18 Burst results for "T-Bone Burnett"

Who Wore High-Heeled Shoes First?

BrainStuff

06:21 min | 1 year ago

Who Wore High-Heeled Shoes First?

"At IBM problems inspire us to push the world forward. That's why so many people work with us on everything from city traffic to ocean plastic smart loves problems. IBM A. B. M. Let's put smart to work visit. IBM DOT COM slash smart to learn more come to brainstorm a production of iheartradio. Hey rain stuff lauren bogle Bam here although these days wearing shoes with high heels mostly coated feminine the original Wears High High heels were men so what's the history here when where and why did people I begin wearing shoes with elevated heels we spoke by email email with Elizabeth Mohawk senior curator Toronto's Batta Shoe Museum who says she has yet to unravel this mystery. The exact origin of high heels remains needs to be discovered. What's clear however is it. High heels. Were not a European invention heeled footwear only emerged in western Europe around the turn of the seventeenth century but had been warn for hundreds of years prior throughout Western Asia Similar Hawk said evidence for early Western Asian heels as far back as Tenth Century Persia suggests a strong relationship to horseback riding and may have been connected to the innovation of the stirrup the store profoundly changed horseback riding and in particular made military campaigns on horseback more effective as as an enabled riders to steady themselves in dramatically improved the effectiveness of weapons such as the Lance and Bowen Aero. He'll seems to have been a further development of this technology as it allowed the wearer to hook his feet in the stirrups better angering him to his steed eventually heeled footwear for men spread to Europe likely three political networks works and trade but the exact evolution is complicated so why did heels only become of interest to Europeans around the beginning of the sixteen hundreds civil heck said the answer lies and things it's complex European world exploration and the destablizing the textile trade to the rise of Persia under the reign shot a bus the first from fifteen eighty the eight to sixteen twenty nine and both Persian and European concerns about the increasingly powerful Ottoman Empire in particular it was the power of Shah boasts the First Mountain Military Terry who wore heeled footwear that may have made heels appealing I to European men and ultimately to women as the he'll entered into upper class men's fashion and there was a concurrent trend in women's fashion to adopt certain aspects of men's attire some hawks said that the women who played with this trend were often quote the butt of ridicule the end there numerous offenses included their adoption of men's military inspired fashion including broadbrimmed hats ornamented with plumes doublets carrying weapons and wearing heels in the heels that both men and women wore in the early years of the seventeenth century were very low but they would rise for both sexes as the century progressed the the majority of powerful and privileged men wore heels through the seventeenth century and into the early eighteenth century in France during the reign of Louis the fourteenth from sixteen forty three to seventeen in fifteen wearing red high heels was a principal signifier of political privilege limited to the king and his courtiers beyond France red heels for men were at first associated associated with French sophistication but by the end of the seventeenth century they were increasingly seen as effeminate especially in England similar. Hawk said fueled. Oh by nascent enlightenment thinking and increasing nationalisms men's dress began to undergo a radical transformation at the end of the seventeenth century. It was in the early eighteenth century that men abandoned abandoned the he'll to women's fashions and the he'll became a signifier femininity. Those shifts included a heightened division between men's and women's tire as as well as March differences between French English men's dress some will hawk said since the Seventeenth Century Western culture has shown extreme sensitivity to men in heels especially if it's deemed that the heels are being used to increase height she notes that this negative view only increased Darwinian ideas of survival of the fittest became came translated into racist and sexist notions of natural male physical and mental superiority but heels for man made a brief comeback in the middle of the twentieth any of century SIMILAC explained the he'll began rising in men's fashion in the nineteen sixties and in the early nineteen seventies reached unprecedented heights in direct response. I feel wheel to the burgeoning women's movement the heels and men's fashion however we're not borrowed from the female wardrobe they were block and high like Louie the fourteenth and were touted as a way increasing one stature masculinity and confidence in no way did they reference the Longstanding Feminine High and Thin Heal these days however however heels on men can be construed to emphasize a lack of height rather than compensating for it which means quote that heels on men function like a bad to pay they reveal insecurity and that in our current culture is deemed unappealing iconic footwear designer Christian Lubaton concurred to a news publication a man and heals. That's a prosthesis but I sympathize. The men need help but a man and heals is ridiculous clearly. Mr Lubaton doesn't watch the cowboy channel those BRONC and bull riders look pretty good or as someone hack puts it cowboys continue to own their heels and wear them with confidence today's episode certain Kerry Tatra and produced by tyler playing brain stuff is a production of iheartradio's. How stuff works ruinous and lots of other topics our home planet has networks dot com in or podcast. My heart radio visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows Hello I'm Dr Q. and I've spent the last thirty years tracking down there and Banjo the two most important musicians of the twentieth twentieth century podcast narrated by Dennis Quaid featuring new music produced by t-bone Burnett written by Jerry Goose did and in Grammy Winning Songwriter Poobah bowling but the new song featuring original lyrics by Bob Dylan listened to bear in a banner on the iheartradio APP or wherever you get podcast.

IBM Hawk Iheartradio Europe Christian Lubaton France Lauren Bogle Bam Persia Batta Shoe Museum Dennis Quaid Shah Bob Dylan T-Bone Burnett Senior Curator First Mountain Military A. B. M. Toronto Elizabeth Mohawk Bowen Aero England
"t bone burnett" Discussed on World Cafe

World Cafe

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"t bone burnett" Discussed on World Cafe

"Oh that's so great will go out on the song the comedians by elvis castillo at the end but i i just have one more question for you before we before. We wrap things out if that's okay <hes> i wanna know so as as somebody we're we're here. We're talking about the solo album that you've made the invisible late acoustic space almond. We're also talking about this incredible body of work that you've that you've produced <hes> and people make art because because they have things that they need and want to say <hes> and i'm wondering if being a producer who facilitates helping other people say what they need to say a ever gets in the way of of you needing or of you having that outlet to say what you need to say or if we can read anything into where you're you're at in your life where you're it seemed to be really making space for yourself to get your message out well. I think i've i've always been ambivalent about <hes> <hes> the notion of public performance <hes> and i never i didn't have that need read that particular need to get out in and be a public performer but i will say at this point in my life i have gathered a lot of information and i see some things very clearly and it's it's crucial to me to say these things now before before i slept this mortal coil you see so yeah. I'm going ah i haven't put out a record for eleven years and i'm gonna put out three double albums in the next twelve months. Hopefully you know up just finished up the second one and getting it ready to release in the fall and then i hope to have another one out in the in the in the next spring and that'll be the third edition of this of this series this invisible light series and i'm just gonna keep going with that. It may turn into five or seven records. I don't know how how much it's i don't know when it's going to stop but i do. I do feel the need to to summarize. I guess my my long experience handsome all of this we look forward to hearing all of it and we're going to go out on the comedians the song that you mentioned by elvis costello t-bone burnett it has been such a delight to talk to you. Thank he's so much so great to talk with you. Here we go so surf garbage cardiac come to answer and all these new fare founded winston says to spread screwed so elvis costello with the comedians. That song was chosen by our guest t-bone burnett. His latest album is called the invisible double light acoustic space. He is a brilliant musical mind. Jeez louise thank you so much t. bone for being here to talk on the show and thanks to our world cafe producer john meyers for all of his work on at this session. I'm talia slender and you're listening to the world cafe from n._p._r. Kylo listened upon inspection last spring yeah..

t-bone burnett elvis costello elvis castillo producer talia Kylo john meyers louise n._p._r winston twelve months eleven years
"t bone burnett" Discussed on World Cafe

World Cafe

05:13 min | 2 years ago

"t bone burnett" Discussed on World Cafe

"That's very beautiful thing that's right. Ah i did is that. Is that additional improvement that you've done based around that original recording recording no that's just the way it came to. I think we probably tried to tone down the the backbeat a little bit but you know that's early hip hop and i have to to say the the hip hop community embrace that record embraced the oh brother where art thou record in an important way and largely largely because they were invited in with that first song and <hes> and and you know so much of the job of the of the record producers serves over the last century has been <hes> as civil rights activists john hammond was an important civil rights activists who brought billie holiday and the all the great jazz musicians of that time into the into the mainstream so to speak and sam phillips was the same way blending the black culture and the white culture and and that's one of the things i think we were we were able to do to some extent with that record. T-bone burnett is here with me on world cafe. His new album is called the invisible light acoustic space. You've talked before about learning something from every different person that that that you work work within studio. Is there a lesson that comes to mind now if i asked you you know what what's something that you have learned from a friend or collaborator that that really stands out with you. I think the the most important lesson i learned in all of music was from roy orbison who sang so quietly quietly. If you stood two feet away from him you couldn't hear him but when you would put a microphone in front of him it would sound like poverty. Dan and i learned i learned that the reality that you've in recording is is to live performance as filmmaking is to theater and that you can bring a camera right in on somebody and he doesn't have to project to the back row and and through working with orbison when when orbison would sing he would wear headphones pretty wouldn't have his vocal in the headphones because he would know how the notes felt in his jaw so so he would just have the ban in his headphones and feel the notes and and sing very softly sleeping presently and i realized that <hes> intensity and resonance doesn't come from volume that residents in fact comes from intensity. Pick us a a roy orbison song which you know what's better than dreams. That's a rhetorical torok question nothing or running or or running scared. Let's listen to running scared sure here we go wrong on and who yeah and i love that you've given us the gift of life picturing him with the muscle memory of his his job and like where where sounds sit for him and you can hear how softly singing there too and one of the one of the other things than this is a story i'll regale with but he was teaching me how he wrote songs and he said i just start on my lowest note and then i step up all all the way through the songs till i get to my highest note which is exactly what he does an dreams it goes from his lowest no two his highest note and when we were doing mystery girl when we were recording mystery girl elvis costello out a song called <hes> called <hes> the comedians and i told elvis that story about the lowest and the highest note and and he rewrote the comedians and went and listen to all roy's records and found his lowest houghton and found his highest note and we wrote the comedians to go through that range and then i took it to roy any listened to it. He came back the next day and he said this cat so amazing he did. He did exactly what i do. You know so so put that royal was a it was a great teacher and a great cat. I loved. I loved her orbison..

roy orbison T-bone burnett sam phillips elvis costello john hammond billie Dan two feet
"t bone burnett" Discussed on World Cafe

World Cafe

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"t bone burnett" Discussed on World Cafe

"Producer t-bone burnett. He'll tell you insider stories about working with roy orbison elvis costello robert plant and alison krauss. He also captured one of my personal. Favourite vocal moments of all time on branded carlisle's the story brandy. She just went into some kind of other world. When she hit the moment. It was a moment of full release of absolute freedom. You know incredible right. T-bone says he never really had the need to be a public performer himself but at this point in his life he has some things he really wants to say. He's he's collected them on. An album called the invisible light acoustic space which came out in the spring and is his first new solo album in eleven years before our chat. Here's here's a little taste of one of the songs. It's t-bone burnett sr being there twitchy trigger finger itchy with the standoff figures. There's the excess three komo t-bone burnett welcome to our cafe. Thank you happy to be here yeah. I'm glad to have you so who i read the you wrote a lot of the words for this album at four in the morning and i don't feel that surprised listening to disarm it. Does it ninety nine o'clock in the afternoon on a sunny day kind of a you know or maybe it yeah no. It's not it's not i love. I love writing it riding in a in a half dream state when you're not quite awake and you're not quite asleep sleep and i feel i feel our defenses are down. My defenses were down and i just started saying the thing that i really was the most afraid of probably wow well when you're up at four in the morning and you're writing. Are you just waking up or you just going to sleep. No no. I'm just waking up. I started. I started actually it started because i was writing songs for musical and when i started writing those songs i started studying frank lesser who i think is the greatest songwriter in the history of the of the musicals goals and <hes> and and every line of his was a fist and i realized i didn't have any room to coast that i had. I had to get down. Get down to it and so i would wake up at four in the morning in in abject fear of i'm never going to be able to do this rally as what happened and and and i just started writing out of <hes> uh that and i i guess out of just being anxiety. I suppose i hate to say that but but once i got into it and once i got into the habit of it <hes> it was no longer that it's that was just the impetus for for how i started that i'd i'd never done that before almost my whole life. When i was up at four in the morning it was a it was at the end of the day at the beginning of the day. You're there's something so amazing about your first moments of your day where you're <hes> the writer julia. Yeah cameron talks about this. Your your sensor hasn't woken up yet like the the sensor brain is still sorta dormant and you can be free with your be free with your thoughts..

t-bone burnett alison krauss roy orbison carlisle Producer julia robert plant cameron writer frank eleven years
"t bone burnett" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"t bone burnett" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"And at the moment. This current digital technology. His is certainly making us less human in just that way. You said that somebody who no one's ever heard of and has never done one could piece of works. Unle- becomes an expert on what everything that's wrong or just an asshole or jobs that? It's usually just sat because nine times out of ten when you respond in there. Like, I got you. Yeah. They just want to connect. So that is that's human. That's all that's all too. Yeah. That's right. Well, we'll say don't care how they can act for how long, but but what they're really doing is just connecting. And that's no for sure the problem. Have you used the the description of that dream in any of the spoken pieces and have it, you know, I just I did an interview and somebody asked me why did I? Why did I get into this? And I started thinking about it. And I realize oh, that's why I got into this. That's why that's why started went on this whole fear of the hand. Yeah. Yeah. Don't talk to the half too late. Good talking to you, man. That was T-Bone Burnett. The new album the invisible light acoustic space comes out next Friday April twelfth, you can get it wherever you get those records. I may have been hallucinating. I still hanging in. I may have been and I made me some sleep. And I have no idea what what the future holds for me. A lot of ways. I if everything works out, and you need media through sure, it'll be a show in Manchester. Tonight. Butter fucking butter. So good right butter. Boom. Our lives..

T-Bone Burnett Unle Manchester
"t bone burnett" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"t bone burnett" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"And maybe you know, I I'm projecting. But you know, if that's been the struggle. I could see your your appeal to to working with other artists. Yeah. I I don't know if this is real or not, can you just do your thing. You know, it helps I'm able to help them not make the same mistakes. I've made you know, that's been part of that the whole time. So that brings his way I've where does it bring us. Where are we exactly when did you come to Los Angeles? I came to Los Angeles in nineteen sixty five to sell record. I'd produced and then I went to New York and sixty five for the same reason. And then I moved out here probably about nine hundred sixty seven or sixty eight. So you were here through all the, you know, laurel canyon, and you watched it all, you know, turn to garbage. Well, yeah. In a word. Yeah. He saw something. Beautiful just turn into garbage Manson deal really hurt. Everybody. Locked the whole move. We really do gave everybody bad name gave everybody a bad feeling. Did you see him around? No never saw. And as soon as that thing happened. I I got in my car and left. I just thought this is bad. I drove back to Fort Worth and going back to Texas where things made sense go look at the flatness. Yeah. I I can't imagine. It just seemed like yeah. It was bending into some sort of, you know, drug driven chaos out here in the late sixties, wasn't it. Yeah. It was Joe Joni Mitchell was was the Queen of everything. Yeah. She was so beautiful. It's like Elke Sommer if Elke Sommer could've sung and written..

Elke Sommer Los Angeles Joe Joni Mitchell laurel canyon New York Manson Fort Worth Texas
"t bone burnett" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"t bone burnett" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"Yeah. That's right. I mean, yeah, you know. That's what really gets flattened out is like the decisions that our producer or an artist made in what should be up front, and what should be in the back. And you know, what you you know, because everything kinda gets smashed together. Everything's the same volume. Yes. Intially when you. Started. You grew up in Texas, the whole time, you're Texas guy, essentially. Yeah. And were you playing in high school? What was when did it? Start started playing my mom brought me back in a coup sit Qatar for gut string guitar from Mexico, which is the story of just about every us guitar player right now that the gut string classical guitar, right? Yeah. For Mexico, probably costs five dollars or something. But it made this crazy sound. And so I started playing with it. Yeah. And EV also the one interesting thing since we're back there the first song I learned to play was while would flour may Bill Carter while would flour. And that's that turns out it's just about every rock and roll guitar player learned to play guitar from may Bill mother may Bill. Really? Yeah. I don't I don't know that one because I'm a different generation, maybe, but I don't even know who she is. Well, she was the she was the. Daughter. She was one of the Carter. Okay. Got it. So yeah. The extended Carter family AP pop Carter. Yeah. His his wife was Sarah. And then I think may Bill was was she the mother she I think she was dog the mother now, she was called mother may Bill. So yeah throws a country folk what Appalachian trip. Yeah. That's right. And and that's what you earn. I. Yeah. Because that's just what everybody learned that was like the step one laid the original groove. That was the first track you recorded in your brain. She grooved like a mother essay. It is so okay. So you do in that with your gut guitar, and what year we talk and when did rock and roll ruin your brain. You know, I think the first rock and roll record. I bought was a Ricky Nelson song call waiting in school. And I think that's where I I connected with rock and roll was on the Ozzie and Harriet show really because at the end of every show Ricky Nelson would come on and size and he killed. He was James Burton was the Qatar player monster guitar, and so but before that what was being played in the house. What was what in chanted you well downstairs by parents had a seventy eight collection that had been retired. Oh, two. And there was a seventy eight player and shelves of seventy eight sauce listening to to kellington Greis strong and Cole porter and Ella..

Bill Carter Ricky Nelson Qatar Sarah Texas Mexico producer kellington Greis Cole porter Ozzie Harriet Ella five dollars
"t bone burnett" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"t bone burnett" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"But you know, but I never associate them as being, you know, singularly ugly part of the the great mix that that volved modern music, but they're kind of they're well, there are crucial important part of this of the music of the United States, right? Sure. Sure. You know, here's one other interesting thing just off on the side for yet. A guy named Mack McCormick. Who's probably the greatest blues archivist of all time died recently. And I was down. I was down in Houston a couple of weeks ago looking at his archives, and one of the things I learned while I was they just call you guys. It's like you might want to go through this. They did they they called his family called and said come look at this stuff because they they were wondering where to put it in what to do with because he was he was bipolar. And he didn't want anybody to see stuff. But you know, Robert Johnson's name was dusty Spencer his real name. Robert Johnson was a stage name. Well, Jesse Spencer is even better name. Yeah. I thought so too. They they called him a little dusty because his dad was big dusty, you, no kidding. But one of the things I learned is. And he's got pictures of Robert Johnson. No one's ever seen. He's got pictures of blind. Lemon jefferson. No one's ever seen. Really? Yeah. It's an amazing archive. But one of the things he uncovered was that, you know, blind lemon. Jefferson had a song called the blues came from Texas loping like a mule. And it was his theory that the blues actually did come from Texas because the blues came from all the fife and drum players back in the south in in the very early days and the pipe the pipers when the Germans came into Texas, the pipers picked up the harmonica, which the Germans brought with them and MAG McCormick said that was the actual beginning of the blues through that harmonica. Yeah. No kidding. You buy it. Yeah. I do buy it actually shitty headphones. No, no, just I have one. Did that happen whenever you were other headphones? I never wear headphones doing it here today. Thank you. A big is a big step T-Bone Burnett. The prolific producer and musical artists has never worn headphones. I try not want keep it real. You know, wanna mediate anything? That's you're you're so right about that. I get it..

Robert Johnson Jesse Spencer Texas dusty Spencer Mack McCormick Jefferson T-Bone Burnett United States MAG McCormick Houston producer
"t bone burnett" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

03:46 min | 2 years ago

"t bone burnett" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"I guess a lot of the the the drunk outlaws are starting to get big hits. Yet will thank Williams. You mean? Yeah. Sure. Lefty frizzell. Yeah. They were you know, Hank Williams co-writer rose. What was his name? I forget the guy's first name not Wesley, but Wesley said. He was a ten pin alley songwriter. And they were trying to write broad hits to they. Right. They were trying to be country necessarily they were trying to be. They were all trying to be pop artist. Jimmy Rogers skull, the father of country music thing. Break man, yet he learned to play from an African American Hank Williams learned to play from an African americ- really didn't. Yeah. In fact, there's a there's a series. We did I did withdrew Christie called drawn and recorded in the great story ended about Jimmy Rogers about some missionaries going to central Africa in the twenties and taking her thirties. Maybe taking a Jimmy Rogers record. Yeah. And over time Jimmy Rogers, Scott mythologised in the kipps tribe as half man half antelope. And they have a song they called him chivvy Rocha in a house on about that. So I understand the beat started. We're talking about. But the poetry of the beat Knicks really started with. I don't know, which I I guess some people attributed to Furling Getty who Ginsberg Ginsburg. Yeah Furlan Getty. And then there was a Carro wax two hundred something choruses that that was something. But there's a rhythm to it. Lord. Buckley? Yeah. Yeah. Love buckling. Right. Yeah. But, but, but it's a familiar mode of talking, you know, when you want to convey, you know, poetic impact. That's right. And you do it throughout this record. And did is how you saw the background. Did you see because the music is not it's not obtrusive it's woven in. And it seems like this is really showcasing. What you're you're saying. Well, the music grew out of the work we were doing on tr- intruder -tective really which became very dark kind of like. And I don't mean to keep saying dark because I. I liked art. So when I say dark, I I'm not saying like, you know, I don't know if it's not danceable. I like it dark is the man's. Yeah. Exactly. The music floats. Yeah. Well, the music I think of it. It's you know, the drum was the first folk instrument. Yeah. The you know, if this was being played in this village the village over there new not to come around. I noticed that about a lot of your stuff is that, you know, you do us. We're not talking you use indigenous American drum beats that's right. A lot of times. They're they're not like the blues beats or not shuffles. They're they're they're American Indian. Yeah. That's right. That's right. But, you know, back in those days everybody listened to everybody back in the twenties Beck in the early times. There's a lot. If you listen to like, a from the Kiowa Indians were I'm from where are you from from Fort Worth Texas for worth? Yeah. So so those the Indian size would be like, hey, you know, it sound just like bluegrass. Know. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. So everybody was checking out everybody. Jimmy Rogers was listening to Louis Armstrong. You know? No, I get that. But I I it's hard for me sometimes to to find the integration of American Indian into certain things until I there's a movie on called rumble a documentary about link Wray and some of the pioneers of rock, and that's good. It is. It's trippy right, man. I mean, you know, who to known that that was usually carried down genetically through actual individuals where they picked up the groove..

Jimmy Rogers Hank Williams chivvy Rocha Lefty frizzell Wesley Furlan Getty Knicks Carro Louis Armstrong Ginsberg Ginsburg Fort Worth Texas Beck Buckley Christie Africa Wray Scott mythologised
"t bone burnett" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"t bone burnett" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"Yeah. So the musicians just sat down and said, okay. We're artists were not going to play for you to dance. We're going to play for you to listen. I don't need to be in that big band. Yes. Sit down. Listen. Yeah. And you know, they were playing in the cabarets which were in the basements of apartment houses, basically. So there were no drums, initially because the that would make too much noise and the people snapped because they couldn't clap because that would make too much. Yeah. And so it just got it got cool. But that also that was it really know Trump's to begin with you were a lot of them. Then by saying the dancing stops. That means that a lot of them were like we're out of work from their gig in the big band. Yeah. That's right. And and then they were all, you know, they were responding to the war, and to what have you know, the end of the war of the certainly Jackson Pollock's paintings are like right being in the middle of an atom bomb. Explosion is all the molecules fly apart. Right. They were they were coda firing these things and trying to find some order in all of this all of this lunacy. Yeah. And it was also sort of at that time where the the the blues really sort of move. Northward? That's right. And started to expand instrumentally. That's right. So then you, you know, you have that whole sort of the intensity and depth of the Chicago blue scene starting to happen. But alongside of this pre bebop, no drum jazz business and basements. Yeah. That's right. That's right. It was all happening, and where's country music at that time..

Jackson Pollock Trump Chicago
"t bone burnett" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"t bone burnett" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"And you, you know, you he says watch this, you know, feel the tone and apply your wizardry. Well, you know, we I I I'm not a film scorer by profession. You've done enough. I do it. I love what point do you? Call yourself that man. I don't think I'll ever called myself that put, but I, but I love to do I love to put image and music together. And and I just always stay inside the character. I come from completely in the characters. So in this case, the it was a character who is degenerate whose mental state was degenerating. So we started off we started off with the idea that this was a dangerous place. Right. His brain know, the place of the Arkansas Arkansas, Vietnam where all of that. Yeah. But the planet earth is dangerous place getting getting there. Yeah. But, but as as we go into it, we we started not quite as discordant a place as we get to as his mind ju- just to integrate, and so, you know, as we went along things got more distorted more discordant. Oh, okay. More fractured. Right. And that and you're matching sound to that. Yeah. I I don't I don't believe that the music is supposed to lead the viewer through. Right. The emotions right or I believe it's the the music is is supposed to stay with the character. Oh, interesting. And that's something that you conceived, or is that something that was passed down to you, buy some other some elder. No, you know, I I will say Danielle Fman taught me a tremendous amount about film scoring and he is a master. And he has he is a film scorer. Yeah. And other things so in if you don't consider yourself a film score necessarily, you are somebody that does sound tracks. Yeah. I do. I sort of just helped with the music. That's your job. T-bone Burnett helps with music. That's it that's on your business card, but I mean at talking about darkness and talking about I mean, I did I listened to the the new record a couple of times that the invisible light acoustic space, and it seems a little dark. Well, that's it is dark meditation on the culture we're living in. Yes. It is. That's, but I do feel there's a great deal of light in it. But it's invisible. I think that's the well. No, I kind of got what you were saying because I mean, it's it's it seems different in in musically than than a lot of your records. There is more space in there is a sort of more of a almost mystical continuity. That's there's not it's not about hooks. Most it seems like most of the songs are are spoken word poetry almost. And that beat poetry. Yeah. Yeah. You seem to like that. It comes comes and goes throughout all your stuff. That's right. It's usually a tune or two or you're just talking. I think of myself. Has a beat generation person. Do you? I mean, I think we're still a beat generation world. Oh, yeah. Everybody says cool. Now, will you know, cool was away. It was a term that came about that African Americans initiated or vacated in is the way of not to get shot in the street for doing nothing. Are we will be right? You know and junkies had to be cool. Yeah. Sure. Arrested. So it it came from that world. And you know, but at the time, it was it was only the initiates understood it sure everybody uses it. Yeah. Yeah. You know, the beach innovation. They've redefined the way we look at everything really sex politics. It started during the second World War. When all the men were away. The dancers the dance stopped happening..

Danielle Fman Arkansas T-bone Burnett Vietnam
"t bone burnett" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"t bone burnett" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"The smarter way to hire. Yeah. It was a little daunting folks little daunting to know that I was going to have T-Bone Burnett on the show. I've always been impressed with this work. I remember some the soa stuff from back in the day. I love that. But he was always that guy that you'd see that was producing a lot of traditional Americana music like the O Brother Where art thou soundtrack. And a lot of why events, but he's just one of these guys where you really you kind of pop into check out what he's done and what he's doing and it never stops. And it was great it, it kind of this was one of those conversations that really blew my mind about music in a way, it was engaging and exciting and. I'm glad I had him and his new albums very. It's very interesting. It's very good. It's the first time he's done in eleven years. The invisible. Light acoustic space comes out next Friday, April twelfth, you can get that whatever wherever you get your music. And this is me talking to T-Bone Burnett back in the garage, and I'm going to while US into this ongoing to go outside in the hall and see if I'm who's Nateing. So enjoy the talk. You don't do. These long-form situations much. I haven't been doing much of anything writing years now. Really you just hold up. And right. Yes. Sorta hold up and ride I quit producing records. I still did not. I did a worked with a couple of people. Yeah. And did a TV show did true detective in the last year. Yeah. I mean, I just watched you you did the latest one I did all of them. Yeah. The music's great. So wake you now. Is that like is that I'm trying to remember? So they're soundtrack. And then there's original songs. But it was there was there any kind of archival stuff that you did. Or was it all it was mostly mostly score this third season. Right. If the few one piece I did with Andrew bird, right? He's sort of genius, right? He's amazing. Yeah. He's what I hear. Yeah. He's good. He did my friend lens last movie Diddy. Yeah. Yeah. He's very good. Yeah. I mean, I I like this last season. So you got to see it before anyone else. So when you do something like true detective that you did all three seasons in your scoring. Do you sit down with someone like, Nick?.

T-Bone Burnett Andrew bird US Nick Nateing eleven years
"t bone burnett" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"t bone burnett" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"Garage. I'm in a very weird room in a. Different country. Okay. I'll tell you about that. In a second. Let's do the show. All right. Let's do this. How are you? What the fuckers what the fuck buddies? What the fuck stirs? What's happening? I am Marc Maron. This is my podcast as you can tell I am not in the garage. I think you can tell or maybe I'm getting more sensitive to sound as I get older, obviously, you can tell because it sounds different. I would think this is one of the weirdest hotel rooms I've ever been in. How's it going everything? All right with you. These mics or sensitive. I'm my body. Doesn't know what time it is. That's the that is the fucked up thing about traveling internationally is that I kind of want to go to bed. It's kinda late here. I've got a lot of press to do coming up. I don't know if I'll be able to sweep I don't know if I'll wake up at three in the morning with my body thinking, it's breakfast time or dinner time or idle fuck in no man dimension that T-Bone Burnett on the show today. He is T-Bone Burnett. This is one of those guys that you know, he just shows up everywhere. He's like this grand American music, archivist producer musician and he's his career hispan- decades. It just seemed like one of those another one of those sort of like, I wouldn't call them dark wizard, but he's certainly a wizard of something of American music and production history of music. I I was thrilled when I could talk to him. But like when I. I did some research about him. I thought man, how am I gonna cover this? But we had a really really good conversation. It was very exciting. And he's got a new album coming out. It's his first album in eleven years. It's called the invisible. Light acoustic space. It comes out next Friday April twelfth. But but yeah, he's here. And I mistakenly thought he was related to the rockabilly Burnett. S- the rocky burnette is that the guy's name from back in the day. They're not they're not related at all. So that was a that didn't go anywhere that trajectory of possible conversation ended with oh, you're not related to him. Yeah. Good times. Not thorough research thought, I'd I thought I'd go out of the box a little bit making assumptions, and they don't even spell their names the same. That's the kind of show. I do what kind of show are you doing? So look folks before I get too lost in myself loathing, and what I ate earlier on the plane and just downstairs in this. Weird hotel truly weird hotel. We're just a little more than a week away from record store day..

T-Bone Burnett Marc Maron producer eleven years
"t bone burnett" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"t bone burnett" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Out next I I've got this really nice employees. By t-bone Burnett the classic Carol Today's God Rest Easy Merry Gentlemen stitched into Siren Radio Sault Saint James To midnights in Ah Miss Mary Christ I see <music> Christmas Day from sanctions Eh sure <music> and dismay Christ US Christmas semester sand aw <music>. I mentioned earlier on the show about how other people pull of been a bit of a stressful run up to Christmas especially.

t-bone Burnett Carol Today
"t bone burnett" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"t bone burnett" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Out next. I I've got this really Nice June employees by t-bone Burnett the classic Carol Readies God Rest Easy Mary Gentlemen Stitch into Siren Radio Sue the chance to midnights in. You're gone this Christ. I see views on Christmas Day so from sex EH <music> dismay Christ US Christmas this stay Sanchez aw <music>..

t-bone Burnett Sanchez Carol
"t bone burnett" Discussed on All of the Above with Norman Lear

All of the Above with Norman Lear

01:38 min | 4 years ago

"t bone burnett" Discussed on All of the Above with Norman Lear

"And that that shot me into some other way of looking at show business altogether i've i realise the potential of of of of an an artist and all his history and what each the history draws from uttar under i saw a whole lot of things just in that moment because it just like it was like little walter walked in but are happy yesterday but you suddenly it was just like pandemonium so here at the audience the obviously not expected was it's the first time he picked up the honecker yeah i mean i think he had played a few songs songsan everybody was in ecstasy any rate at any rate but there were some that above that harmonisation get my oh yeah it's sorted stamped it like this really is you know his sound heard the sound of am playing very unique so when you hear it you instantly no it was just so in i think he had been gone for a long time at that point to earth right and also enough in a little 500seat place ninety 75 75 hearings in america i remember i read rats host book any debris democrats very sloman hair he was a character yeah he wrote a book about this tour about the rolling thunder rebuke to her it a crazy to one his one story is there was a people magazine writer there to a story on bob and bob would meet with him so bob i was in my hotel room one night about 8 or 9 o'clock after rehearsal and bob said he tbone ku'damm the bar there's the sky from uh.

walter america writer people magazine bob i
"t bone burnett" Discussed on All of the Above with Norman Lear

All of the Above with Norman Lear

01:47 min | 4 years ago

"t bone burnett" Discussed on All of the Above with Norman Lear

"Well he as his he was a deep historian sir so what are your laverick adb these days with all that syria fifth bone let's see what what did i laugh that i've had a wild day to day i have to say so backtracking from yes i just saw the offtherecord probably put alfonso who our own has an incredible new movies undone in mexico and he screened it for me today uh it's it's one of the most powerful movies ever seen it's called roma at the moment it's incredible movie but i walked out of this movie i was sobbing at places in the movie was so it was helpful simplistic and white he recreated 1970s mexico city dial by tiles and crawl an no actors involved in law that's all people he found in its on an epic scale on put up it's about essentially a a nanny housekeeper and family and the family any rate i walked out of that injured tom petty a total of eight yes so that sorta i'm sort of so in that place just right at this moment it's solve shocker xiaosha it's tough yeah are very close while i loved him we work close friends but i had i held him in highest regard and we were friends to be sure and i did the grammy tribute to him less you remember that dylann show we went to yes oh person of the year for serbia so this i'd music directed one for tom last year so.

mexico serbia syria alfonso tom petty
"t bone burnett" Discussed on All of the Above with Norman Lear

All of the Above with Norman Lear

02:16 min | 4 years ago

"t bone burnett" Discussed on All of the Above with Norman Lear

"I'm victorious she nowousted and these life we've pats where we celebrate parts and the people who love them each week on the show i'll explain a different facet of parenting from troubleshooting challenges like leader bots problems dealing with many pop prints on the couch to learning all about how you can help toxin cats by fostering you'll hear from amazing gas and announce the results you'll also hear from million my studio patten makes the snoring in the background we got new episodes launch an every monday so make sure to listen exclusively at cod cast onecom for new podcast went after poor it apple podcast and it would be great if you could rate and replenish also added pet gains can find it that's pattern these a life with pats learn laugh and become a better pat lever along the way now back to all of the above with norman lear to deepen comes in if he if therefore four people a nineteen people in in front of him you'll see app well i i think the man is nine and a half feet ferry for almost always seen that way to be open a dark come on nj guarantee bodies here after another good afternoon tbone burnett everybody how are you know where you robert plant and alison krauss robert clients at alison krauss were play that saw all sin city limits and that's when people acceptance what they come together did you put that together no yeah i would i wish that i i mean i don't wanna say on i'm glad i got a chance to work with them but uh i actually think my friend bill flanagan who is used to produce a show called roads mtv and dillah show called unplugged mtv of an interesting television producer and ride her brilliant music ride reach us he does things on cbs sunday morning he does music stores while i've seen him yeah yeah and i think that was his idea to put the two of them together for one of those cross roadshows were rock and roll person sing so the country personal they are whether they were big hit there they were they were they were terrific with it's that turned into a whole thing of all its own you know they were they were a powerful douro and you that record an idea are great.

norman lear alison krauss bill flanagan producer apple nj robert plant sin city