33 Burst results for "Systems Engineer"

"systems engineer" Discussed on Technically 200

Technically 200

03:54 min | Last month

"systems engineer" Discussed on Technically 200

"I'll send out my the source I saw from it. So, if we have to talk on her phone, we've all done our. There's so much stuff happening in the background when you open up the APP. So it's collecting a lot of data and it's not really regulated the same because it's Chinese developers created it. So it's just the regulations aren't the same. So okay. So if I deleted it and no longer open it than. Good going forward. Well. Based off of what they already did. Because I don't know if you know all the time that whenever you accept the terms of the agreements and then you accept it to get access to your camera to your microphone. So lots of stuff was going on in the background while you're just scrolling through watching videos. So that's great. Sad in. For me personally I did have it I deleted it, but I've noticed an increase in. Like the amount of text messages, I get from just random numbers, random links, they're all fishing links. In the same with phone calls that's why I've I've started to are you kidding me that is? A. Man. I was just trying to understand why the you know. I'm just trying to say relevant our students they like to talk. So I just I'm learning a lot. Okay. So first thing listeners delete tiktok would you we can go out and say that they'll look TIKTOK man that's. Ooh, we gotta make sure this episode gets out like quick fast and in a hurry. Okay. So that's the first thing we're learning a lot second thing well I before we get to the second thing. So living off the grid you said is no technology so we're talking about. You know like the Amish for example, they that is living off the grid. I read a really good book. One time Some people go as far as like not using anything electronically. So I know sometimes I read this book about this guy who ends go live in this amish community and they didn't have microwaves, stoves, ovens which. I. Don't know how I feel about that. Not having a refrigerator but living off the grid is definitely maybe not having Internet access and then the guy who tried it for six or eight months or so he then changed the way he approached technology and his relationship with technology. So he would still need to know use email and telephone. So he would have like a house phone or he would go down to the local library. To access email there and not have it like in his household so I mean you've now been in the cyber security or at least cybersystems space since college right? Yes. Was the first time that you wrote a line of code elaborate my first line of code in two thousand and sixteen when I was back at US FA and it was the basic hello world. Okay. So four years ago. For years ago. Okay. I was thinking that you've been coating for a long time and this was just natural to you. Probably using computers I would say I'm computer savvy but when it comes to computer programming that is something more recent. So tell me how did you get here today being a cyber systems engineer yet for years ago that's when you wrote your first line of code because I. Think most people would have assumed that being an engineer being in the cyber systems or cyber security space that this had been something maybe you've been doing since high school or even before. I'll start from college because that's when I really made the shift actually even well into college it was in two thousand seventeen. When I transferred to TSA TO START STUDYING CYBER..

systems engineer A. Man engineer
Getting A Robot To move

Innovation Now

01:19 min | 2 months ago

Getting A Robot To move

"It's just something about seeing your software do something in the physical world at the end of the day. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shape our future. Getting a robot to move is all about solving some problem you have. What decisions will the robot need to make to solve the problem? What data will be needed to make those decisions Jean Pierre de la. Is a robotics systems engineer at NASA jet propulsion. Laboratory his job is to create and test the complex algorithms and operations software that allow robots to do what they were designed to do. So being algorithms is sounds fairly dry, but you gotta think about it that once you're on the field, and you see a robot move. It's really moving because you've created that algorithm. You've implemented that software. You've tested and debugged at a new worked with other people. To make that happen, and it's almost like you're seeing an algorithm that you've developed or an idea that you've had come to live. These robots come in all sizes and shapes, and can be used in space, exploration or terrestrial applications. Maybe at first that will work, but you'll go back and you'll make changes to the rhythm or software. Test again eventually you'll have your robot moving through the world for innovation now I'm Jennifer hope

Jean Pierre Jennifer Hope Systems Engineer Nasa
The Ice Shelf Garden

National Trust Podcast

04:52 min | 4 months ago

The Ice Shelf Garden

"Job seats working in life support systems that may eventually support astronauts on missions to the Moon and Mars. These are places where poor is unlikely to see who were in action, but in Twenty Fifteen Paul was given the opportunity to join a crew on a mission where be in charge of testing a life support system that would help subsist. Subsist an isolated crew in one of the furthest flung frontiers, not humans pull was going to Antarctica the continent often tactic half is next best place you can garbage very similar to living and working on the mood to wasn't quite the Moon Amas. It wasn't even the job pool was expecting. The official title was systems engineer about the most commonly used as laws on Octagon A- die, I was doing gardening and growing vegetables and OCTA. Pool was going to be part of a team that would be tasked with building and Transport Espace. Greenhouse called even I s to Attica Bay on the eskimo Ice Shelf in eastern Antarctica. The I S S would be stationed at a research base where poor and the crew would spend twelve months, but for nine of these months that'd be is elated from the outside world and poor would be solely responsible for the cruise supply of fresh fruit. There's just one problem garden in wasn't pose particular forte. I've done some some gardening. A child in the garden I would say I had not much experience with that. So in just a few weeks had to master the scientific gardening art of Arrow, politics. So. Soil normally already has all the nutrients the plans need, and when you water, the soil, water dilutes the nutrients and make them available for the roots of the plants can use the nutrients to grow, but with their opponents things were differently. The roots are basically hanging free in the air and are sprayed with water and nutrients every two minutes, so it turns out Paul. Skills as an engineer were perfectly suited to the task of Space Garden. We have a very technical greenhouse, the control the climate, the temperature immediately you the CO two level all systems that keep the plants alive so that they can produce food for the crew. So after months of preparation, it was finally time for poor to make his way to Antarctica. Even the first leg of this adventure could be an epic seven day journey. Surfer cool. It was faster flight from his home town of Bremen to meeting. From unique to Cape Town. Then, a native of three days for his Antarctic bound flight. From south. Africa is still nieve about six hours flights. And Star this just felt like another routine flight. Bomblet flight number to go to a normal check in desk. Instead of auditing, the normal flights, your flight, one doctor. Then you sit in this APP plane of people from different to countries. They'll really excited. Enter the aircraft with some cloves. The crudes cooling down the path. That everybody is changing. All, clothing governor nerves. I'm boss for plunk him. I'm a professional social psychology to University of boss ambassadors, main area of research is into the psychology of habit or people don't realize how many have is we have? And that comes to the to the fore when you are the want to change behavior or have to change behavior I often have an overestimation of how easy or how good we are in changing. What's what we usually do, so we? We overestimate our willpower, says one of the most effective times to get the better of your habits is at a time of drastic change so when you're devoid of all the routine and triggers that allow your old habits to prevail. Happy sign not triggered by your patient or your willpower, your intentions, but trick triggered by cues in the environment. The Eight o'clock cure for instance is trigger to to go to work or certain moments in the day you to to take snack. They have not think that you decide. It's not willpower. It's it's environment. That's that's cues. The TRICO sits so pause lockdown Antarctica an hour lockdowns in our. Our homes would create these almost blank canvases for creating new

Antarctica Pool Paul Attica Bay Trico Systems Engineer Africa Engineer Space Garden Cape Town Transport Espace Official University Of Boss Bremen
Researchers aim to cut energy footprint of indoor farms

Climate Connections

01:11 min | 5 months ago

Researchers aim to cut energy footprint of indoor farms

"Indoor farms can grow vegetables close to cities where there are lots of people to feed. Farming indoors can also extend the growing season in cold climates and protect crops from damage during extreme weather but growing food indoors is energy intensive so it can produce a lot of carbon pollution. Lighting is a big factor. You have the heating and cooling systems of insulation system so have all these systems have control. So it's really important for us reduce this energy demand. Eric Amato's directs the greenhouse lighting and systems engineering consortium. The group is working to reduce the energy used in indoor farms and greenhouses the challenges. How can we still provide all inputs? The plants require the crops require grow. What using energy with the most efficient way possible researchers are tackling the problem from multiple angles for example they're designing high efficiency. Led Lights and they're experimenting with ways to optimize specific crops. Growth with customize lighting ventilation and humidity controls motto says. He's technologies and systems will help make greenhouses an indoor farms more cost effective and better for the climate

Eric Amato
How A.I. is Filling in Coronavirus Testing Gaps

WSJ Tech News Briefing

05:51 min | 5 months ago

How A.I. is Filling in Coronavirus Testing Gaps

"As we've been going through this pandemic there have been a bunch of things happening in parallel on the one hand. People are doing everything they can to figure out how the virus is spreading. They're trying to mitigate it from spreading telling people to stay indoors wearing masks all those sorts of things and health officials are also working to find a cure for it so that we can all go back to normal one of the ways that tech companies and health. Insurers have been trying to do this is by utilizing artificial intelligence a I R digital science editor Danielle Hernandez has been looking into this and she joins us now Danielle. Thanks so much for being here. Things were having all right. So one of the big questions is where testing stands at this point. How are they using? Ai Right now to try to fill in the gaps with testing right so since the pandemic started in came to the US Are TESTING CAPABILITIES. Have lagged and so. It's made it difficult for policymakers for researchers for clinicians for everybody essentially to track where exactly the corona viruses striking in the US and also to help us understand like where are the areas that are most at risk are and so because testing is still not reaching optimal levels. People are trying to assess risk. And where might be safe eventually to reopen economy safely in a data driven way? And so- policymakers researchers health systems are looking at alternative forms of data alternative being because it's not testing data and it's not necessarily tracing contact tracing data either Aso. They're looking at medical records from past conditions responses to respiratory illnesses like the flu complications demographics and other things that affect our health that we don't typically think of think of health related like what. Zip Code we live in. What socioeconomic background we have these things really do affect our health because they affect access to it and in our in our health throughout our lives and so they're mining that information to try to come up with insights about who at risk populations are and where they should deploy already scars resources to get ahead of the spray. Do we have a positive examples of that around the country like places where they were? They've used ai to try to figure this out well. So I spoke with one company that I mentioned in the story called Kinza. They make a smart thermometer that tracks. Thermometers our body temperature. So because the symptom of us in terms of nineteen and other respiratory illnesses is a spike in temperature. They think that they can use this information to basically alert Public health officials governments early earlier than you would actually like. Maybe have a positive test to to help them. Figure out like where these hotspots are. So they say that their data shows that like across the country like they were able to see in their data abnormal spikes in temperatures. That didn't Corley or were different than what they were. Seeing historically at other points and so one of the things that governments down in Florida are doing like deploying some of these thermometers to communities that are at risk so homes that have healthcare workers or people with preexisting conditions or that live in large households that might be more risk of complications but also being super spreaders and so the data are early. They haven't been validated Which is one of the criticisms that scientists have like they? They think that this information is useful but that we should keep in mind that the data aren't perfect and the previous attempts to use in medicine have met with problems because the data are incomplete and this virus is so new that we just know very little compared to other diseases about how it works. How it manifests complications etc. One of the other Examples that you had in your story that was really interesting as an speaking of like specifically targeting at risk communities. You had an example of in your story of a group. I think in Oklahoma that was reaching out to people they thought could be potentially a higher risk. Can you talk about that? A little bit. shores so this healthcare provider in that space in Oklahoma contracts with employers to provide their employees and their dependents with healthcare services. So think about like boutique clinics kind of settings right and so they use artificial intelligence system engineered by a different company to look through data that includes outcomes. Er visits socio economic data zip codes and so they use these data to train an algorithm to basically pick out who they thought would be at greatest risk if they were to contract Kobe. Nineteen so these are not patients with covert nineteen currently but patients. Who would maybe end up in the hospital in an ICU on a ventilator because other previous history as well as these other factors that I mentioned so nurses that were employed by this organization. They got on the phone and call these patients to tell them. Hey you may be at greater risk here. These are the things you should do. You know hygiene social distancing and then also inform them about what they should do if they were able to they were experiencing symptoms so the idea. There is prevention right. So I don't want these people to remain out of the hospital and healthy so that they don't overwhelm the healthcare system possibly infect other

Danielle Hernandez Oklahoma United States Kinza Editor Corley Florida
Go Networking with Sneha Inguva

Software Engineering Daily

09:41 min | 7 months ago

Go Networking with Sneha Inguva

"Guba. Welcome to software engineering daily. Thank you thank you for having me here have been a huge fan for a while so. I'm super excited and humbled to be on the show right. Well happy to have you on you work at Digital Ocean which is a cloud provider. Give me a few examples of engineering problems that you've worked on so digital ocean. We are cloud hosting provider. We have a variety of products in different areas for example with storage with networking as well as compute. Which is probably. I guess what most people are familiar with who used digital ocean we have droplets serve virtual machines that they can use but the interesting thing as cloud hosting providers that it's a little different from other companies in which in that we have both physical hardware issues we also have software issues and then we also have a web application so we've had interesting problems kind of all over the place when I joined the company. I wasn't actually network engineer. I was working on. One of the internal delivery. Teens is what we call the and on that team the biggest problem we were addressing was the difficulty in deploying and updating applications so namely working with Kubrick so that was definitely an interesting problem because I think we addressed. Both you know the challenge in building an abstraction layer on top of Kuban as that increased the just ease of deploying because before that people use chef chef was a little complicated in general and then on top of that also getting buy in from different teams to kind of use this new internal tool that we had so that would. That's kind of one of the problems we've had that we've addressed as you've mentioned digital ocean is built around these abstractions called droplets. Can you say much about what droplet is? Is it a VM? Is it a container? What am I actually interfacing with? When I spin up a digital ocean instance of course so it is a virtual machine. I think droplet just our marketing speak for everything oceanic themed in our company but it is essentially a virtual machine that is I guess. Technically Co located on servers with other virtual machines and you can spin up really in any location around the world. I think we have about thirteen data centers. So that super fine I I also heard you mentioned container so right now. We don't have containers as a service but we have coober. Netties is a service so technically speaking you could manage your containers as well although droplet itself is just a ritual machine. Got It now when you join a company. It's always tricky to find the bounds of what you should learn. And what you should know. R- it's hard to know just how deep to go and I know that when one of these virtual machines spun up. There's a ton of stuff that is going on under the hood. What was your process for figuring out what to learn the the life cycle of a user spinning up a VM. That's a really good point. In fact I think I think we still do this. When someone we have a for networking at least we have a really good on boarding process. Or when I joined the company not a networking we also had still had a pretty good on boarding process but it was more generic and there is in fact I guess. An on boarding session called how. The cloud works where an engineer who's been at the company for a while actually goes through the entire process and kind of goes through all the micro services that I guess receive a request and send a response. You know down to the schedulers that actually are scheduling the droplet placement on a particular hyper visor. Down to everything. So the thing is I think most people probably have a general idea of the different services that are being touched but then when it comes down to the nitty gritty of how exactly he's Networking Setup Hauser. Sdn configured all of that. I don't think unless you're on that specific team. You are aware so. It's it's kind of a t shaped process in a way so you have a general like breath of knowledge of how I guess the cloud works quote unquote but when it comes to the nitty gritty details. You probably have a very good idea of just your specific area. And I think it's impossible to have a very deep knowledge of absolutely every single service when you're at a company this large with this many micro services and with this many domains of expertise totally now. The reason I want to have you on the show is because I saw some talks. The you gave one specific talk about networking and the term networking can mean a lot of different things. But I know that now working at a cloud provider and you being a systems engineer working at a cloud provider. You probably have some insights on the engineering that goes into the actual nitty gritty of something spending up within digital ocean. What does networking mean at a cloud provider? What does that term networking so networking at a cloud provider? I think has two layers. There's of course the physical infrastructure that is set up so of course I think every cloud provider has physical switches physical address physical gateway so that is definitely one layer but then another thing that you have to consider especially at a cloud provider where you are dynamically. Creating and deleting virtual machines is that you are constantly adding different paths for networking packets traverse and removing them as well. So that's where software defined networking comes in and that's a completely different layer that you have to consider especially at a cloud provider and in fact at digital ocean. We actually have a team that deals with a lot of the physical details when it comes to physical switches in our data centers but we also have a SDN team which has a lot of sub teams that deal with a lot of the micro services that are interfacing and communicating with obvious open switch which is our virtual switch of choice that are actually making a lot of our networking products. Possible such as you know such as VP see or firewalls or even DHCP. A lot of these different things about some of the lower level networking concepts that you needed to know to build some of the projects that you've built within digital ocean. Of course so I'll just take you through. I guess when I first joined the networking team we were coming out with a product called. Bring Your own image so previously when people typically spin up a virtual machine or droplet they can select predefined image whether it's a boon to or I don't think we have Microsoft but a different version of a boon to or one of many different options however with Byu Hawaii we started giving them the option of bringing their own image. So the only issue with that is when we control the image ourselves. We can kind of control the cloud configuration meaning allocating IP addresses and setting up a lot of configuration. But when they're bringing their own image we need a way to dynamically allocate Ip addresses for those droplets using that image and that's where the DHCP protocol came in. And that was something that I had heard of. But I wasn't super familiar with but in general I guess whenever you're building a new networking product. That's using a new protocol my first step typically is to read the RMC so I pulled up the DHCP are of C and then the DHCP C. Which is a little different and started to learn about the protocol and I guess most people at home are probably familiar with it when they log into their computer and they fire up the Internet their ISP Rod are actually allocates Ip address for their home computer and so that's essentially using the DHCP protocol so we were implementing our own. I guess a hyper visor level demon to do that for different droplets in our data center and so that was something that I started to learn about. And then the other thing. When you're a cloud hosting provider is you start to learn about perhaps the ways in which you might have abusive actors and kind of look into security and so that was very interesting and then you you start to do a lot of load testing and try to figure out how to mitigate any possible issues so that was also something else. I started to look into when it came to the server that phrase you mentioned. Rfc reading the RFC. I've read some core answers and wikipedia recommendations about you WANNA learn networking concepts you should read the RFC which chance for the request for comments. Why is that the best path to learning about networking protocols? I mean that is fundamentally where the networking protocols were designed and some of these protocols redesigned like decades ago so I think that of course you could read wikipedia articles encyclopedia articles youtube videos. All of those are helpful. But I think that going to kind of the original source of where this communication protocol was defined. And of course to be honest the first time you read through any networking RFC. It won't one hundred percent make sense so obviously going through it marking up everything you don't understand which then and then of course every RC is somehow linked Tillich twenty other RC's so then go jumping to another RFC to kind of understand. Maybe another protocol that is used within a particular protocol kind of helps you build sorta like in a mental map or like a mental knowledge tree of what that protocol actually does what it

Digital Ocean Engineer Kuban CO Kubrick Netties Systems Engineer Tillich VP Microsoft
A Tiny Satellite Revolution Is Afoot In Space

Short Wave

08:38 min | 8 months ago

A Tiny Satellite Revolution Is Afoot In Space

"Okay Joe we're talking. cubesats where shall we start. Well let me start by introducing you to Hannah Goldberg. She's a systems engineer at a company that makes cube sets but in nineteen ninety nine. She was an undergraduate at the University of Michigan Majoring in engineering. And she. She saw this flyer on a bus stop. That said want to build a satellite and so I joined a group that ended up making small satellite as part of a larger NASA program. Capanna says that This class that she took was a way for students to build a simple kind of satellite. Now this was pre cube set but clearly it would be valuable. We'll have young. Aerospace engineers have a chance to build something that was really intended to go into space and that hunger lead to something called the Cube set which was an idea idea from two engineers one at cal poly San Luis Obispo and the other at Stanford University to build this standardized platform for building space hardware. Okay Joe so. Let's get into this a little more. We've got this standardized platform now for cubesats. What makes cubesats cubes that well there's a manual and it just spells out all the details? I mean how big it'll be ten centimeters or four inches on aside at has to have this kind of screws of this kind of Wade has to have all kinds of specific things and then there are different form factors so it turns out at the Basic Cube. Said is called a one you but there's also a to you and at three U and six U is the one. That's the cereal box size. And what can you put inside Well a ham sandwich or no. You could put anything you like. But that's the brilliant part you can put any kind of scientific Communications technology kind of hardware in them. And you know these exactly GonNa fit and it's going to go into space that way. Okay so when I think of cubesats. They're like the legos of Satellite Adelaide. They're modular there customizable. They're small on smallest really key here because one of the things that makes the queue set program work is the people who build cube sense. Don't actually worry about how they're going to get into space. They hitch a ride with somebody else. WHO's already going into space? That's the real money saver because it's getting into spaces expensive all right. So how did the aerospace field respond to all these low-cost cubesats hitching a ride into space and embarking on this research. I think at first. They were kind of dismissive in the beginning. In the early days of cubesats they kind of had a bad reputation and more of the the classical aerospace. So people didn't think you could do much science or much much engineering benefit with them. So how'd cubes. That technology evolved to the point where it earned respect among scientists. Well there's an example of the technology that made made it possible probably in your pocket right now gum wrappers yes no actually gum purchase a great idea but no. I was thinking more of cell cellphone mobile phone. This is the evolution of the ability to miniature is electronics down to very small footprints. Very little wait and suddenly when when you had an impossibly small space to squeeze all your stuff into well it was possible now. So that's why people started paying attention to what you could put into a cube set. Gotcha Yeah I've I've read. There are hundreds of cubesats that have been launched over the years and I wanNA know about a few missions. That have caught your attention. Well we're really got me started on this story. Was the two thousand. Eighteen Cube set known as Marco. Actually Asari gone okay. You'll be a lot of fun in space ace Actually the word two of them. So you remember insight that was the mission. That's currently sitting on the surface of Mars. Well somebody had this idea that maybe they could could build cubesats that would act as really stations that would send signals back as insight was landing on Mars. It didn't have a strong enough Radio Antenna to send the single all the way back to Earth. So it send it back to these Marco satellites which sent it back to Earth and so for the first time ever there was real time telemetry ask has inside came the ground. It was all possible because this little tiny satellite was sent into deep space. So suddenly you're not just thinking about cubesats in Earth orbit you're thinking about cubes cubes heads in deep space. And so I think that's really cool very me. And when you say relaying Telemetry Marco was playing a role in telling people down on earth. What was happening on Mars with the insight mission? Is that what it is right inside saying. Hey I've just deployed my parachute or I've just got my Rye Retro Rockets on or I'm this far above the ground and all that information was coming back to Earth through Marco through this cube set very neat so the world of space exploration is clearly seeing these. cubesats keeps US useful yes a cube set can be very handy. It's a miniature spacecraft. That's actually the way we think about it. That was Barbara Cohen. She's a planetary scientist at NASA has Goddard Space Flight Center. She's part of a team. That's using one of these six you cubesats about the size of a cereal box that is for emission called lunar flashlight. I'm assuming this mission has something to do with the Moon. No it has to do with Luna Moth. No you're right. Is the moon lunar one. Yup that's true. Lunar flashlight is designed to look for exposed. Water Frost in the permanently shadowed regions of the moon so once lunar flashlight is in orbit around on the moon the spacecraft will shine a laser into those regions which are the South Pole of deep craters. That never see the sun so those are the places that that never see the sun so those are very very cold regions. They are as low as thirty five. Kelvin that's colder than the surface of Pluto. They want to know what what kind of stuff is down there. Maybe there's water or methane or mercury and they wanna know how it got. There and lunar flashlight is going to help. Tell them but to do. Its work once. It's deployed deployed. It actually has to adjust its orbit. Yeah how does something the size of a cereal box change orbit in space. Well again. This is the problem you have to news. Almost a third of the mass of this cube set for fuel so changing direction is the really expensive part of flying around in space in terms of weight because the fuel is very heavy. But there's one more cubes at mission. I want to tell you about. That has a really cool. Lightweight propulsion system called a solar sail. Deal oh I already loved the sound of this mission. Tell me about it okay instead. It tiffany Russell Lockett explain. This is actually her first coop set mission. She's an engineer. as-as Marshall Space Flight Center. A solar sail is a large thin-film reflective surface. Think of Like a sailboat route or a large kite but instead of using wind to propel itself is uses sunlight of. That's pretty brilliant. And that's how they're able to get the cube sat to change directions. I mean but how to sunlight propel cubes at well the Sun is always pushing out photons and that causes solar radiation pressure and that pressure is constantly constantly pushing against anything that happens to get in its way in this case. The lightweight material the solar sail and it acts like a sale. And that's how you get thrust and the sale by the way his square in shape and about each side of this sale is about the length of a school bus. And if you want to see a really amazing video go watch as this thing. They've they've unfurled at a couple of times and oh my goodness it's huge because it packs into this tiny little space and unfurled to this huge thing about the size of a tennis court actually more properly half a tennis court. This whole solar sail is packed inside. This cube sat amazing. And what's the mission for this. Solar sailed cubes. Well this one. What is going to head to a near Earth asteroid and take pictures and they want to learn more about this asteroid shape it size it how it rotates? What colored is what it's made of and to do that? We're planning on getting to within a kilometer of the asteroid for our closest Fly By and then we'll just keep going after that so this cube sat will fly off into the sunset on the power of the Sun. Well metaphorically I don't think we have sunsets in space. There's nothing I think for the sun to set over but I take your point. Joe Win. Are these missions likely to happen. Well that's an interesting question because the two last last ones I mentioned this lunar flashlight and the asteroid one are supposed to go on this project called artists one which is a rocket that's going to carry area capsule that's going to go around the moon and come back and that's been delayed and delayed and delayed so the cool thing. Is You get a free ride into space. If you're a cube set the bad thing thing is you've got to wait till your driver's ready to go

Cubesats Marco Joe Win Nasa Basic Cube University Of Michigan San Luis Obispo Goddard Space Flight Center Hannah Goldberg Systems Engineer Marshall Space Flight Center Stanford University Capanna Tennis Scientific Communications Wade
A 'Mole' Isn't Digging Mars: NASA Engineers Are Trying To Find Out Why

All Things Considered

02:15 min | 10 months ago

A 'Mole' Isn't Digging Mars: NASA Engineers Are Trying To Find Out Why

"There is a mole on Mars that's making NASA engineers tear their hair out NPR's Joe Palca explains why no they haven't discovered a small insectivorous mammal on Mars the mall we're talking about is a scientific instrument carried on NASA's insight probe that landed on Mars a year ago the malls designed to measure heat flow coming out of the interior of Mars Troy Hudson is insights instrument system engineer the mall has a pointy tip and an internal hammer that works like a kind of pile driver to pound them all into the ground the frustrations began last February when the mall started downward it was supposed to go down sixteen feet instead it got stuck after fourteen inches Hudson says he and his team decided the problem was related to bouncing just like a gun recoils when you fire at the mall recoiled ever so slightly every time the hammer tried to drive it into the ground so instead of going down it bounced in place engineers thought they might be able to prevent the bouncing if they use the scoop on insights robotic arm to press against the mall as it hammered they tried that in October and it worked for the first time in eight months we have definite forward progress that was about six weeks ago but Hudson New a problem was coming eventually the top of the mall would be flush with the Martian surface and there would be nothing for this group to press against so they came up with a new plan we moved to this group over to a different position nearby and pushed hard on the soil hoping that that would transfer force to the mall through the soil rather than directly in late October they sent instructions for insights camera to record what happened Hudson says he was horrified when he saw the pictures I was very distraught the mall had backed almost half way out of the hole Hudson is pretty sure he knows what happened without the arm pressing the moles to artid bouncing again and when it does that loose soil in front of the mall can infiltrate in front of the tip filling up the space that occurs whenever it bounces and the just bounce bounce bounce bounce and more material fills in and it ends up backing out of the ground Hudson says they're confident they can use the scoop press technique to get them all back down to where

NPR Joe Palca Nasa Troy Hudson Engineer Fourteen Inches Eight Months Sixteen Feet Six Weeks
A 'Mole' Isn't Digging Mars: NASA Engineers Are Trying To Find Out Why

All Things Considered

02:20 min | 10 months ago

A 'Mole' Isn't Digging Mars: NASA Engineers Are Trying To Find Out Why

"There is a mole on Mars that's making NASA engineers tear their hair out and here is Joe Palca explains why no they haven't discovered a small insectivorous mammal on Mars the mall we're talking about is a scientific instrument carried on NASA's insight probe that landed on Mars a year ago the malls designed to measure heat flow coming out of the interior of Mars Troy Hudson is insights instrument system engineer the mall has a pointy tip and an internal hammer that works like a kind of pile driver to pound the ball into the ground the frustrations began last February when the mall started downward it was supposed to go down sixteen feet instead it got stuck after fourteen inches Hudson says he and his team decided the problem was related to bouncing just like a gun recoils when you fire it the mall recoiled ever so slightly every time the hammer tried to drive it into the ground so instead of going down it bounced in place engineers thought they might be able to prevent the bouncing if they use the scoop on insights robotic arm to press against the mall as it hammered they tried that in October and it worked for the first time in eight months we have definite forward progress that was about six weeks ago but Hudson New a problem was coming eventually the top of the mall would be flush with the Martian surface and there would be nothing for this group to press against so they came up with a new plan we moved to this group over to a different position nearby and push hard on the soil hoping that that would transfer force to the mall through the soil rather than directly in late October they sent instructions for insights camera to record what happened Hudson says he was horrified when he saw the pictures I was very distraught the mall had backed almost half way out of the hole Hudson is pretty sure he knows what happened without the arm pressing the mole started bouncing again and when it does that loose soil in front of the mall can infiltrate in front of the tip filling up the space that occurs whenever it bounces and they just bounce bounce bounce bounce and more material feels in and ends up backing out of the ground Hudson says they're confident they can use the scoop press technique to get them all back down to where it was and we haven't figured out exactly what we're gonna do that yet when they figure it out we'll let

Joe Palca Nasa Troy Hudson Engineer Fourteen Inches Eight Months Sixteen Feet Six Weeks
The PT Cruiser: A Custom-Built Downfall

Past Gas

08:46 min | 10 months ago

The PT Cruiser: A Custom-Built Downfall

"Into the new Millennium Chrysler had a lot of good energy surrounding them stirred the prowler. He didn't do amazing. But it gave Chrysler much-needed image rebranding and got people excited for what was to come. They had spent the better part of a decade designing and engineering a new car using the most sophisticated technology on the planet and they were confident it was going to be a hit. The PT Cruiser was Chrysler's flers savior. Chrysler chose a plant into Luca Mexico right outside of Mexico City to begin production on the new car. This Chrysler plant had a reputation for building. High Quality. Cars on a shoestring budget says workers were not paid very well. I don't know This plant also made dodge see brings and strategize strategists dodge stratos the Gulf of the year. Two thousand the first year of production for the PT Cruiser was to build one hundred eighty thousand thousand of them but Chrysler immediately ran into a problem. The car in the engine were assembled on separate production lines until the engine has to go into into the engine bay. Chrysler did this all the time but because everything on the PT cruiser was machine to fit perfectly. There is literally no room for error. The engine in Bay had only point six of an inch clearance experience. Workers struggled to fit the engine into the pizza. Cruiser and for the first couple of weeks of production. The only we finished one car a day for Reference Ferrari today builds about twenty cars a day. The only way that deluca plant could do it was by stopping both assembly assembly lines until the engine had been installed in one car something needed to be done quickly if they were ever going to meet the one hundred eighty thousand car quota can you imagine being on the production line and like you're in the middle somewhere like do I'm good at making doors putting doors on this thing right those baths at the time. Just do your job put the engine. I do WANNA be the guy gets to run up and like hit the red but the next stop C. I. A.. You got to put the engineering guys what you will need. You solve the problem. Exact Gary Henson told the plant manager Luiz Rivas to practice the process for two weeks. The workers set up a three section practice area in a corner of the factory. Each sector had five workers and if they could not complete their task before the car move to the next section the line would hold until the could seems pretty reasonable at the end of the two week practice session. The plant went from one car a day to one car. Every ten minutes conventionally as production got into a groove and Chrysler selling cars that deluca plant could build one. PT Cruiser every eighty seconds. Problem solve so act. That whole thing was because there is only point. Six of an inch I think combined or light so like when you're dropping the motor and before the hoods on. Yeah you have a little bit more than half an inch to squeeze in the voter to get it in in place because they used all these cats systems engineers designed it to be as practical and like utilitarian. Tehran is possible right so they used every square inch every square inch of space and then the workers figured it out engineers are Dick's the year two thousand was huge for the PT cruiser. The car officially went on sale in March and people went crazy for them for the first year the not only came in two trim levels base model. PT's had an MS RPM of fifteen thousand four hundred fifty dollars and the highest trim level the limited addition came in at eighteen thousand two hundred sixty which according to my inflation calculator. Fifteen thousand four fifty in today's money as twenty three thousand one hundred seventy one dollars. It's more expensive than I thought. And then the top of the line trim at eighteen thousand to sixty is the same as is twenty seven thousand three hundred eighty five dollars to twenty three thousand dollar car or twenty seven thousand dollar car. What what can you get for twenty three grand today civics Cross track severe across getting a Nice Kia. If you'd like but it was going up against Camrys and yes and probably record and there's probably a lot of people like people cross shop really weird stuff all the time I bet. There's people cross shopping against like GPS Sherry Raff four four. Yeah that kind of stuff pretty pretty small compared to this right so this had five more cubic feet of cargo space raffling around our. Okay Yeah Okay Anyway at that price point even the most expensive. PT was pretty affordable customers loved the PTA for its unique heritage inspired. Styling and utilitarian design nine. Don't you ever say retro. It was reliable cheap fund and had a cool factor. It didn't look anything else on the road which was again we have to remember. This car is a huge deal back then and that was a large reason why was the looks pretty groundbreaking dealers couldn't keep these things in stock and soon weightless filled up one in guy from Louisiana bought one of the first. PT's in his State and someone stopped him on the street and immediately bought it with cash for more than he paid even though it ahead of cracked windshield. That shows the demand for these cars. The hype for the Peachy cruiser created was on par with the new beetle. At the time. It was a hit right off the bat and the bigwigs at Chrysler eating it up especially Tom Gale Tom Gale and senior vice president of design. Trevor Creed these two guys were the official hype men for the cruiser. They always knew when to drop a cruiser mania or PT fever interviewed to blow the whole situation out out of proportion so most of the quotes in this book are from these two guys and to their own horn a little bit there to their own horn there too in the PT's horn fine. It's hilarious because Tom Gale was involved in a lot of other cars at Chrysler head of design like he was one of the reasons. The Viper forgot built he. was you know the NEON S Rt.. He was head of. Sat for Awhile. Yeah he's a hot rod enthusiasts. Yeah but like he's super jazzed about the P. T. he as well but also it makes sense 'cause like last week we learned they sold over a million of these right. Yeah so he's making money honey. You know you go sell a million of anything. You're doing pretty good. That's true. We were like different people last week. uh-huh whether it was a rear luggage rack front end bra or polished. Chrome Wheels Chrysler encourage drivers to customize their. PT's Tom Tom Gale said it fits any lifestyle. Some may seem as a tribute to the classic era a street rod others as multifaceted and functional light truck in a class last of its own or some is simply a cool senate wheel boy. Tom The speed equipment manufacturing association or SEMA show in late two thousand was packed. Full of custom PD cruisers. This is when it gets really good. There was a Louis Vitton. Cruiser Maytag hewer cruiser cruiser. Even a futuristic woody concept Tom Gale personally debuted gt cruiser concept with a turbocharged. Two point. Four liter inline nine four but the most exciting had to be the Brian. Setzer of Self Setzer cruiser Accidentally Typing Seltzer. I I thought his name was. Brian Seltzer L. Just so these are all just one off. Build that people brought to seem Became you have your laptop in front of you. I suggest you look up the volume peekers right now. I'll describe the picture that I see Yup Bright Candy Blue Chrome wheels. It has red flames going down the side with lock texts that says vote them in and the flames and a guy standing outside at Planer. Red Guitar Guy. That's fine Seltzer. Dude if you took the year two thousand and boiled down into a syrup the boom cruiser is just that like Jeremiah mentioned. It's painted in electric blue with yellow and orange flames. This was customized is by Chrysler. PACIFICA advanced product design center. It features a built in guitar rack. An amplifier inside the cab and the word vote on the fender which was actually a promotion for Seltzer. 's album of the same name. Oh my tail lights and bright orange. Leather

Chrysler Tom Tom Gale Deluca Plant Seltzer Jeremiah Pacifica Brian Seltzer L. Mexico City Plant Manager Tehran Luca Mexico Maytag Sherry Raff Senate Gary Henson Louisiana Camrys Luiz Rivas Trevor Creed
NASA’s InSight lander is drilling on Mars again, after being stuck for 6 months

All Things Considered

01:57 min | 1 year ago

NASA’s InSight lander is drilling on Mars again, after being stuck for 6 months

"NASA's probe called inside is supposed to study the interior of Mars one key instrument is called the mole it's a kind of thermometer that was supposed to pound itself into the ground sixteen feet deep enough to measure the heat flow coming from the interior of the planet in February though after digging just fourteen inches it stopped since then engineers on earth have been trying to come up with a strategy to get it moving again for the first time in eight months we have definitive forward progress try Hudson is the instrument system engineer for the insight mission the mall has moved forward about two centimeters which to me definitively says there was not a rock in front of the mall that has always been a possibility and now I think that possibility has been eliminated if it had been a rock that would have been bad bad news we could encounter another rock later on but what stopped us from digging eight months ago was not a rock so if it wasn't a rock what did stop the mall for moving well Hudson says it was the nature of the Martian soil to move forward there's a wait on a spring inside the mall that acts as a kind of pile driver thumping on the mall to drive it downward but the mole needs just a tiny bit of friction to allow it to move the Martian soil wasn't providing any and all that pounding was completely useless luckily the insight lander has a robotic arm so we brought the robotic arm in and use the scoop on the end of it to push sideways against the mole this drives it into the soil and increases the amount of friction resistance it experiences that apparently did the trick now the mall is moving again but more slowly than engineers had expected but they think they know why all that ineffectual pounding only serve to compact the soil beneath the mall Hudson says once they get through that compact patch things should pick up

Nasa Hudson Engineer Eight Months Fourteen Inches Two Centimeters Sixteen Feet
Swarm AI for Event Outcome Prediction with Gregg Willcox

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

12:47 min | 1 year ago

Swarm AI for Event Outcome Prediction with Gregg Willcox

"I'm on the line with Greg Wilcox Greg is director of RND unanimous. Ai Gregg welcome to this week in machine learning and I- thanks for having me absolutely absolutely so before we started this call I went over to your Lincoln and saw that you did your Undergrad and end at Wash U. and Saint Louis which I'm in Saint Louis Recording this as we speak and waste here in Saint Louis Yeah so maybe tell also a little bit about your your background and kind of how you got started in a church yeah absolutely so I got started. I was doing my bachelors and Systems Engineering and Physics at Wash U and it was really enjoying it and I had the opportunity to do my master's there as well and I wanted to get into robotics. Robotics robotics always interests me. I had done some electrical engineering. My Dad's electrical engineer and I Scott Thinking started like doing doing some research into artificial intelligence result a lot of robotics researchers focused around machine learning and obviously artificial intelligence so through that process says I took a couple of machine learning courses got more interested and obviously started hearing about things like like deep learning an Alpha go and stuff like that AH obviously just super motivating results that I think a lot of students these days are noticing and taking note of and really motivating them to get started. Hey I research so I that same puth and got my masters in robotics from Wash U. and then yeah and then joined Janus. Tell tell us a little bit about what unanimous is up to. I'm looking at this paper that you wrote with CEO and founder of the company Louis Rosenberg on artificial official swarm intelligence what is that and what are you trying to do at the company yeah absolutely so most. Ai Companies Take the approach that we can use artificial intelligence and machine learning to automate human processes right to do things that are the easy or hard to do but that are fairly automated such as making predictions or learning about the world in making decisions as a result of that unanimous we treat humans a little differently right rather than rather than his data labor leaders. We think that humans are really really fundamentally very smart and have knowledge and wisdom about the world that aren't machine learning algorithms just don't have access to you and so by by thinking about humans in this way by thinking about them as really really really smart we can actually use them as data processors rather than data points so when you're as one example when you're you're on surfing Google Google tracking your clicks they're treating your behaviors as just a data point and trying to learn like market using zing machine learning algorithms to market to you based on your data points that you leave behind we do things very differently we connect people using Algorithms uh-huh and allow them to think together as a group. So what we've we've devised this score. May I l them. That's based off of Algorithms in nature that allows human groups to make more optimal forecasts decisions or privatizations and it's all really based on this idea in nature that organisms are better her collectively thinking than thinking alone and some examples of that our bees fish schools of fish flex birds all of these natural organisms uh-huh have developed systems that allow themselves to think together more accurately then individuals so be when trying to be calling when I'm trying to think about where we position our hive next year a single just can't make that decision if like they're just not intelligent enough they have a brain the size of a grain of rice and so they can't think of oh there are seventeen different locations and let's weigh those different factors including the height from the ground the the size of the high itself Etcetera Etcetera so the individuals are not smart enough to make this decision accurately and so what they do who is they they form this real time system they actually an immersion intelligence four at forms because the the group thinks together as a whole and the way they do do that is by communicating they form a swarm intelligence by almost debating answers in real time. I don't know if you're familiar with a waggled ONS. presidentially they are dancing to express their their conviction in a certain site yep so please do this in one way fish to another other way way but really what we see is that these real time systems of independent thinkers and decision makers the real time systems as the whole former smarter super intelligent a hive mind that is smarter than the individuals in the group and so we based our technology of that phenomenon called Swarm Intelligence and all we do is because humans hasn't evolved that method themselves of forming storms. We've created an artificial intelligence which is really connecting humans with an AI algorithm so that the humans can become a hive mind they they can group together and die of mine that is more accurate as a whole than any individual as a group or that group is just as if they were taking a vote. I don't think anyone would argue oh you you're kind of base premises that humans are smart and that they communicate and when they communicate they can make each other smarter or make better decisions things like that beyond that though the notion of kind of discounts of swarm in a is still we'll abstract like how can we make that more concrete sure so you can think of language as one form of swarming so you can think that when we're communicating everyone is thinking together as a group. Let's say where a group of five people trying to make a decision we would start talking and coming up with the best answer that's a form of swarming the problem is the loudest like it's basically a focus group debate the loudest person in the room exerts the most influence the the our biases come into play so age of necessity the background of a human determines how you judge that human and so realistically realistically. That's not an effective form of decision making the group's insights are not an aggregated and of good way so what we've done is we've designed a graphical interface and online interface in which all participants are anonymous and this interface is contains a puck and everyone has a magnet they can pull on a puck on the puck and so in an anonymous way and in a very democratic way where everyone's exerting influence in real time synchronous Louis we can reach optimal decisions collectively together so it's it's an anonymous democratic form of communication so we've we've got a decision that needs to be made Where should we build our hive? We've all got say there are half a dozen options and we've all got access to some magnets where we can pull this puck. It sounds like you're is canvas sophisticated voting scheme in some way chirp yeah you can consider it it's real time voting where the consensus being represented presented on the screen and so yeah it's yeah it's similar to that and so where does come into play so what we're really doing with a I is moderating discussion. The puck is sort of a representation of the consensus of the storm and so as that approach is a target the the swarm is choosing that as the puck approaches in answered the swarm is choosing that answer so were there. I really comes into play is moderating rating the strength of each user so as we as we noticed one users more convicted than another or really really has a strong belief in one of the answers they'll get more strength and more weight into the decision or forecast and so we we've designed a number of Ai Algorithms that using the graphical graphical interface sort of measure users conviction for example. If they're switching between multiple answers they're probably less convicted of less mm strength of belief than someone who is pulling for the same answer in the whole swarm someone. That's really entrenched and really really wants. One answer is more convicted than someone who is wishy washy so we have some algorithms that measure conviction in that way another one is that you really have to be close to the puck with your magnet. The closer your magnet the more force you have the problem is the puck moving and so you have to be really thinking in really putting effort into controlling your location of your magnet really trying to pull his heart as you can at all times and that dynamic system really we've like we've shown that it is very useful. In finding the conviction of user views that are more convicted will put more more effort mentally into trying to exert their will on the PUCK and so we're talking about moving this puck. Are we talking about like with a video jio game controller like slamming down on the down Arrow keys or just using your mouse or using your mouse so you're you're physically doing some action so this is kind of a real time voting thing where you've got how I'm trying to remember the name of the video game that I'm thinking about where you you have like multiple players in in like it has one of these track balls and you just ended up slamming this trackball hard. You can try to move whatever it is in your direction action like that's the picture that's that's forming for me. Yes it's it's I think rather than slamming attract bullets pretty calm and it's pretty fun users really enjoy so using the system I think yeah but I think it is like a very engaging experience. Where people really are like our feel a sense of emotion motion when the swarm is not going their way and they're really forced to think about the options at play and how they can reach an answer? That's good for them. Even if it's not their best answer until it's about not at this game of compromise a game is a good word for it. We're we're thinking about compromise and entrenchment all these human factors so it really at the end. If the day comes back to humans and emotions so you you mentioned compromise and previously you mentioned that the part part of the dynamic of this game or system is that the more convicted user gets more strength than and has more greater ability to influence the the outcome if the political climate is the is any indication you know strength of conviction isn't necessarily tied to judge men or willingness to compromise. How does that play out in this environment yeah so well strength of conviction is always correlated to accuracy in general we find that it is specifically when there's a when we're forecasting so if we're like trying to forecast the outcome of a sports game generally we find that the strength of someone's conviction is correlated to their accuracy accuracy people who don't know what they're talking about are more likely to switch than people who do know what they're talking about? while that in certain cases is not true as a as a general rule we find it to be the case and you mentioned sports. Maybe that's a good segue to talking about some use cases that will help help make this even more concrete. It sounds like you're doing some work in the sports arena absolutely yeah so every week we predict a number of sports the five main sports in the NHL NBA MLB NFL and EPL English Premier League League We've done some really really interesting research that shows that swarms are very very accurate forecasting sports and were predicting March madness this year and actually last year. Maybe a good point of conversation is that we went up against.

Ai Algorithms Louis Rosenberg Saint Louis Greg Wilcox Greg Scott Thinking Gregg Director I Engineer NHL CEO Official Founder MLB NBA
"systems engineer" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"systems engineer" Discussed on KNSS

"Systems engineer page Thompson and she wasn't content till she bragged about the hack online hi unfortunately I don't think other financial institutions are gonna be doubling up and they know being a little bit more cautious but unfortunately what we've seen with some of the largest beaches happening on our history over the past twelve months you still see different organizations so are acting in a way that they shouldn't Daniel tell Bach runs the cyber security firms I Telligent and he says banks need to gather less data keep it for a shorter period of time and encrypt the data they have Jessica Rosenthal fox news I'm chat program with the speaker's lobby rather interesting exchange occurs in Lewis Carroll's through the Looking Glass which tells us a lot about whether or not Democrats want to impeach president trump here's the passage during a conversation between Humpty Dumpty that Alice when I use a word Humpty Dumpty said in a rather scornful tone it means just what I choose it to mean nothing more nor less the question is said Alice whether you can make words mean so many different things an impeachment inquiry is not an official things and wanted to share a committee council instead lawmakers on the committee say a recent court filing is just part of a democratic in quest to determine if they should recommend articles of impeachment too much of been made of the phrase impeachment inquiry protested house Judiciary Committee chairman Jerry Nadler we're doing what our court filing says we are doing what I said we are doing now they're added that the objective of the exercise was to determine quote whether to recommend articles of impeachment hall so are we in an impeachment inquiry or investigation let's go to Humpty Dumpty when it comes to impeachment it may just mean what Democrats choose it to me and how the public interpreted speakers lobby chat program fox.

Thompson Bach Lewis Carroll Humpty Dumpty Alice Jerry Nadler Systems engineer Daniel Jessica Rosenthal president official house Judiciary Committee chairman twelve months
Testing in the Tunnel

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 1 year ago

Testing in the Tunnel

"As planes began flying faster engineer's discovered that uneven airflow over these aircraft caused a shock wave tip or but how do you study a plane moving at trends sonic speed this innovation now bringing you stories of revolutionary ideas emerging technologies in the people behind the concepts that shape the future a complex system of win veins in a giant steel structure generates win speeds of up to nine nine hundred miles per hour an adjoining control room at nasa langley's trend sonic dynamics tunnel researchers analyze what's happening to the model inside in continuous operation for more than half a century be aerodynamics it's affecting hundreds of aircraft in space shuttle models have been tested here but this tunnel isn't just part of langley's past the td t hosted a ten foot model of the world's most powerful rocket the space launch system engineers are hoping to understand how the rockets shakes as it moves through earth's atmosphere ntt t will help them do just that launching nasa into its next century of exploration for innovation now

Engineer Langley Rockets Nasa Langley Ten Foot
Operational Status

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 1 year ago

Operational Status

"The Hubble's wide field camera. Three is back in business. This is innovation now in early January. The wide field camera three on the Hubble space telescope autonomously suspended operations due to a hardware problem the camera which had been installed during servicing mission. Four in two thousand nine has taken more than two hundred forty thousand ob- survey Sion's today, and is the most used instrument and Hubble's current compliment. So a team of instruments systems engineers and the camera developers. Immediately went to work collecting available telemetry and onboard memory information to determine the sequence of events that led to the interruption the team designed a recovery plan which included resetting telemetry circuits from the control center at NASA. Goddard Space Flight center one week later. The camera was brought back to full operational. Atis? Now, NASA is pleased to report that all instruments on the telescope are operating normally and Hubble's wide field camera. Three is once again able to peer deep into the universe providing images in three unique bands of light for innovation. Now. I'm Jennifer pulley ovation. Now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with NASA.

Nasa Goddard Space Flight Center Jennifer Pulley National Institute Of Aerospac Sion One Week
"systems engineer" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

The Dave Ramsey Show

04:39 min | 1 year ago

"systems engineer" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

"And zero debt except a house payment that would put you in the top five percent of Americans right there. Long before we start talking about building wealth. But now you're in a position, actually, build wealth. And that's what you wanna do. That's how we do. It Brendan is with us in Utah. Hi, brendan. How are you? Hey, doing his best as I can hear appreciate your time. I've had some health issues that make it pretty colts work outside the home White House them health issues as lonesome can't work at all. Despite my health issues, I've made just over a hundred thousand dollars a year for the past twelve years with the exception of year and a half where I couldn't work at all. Because of my, wow, what kind of begun. Well, my liver doesn't beat talks the way it should. So when I get around fumes paint fumes exhaust fumes you name that my body can't get rid of it. And so it's a pretty bad deal Wow. Knowing that my health issues weren't going to get better. I trying to find a way to replace income. I invested six years into learning how to patriot as I'd hustle and last November, I was I was making way more than I wasn't my day job. So I quit today. Trade fulltime like focus on mine and my wife's health, but unbeknownst to me the very. Same week that I quit my job. The government revoked my broker's license and all their client assets. So I'm actually started job this next Monday. But if I'm if my health allows me to make it past the first two two weeks, if the a'miracle, and so I'm trying to figure out you know, that I don't have any money to invest right now because it's all tied up with with the accounts being frozen. I'm trying to figure out how to replace my income, and maybe even more from home. So I can not have to worry about the toxic office environments that I have to go to and dealing with my health there. Okay. Well, you're obviously good with math. And you're good at studying trim lines. So I wonder how we can apply that to a business idea that hadn't got anything to do with the stock market. Minor right now with systems engineering down that doesn't shock me. Okay. And why can you not do systems engineering? Remotely as a contractor for five different companies from home. Well, the nature of my systems engineering is supporting software as a service type environment. It's it's which willing itself beautifully to remote. It should you really should. But I still find work doing that remote. There's a lot of development jobs that are remote but systems engineering, especially if they've got a data center that you need to be in and be there physically. It's it's a little bit more of a challenge would be it'd be more because it's more of a team thing that makes a lot to be Skyping, your brains out or Suman, your brains out probably. But yeah, I I think that's your answer. What in the world happened that they shut you down in froze your accounts? What are they usually? Well, no, it's not me teasing of the broker. This is out in Australia. I went to Australia's or combat some of the Frank stuff here in the US. And the the broker wasn't filing. Their all their reports to there too, which is like our SEC. And then they started not fulfilling people's withdrawal requests. And so they showed the whole brokerage down. And you were just one of them yet. I'm just one of many you got called the crossfire. Yep. And so they should go through the accounts though, and determine each account that doesn't have fraud and release it. What's the time line on that? They're not gonna confiscate the money. They well, it's relative to how much money that they broke. There's there's claims that perhaps the the executives of the brokerage firm was using money that they shouldn't that wasn't theirs. And so if there if there is money to get back, they they had a court date this month, and they said another your money in there. How much of your money three hundred thousand in Australia. Good gracious. Okay. Well, I yeah. That's the bad deal. Yeah. I think you take the same talent. And find a way to do it as a remote thing. Good as to push and. Give an amazing amount of energy in amazement of vision that I think you can apply turning some money.

Brendan Australia Suman White House Utah SEC fraud US Frank hundred thousand dollars two two weeks five percent twelve years six years
Back in Business

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 1 year ago

Back in Business

"The Hubble's wide field camera. Three is back in business. This is innovation now in early January. The wide field camera three on the Hubble space telescope autonomously suspended operations due to a hardware problem the camera which had been installed during servicing mission. Four in two thousand nine has taken more than two hundred forty thousand ob- survey Sion's today, and is the most used instrument and Hubble's current compliment. So a team of instruments systems engineers and the camera developers. Immediately went to work collecting available telemetry and onboard memory information to determine the sequence of events that led to the interruption the team designed a recovery plan which included resetting telemetry circuits from the control center at NASA. Goddard Space Flight center one week later. The camera was brought back to full operational. Atis? Now, NASA is pleased to report that all instruments on the telescope are operating normally and Hubble's wide field camera. Three is once again able to peer deep into the universe providing images in three unique bands of light for innovation. Now. I'm Jennifer pulley ovation. Now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with NASA.

Nasa Goddard Space Flight Center Jennifer Pulley National Institute Of Aerospac Sion One Week
"systems engineer" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"systems engineer" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"I am enough of those base keeping that I could excited when they see that someone from NASA as young Twitter and even more. So when I see her Twitter bio says she's baseball ADA nerd because that gives me an excuse to Heffer on baseball podcast talk. Bit about baseball also about space. So we're excited to join now by shit and tally. She is a mission planning and execution systems engineer at NASA jet ocean laboratory, she works on the Mars reconnaissance orbiter and the first twenty twenty mission, Shannon. I don't know what incredibly cool and complex work. You're currently not doing because you've decided to leave a little early to appear honestly sports podcast to talk about a sport. But thank you for being here. Glad to be here. Thanks renovating. Yeah. My first question is why are you working right now because I actually emailed a few people at NASA last week about a story that I'm working on forgetting that the government is horribly broken. And I got a couple auto responses that said messes currently closed due to elapse in government funding. I am in furlough status. Therefore, unable to respond to your message at this time and cheap. E L is federally funded, but you are still at your posts. So I can only assume that means that you are so essential that society would collapse without you are highly true. JPL is actually managed by Caltech Edward contacted by NASA. So during pedal, shutdowns, Caltech, usually steps into keep US Open. We're the only necessary currently working, but almost no one JPL has been led so far. So what are you working on currently? So as he said, I currently work on a two missions Moreau, which is the since orbiter that's a mission that's been going on for a while. It's currently an operations in orbit on Mars end. My other project is more sweaty twenty which is our next Rover mission that will be launched in twenty twenty. I'm working on some ground data tools for that. So I will ask you that in a minute. But before you joined JPL, you had another cool science job. You were a detector technologist at the large Hadron collider at certain in Switzerland, working on one of the experiments that previously played a part in discovering the Higgs both on so I guess at some point you face the decision like. Do I want to keep working on discovering subatomic particles and explaining how the universe works or do? I want to discover life on other planets just like one of those typical career choices that we all encounter. Yeah. I worked at certain. So I did a physics undergrad sets major is in but upon graduation. I wasn't quite sure if I wanted to going through like physics peach de track or do something else. And so I was lucky enough to get hired on for year certain Seiken China figure that out it was a total blast to work there. I learned a whole lot got to participate in a lot of very cool projects research that when that was sort of after a year, they're kind of right at come back and try to a pit into engineering. So that was what led me to GPL and migrant -sition, you just kinda took a gap year. Just worked at says. Got everyone does when they're just graduated from college trying to figure out what to do with their life. Go search for some time. It works out in fact as a Mets fan that year was when the Mets were in the World Series. So we were doing a n experiment at certain that was like twenty four hour experiment, and I was signing up for like the overnight shifts because I was winning the games are on time zone. So I'm going to be up at three forty AM to watch the World Series..

NASA JPL Heffer Mets Twitter Caltech Edward NASA jet ocean laboratory baseball US Shannon Caltech systems engineer ADA Switzerland Seiken China Moreau Higgs twenty four hour
"systems engineer" Discussed on Future Thinkers Podcast

Future Thinkers Podcast

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"systems engineer" Discussed on Future Thinkers Podcast

"You're not called to care for the world. You're looking out for numero Uno. I know you that's the story of human nature from which universal basic income seems ridiculous ridiculous. So it comes down to what are we inviting people into what story do we stand? Giving someone universal basic income actually telegraphs in invitation to them. It says I know you if I support you you'll do the right thing, you'll do beautiful things, and it is a gift in it really is a gift in the sense of. A release of control and trust. Because maybe what you do need to do for your healing is to do. Nothing. Maybe you need to rest, maybe you need to program from a life of being coerced into work that. You hate. Maybe that goes all the way back through your school feeling out those worksheets in third grade. One math problem after another after another, and I hate this. But if I don't do it. Teachers gonna yell at me moms can yell at me, I'm gonna get a bad grade that programming runs deep, and I think that. A lot of people might need to be supported for a few years to d program from that. Like if that's what you need to drink beer every day for three years. May probably you're gonna do it. Anyway, you know, so. Yeah. But but. So what I'm saying is that there that is deeply in the spirit of gift because it's unconditional. So those are like some philosophical levels of it, practically speaking. It would entail. Enormous changes in society, the people who say that society, as we know it would not function are right because you would not be able to compel people to do degrading dangerous tedious work just because they have to survive. So you would have to redesign economy if you were in dust, real engineer systems engineer, you would have to take into account. That you can't make people do these jobs. You have to make them somehow engaging. Dignified. So it'd be a design constraint. It's not that you would have nobody driving buses or cleaning toilets or something. Like that. I've done that before and at a certain phase of my life. It was a bomb to the spirit like I needed to wash dishes for a while. There is something very therapeutic about that. You know, I I used to love some of those jobs are just put in headphones, I washed dishes, and you know, a learned something only oppressive. It's your career. Yeah. But if it's like a summer job for while or like in a transition phase of life, you know, so we'd have comedy with no tedious labor, but it would be way less of it. Everything would have to change. So it is a huge huge shift and as for how funded. It gets down back to this pile of wealth that were sitting on. Which not just human wealth, but natural wealth to which human being is more entitled to the benefits of the Chola Tesla's inventions than another human being. This is part of our collective heritage. Our collective patrimony. No, one is more entitled with everyone gets dividend from this pile of wealth. That's the moral justification for everyone gets a dividend from the wealth of land, and and culture in technology, and that leads to have funded. It should be funded through. You could say taxes or rent payments for anyone who is inefficient or own through ownership of of this inheritance and natural wealth. So basically that comes down to tax on money attacks on land, and maybe some other things too. But, but basically, it's money land. The land parts is was developed by Henry, George. And the money part by Suva Gasol and not an income tax. It's a built in negative interest rate on on money at self specifically implemented through a liquid feeling Bank reserves. So basically a built in negative interest rate on money, and I won't go through the whole theory of it right now. But basically it recognizes that money is only valuable because of a web of social agreements and a history of creativity and productivity. So if you have a billion dollars is not actually your money. It's it's not only your might. It's value is created by society. Therefore, you should have to pay society royalty on that value of say five percent..

Chola Tesla Suva Gasol engineer systems engineer Henry George billion dollars five percent three years
"systems engineer" Discussed on Embedded

Embedded

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"systems engineer" Discussed on Embedded

"Hello. And welcome to imbedded. I mean, we see a white here with Christopher eight. Have you ever wished for book that could help you understand the path from a DEA to product? It turns out there is such a book, and it is a pretty good one. It's author is our guest Alan Cohen prototype. A product a practical guide for getting a market I own thanks for joining us. Thanks for having me. Could you tell us about your background? Sure. I am a systems engineer. My background prior to doing systems engineering is in electronics software. My career has been in practice element, primarily in the development of medical devices. So private eighty percent of what I've done is medical devices. But I've done a few of the things as well. And I'm also an author of the rally book prototype a product of practical guide to getting the market. Currently I'm at Massachusetts General Hospital and the department of radiation oncology, where I'm helping to do some renovations on a very very large medical device something called a proton therapy system, which is basically in ultra-precise death-ray. That's does thirty scan of tumor. Listeners are going to be really angry when I don't ask anything about the ultra precise death-ray. But maybe we'll get to that at the end or maybe not. Okay. So lightning round is on break due to recent extensive lightning related questions. So you even spurred you've been spared. Okay. That's okay. So let's get straight to your book. I have heard that if everyone in Silicon Valley and other tech centers read and followed the advice in your book products would be cheaper less engineering time would be wasted. And general happiness would descend over the world puppies happiness. An puppies. Is that all correct?.

Massachusetts General Hospital Alan Cohen DEA systems engineer Silicon Valley Christopher eighty percent
"systems engineer" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"systems engineer" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"A lot of us on the on the media side. We're we're wondering whether you're going to have to cancel this mission. I mean, they were they were going to miss the launch window, and they did yet in the interim. They were able to repair that that sites. We've got to a point that they could attempt to another launch this year in two thousand eighteen and you know, every twenty six months old marches in the right place to launch. And that's why they missed that first window, but they were able to get it done. So this mission kind of went from an innovative something never done before. To all my gosh, is are they going to be able to fly it now that we've built it to? Yes. Now, it's this huge success on the red planet and you use these stars to navigate. To get this thing to the right place as well as not incorrect. Yeah. So they have star finders on the cruise stage on the way out there to make sure the also launched on the proper directory at that time in that that window that I mentioned earlier where Mars was the closest that it would be in that that kind of part of its orbit to make this journey only a few months rather than years or so and then on the way in they did have some trajectory maneuvers to kind of fine. Tune that that approach during during the long cruise to the red planet may bring in now Elizabeth Barrett. She's a science system engineer for NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory on the insight mission. She joins me from JPL where mission control is in Pasadena, California. Elizabeth great to have you. Thanks for making the time. Hello. What was your emotion? What were your reactions? The moment that that Lander touched down on the surface of Mars overjoyed watching the descent come down was a little nerve racking in the final minute. They're just hoping we made it. That planet wanting to see all those years of hard work pay off. And I actually got to experience it with our science and instrument p members who've devoted years to this mission and her looking very much forward to the return. We can get from it. So seeing all jump up and celebrate that landing was a great moment. So there is tremendous innovation on this Lander..

Elizabeth Barrett Lander NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory Pasadena California twenty six months
Look Out Mars, Here Comes InSight

NPR's World Story of the Day

03:38 min | 1 year ago

Look Out Mars, Here Comes InSight

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from internet essentials from Comcast. Connecting more than six million low income people to low cost high speed internet at home. So students are ready for homework class graduation and more. Now, they're ready for anything Mars is about to get a new visitor from earth tomorrow. If all goes, well, a NASA probe called insight will land near the Martian equator its mission is to study the interior of the planet, but before it can carry out its mission. It has the land safely that means slowing down from twelve thousand three hundred miles per hour as it enters the Martian atmosphere to a complete stop on the ground six and a half minutes later NPR science correspondent, Joe palca explains. The steps involved in making that happen. The person responsible for getting insights safely to the Martian surface is rob Grover. He's in charge of the team that designed the landing scheme landing is all completely automatic. And Atanas we have no. Ability to actually kind of fly the Lander to the surface. That's because it's a six and a half minute ride to the surface. But it takes a radio signal longer than that to reach Mars. So real time control is out of the question. So here's what's supposed to happen. I the probe gets rid of what's called the cruise stage. That's a part of the spacecraft only needed while inside is traveling from earth. Tomorrow's we checked that from the ical seven minutes before we're gonna hit the top of the atmosphere next the spacecraft turns. So it's heat shield is pointing in the right direction as the probe drops towards the surface air molecules in the Martian atmosphere. Strike the heat shield causing it to heat up and the craft to slow down believe it or not ninety nine percent of the energy that we have coming in from space is actually bled off by the atmosphere. The heat shield does its thing for about three and a half minutes. The next week event is parachute. Deploying Grover says at this point the probe is still traveling faster than the speed of sound. So they have to use a special parachute. Designed for supersonic speeds. When the probe is about four miles above the surface. The radar comes on it will help inform. The onboard navigation how to steer the craft wants it cuts. Loose the parachute and lands using rockets the whole descent under rocket power takes about forty seconds. Or so we have twelve small descent engines grouped around the bottom of the Lander. They're providing the thrusts this lowest down the final kilometer, even though they can't do anything to help insight as it descends mission managers should be able to watch its progress. It'll be sending back data in real time. And the Marco space craft will be helping with that relaying the data Marco is a small spacecraft. That's flying to Mars within insight about the size of cereal box a family size cereal box. But still and Merriman is systems engineer on Marco. She says Marco is one of a new generation of really small satellites called cube sets keeps that's for originally developed as a way to easily give students essentially access to space. But Maryland says cube sets are now being used at. Nasa test new technologies in Marco's case. The new technology is communications equipment that will relay insight telemetry data back to earth. There are two nearly identical Marco spacecraft at launch with insight last may and have been trailing the probe on its flight. Tomorrow's to start out with we're behind. But by the time insight lens will be beyond Mars, and you're not stopping. Nope. Meriden says the two Marco spacecraft keep on going pass Mars and into space. Their communications relay mission is over with luck insights mission on the Martian surface. We'll just be beginning. Joe palca NPR news.

Marco Rob Grover Joe Palca Marco Space Nasa NPR Merriman Comcast Atanas Maryland Meriden Systems Engineer Ninety Nine Percent Forty Seconds Seven Minutes
A Tribute to Dawn

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 2 years ago

A Tribute to Dawn

"After eleven years of extraordinary, planetary science and unprecedented. Engineering. Feats Nasr's dawn mission is coming to an end. This is innovation now. Thanks to its officiant ion propulsion system engineers were able to maneuver dawn out of orbit after exploring Vesta steer it through the asteroid belt for more than two years and insert the spacecraft into orbit around the dwarf planet series making dawn the only spacecraft to orbit to extraterrestrial destinations dawn's mission was extended several times as it explored. These uncharted worlds. But now the spacecraft is about to run out of hydrazine. The key fuel that feeds the thrusters controlling spacecraft orientational when the fuel is gone, Don will also lose its ability to communicate with earth. No longer able to send home. Breathtaking images of worlds that were once no more than pinpoints of light. Amidst. The stars unlike other spacecraft designed to burn up in a planet atmosphere. Dawn will remain in orbit around series a silent monument to the humans who sent it there for innovation. Now, I'm Jennifer fluid. Now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with NASA.

Dawn Nasr Jennifer Fluid National Institute Of Aerospac DON Nasa Eleven Years Two Years
"systems engineer" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"systems engineer" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"I chose engineering because it is. It is attraction of being able to do whatever it is you wanna do bioengineering really takes biology and then aspects of any kind of engineering. So if you're really interested in computers, you could do data's datum for Matic's. You can weed out data and data informatics is actually huge field right now because there's a lot of data that people are collecting and we don't know how to weed it out in terms of genomics, proteomics transcript domains. And we have to have people who are smart enough till take these data set. Vets and weed out data that is important versus data that is noise and so on. So that's computer systems, engineering, if you want to do something like mechanical engineering, for example, let's take three d. printing. If you want to three d print a thumb or hand for someone that requires not just mechanical engineering, but ideas for that requires not just mechanical engineering, but a concept of bio mechanics as well. How do you fit this mechanical thing? You've created to the human that you're going to need to use it for? So that's mechanical engineering. Electrical engineering is also a huge, huge field with bioengineering. And these these memory chips, things he can implant in yourself or on yourself, right, to do telemetry to do telemetry diagnosis for yourself. For example, if I wanted to slap slap a sticker on my self to measure my blood, my sweat sailor. Concentrations or my sugar levels. They are developing. Thanks to do that as well. My engineering has this huge potential that you can. You can target it to whatever it is you want to do as long as you play it to the human condition, right? Yeah, it seems like how does tech is does exactly how does technology fit with biology? That's really that sounds like kind of what it is meshing. Those two fields? Yeah. And how can you use technology that's available and modify it to advance the human condition? So how how does this help with your understanding of radiation and how that affects human? I think it's just in the sense that I had perspective of the multidisciplinary nature of things that you can apply to the radiation problem, which does ban this huge gap, not just huge spectrum from physics to clinic. So then so your field in im- bioengineering really kind of helps you to understand the effects mainly it sounds like the the human body. That's really, that's really the focus here. Now. I'm sure radiation has impacts on on some engineering components to structure and whatever will focus mainly on the on the human body. Now we're going to destinations like them like Moore's, what is the radiation environment like, let's go, let's get the moon for now and go to Mars. What is the radiation environment like on Mars? So on the surface of Mars, actually the dose rates are going to be similar to what crew on ISS. We'll see. The composition will be a little bit different, but the dose rates are very similar. So I s you're getting a lot of shielding from the earth magnetosphere so you don't get the higher. You don't get the learner GTC are, but you do get a potential for solar flares and you get some. Higher energy, g CR, if you move outside of ISS orbit to the moon, your dose rates about one and a half times that of the s then you go to deep space. That's where you don't have any protection from the magnetosphere or planetary body. You have risk of solar flares, and you have g. c. which is always present, so your dose rates can raise can rain your.

ISS Matic Moore
"systems engineer" Discussed on Affording College with Aaron Greene

Affording College with Aaron Greene

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"systems engineer" Discussed on Affording College with Aaron Greene

"They really liked the widget winston salem but really it's maybe three hundred ten stores i really like it not the other seven so somebody's gotta make sure that that sore gets properly supplied with nudges sure widget put the thousands of other goods and the right measurable as well the other side of what industrial systems engineers do think of manufacturing a car actually this is when you're making a car you actually have to take it from the start of the manufacturing process to the point where drives off the assembly line what industrial systems do at their cores the actually create that entire process utilizing not just humans but robotics at how to mix them in in the best ratios in the best ways to get the most out of both so a lot of things i robots do a lot better than we do they're still a lot of things that we do a lot better than robots so when you're making a car you have to make sure that that processes smooth all the way through and there's no hiccups in lines but also more than anything you have to make sure that they're all done perfectly that being said they're still going to be some hiccups you're always gonna have a part here and there that's not right but the industrial engineers goal in utilizing people in robotics and creating an assembly line literally creating it how can i make sure that the processes smooth and the product is always right in the end that's their job plus they do have a little bit of touch and robotics as well they do know how to manual our work on the robotics at they're actually putting into into action or at least have some idea about what's going on with it if you ever want a good example of industrial since in engineering watch the show how it's made that's literally into industrial systems job is to make sure that the whole process of whatever it is they're making in that show happens from the start of it to the end of it so that's how those degree sets kind of work they converge in the fact that they're dealing with the supplying of goods and the operations of a company that actually make and produce and sell.

winston salem
"systems engineer" Discussed on The Schmidt List

The Schmidt List

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"systems engineer" Discussed on The Schmidt List

"To talk to salespeople in regards to channel channel programs or sales programs sales incentives because as a product manager you're going to be influencing those as well and again is going to come back to talked earlier is an exciting role because of all of those different divisions in different roles within the company that you get touch on so somebody coming out of i've seen product managers come out of support out of training cincinnati systems engineers that's you know the person's might be the sales engineer the system engineer the one that's giving the demo that's also a great area for product and her to come out because again they're getting the customer contact the sales knowledge that at the market knowledge and the product knowledge all wrapped up in one and so the way that i described it to other people is it's kind of what versus how in product management is really the what would you agree i would agree and what are some of the ways what some of the ways that you discover the what what have you found that's worked for good for you in your career to discovering what the what is yeah well it's and that's the fun of it is you get the discovery so you also have to be somebody who was and i think there's probably the most important character traits of product manager is curiosity if you're not a curious inquisitive person boys is gonna be tough rule for you because it's not there it's it's a lot of of picking up rocks and seeing underneath this what's underneath this one and what i found for myself is it's it's getting out and talking to customers discovering the what is really being involved with them talking with them and it it's a matter of it's a matter of your listening skills so there's the curiosity but having active listening skills another character trait in other skill that a strong product manager is going to have to have because you're asking questions so you're bility to ask good questions and to be able to pull data out of a customer's one thing and then listening to their response but also.

product manager sales engineer engineer
"systems engineer" Discussed on The CyberWire

The CyberWire

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"systems engineer" Discussed on The CyberWire

"On january 1st 2018 some new security requirements kicked in for government contractors who work for the department of defense or intelligence community they are now mandated to comply with a nist special publication eight hundred dash one seventy one thomas jones is a federal systems engineer with bae dynamics and he helps us make sense of the new mandate december 30th two thousand fifteen the dod actually amended to the nra requirements for actually yo compliance with contracts so if you're going to do business with the doj uh you had to actually fallen to areas no new areas within the d far contracts and ones around protection of controlled on classified information and they're the ones around reporting breaches within your organization so it reaches outside of what is normally considered federal purview and to the contractor community ernst the civilian community and actually tells them how to set and control new safety standards are now it systems are so this is one of the first times they've done that four nonclassified information there's always been something in place for classified information things that are sacred or topsecret or or what have you put this actually touches upon the non classified information the now social security numbers of individuals the contact information as as well as sensitive but maan classified information that you simply wouldn't want other people will have from an individual perspective and from a national perspective so what are the real world practical implications of this there will the it's actually been very interesting a lot of times you implement these with with contractors in it's a fairly straightforward process your tell him that to a it their contracts are dependent upon them and they rolled them out but this one it a little different and that it's not just the prime contractors that had to be in line with these requirements is also the subcontractors so each one of the primes out to go back to their subcontractors makes.

systems engineer bae dynamics dod doj prime contractors thomas jones nra social security maan eight hundred dash
"systems engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"systems engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Today's episode is sponsored by data to off a cloud scale monitoring in analytics platform data dog was built to bring clarity to complex dynamic applications in the cloud on premises in containers or wherever they run with beautiful dashboards seamless integrations with more than two hundred technologies and distributed request tracing data dog provides deep into in visibility into the health and performance of modern applications visualize key metrics set alerts to identify anomalies and collaborate with your team to troubleshoot and fix issues fast try it yourself by starting a free fourteen day trial today and listeners of this podcast will also receive a free data dog tshirt you can get all those things by going to software engineering daily dot com slash data dog that's suffering j daily dot com slash doubted get barreda is the former tech lead four protocol buffers the lead developer of captain proto and the founder and lead developer of sandstorm dot iaco he's also a systems engineer at cloud flare kenton welcome to software engineering daily harry i'm doing great and i'm looking forward to talking about data serialisation and some different strategies for doing that let's start off with a basic question what is data serialisation well see however this structure in memory in your programme unusually it's not that doesn't exist in contiguous memory because you might have lurk the tree of data or a map of data that you're modifying removing parts adding parts but when you want to send that over a network it needs to be contiguous bart's so you need some way to take that data and packet into boats descended and for the other side to unpack that to do the structures useful for.

lead developer founder systems engineer fourteen day
"systems engineer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"systems engineer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The to the injured me when i was hired what area where you i started out as a systems engineer so in asia junior and i worked in banking insurance and and i had many experiences through my years and i remember i'd gone into consulting settler and a lot of things and it was time to to do another job and the story i was tell us that i worked for a gentleman very good mentor and he said to me hey i'm going to get a new job and you're going to get my job the iebl fruit interview the lethal you're one of the candidates go to this interview so i thought said though the interview and a tells me about the job and i'm sitting there i think boy in my mind i'm not sure i'm ready for this ship is a big job right just a little more time i would be ready and i said to him i said well mad the home and i'm and i would like to talk it over give me overnight to think about it and i went home and take it home and my husband he sitting there and as usual i always say in our talking talking he's like and i i tell about the serve you and i said but uh i said i wanted to go home and sleep goes you think the man would be answered that question and that way and i mean i can remember like rozier a now and i went in the next day and of course i took the job immediately and in the man who did my mentor who suggested he said to me goes don't do that again i say i understand and it it it is what form this basis for me that i think is guided my whole career which is growth in comfort never coexist in you have got to get really comfortable with being uncomfortable it's when you learn the most when you started doing these things are did you've been a think that there was a chance that you could be the ceo do you think ibm like many companies were never going to make a woman she us now i o never entered my mind that ibm would make a choice based on gender and now i mean ibm has for all my time there has always been the most inclusive company i'd known so when you interview others do they feel like they they.

systems engineer asia ceo ibm
"systems engineer" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"systems engineer" Discussed on The Changelog

"Never really knew it themselves and saw they never taught me and so it the kind of just like this selftaught notion that like or something that i just thought was the case is because i observed it like when i visited some of these campuses for example in menu risk the engineering department part or the computer science department all ucs like really nerdy kids walking out with like miller big backpacks and i didn't feel like swimming yet and i felt like i didn't fit into that even those like a pretty nerdy person i'll i kind of was always had this conflicting personality were as a super super duper nerd and i was like merely into math in physics but he also had the social side to me where i wanted to interact with people and signing wanna be sucked into just like this nerd nation and that's what that's what computer science was to me for some reason in college and even engineering itself was like that boat when i didn't i shall systems engineering we were kinda they cool engineers in school before leaving learn nerds be some people even called it live like um it's the major was like an acronym for was like icy industrial and systems engineering and they even sometimes called it i am a sucky engineer or i am less than snobby engineer or something like that because they thought you know we weren't really engineers but like we took mis still took very very heavy math in physics and all of that and i loved it but basically i got um and he will get a holistic picture of software engineering when i was in college and when i was a junior in college i had met month goldman sachs and he really liked me he's a k you should recruit for us so long story short ended up getting an offer there i there their then they gave me a fulltime job so by the end of june a year i already know where i was going in terms of fulltime and so i didn't really have an opportunity to explore engineering opportunities after graduating college because that's where i was going and so that's her brought me up to assess and assent brand and and then i pretty quickly realize.

miller computer science engineer goldman sachs
"systems engineer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"systems engineer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To the sun the system engineer team kimsun said exhaustive tests being carried out we have taken a lot of care a lot of effort love testing time to make sure that the spacecraft is going to perform awaits postal and so yeah i wake up in the middle of i'd sometimes ago is this really going to do what i think it's going to go there we start thinking about another set of tests that we can do just to make sure so yeah we think about us serving thing all the time as the reason why were settles because winning try to think of everthing the sun is the only style we can study class up by learning more about it scientists had they can find out more about other stars throughout the universe it everything against the planned the spacecraft will be launched in july next year janette jalil you're listening to the bbc world serve his and international children's charity says it's believed that every thirty seconds a child flee war zones in attempting to reach europe is exploited by traffickers and criminal gangs it's calling on the british authorities to allow orphans to fly directly to the gay rather than being forced to enter europe via the land border this report from our british affair here's correspondent june kelly unisex uk once orphaned children and teenagers in conflict zones to be allowed to travel directly to britain said they can live with ons uncles grandparents and older siblings already here it says this would stop a vulnerable youngsters from falling into the hands of people smugglers and making perilous journeys to europe so they can then apply to be allowed into britain italy caproni is the deputy executive director of unicef uk they saying children making incredibly dangerous chinese hang fed wore things just to get to europe well to get to the aci and sadly along the way many of them are exploited apiece and traffic we will know assistant buffet said they don't have to maitland's chinese anymore the charity is also concerned that the european option cook close to young refugees once britain leaves the eu in response the home office which is responsible for immigration said it was too early to.

kimsun europe deputy executive director unicef uk buffet maitland britain eu engineer janette jalil bbc italy thirty seconds
"systems engineer" Discussed on Learn to Code with Me

Learn to Code with Me

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"systems engineer" Discussed on Learn to Code with Me

"Of course securities is always be mentioned in different kinds of hacker organizations in even just people may be not necessarily hacking government situtions both thinking of like the celebrities who have their iphones hacked so a really affects so many different facets of people's lives up but i want to backtrack if you don't mind how did you first get into the field of security yes so um i went to college and got a bachelor's degree in koop in computer and systems engineering so i got out of school and a became a programmer and um i i started to um uh this was around the time that the internet was was was first um you know becoming a public thing that you could connect to the internet and um i started researching like what is the internet and what are these you know what is a web browser and and how does that communicate and all that and as a software um developer i started to think well wait a minute this seems like um you know there's going to be security challenges here because you're letting people over the network over the internet that you don't know connect to your computer and that really fascinated me uh that that was going to be a new challenge um and i just started you know trying to learn learn um you know from from books freight because there wasn't a lot online and talking to people and i just i ran into some people that.

programmer developer
"systems engineer" Discussed on Go Time

Go Time

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"systems engineer" Discussed on Go Time

"Experts lennox experts systems engineers that's uh approach containers in one way and on the other end you we have a lot of people now who are fron devs that are just getting into back ends and dockers is really easy way for them to do back and things and now we have people actually getting into programming and are absolutely beginners and and docker is giving them a kind of a a safe exciting place to get started where they don't feel to judged under surrounded by people are just excited about a helping them so these are two pretty wide extremes but somehow the challenges how do we get everyone to participate in the same community and talk about containers together and it's not always easy it's actually a really interesting point i had never thought of some on i i wanted to ask you to take his back to the point where you were transitioning from your but foam is a service to open source project because what i'm thinking is and there's no doubt that you are assess the story now which may save more fascinating so what i'm thinking is you have these baid per use service and people are demanding of service for this they're saying oh we don't want to pay for it and i'm asking this question from a business perspective specially for people who think about into going into business or i in business i will have discussions myself and i think it will be curious to so let's get to it so you at this point that people are them in your service but they don't want to pay for it so how is the rationale.

dockers