrowed brow of interest. Yes, and then we leave. My favorite part is Dennis's flight is. Vegas is weird. Everyone gets their flight with one minute left. But Dennis is like Oh shit. What time is it? Flights to. Your pitch was flimsy. I think they bought it. and Lo and behold. 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The Amazing Class of two thousand twenty, so choose from choose willfully and choose confidently listen to iheartradio new podcast commencement now on the iheartradio APP or wherever you get podcasts with a special Doritos Valedictorian episode where Doritos takes graduation speeches to another level by naming five Valedictorians giving them each fifty thousand dollars in tuition assistance and sharing their speeches with the world. You are the ones that's GonNa. Make a difference. But. It was a question. You know you just about the podcast you mentioned people who are now expecting to your. If you haven't listened to Banjo download it now. Listen to the entire season. Whatever's available up? Get caught up here. People turns out that the question was kind of the story was. But, if people are looking to listen to a typical musical episode like you know what you might see on. Broadway or an crazy ex girlfriend? It's now you're going to get here. It's like the music is more like an Easter egg to the actual story, the story being about the music. We're trying to secretly teach people about musical history I have. It's weird because as dumb as I am I do love long form entertainment and learning about the secret history so. DOC, which wasn't even out at the time that we started. This is almost like when you look at one of those Ken Burns photos, and you keep pulling back and all of a sudden Barron Banjo or there. Are Those two guys. Sort of had a hunch, and then the strangest thing happened which we go to south by South West and Connell. WHO's really really smart and Gail who's really really smart goes? Why don't you and Dennis and Pooh bear come to south by open for Tim McGraw Talk About it again the we did in the room with Dennis Talking Poo, and I play a few songs, and it was like this barnum moment where it felt like we were Baron Banjo. Were Banjo it. He's got this letter Jack. He's got whole sues. Jackets suit the toreador outfit. Erbil and spent the money. Yeah! Have a budget I'm. Never known. What is the fray where we get? Hit the Stop Watch. That's it money is stopped spending. The craziest thing about that all like thinking about how surreal it was at that moment at south by we open for Tim. McGraw is one of the biggest country stars in the world and even Tim. Afterwards was like what was that oh? Cool it. Is that what you know? We don't know right and. Is So humble. He shows and I love the moment before we go onstage because everyone's so cool. Denis is like lives in the moment, so it's always ten minutes before we go on stage where I'm starting to actually feel the nerves that he's like. What are we doing here? Remind me. What is this and I? Say? Dennis, we're pitching again, but this time to brands and hoover then goes with me. What do we which project and what are we doing? It doesn't really give me a chance to really get nervous about things. Because then it really is like a circus. We've run this thing like a media. Circus is a new form a new art form I think. Is there an ultimate goal for the PODCAST as a show? Is it a television? Thing is a tour. What do you guys? Should be I think it should be unto itself, and from that can't come things. I think like television shows. If the is enough, interest has an audience so many movies that are made into TV series. Here's one four nine podcast maiden into and guess what became a movie Red headed stranger young. Tommy. Tommy Gesture Sergeant, pepper's had a really bad Nicholson saying yes, and Elton John Version of pinball wizard. That's actually my favorite verse. Kidding. My wrong. Jeez who wrote me these notes I'm sorry. Reference. And we. Like we should go from poly to the Bob Dylan of an awesome. Segue because anything is. That like we always gloss, we glossed over this at south by every now and then someone's like go. Yeah, and Bob Dylan's involved I would like to talk about those while I've known jared about almost ten years now I think, and for Bob Dylan's been him. You're to hear him in weird al which is bizarre, but beautiful fan ballengee. Bromley in Branson Missouri by the way. They all are. Theater town. Okay, you know I just want to know I. Guess First of all. You got to work with your hero. How'd that come about? And can you just sort of breakdown? What the song is that? He wrote as fast as you can. How much time do we have? But right it is reticent. I had this amazing philosophical conversation last week. And I'm not going to get too deep into it. But I. All I will say is that it and I'll give you my philosophical answer. Then I'll give you my little one is Dylan lives in service of the universe? He's not actually you know. There's people who've played in bands with them. There's t-bone. Who's produced music and you can. You can work with this person. You may never meet him. You may never talk to him. You may never and you're like, is it? Is this some sort of idea to like psych people out and. Rolling Thunder View. One of the guitarists was interviewed and they're like. What was it like you know for the time of year when the music I never met them like how well all of that? All of that as Ben True for Jilin throughout his career. The the Mystique of that he brings with things. It's a full commitment to your life in service of the universe, because there are people that are mysterious that exist in different time escapes the new where they can disappear for ten years show for five disappear for ten again like in a weird way every now and then. I always say this even with Poo bear. Sometimes, there's like in a lifetime. There's a few artists that are the beacon of all ideas of the universe whether it was the Beatles. Dylan and you can laugh, but Poobah with with Bieber. Bieber has is the only artists in the world that has like billions of streams off multiple songs. You don't need to like his music, but clearly billions of people do and. And you and your life looks different because of how many people digest what you're doing, and Dylan has been doing that now for holy. Shit since the. What was it the early sixties? Yeah, said to what sixty one two three and we saw last weekend killing it on at eight. Yeah, yeah, and that was something, but the weird thing was. It was like dealing with some. Secret Organization like I. Don't want to say too much because I wanna like. He. His whole thing is obfuscation so. Hey, t-bone I wanNA in this project. It would be really cool if we took a basement tape, song and Pooh bear the biggest topline writer of our time, and I the biggest General Guy Right, or whatever I throw myself in the history, but I just you gotta ask you. Don't get so t-boned goes. That's cool Alaska nothing for for year a year later. Hey, man, what happened with the Dylan. A year later I'm Nashville. I'm at a bar and I meet this Guy John and set. Oh! Jingle Jared Oh yeah I, if you're working with a T. Bone, he's my client and he goes. WHOA. What's going on with that project? It was like well. We're going to wrap it up soon, but I've been trying to get to this like Dylan lyric thing where we do like a basement tape thing and he goes. Oh, yeah, used to work over at Sony. Let me see if I can talk to his manager through some bizarre back, channeling I'm at my codge in Canada and I get a phone call from him and Dylan's manager. Go we google. Jingle punks think is really interesting, but we have questioned about. WHO's. The most established right in the world. What is what do you mean? Where are you now I have billions of St. I said write songs that are questions. What do you mean? Where are you now? The that's his thing and they go, and he goes okay. We'll call you back. They apparently speak to Bob Dylan. WHO had by the way no problem with Jingle punks or Jingle? There was this question. And they call go. He's going to send you an email right now. I get the lyrics and a week later and Pooh. Bear should tell the story because. Various unmoved by a lot of things. Just because he's you know like you. He's he's in. He's that I I am the tourist. This whole project I've never been in a blockbuster movie I've never been in a had a hit. I've created a Jingle Company and when that thing came into focus I put the. Lyrics sheet on poopers desk in front of me goes. Oh, Bob Dylan wrote this I was like Iago's cool twenty minutes later. The songs that's he goes. Yeah, we're done. And then I had to send it back. The T. Bone to had to send it back there and then they're like this is great. Produce it now. What's a song called? That one is gone, but not forgotten, and that is the going to be the final episode of the season on, but not forgotten and that script is a. Script with. Tom Piazza wrote it for Dennis in a leading lady and you did that with resort Zindler. Am I in that one. No. All right I still technically work with dealing. There's a book component coming out to Barrena Banjo. Jared is that something that keeps surprising Dennis once again really. Yeah Yeah Yeah. Work so this is I am I'm all in on the Audio Universe? Here's what I WANNA. Do I want you and I? To have a concept and I want to write it like this, and then I want to transcribe the book based on A. Multiple our conversation I have an idea of where it goes after season one and you know bear. Banjo could show up anywhere. They could show up in Seattle at the Donald as they could. Studio Fifty Four. They can show about studio fifty four. That I'd love to write some new stories with you about that because I feel like. Every oppressing. We've done so far. People are just strangely comparing it also the quantum leap where they just like jump from time to time without meaning it now that we've proved that they actually existed now we can raise some more reggae seventy-seven Jamaica. NWEA haight Ashbury Way Montego Obama, but it's a great way to educate people. I think about music. I love music, history and I look forward to the day that Ken Burns. Does the the nineteen documentary on Mumble rap? We're GONNA get their. Juice world was a talented young man. So lot look forward to in the Barren Banjo universe. Got This. What are we drink in here? By the way I'm having Japanese whiskey? I was having a glass of Red Wine Dennis. Products is a little some from Nashville. That's actually sharing. Drinking moonshine people out of the jar here Oh. My Lord Golden Harvest of Mason Jar I mean this is the real shit. Excuse me. This is the real stuff Raila Shine! It's definitely sipping Warms the whole body. Yeah Nice. Can I ask you a question Dennis I know you have a vast musical background growing up watching you know playing the killer incredible performance. You play in a band, the sharks. And You've been around music. You're stroman earlier. How did your musicianship help? You kind of I guess t-bone introduced you guys because you guys have a mutual love for certain types of music, but. For Dr Cues Character. was there like a little bit about your past or your love? This music that really attracted you to the character well. I grew up in Texas. In Houston, which is. Very much taxes and cap also western Louisiana. A while there's a kind of a real Gumbo of music that you down there and my dad was also really into Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin. And I had a very wide. Musical Range growing APP that in my house or on the radio and Buzek has always been a part of my life. But acting came along, and that was the path had opened up to me, but music has always been a part of even my acting career in Seoul songs to movies I was a done musical movies and. I mean Steph humble CD's? It burns them great balls of fire the footage that you show me with you and Cowboy Jack Clement and like getting taught by. Louis and that's one of those. That's one of those lucky life. Experience. Guitar. Your Food Guitar Johnny Cash That'd, be fun DA. masterclass on. Charlie chocolate factory moments. You've had the most fascinating existence the people you've met at sometimes you're again with Dr Q. n you in real life. That's kind of the inspiration for you. Tell me things and I had I nodded and I go i. know about that and then go home and Google it because I don't want to seem like. I don't know what I'm talking about, and I'm like Oh my. My God I didn't know that Cowboy Jack Clement. Did this and I didn't know that the Carter Cash family. Oh, I didn't know that you know Tanya. Tucker I. Didn't know any of these things and or Jerry Lee your connection to American. Music is so deep the fact that like Look Lynn this year at the the you know the rhyme in when they did that big tribute. You're up there. With history, but that was like one of those moments because know I didn't belong there. They just him come over I. Just think I'm sitting next low rental and. Of just adored. And idolized and Don't just as the lucky life love it. They say what's the, but I never played I'd never played piano when I got a great balls of fire. I didn't play piano. I. Play Guitar, but I had a year to to learn it and. For twelve hours a day, learning and and Jerry Lee was one of my teachers to like really slow down the licks, and also just being around him a lot. Yup and just worked on the left hand. It's all it is. It's flooding. really right Dennis is. Passion for not only music, but also the intensity of anything he's into at the moment. him committing to it one hundred percent, he would reset by playing a bunch of. These songs on the piano and Dennis is here. I was thinking to myself. Man I worked a six hour day. exhausted. I'm Brentwood tired. Tired. The TV show. And I was like I, bet you and I thought to myself before I knew him while I was like I. Bet you he'll just do hill read and he'll just be like. We're done, but he. Like every take, he would read it and then he would do I. Always know when you're ready to really do it because you read it. You read it again all right? We're going back our going back and and That's the cool thing we're podcasting is that? Look! It's not supposed to be an actor format. It's really supposed to be a talk format, but you also have to do a ton of the prep as an actor. Because in the room you're dappling and the coolest thing was the final episode with Roseanne that live to read. Yeah, and it's also people. Don't see radio, so you create a character through your voice and. Feels very improvisational, and as you're going along and the audience uses to magic nation, which is that is a beauty. Ed's creative visual soundscape through the music and the words, and then you have a visual that you're driving around wherever you listen to your podcast on the train. You know if New York or whatever suddenly you're transported to that. Creating stories been the most to me. The most exciting projects I've ever been part of an just everyone has some context for the my six our Brentwood. Day actually woke up in San Francisco this morning, because I was meeting with our label empire, whose putting out the soundtrack we came back here. did this with Denison our GONNA. Go Talk to Poo. Bear about the music in. Studio City, but This is amazing dentist. They'd have so much. Thank you for. Ride! Yeah, absolutely gray ride, so look for bear, Banja the lunchbox bear. Apparently. Prophylactic. Banjo chain right here we go. Got Once just got one of those zip ties. Under, yeah, never WHO's. A. iheartradio and state farm know that the graduation stage is the first of many, and while grads may not be walking across one this year. They can get the send. They've always dreamed of with our new podcast commencement, featuring inspiring speeches from the biggest names like John Legend. I'm honored to have the chance to speak to to share in the special moment, Katie couric. You'll need some very important life skills to move forward. Perhaps the most important one is resilience Chelsea handler. Dare to do things that scare you if you can embrace the. The unknown and fully jump into what life has to offer you. There won't be much to celebrate and much to enjoy and cash. Reflect on the work you've done and celebrate moving into your new face. These iconic names all coming together to celebrate you the class of twenty. Twenty listened iheartradio new podcast commencement brought to you by state farm speeches are now available on iheartradio APP, or wherever you get your podcast and remember state farm will be there for this stage and every stage after like a good neighbor. State farm is there. It's one thousand nine hundred four Michael. Jordan is the most famous person in the World He's reached the pinnacle of his career as one of the best basketball players to ever play the game. And what does he do? He leaves the sport altogether to try his hand at baseball. Then something funny happened Jordan Young Baseball career gets cut short when Major League baseball goes on one of the longest strikes its history. And Michael. Jordan goes back to basketball. The story could stop here, but as we all know it doesn't. Jordan goes on to win and other three championships kickstarts. What economists call the Jordan effect generating billions in revenue and re-energizing a struggling NBA. I'm Sean Braswell and I want you to check out the new show presented by ozzy flashback and find out how some of the best laid plans can go horribly wrong or proved, unexpectedly magnificent. Listen to flashback on the iheartradio. APP, apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. Hey welcome to part two of the special behind the podcasts of bear and a Banjo. Zach, Selwyn, I am now in. A studio owned by Poo bear. Black Star. Thank you Blackstar my second time here. The first time you didn't notice I just kinda snuck in, but it left kicked out. Really Happy Birthday. Happy Birthday to you! My friend jingle jars with me as well. You guys are the musical forces behind the Barren Banjo podcast, which is doing exceptionally well right now. You guys are ahead of fish. The White Stripes! You're hanging out with Dolly Parton I mean. In echelon musical podcast for fake Dan bad for a fake band and I want to start with you, Pooh, bear, how'd you guys I? Meet you and Jared Oh man. Um It! At a Bar Mister Nice Guy. And Strange enough. There were it was. It was alcohol involved in. Actually it seemed it still justin. Bieber can introduced me, introduced us and his. It was crazy. 'cause I really wanted to get into I wanted to. Write jingles for television. You know so least changed numbers, and unlike music industry people. We actually like reached out to each other the next day and I think we even. The next day we got together together on a project. It was a project. That's what started. It really was crazy because. You know I took to paraphrase what he was I was hammered and I. Bet be I don't know beaver at all I. he would know me, but I met him in that one moment and I was like. Oh, I'm the king of Jingles. Make these two. It was like she she she. But. I'm the king of. And he's like you gotta be my friend Pooh. Bear is the best fighter in the world and the next day. It was one of those things where back in my drinking days not like the way I am now, but when I would stay until like five in the morning I googled who in the morning and I was like. Oh, my goodness. That's like a real guy like he really. Really makes big big songs now, so we got together and history channel was in the middle of this thing for routes, the mini series and Krista shows up at the office meets Poo, bear and I and she to this day she goes jared. You're zero percent chance. Get into the music for routes the miniseries but I'd already gone stars and all these other things. She's like zero percents zero. There's no chance. And who came by and I I was like Oh I. Really Hope you know. She Digs Pu, and it was magical. Because you know it's that weird moment between when someone says, we might do the job and hey, sentence the music and I picked up a Banjo instead of guitar, and you were I remember I, did like the Born this way Doon Doon then and you do that, and then we got the other the next day. I'm so naive and stupid because I didn't realize that now that I've worked with you a lot I realized how frightening it is to be your engineer, and all these other things and we recorded the song at my desk, but that was it turned into one song, and then they loved it, and then they called you back and I remember. They said they want to. And they WANNA shoot a music video and. That's when a guy we're in, so it started on certain off with the roots miniseries. After you guys initially got together creatively. How long after that, and the success of that did bear in a Banjo, come together, and you guys collaborating on songs for. What became a record and now a podcast. I think things really started to go when around the time you're doing. The Red Bull Doc is you, were you? He put me into the story line of all the he was working with huge people like Jay Valdan and Robin and and Bieber, and he shows up at my office one day with cameras, which is a very jingle. Jared thing to do not wear things. Like five cameras I was like no big deal each. polly, we're doing the behind the music on jingle dared, but you were thing was really real, and then a few months later. It's so strange have known Pooh bear because the most amazing things have happened. I show up a few months later at a premier and there's a real movie that I'm really in long sense of like real people. Real. People! Not usually in stuff like that, and then things started to really fast forward and weeded Steven Tyler Jeez e for UFC and then we almost became like a fake ban that would make business. That's what we're doing. We were like we were this faked band like people have fantasy football league. We fantasy band, and like for me like I always wanted to be able to sing music. You know in this lane. In Americana John Mara and it was like. Wow, here's my chance to really be able to to escape my my every day. And it really turned into a song for these artists. We were like basically just doing records fake. For Barry Banjo, that was like the sound and able to know place those songs on. You know for those big campaigns in. Doing so, we were creating this the sound for ourselves despite sound. And we just turned into an actual album because we. We kind of let your list his make a song. Every Saturday and we do like a real song, and then on the way it was like. Hey, you want to say like twenty more minutes. Do. Banjo Song you would just sing on it and then I felt like I'm a music industry nerd I like reading about Alan. Lomax and you know the Bristol sessions in met around the same time at Pooh, bear I met T. Bone in the same way that I was hammered at this the sunset towers, and said Oh brother out there. You're so cool. I wanted real brother. He goes. If you ever anything anything that's interesting. That's in the Americana Space. Sending my way, I sent him. born this way the first time we did and he goes. You guys should do a full record, so just sent him scraps of like. A minute and a half of pure vocal awesomeness that would do on top of Blues Guitar and you know I was like. Is this enough to make a full song? Is this like? Is it you know and he would just arrange it in a way. Where there was no additional vocals needed, we would take the airstream vocals where we'd record my tin can where you're doing the bullet, Mike and the little. You know singing through an APP Mr. Bill Bullet My. We're going to bring that back for the young. I don't WanNa do this. If we don't have, the bullet might need not producers. Producers let's get bullet. Mike the Crazy thing. Was We so next thing you know like T-? Everyone thought that it was lying to each side like t-bone. It ever met Poo. Poo Bear had never met t-bone. None of you guys even like and we I. It was since I look at my phone, two, thousand, sixteen, seventeen eighteen, and then we get to two thousand, the beginning of nineteen and I go. Well we better figure out what to do with his album, and in and around mid I, think it was eighteen. We get the call that Bob Dylan is agreeing to give us some music that we can work with. And I remember you coming to my office and plunking the sheet in front of you and because. You know much like Barron Banjo. There's like the very authentic poo bear. Then there's the carnival. p.t Barnum Jingle Jared night places, lyrics goes. Dylan wrote these. From anybody. He type. The name, you weren't a hundred percent sure where you. Know. Like these words came from Bob How long did take for you to get those lyrics and turn it into what the song became. Oh I don't ten minutes forty minutes fifteen minutes, and then I said are we done? And he goes he always when he finishes the song he goes we're. Like. Are you certain and he's like yeah, and I was like well. Some people wanNA fuck with something. A thousand different ways, but when it's good, it doesn't take more than fifteen twenty minutes. No. It's the opposite in our lives. I'm working on something for a long time usually sucks yeah. So the faster. The faster we feel it and get it out there. All the songs in this podcast. How long do you guys think it took you to make the record in its entirety? Mean Honesty Lake. If time wasn't a factor we would get together basically every Saturday and just write a song for twenty minutes. That was it, but it was like a four year experience. WHO's wanting? We didn't and I am so paranoid because I always think things have to come out now. They have to come out and I sat with T. Bone and I'm not a patient guy like I went from Jingle Jared two, thousand eight to building a business that we sold so I'm used to things happening quick and I remember being in real mental funk about this whole thing being like when when should I put? You can put it out like next week. You can put in four. You can put it in twenty years. He's a good like that's all that matters is good and I was like, but I really wanted to come on. He goes well. That's the worst way to think about it. You shouldn't really think about it being like coming out now. Just think about coming out when it's ready I got a question for for Pooh bear about music in general you. You know there's a timeless element to a lot of the stuff. You guys are mentioning in the podcast. You're working with Bob Dylan working with t-bone. Burnett you know, and in your history worked with incredible artists. Would you say you find difference in working in the Americana space versus working in the previous spaces you work as far as like longevity and the way music moves now versus the way it used to work back in the day like. Everything's different, but the same it end of the day. The song has amazing. The Hook has to be Hooky, and it has to be simple and effective, and so for the different genres it just way more exciting doing you know Americana. Just because it's something that me coming from my culture in my race, you know is kind of like as a kid who looked about look at not being there cool to listen to that or be into that so to be able to to have that in you know really in the ninety sneaking listening to third eye, blind and away says and Nirvana and like sneaking hearing stuff. It may be all love to do something like that. In years and years later, our fantasy band in on my. I could do. Let's sit right now. You know and. Really, but at the same time doing fantasy band is still like. We're still. Sensitive you know still we still don't want to be whatever even Nossa. A fantasy man is still like our our passion. You know art and to be honest, a lot of the stories that ended up being part of the fantasy story. You know that is our backstory everything in the podcast. If you really know the weird things, Apu bear and I've done. We shown up at pro bowl, riding and Maga country where like a Jewish guy, from Toronto, who shows up and he's like what the fuck is this like? Get the hell we we. We went to We went to France where we've been to. The marlins like all these little things that are written into the story in the last episode, which I won't give away. Essentially Poo bear story from his documentary like when I saw. The Red Bull Doc that the people who directed and produced it created about him. I I didn't know anything about puberty life, except for the fact that he made amazing music. We had a lot of fun together. We hung out and then when I saw that I was so moved by some of the things that it actually happened in life that got him to where he was that like. Most people don't know much about people who work in music and what it takes to tell stories, but you are. You know it's your at least twenty years into the business more three. And I didn't realize that you were writing songs. You know had I known any of this stuff before we actually got together. I probably would approach the our first meeting with a bit more caution and. Engineer and this and maybe an idea. Nobody cares but You know the fact that I've been able to do all this cool stuff with poo bear. And right into the fiction of what we're doing I. think that's what people have reacted too because i. you know it's the first time I've ever done. A podcast the first time you've ever done a podcast gin and I wanted to come in at a level where there was some level of in entertainment with the music. Some level of education with I love musical history and I over think things. Things, but puberty naturally understands the blues and folk music. Those things don't have to be explained to him. It's like I pick guitar and go. Oh, you know one three five and all of a sudden. There's this complex melody over it, but I think that is why. t-bone reacted to it the way he has. That's why the reason why Dylan got involved in this. I think that's the reason why. You know we're sitting next to Dolly part in the white stripes and other very serious. Is Right now. If this keeps going on which looks like a will got a season to season three to tell me what you see happening next, and what you who you would like to collaborate with dream collaborators as far as like. Taking it down the line. If, there's anybody I really feel like a cool thing would be able to to work with people who you know a great stat here anymore. That's cool. especially in the be able to hear what type vocals we can get our hands on. You know that they haven't been hurt just recordings. You're hearing a lot of stuff now. Come Out I. Mean it happened when Park and Biggie when they passed away like all of a sudden, these other records were coming out remixed by artists of the day. Of Fit, the sound that was coming out at that time could be an interesting concept. Take those same kind of songs that may be might not have hit the public the way they wanted at the time and taking a fresh approach to him. Now you know like. Somebody. makes. Fun We're almost remixing culture because it's not even about the music were. In history, INSERTING OURSELVES INTO SISTER IS A. Little Richard Ronnie Hawkins and just picking parts of history apart and I. You know when we talking with Dennis. Quaid today, the the whole concept for me, really made sense when I started watching this Ken Burns documentary about country music, and you'd see a photo of like twenty people, and all of a sudden he pulling back, and there's two people there. That aren't supposed to be there. That aren't from that time or that place. That's what Barron Banjar. They did show up seeing those pictures. You know what I mean and. Waving. Selena twenty. Walk into the movies. That kind of what the thing is. It's like we're hung. There's a little bit of like Is that a quantum leap? That's about it. Yeah, bearing Banja Wheel Quantum leap pin. and. His. But also lied about what actually happened in history. I know we're Kinda getting limited time I WANNA. Ask both of you guys, 'cause, jared. You play the lead actor really in this besides Dennis. Banjo, you have a big part of your narrating your life guidance through Poo. Bear your characters a little less involved. How did that come about and were you comfortable or uncomfortable? With like the acting part of the whole thing? you know what I was comfortable with just because is really not a band and so. I just wasn't nervous and. Look at it like that in that way I. Don't I protect myself and protect my feelings. You know sort allowed me to be myself. In I'm bear and just added. You know what a little fun man is really like pretending. I didn't get a test as a kid. Really pretend much I wasn't any toys. So now that I have a kid in those Kinda, it's Kinda, cool to prepare as an adult. And it was I wanted to make sure that the PU. Bear or the bear character was also very mysterious where he solves problems through the music, and he comes with good advice. It's almost like a fable in my voice again to protect myself in the levels of masking of the story I. I love Bob Dylan and I know that throughout his career he's used several voices to sing, and actually speak throughout his rap and everything he. He really interview. Nobel Prize speech. He really is speaking like a liquor blackjack dealer from Kansas City hit. Fifties is like eight. That's when I was ran away from home when I was a connie like it's all made up. There's nothing that's unreal, so it's A. Truly in the thirties, forties and fifties with being bear Banjo would be this big liar whose adapting to every environment. He's in Leagues Elig says I'm just to go with that voice I heard him do. Salon and Dennis I was very insecure and I was like. What do you think he goes? It's perfectly moronic for what it is that Jay Banjo is which is, he's a big liar and he's. Great any his voice could change if he was hanging around British people. It might change if he's hanging around Canadians. Did that to right. Madonna. She'd come out. Code. People getting richer, they become British sometimes. I haven't been having gotta you five years. who was like hello and I? Am I good yeah. Well! Thank you guys so much. a Banjo. This has been a little special. Actually. I have one last question before we wrap. What would you say is the weirdest thing that's happened since you've known me in terms of like the craziest? Does door day this interview. Maybe because I know what it is, I don't know if you remember the weirdest thing that ever happened. I would probably just say. Your suit. That's one of the weirdest things will. Would you say that place in Atlanta you took me to? Oh The blue flame blue flame? Yeah, That was a culture shock for you. That really was and I think. I walked in I didn't have enough information. Or they're. Not? Anything that's I'm like kind of first danner every day, so I didn't know at the time, but that place was I place. It was pretty hard. But full circle much like when I met Pu. I didn't Google until the next morning I. Didn't. Google blue flame till the next morning. Jesus Christ. Start everything that came under the. Murder. Death shooting here, but you must. Be Very hospitable. Everyone's really nice to me. This the cartel Barron Bangles. You know I just want. Like? That was a lot of fun. Banjo suit has pretty much deserves a podcast of its own. Yes sure if anyone hasn't seen it, go take a look at any of the press kits or any of the stories online any visual. Image that see what Jared Commission for this. Band in this this show which you know, we're on join and I thank you guys for sitting down with us here and thank you. Talking more. Than you have in this, thank you, blue flame address for anyone interested in Atlanta is. Google. Google that. That's a true fictional story going to sponsor season to buy a Yankee hat, and they're either no I did that. That's what I was wearing and someone's like. You better. Take that off, get. Taking it off. All Right Anyway Jared goosestep poo bear continued success Barron Banjo. Keep listening. Keep download until your friends share. Get on. Social Media promoted. Make It happen and get prepared for the final episode, which is going to blow everyone away especially when you hear what we've been cooking up in the studio and Thank you guys. You're welcome. Thank you, okay. That was my conversation with Dennis Quaid. Improve air and I. Hope that you enjoyed. We greatly appreciate you. Tuning in and following us on our Barron Banjo musical and story journey you can find all the songs and the music disgust wherever you stream your music under Berna Banjo. We're GONNA play for you to songs that have not come out from the podcast just yet, but these are previews of our collaboration with Bob. Dylan and next week's episode is a very special one because Zach Brown is going to remix one of the songs from the soundtrack and released a single. These are a preview of those songs. Thank you again so much. We hope you enjoy. Nafa Garden. Trust. Mon.. Baby. To run a neither knowing where to go. One. On the San Antonio. She. IS A. She added. Other women. Own I roll. burs. Mothers. And Raise. One. Love Baby. Own. Garden. She, added. Just. About November. Just. I hope you enjoyed this episode. And if you dig the music from our soundtrack, you can stream it anywhere. You Get music and at the IHEART APP the remix of. Can you hear me now? Features Zach Brown vocals alongside Berna Banjo. This song will be available as a special single. Our Soundtrack November eighth across all platforms. Oh, and if you dig the series, please share with your friends and make sure to give us a five star review on the apple podcast APP. Our Job got her show. No Way. Certain. On. Here's something. Good is a new show from the Seneca Women Podcast, network and iheartradio. Each day we aspire to bring you the good news. The silver lining the glass half full because there is good happening the world everywhere everyday. We just need to look for and share it. Here's something. Good is a short daily show. That offers positive stories. Helpful suggestions shared experiences to inform and inspire you every day. Listen to hear something good on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows subscribe now. October, Sixteenth Nineteen seventy-two to Congressman Vanish on a small plane in Alaska. Despite a massive search, they're never found. The case goes cold. That is until I start researching it I'm standing right, let alone portage, pass and Alaska. My name is John. Wall Zach and what I found is one of the strangest stories you've never heard. Did he indicate what was in the suitcase? He said it was a bomb. So join me as I travel from Arizona to the Arctic, circle trying to crack this case. Listen to missing in Alaska on the iheartradio. APP Apple podcasts or wherever you find your favorite shows.

Bob Dylan Barron Banjo Dennis Jingle Jared Dennis Quaid t-bone Pooh Bear Google Justin Bieber Ken Burns Barrena Banjo A. iheartradio John Legend Jared Oh t-bone Burnett Vegas Bob Jack Clement Ed Sheeran Nashville