35 Burst results for "Syria"

How the Ukraine Conflict Effects the Middle East

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:22 min | 3 weeks ago

How the Ukraine Conflict Effects the Middle East

"So I'm going to ask you a toughie. And that is the Ukraine situation. And Israel's Israel's reaction. So as an outsider, obviously, not Israeli. But great, obviously, very sympathetic to Israel's desire to survive. I mean, it comes down to that, basically. So they run into this problem. Their hearts are with, I assume the Ukrainians, most Israelis, but they fear alienating Putin means a lot of danger in the Middle East. Is that a fair summary of the Israeli dilemma? Yeah, and I'll put the finer point on it. What they fear specifically is that the Russian army in Syria will shoot at our planes and troops who are trying to prevent Iran from transforming Syria into a forward base against us. And the Russians have been there since 2015 and we haven't had a clash with them yet. We've been very effective in hitting those Iranian targets. And the military establishment in Israel was very concerned that the Russians would start shooting at us. If Israel supported Ukraine. And I rejected this position. I am a frequent commentator on Israeli news. And going back to February right after the invasion, I said, our position is wrong.

Israel Ukraine Syria Putin Russian Army Middle East Iran
Takeaways from investigation of Russian general in Ukraine

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | Last month

Takeaways from investigation of Russian general in Ukraine

"The AEP and the PBS network have run an investigation on an allegedly brutal Russian general Now in charge of the Ukraine campaign The probes found the carnage left by Russian soldiers on the road to keep wasn't random It was organized brutality perpetrated in areas that were under tight Russian control where military officers included colonel general Alexander checo the royal United services institute has received copies of Russia's operational battle plans compiled by Russian intelligence Soldiers were expected to conduct cleansing operations and to sweep neighborhoods to identify and neutralize anyone who might pose a threat Checo has earned a global reputation for brutality as leader of Russia's forces in Syria I'm Charles De Ledesma

Pbs Network AEP Colonel General Alexander Chec Royal United Services Institut Ukraine Russian Intelligence Soldiers Russia Checo Syria Charles De Ledesma
Joe Kent Calls in to Discuss His Congressional Race in Washington

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:58 min | Last month

Joe Kent Calls in to Discuss His Congressional Race in Washington

"Joining us now is one of the most exciting congressional candidates in the country, someone we have to make sure wins. Joe Kent from Washington, who defeated an impeachment voter and is now up against a very far left winger, Marie Perez. I don't even want to talk about her, but Joe Kent joins us now, Joe welcome to the Charlie Kirk show. Thanks so much for having me on. So Joe, take this opportunity to introduce yourself, talk about your race and talk about what your message is the next 18 days before the election. Yeah, absolutely. So I had the honor of serving this country for a little over 20 years. I was a green beret and did 11 combat deployments for this country. Greatest honor of my life. I thought I was going to continue serving in that capacity really for the rest of my adult life. I had started a career a second career in the CIA as a paramilitary operations officer. That was still about three years ago when my late wife was also in the military was killed fighting ISIS in Syria. She was killed one month after Trump tried to get our troops out of that conflict the first time. Secretary of Defense Mattis a bunch of other unelected bureaucrats betrayed president Trump, resulting in my wife and three of their American staff. So after that I stepped aside, but I had an opportunity to meet with president Trump and I told him he was getting everything right as far as foreign policy went, starting to finally put our country first. However, he was being thwarted at the mid to senior levels in ways I had never seen before in my 20 years of service. So I started working with the Trump administration as an informal adviser, worked heavily on the Trump 2020 campaign. And then we all know the rest. The election was stolen and then a bunch of folks decided they were going to vote for impeachment. And I was living in one of the districts of one of the impeachment voters. And so I looked around and nobody else was stepping forward and I said, I'm going to go for this, and we can't let this stand. We have to start taking our country back. And that was 19 months ago. So we've been at it for this long, hard fought primary. We're grateful that we got through with everyone's support here in the district. Right now we're consolidating the Republican base here and we are up against a very far left Democrat who's doing what Democrats throughout the entire country are doing. They're trying to say, hey, I'm a different kind of Democrat. I'm not the one who's responsible for inflation out of control crime. Our children being sexualized in the schools. However, she endorses all of those exact same policies. So

Joe Kent President Trump Marie Perez Charlie Kirk Secretary Of Defense Mattis JOE Trump Administration Washington CIA Donald Trump Syria
Will Russia’s Vladimir Putin go nuclear? | Russia-Ukraine war News - Al Jazeera English

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | Last month

Will Russia’s Vladimir Putin go nuclear? | Russia-Ukraine war News - Al Jazeera English

"For general carrying out president of Vladimir Putin's new military strategy in Ukraine has a reputation for brutality for bombing civilians in Russia's campaign in Syria Bold and fierce looking general Sergei surovikin was put in charge of Russian forces in Ukraine on October 8 after what has so far been a faltering invasion to see a number of chaotic retreats observers report in Syria he'd overseen the destruction of entire cities to flush out rebel resistance sura vikin had also played a role in the deaths of three protesters in Moscow during the failed coup against Mikhail Gorbachev in

Sergei Surovikin Ukraine Vladimir Putin Syria Russia Sura Vikin Moscow Mikhail Gorbachev
WHO Syria boss accused of corruption, fraud, abuse, AP finds

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | Last month

WHO Syria boss accused of corruption, fraud, abuse, AP finds

"Staffers at the World Health Organization's Syria office have alleged their boss mismanaged millions of dollars more than 100 confidential documents messages and other materials obtained by The Associated Press so WHO officials told investigators the agency's Syria representative doctor akim mova engaged in abusive behavior pressured staff to sign contracts with high ranking Syrian government politicians and consistently misspent WHO and donor funds In addition matti mova had plied government officials with gifts including computers dull coins and cars to complaints have triggered one of the biggest internal WHO probes in years I'm Charles De Ledesma

Syria Akim Mova World Health Organization Syrian Government The Associated Press Matti Mova Charles De Ledesma
French firm charged in US with Islamic State group payments

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | Last month

French firm charged in US with Islamic State group payments

"French cement company lafarge has pleaded guilty to paying millions of dollars to the Islamic State group so a plant in Syria could remain open U.S. attorney Brian peace calls it a first of its kind case Lafarge made a deal with the devil That was back in 2013 and 14 now they pay finds a 91 million plus four fitting 687 million according to the agreement Deputy U.S. attorney general Lisa Monaco says while many Western countries left Syria because of terrorists lethargy made a different decision To go into business with ISIS and Al Nusra two of the world's most notorious and brutal terrorist organizations Lefarge ended up merging with another company which fired those executives but emails and other evidence uncovered the payments I'm Julie Walker

Lafarge Islamic State Group Brian Peace Syria Lisa Monaco U.S. Al Nusra Lefarge Isis Julie Walker
Why Aren't We Brokering Peace?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:35 min | Last month

Why Aren't We Brokering Peace?

"Pathological obsession with trying to support the Ukrainian regime via zelensky is very similar to wear a mask. Get a vax, BLM, post your black square, and it seems to be reemerging recently. It went down. It was up and it went down. Now it's back up. I want to play some sound here. People are just so gullible, including Republicans. What a disappointment, some of these Republicans are. And it just saddens me. We're 35 days out from a midterm election. All Republicans had to do was take a moderate position, which is, I don't think it's a good idea for us to send money. No, no, no. How about this position? This is a great position. Why aren't we brokering peace? That could be a great talking point. In fact, I think that could turn into a political advantage for Republicans. All Republicans had to do on the campaign trails, why aren't we trying to broker peace? Why aren't we trying to use American strength to broker a ceasefire? Instead of let's go send more money to Ukraine. Where's that money going? Where are those arms going? Are we getting closer to the saccades? You can't tell me you can't define? How does that make America stronger? Does that is that going to make us into another foreign entangled conflict? Why is it that eastern Ukraine speaks Russian and wants to be part of Russia? Why are we trying to insert ourselves when they want to be part of Russia? Well, we know what's better for them, actually we don't. Every time we try to impose our values on these countries via Iraq, Afghanistan, Libya, or Syria, it doesn't end well. Do I think western values are the best? Of course I think western values are the best. All people are created equal, but not all cultures are created equal. That's not the point. The point is if they don't want them, don't force feed them.

Ukraine Russia America Libya Syria Afghanistan Iraq
Should We Lift Sanctions on Iran?

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:36 min | 2 months ago

Should We Lift Sanctions on Iran?

"Congressman waltz, let's turn to Iran yesterday the president of Iran was invited to the UN. I don't know why he got it. Visa, he came and he threatened Israel in America and held up a picture of the now dead Soleimani who was in Iran in Iraq trying to kill Americans. What did you think about that and what is the law that you propose law that you in the senator of introduced? Well, on top of the supreme leader having to be the sons of all of his inner circle, are going to school in America. They're enjoying student visas. They're hanging out at Harvard and for instance. So it's a broader issue of what we're allowing to come into this country and these thugs that we're allowing to come into the country and the rich elites in Iran. However, the bottom line of the legislation I'm really proud to work with senator Ernst on this is twofold. One, we don't lift sanctions on countries that are holding Americans hostage, trying to assassinate American officials of John Bolton Mike Pompeo, Robert O'Brien and others. And oh, by the way, wounding an attacking American soldiers as they just did in Syria through its proxies. And then two, we have to codify the sanctions on Iran on its financial industry as energy industry. It's inner circle because my fear, my biggest fear of these negotiations is that Biden somehow tries to tie the hand of a future administration, which is unconstitutional and wrong by giving Iran through Russia. Some type of deal that if a future administration said, this isn't in our best interest would tie their hands.

Iran Congressman Waltz Soleimani Senator Ernst America Mike Pompeo Robert O'brien UN Visa Iraq Israel Harvard John Bolton Syria Biden Russia
 UN votes to allow Ukraine's Zelenskyy to give virtual speech

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 2 months ago

UN votes to allow Ukraine's Zelenskyy to give virtual speech

"The United Nations has voted to allow Ukraine's president to give a virtual speech to the world body I Norman hall the UN General Assembly voted to allow Ukraine's president volodymyr zelensky to deliver a pre recorded address to next week's gathering of world leaders Zelensky is being given an exception to the role requiring leaders to speak in person because of his need to deal with the war following Russia's invasion The 193 member oral body approved zelensky's virtual address by vote of one O one to 7 with 19 abstentions including China the southern countries voting no or Belarus Cuba Eritrea Nicaragua North Korea Russia and Syria I Norman hall

Norman Hall Volodymyr Zelensky Ukraine Zelensky Un General Assembly United Nations Russia China Belarus Eritrea Cuba Nicaragua North Korea Syria
Declassified report shows US predictions of IS group threat

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 2 months ago

Declassified report shows US predictions of IS group threat

"And intelligence report validates U.S. predictions of the threat from the terror group Islamic State I Norman hall According to a newly declassified report U.S. intelligence officials predicted two years ago that the Islamic State group would likely regain much of its former strength particularly if western forces reduced their role in countering the extremist movement Analysts said many of the judgments in the 2020 report now appear prescient particularly as the group is resurgent in Afghanistan following last year's American withdrawal the group no longer controls huge swaths of territory or staging a tax against the U.S. but it is slowly rebuilding in Iraq and Syria and fighting local governments in places including Afghanistan Norman hall Washington

Norman Hall Islamic State Group U.S. Islamic State Afghanistan Syria Iraq Washington
Is the Trump Movement Like Syria's Kurds, an Ally for Christians?

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:21 min | 2 months ago

Is the Trump Movement Like Syria's Kurds, an Ally for Christians?

"Have the joy of speaking with our friend John mirac John. You have an article at stream dot org. People need to know to go to stream dot org and find your article. The title is, is the Trump movement like Syria's Kurds and indispensable ally for Christians. Right. So I was telling the story of the devastation of the Christians of Iraq after the American invasion in 2003. In Syria, something similar seemed likely to happen. The Arab Spring was going to bring democracy to Syria was going to overthrow its evil dictator and the American liberals and American neoconservatives were all gung Ho excited that it was going to overthrow this Arab dictator. Only problem was, the people were going to overthrow it, were radical Islamists linked to Al-Qaeda, John McCain lied to us about that. He flew over there and said, I vetted them. They're moderate rebels. They're moderate, moderate. During the 2016 presidential campaign in the foreign policy debate among Republicans out of all those like 12 or 13 Republican candidates. All of them but three wanted to shoot down Russian planes to help these Al-Qaeda linked Islamist jihadis take over a country with a million Christians. And of course, ethnically cleansed them like they had in Iraq.

John Mirac John Syria Iraq Qaeda John Mccain AL
If You Don't Get Angry, Something's Wrong With You

The Eric Metaxas Show

07:19 min | 2 months ago

If You Don't Get Angry, Something's Wrong With You

"But the reason I'm telling people this and I'm taking your time, John, is because Mario morelo spoke. A lot of people don't know who he is. Ladies and gentlemen, there are just a tiny handful of people like Mario Morello. I've never seen anyone bolder more in tune with what God is saying. I don't say that lightly. And what he talked about, you just got me thinking, John. The level of evil that is manifesting itself in the United States of America right now. When you hear about the government going after an organization like Christians engage dot org and saying, well, we're going to take away your tax exempt status. This is evil. And if you don't get angry at this, something's wrong with you. You're trying to pretend it's not happening. And by the way, that is about the most anodyne little thing you could possibly mention, but I just thought when Mario marlos spoke, he spoke about some of the genuinely wicked things done and there are people in the church convinced that somehow the Christian thing to do is to be quiet or to be nice. I mean, if somebody mutilates your children, are you not going to fight? Are you not going to stand? Are you not going to do? There are things happening that, you know, apart from the literal mutilation of children because of the transgender madness, if you don't speak up, if you don't get angry and say, I have an obligation to fight for what is right and true, the idea that I can't be political. You are absolutely hiding from reality. And I just want to be really blunt folks. God's going to judge us when we are silent in the face of evil. God calls us to speak. And not only will God judge you, I will judge you. I will be in the gulag for a couple of years before they finally come and get you. And when you show up, I will laugh at you. I will judge you. That's the most important thing. I mean, I tell you, forgive me, John, but you know, when you tell me that, that the IRS or whoever is trying to bother Christians engaged. It's another good reason to go to Christians engaged dot org, folks. Because we have to stand with those who are being persecuted and vilified, attacked in any event. Well, John. Well, I've got a piece at the stream that relates to this. And it's an unusual title. Is the Trump movement like Syria's Kurds and indispensable ally for Christians? Is the Trump movement like Syria's Kurds and indispensable ally for Christians? Like Syria's Kurds and indispensable ally for Christians. For Christians. Okay, let me guess. Yes. Yes. So I tell the story of two very similar Christian communities in very similar circumstances with tragically different outcomes. The Christians of Iraq had and the Christians of Syria as circa 2001 on September 11th, 2001. They were in very similar situations. They were dependent on the goodwill of secular Arab dictators. Saddam Hussein Bashir. The U.S. fights this pointless war in Iraq based on weapons of mass destruction that never existed. Our regime our occupation does not protect the Christians. The Muslims are infuriated that the American crusaders are in their countries. So they started attacking the local Christians who are hapless helpless scapegoats. They had all been disarmed by the government. Saddam Hussein, like a good tyrant, had gun control. America being good liberals, we kept gun control laws in Iraq. The Islamists like other criminals don't obey gun control laws. So they got lots of guns. The Christians of Iraq, obeyed the law, counted on the government to protect them, were slaughtered. Three fourths of the Christians in Iraq who had been there since the apostles, the churches have been there since the second century. Three fourths of Iraq's Christians were killed or driven into exile. And if you want to help them go to Iraqi Christian relief organization, they really do need your help. It's tragic because they were disarmed. They were helpless in the face of ISIS. When ISIS marched in the city of Mosul, which had 1.6 million people and tens of thousands of Christians. Like a hundred guys from ISIS took over a city of more than a million people because they'd all been disarmed by the government. Hundred guys took over a terrorized the city of 1.6 million people burned all the churches, drove all the Christians out, raped the women set up rape camps where they traded them. Horrendous tragic outcome. That is what happens when Christians trust a secular government that doesn't like them to protect them. And the secular government here in America clearly likes us less and less with each passing week. So as I've written and I've got a book on this coming out on this called God and guns versus the government, the more hostile the government becomes, the more important our gun rights become. Now let me tell the story of Syria. In Syria, do you remember the Arab Spring went to democracy was going to come to the Arab world? Well, how did that work out? Joey walked out. We have to go to a break here, but I just have to remind my audience just so that they're tracking with the conversation. The lunacy of the Arab Spring, the lunacy that the idea that democracy could break out in a place like that. The naivete of the people who put forward that narrative. And then we saw it collapse and they never bothered to say, oh, oh yeah, we were wrong about that. When we come back talking to John for the rest of the hour and more, don't go away. Well, I for one second, I've got an alarm going off. I got to turn it off. Is the government the best mechanism for fighting poverty? Are there any real life examples of communities successfully combating addiction and homelessness today? How can we best deliver hope to our nation, those questions get answered September 23rd on Salem now dot com in an inspiring new motion picture from kingstone studios based on a true story in no vacancy a demoted journalist finds her cynicism slowly transformed as she befriends a recovering addict while working a story about a church struggling to purchase a motel for homeless families, no vacancy, starring dean Cain, TC stallings and Sean young is based on the true story of first baptist Leesburg, Florida, and a real location the Samaritan inn. Move your viewers are saying movies like this bring purpose to the big screen, well produced and the acting is tops, enough can not be said about how incredible this true story is.

Syria Iraq Mario Morelo Mario Morello John Mario Marlos U.S. Saddam Hussein Bashir Iraqi Christian Relief Organiz IRS Saddam Hussein Mosul Joey Kingstone Studios Tc Stallings Salem Dean Cain Sean Young Samaritan Inn Leesburg
Jared Kushner: We Were in the Middle East to Listen

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:24 min | 3 months ago

Jared Kushner: We Were in the Middle East to Listen

"Were a point person along with Jason greenblatt for the Abrahamic chords for trying to bring peace and stability to the region. And as somebody who's been working in national security for what 25, 30 years by then, I came to you and I said, hey, if you need, I know I've got a different portfolio, but I'm happy to try and help you and give you a couple of pointers. And you said, sure, okay, go and talk to Jason. And I went and spoke to Jason. And Jason said the following. I think was he a lawyer by training what Jason's back? Yeah. He's a lawyer. And I sat down with him, and I said, hey, look, I'm here if you need me. And he said the following said, thanks, Seb. But we are newbies, we need to go there and see for ourselves the ground truth and make our own judgment. And I thought, um, pretty impressive. I didn't want to say you will find out very rapidly. There's one party in these negotiations that isn't acting in good faith and it's not the Israelis. But you did the due diligence. You brought it to a fruition that is stunning because 23 years of Republican and Democrat presidents breaking that promise to Israel. I want people to get the book. You got to get the book breaking history. But talk to us about your experience in bringing those incredible deals to the table Jared. Thank you. And again, we appreciated the help at the time, but we were at a place at that point where we were doing a lot more listening than implementing our first year and again, I write about this a lot in the book was president Trump asked me to work on this file and I didn't know if he was hazing me at the time. Maybe he just felt like it couldn't get any worse, right? If you remember in 2016, ISIS had a caliphate the size of Ohio. They were the heading journalists. They were murdering Christians. You had Islamic extremism, rampant on the Internet. You had the pulse nightclub shooting, the San Bernardino shooting from people who were radicalized on the Internet, Syria, had a Civil War. Where there was 500,000 people dead. It was a nightmare, ran was flushed with cash on a glide path to a nuclear weapon. And all of our allies felt very betrayed. So president Trump really sent me in Jason out there and Avi to really just start listening and to try to understand and actually I write about a lot of my early interactions with the leaders in these countries where my number one question for them was America has a lot of power. If you were us, what would you do?

Jason Jason Greenblatt SEB Donald Trump Jared Israel San Bernardino Ohio Syria America
US airstrikes target militia-controlled areas in east Syria

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 3 months ago

US airstrikes target militia-controlled areas in east Syria

"The U.S. Military has said that it has carried out air strikes on targeted areas in eastern Syria The U.S. Military has said that it has carried out air strikes on targeted areas in eastern Syria U.S. Military authorities said the strikes were on areas used by militias that were backed by Iran's paramilitary revolutionary guard opposition war monitor the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights and an activist group said the air strikes targeted the ayyash camp which is made up of Shiite fighters from Afghanistan a U.S. Military spokesman said the strikes were necessary to protect and defend U.S. personnel the spokesman also added that the attack was in response to an earlier attack by Iranian backed militias that targeted a garrison used by American forces on August 15th I'm Karen Chammas

Syria U.S. Syrian Observatory For Human R U.S. Military Iran Afghanistan Karen Chammas
Syria denies it is holding American journalist Austin Tice

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 3 months ago

Syria denies it is holding American journalist Austin Tice

"Syria is denying U.S. accusations it's holding or kidnapped journalist Austin tais or other Americans President Biden made the accusation last week in a statement released by The White House to mark the tenth anniversary of Tyson's abduction The journalist was in Syria covering its lengthy conflict and went missing at a checkpoint in a contested area west of Damascus A video released a month later showed him blindfolded and held by armed men saying oh Jesus He has not been heard from since Biden's remarks were the clearest indication so far that the U.S. is certain ties as being held by the government of president Assad I'm Julie Walker

Austin Tais Syria Biden Tyson U.S. White House Damascus President Assad Julie Walker
Jason Jones Discusses the Vulnerable People Project

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:06 min | 3 months ago

Jason Jones Discusses the Vulnerable People Project

"I'm talking to Jason Jones. Who is the head of the vulnerable people project? I want to hear more about that and how people can find that website. And I also want to let you finish. You were just going to say that there are a number of things that you all are doing. And we were referencing Trump just as we went to the break. I hope we didn't lose people. I was obviously being ironic. You know, under president Trump went on to Biden in the midst of the collapse of Afghanistan. The processing of SIVs collapsed to 10% of what they were in the previous year under Trump. Okay, say it again. Under under who under Biden, the processing of special immigration Visa people. And we're going to be collapsed. So who are those people? These are Afghans who fought and the war on terror side by side with American soldiers, marines and sailors. And so we know they were especially targeted. As we saw in the days after the United States left Afghanistan, our Friends were hanging from lampposts all over Kabul, they were beheaded. They were set on fire, their children were killed, and this happened, Eric. And so my organization began moving as many of them as we could to safe houses. And one other organizations were looking to use planes. We realized that was going to come to an end when the U.S. left. So we began doing overland routes to all of the neighboring countries. To get these folks out. But under Biden in the midst of the collapse of Afghanistan, these SIV visas were processed 10% of what was done the previous year under Trump. You know, you see this with Trump, the JV team of ISIS, which was the JV team, committed a brutal genocide that was quickly put to an end, Obama seemed utterly confused and helpless to put it into the genocides in Iraq and Syria. Trump shut that down.

President Trump Biden Jason Jones Afghanistan Donald Trump Kabul United States Eric Isis Barack Obama Iraq Syria
Biden's Response to Russia Is Historically Weak

The Ben Shapiro Show

02:26 min | 3 months ago

Biden's Response to Russia Is Historically Weak

"Joe Biden suggested that we were pulling out of Afghanistan. This is going to free up our hands to deal with Russia. There's only one problem. The pullout from Afghanistan actually incentivized. The war between Russia and Ukraine because after all, where Joe Biden has been clear he has been wrong and where he has been unclear, he has provoked conflict. So no wonder Russia thought that Joe Biden was a weak horse. After all, Joe Biden had basically been a Russia defender in the 2012 election. You'll recall that he was ripping on Mitt Romney for suggesting that Russia was a geopolitical threat. Here's Joe Biden's circa 2012. Governor Romney's answer I thought was incredibly revealing. He acts like he thinks the Cold War is still on, Russia is still our major adversary. I don't know where he's been. I mean, we have disagreements with Russia, but they're united with us on Iran. The only way we're getting one of only two ways we're getting material into Afghanistan to our troops is through Russia. They are working closely with us. They've just said to Europe, if there is an oil shutdown in any way in the gulf, they'll consider increasing oil supplies to Europe. That's not this is not 1956. This is not 1956. It says Joe Biden. Don't worry. Rush will take care of the oil for the Europeans. Russia will help us with Afghanistan. And then of course, Russia helped us with Syria by basically taking Syria off the hands of president Obama to the wild cheers of people like Joe Biden. And in 2014, Russia invades Crimea. And Joe Biden has some words for Russia. That's pretty much all he has for Russia. So his vice president when that administration did nothing over the invasion of Crimea. Here was Joe Biden circa 2014. I want to make it clear. We stand resolutely with our Baltic allies and support of Ukrainian people and against Russian aggression. As long as Russia continues on this dark path, they will face increasing political and economic isolation. There are those who say that this action shows the old rules still apply. But Russia can not escape the fact that the world is changing and rejecting outright. Their behavior. Of course, that was a lie. It turns out that the steps that The White House pursued, under vice President Biden, were extraordinarily weak. And basically they announced a Visa ban on a couple of Russian and Ukrainian officials. And they canceled a couple of talks on trades and commercial ties. That was pretty much all of the things. And by the way, they then proceeded to deny lethal aid to Ukraine.

Russia Joe Biden Afghanistan Governor Romney Crimea Syria Mitt Romney Ukraine Europe Iran Rush Baltic Barack Obama Biden White House
Joe Biden States Support for Two-State Solution

Mark Levin

01:00 min | 4 months ago

Joe Biden States Support for Two-State Solution

"So here he is Cut 5 go Now as president of the United States my commitment to that goal of a two state solution has not changed And all these years two states along the 1967 lines were mutually agreed to swaps And again in 1967 lines Israel can not survive with the 1967 lines They can't survive The 1967 lines Obama pushed the same thing There was a war in 1967 Because the Arab states led by Egypt Nasser In Syria and others we're building up their military to cut off Israel economically from the sea from the land from the air To surround it attack it and destroy it

Egypt Nasser United States Israel Barack Obama Syria
"syria" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

06:16 min | 7 months ago

"syria" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Do for you at CNB dot com. City national bank member FDIC. Californians have worked really hard to beat COVID-19. By doing the things we know work best, like getting vaccinated and boosted. Testing before and after travel, staying home when feeling sick, and wearing a mask when it can protect us and others. Let's continue to do our part to keep each other safer from COVID-19. When we work together, there's nothing we can overcome. Learn more, COVID-19, dot CA dot gov. Brought to you by the California department of public health. Nabi, I'm interested in what Russia's war tactics mean for the people kind of the crosshairs. Do we know the civilian casualty council for in Ukraine? So the Iran has given a figure of about 3000 a 150, but of course it should be said, this is probably a massive undercount. I mean, we really have no idea at this point. And it's really have no idea about the military casualties either as well. So it's very, very opaque. We're just two months into the fighting on the other hand, the conflict in Syria has been going on since 2011. Any estimate of how many people have died in Syria's war. I mean, the last figure you heard was 350,000. I think that was from 2018 from the UN, but they stopped counting years ago. Wow. In your coverage, what has been the refugee situation for Ukrainians and Syrians escaping their respective wars? So when it comes to Ukraine, we're talking about a third of the population now between 5.5 who have left the country at 7.7 that are displaced internally. With Syria, right now, I think in total it comes out to about half. And of course, I mean the sophisticated in both situations, but Syria, I think is 26 million pre war population whereas Ukraine is about 41.5. It's also a huge country, really, very, very large. And then the damage is to cities and towns in Syria and Ukraine, all that infrastructure. What's the scale is destruction? I mean, one hesitates to compare, obviously, with these things. But I mean, I should be said, that right now, you know, this is still early days, of course, and we really haven't seen the full scale of the Russian military machine. But the fact is that the destruction in Syria is much more, of course. I mean, taken right now on a tractor, this clearing all the mud in this area. We're here near the great boss of Aleppo. And it's the side of some major renovations. It used to be the site of some major conflict unfortunately. But we're still in the situation Ukraine, where the damage is let's say relatively minor, of course, but it's not as, it's not as if it's stating it's what I've seen Syria..

Syria Ukraine civilian casualty council City national bank California department of publi Nabi FDIC Russia Iran UN Aleppo
"syria" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

04:49 min | 7 months ago

"syria" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"My LA times colleague in Middle East bureau chief from the bibulus has covered both conflicts and he joins us today to talk about what he's seen. Nabi, welcome to the times. Thank you for having me. I appreciate it. First off, Americans haven't thought about the Syrian war in years if they ever did. How did it all start and who's been involved? Caught the series Civil War? It all feels like ancient history at this point. But it began as part of the Arab Spring revolutions. We had the moment in Tunisia and then another revolution in Egypt. And then along the way, the domino seemed to finally hit in Syria. I mean, people will often dispute the beginning of this, right? I mean, people who are pro government would say that this was all a big conspiracy that fomented this unrest. And then there are those who will tell you also that this was a spontaneous uprising that then just evolved into Civil War when the government refused to back down or refuse to actually give up power. I mean, it was never interpretation you want to have for the result is finally the same in the sense that now the country is essentially and ruins. And so it's very sad in Sierra I have to say, and yeah, there are echoes what we're seeing now in Ukraine, of course. It eventually turned into a larger proxy war, right? Like it seemed anyone with any interest in the Middle East ended up being involved one way or another. In some ways, yes. I mean, it should be said that some of the original notions, the idea of topping the government. These have been grassroots ideas as well. But as time went on, you had various actors getting involved handing over weapons, handing over cash, heading over support for the rebels. And so this became a situation where, yes, you had a proxy war. And of course, later on when ISIS appeared on the scene, you had, of course, a full on proxy situation where the U.S. was actually fighting ISIS via its Kurdish allies of the northeast. And then Russia enters the picture. So Russia came in around 2015 and it came at the moment when the government seemed on the verge of falling. Russia says it's targeting Islamic State physicians, but a senior U.S. official says the strikes appear aimed at groups fighting Syrian president Bashar Assad's regime. Putin's ambitions are blindingly obvious, my Friends, he wants the proper facade play king maker in any transition undermine U.S. policy and operations and ultimately expand Russian power in the Middle East. The strikes began after Russian lawmakers approved president Vladimir Putin's request to use force in Syria, amid western concerns that Russia will also target the Syrian opposition. People don't remember this perhaps. This wasn't around September of 2015. And if memory serves about two months before that, as a really remarkable speech where he basically said, for the first time, since the war began in Syria, president Bashar al-Assad admits government forces have a problem. That the army couldn't be everywhere at once that they had enough material, but they didn't have enough people to fight those battles. And so they had to do what he called at the time. A strategic retreat. The government seemed poised to lose control of most of the country and seemed like it's heartland areas. You know, especially the coast and Damascus, et cetera, around the ridge of being run. And that's when the Russians came in. And really within about 6 months, they had really shifted the government's fortunes and knew. It was really quite impressive for the quickness of the turnaround. Yeah, the Syrian president Bashar al-Assad as he said he was on the ropes, but with Russia's help he was able to stay in power and regain control over big parts of the country, but what did Russia get out of helping Al Assad? You know, the common narrative was that it had the warm water port in tortus, right? This coastal city in Syria, and of course they wanted to build influence in the Middle East. That is worth saying that because of that situation, you know, Russia has a big word in the Middle East when it comes to turkey when it comes to Egypt when it comes to Jordan, et cetera. I mean, it's been involved in a lot of the decision making processes around. So that's an important point for this intervention. What's Russia's involvement right now in Syria? Actually, that was being reduced, right? It's footprint there, slowly being reduced because they're forced to divert forces to obviously Ukraine at this point. So I mean, it's still basically involved in ostensibly peacekeeping efforts. But otherwise, you know, they're basically I think trying to just negotiate some kind of a settlement there. Very, very slowly. Perhaps like acting in some, you know, some of them back faith I have to say. But that's the attempt. And as you said, Russia has now turned its attention to Ukraine, which is its own thing, of course, the histories of Russian Ukraine are very intertwined. Russia and Russia alone has pursued a massive crown war and like in Syria and thousands of soldiers have died so far in Ukraine for Russia, but I'm curious whether Ukraine can also be seen as an extension of some of the same foreign policy goals that you mentioned Putin accomplished in Syria. Perhaps in the sense that the idea of Russia being a major power right of Russia's area of influence being.

Russia Middle East Syria bibulus Bashar Assad Nabi LA times Ukraine U.S. president Bashar al Tunisia Egypt Assad Bashar al Sierra ISIS Putin Vladimir Putin Damascus army
"syria" Discussed on Between The Lines

Between The Lines

05:49 min | 9 months ago

"syria" Discussed on Between The Lines

"And at the same time, Obama's very dismissive of Putin's intervention saying that Russia would find itself in a quagmire as you just outlined. That didn't happen. Why didn't Russia find itself in a quagmire the way it potentially will in Ukraine? What was the difference between Syria and Ukraine? Yeah, and I go into a lot more details of this in my book, but in short, analysts looking at the Syria intervention immediately assumed that this will be just like the Soviet experience in Afghanistan. But the military intervention was precisely designed to avoid another Afghanistan. It was the target primarily focused on aerospace forces with a naval component and limited elite ground troop contingent. It relied on luts and other actors to do heavy lifting chiefly Iran. So really the brunt of the work and the costs were borne by Iran, not Russia. What Russia did is it quickly unveiled something called a two AD layout anti area access denial layout. Precisely to deter the west rather than fight the Islamic State as was the purported Putin's purported reason for going into Syria. Again, it was a very limited targeted intervention designed to be low cost and relying on others to do the work. In Ukraine, what we see happening is a colossal miscalculation. And at first, it's clear that the scale of the invasion is far bigger than anything that Putin's Russia had done. Certainly bigger than in Syria. He went for all of Ukraine. Think about it going after the largest all European country of over 40 million, about 44 million to think that it can fall in two days, which apparently is what the Kremlin had expected. That is a massive, massive miscalculation based on hubers. So what's happening now instead is an incredibly costly intervention. But it is caused in everybody. And it's not over by a long shot. On IBC, right, our national, this is between the lines..

Russia Syria Ukraine Putin Afghanistan Iran Obama
"syria" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

06:01 min | 10 months ago

"syria" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Or both? Now I can't tell you the intentions of the officers who are conducting these, but I think if you look at the overall system and what it prioritizes, which is not being on the ground, it prioritizes following this particular process. And if you see civilians in this video, you can count them. It essentially winds up becoming what many experts have now told me is a means to model accountability for the rest of the world to say that we are going through this incredible and complex array of procedures, which is true. The United States has a very complex process for this to mitigate harm. But in effect, it's being used more to establish America's reputation on this issue. Rather than necessarily to truly prevent civilian loss to study it to go on the ground to do these very straightforward things, you know, if I can go to these sites, more than a hundred of them, civilian casualty sites, in different war zones, you know, as somebody who is just a reporter without the means or access of the U.S. Military, which also has the coordinates of all the strikes they've conducted. You know, they have a better means of actually investigating this. So if they're choosing not to do it, if they're choosing not to study in aggregate lessons learned. If they're choosing not to implement procedures to change confirmation bias in a way that really shows results, what does that tell you about their intentions of truly trying to prevent civilian loss? You say The Pentagon is trying to model accountability to the world. Is there actual accountability inside The Pentagon? The Pentagon can and should make changes. There are some within who were very supportive of a recent memo that the Secretary of Defense issued, saying, you know, really putting in place a timeline for this new civilian casualty policy, starting a, I guess, an institute or a center to learn lessons a center for excellence. But the reality of the matter is is that that policy, that civilian casualty policy that he's now put a timeline on. That was mandated by Congress several years ago. And they've been working on this for quite some time. And his response was to put a timeline on it for something that had actually Congress had gone so far as to actually fence off millet to some military funding until they completed this policy. It's unclear to me what is different because they have been claiming for years to be doing many of these things. We should be watching what they actually release in the timeline that's been given. And to really follow up to see if there are differences between what they've been claiming for so long and what they are now doing. What we have is this attack last week that resulted in the death of Abu Ibrahim Al hashimi, Al quraishi. Where it looks like special forces went to great lengths to prevent civilian death. Of course, civilians still died. But does that give you hope that something may have changed here? That is someone that they are going to expend a great number of resources. To take out, that is not the kind of care and attention that's given to bombings that happen every day, sometimes with far less planning. I think it does say things about the Biden administration specifically, but it doesn't necessarily tell us about The Pentagon's own process when it comes to all of these other air strikes that are being carried out not just in Iraq and Syria, but in places like Somalia, places where the CIA might be operating places like Yemen. We don't have a true grasp of how sustainable. A change like this is. And will we? You know, I know that there are hearing scheduled in Congress. So for example, on Wednesday, the Senate Judiciary Committee is holding a hearing on this issue. There are many civilian harm organizations that are pressing the Biden administration for change. And I know that there are several members of Congress who.

Pentagon U.S. Congress Abu Ibrahim Al hashimi Al quraishi Biden administration Somalia Syria Senate Judiciary Committee Yemen CIA Iraq
"syria" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

06:54 min | 10 months ago

"syria" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Hey folks, I'm Heather Cox Richardson, and I'm Joanne Freeman. We're the hosts of now and then, a weekly podcast that looks to the American past to make sense of our current political and cultural climate. There's been a wave of headlines recently about book bands. School boards and state governments are trying to outlaw the teaching of books that they find objectionable from arts feeble men's mouse, to Tony Morrison's, the bluest eye. This week, on now and then, we're releasing the first episode of a three part series. The series will dive deep into past book panics, explore why public schools so often become ideological battlegrounds and dissect the interplay between book bands and political bullying. Join us as we try to make sense of the role that bans have played in our national culture and explain why we're seeing so many bands today. Listen for free on Apple, cafe dot com or wherever you get your podcasts. Hi, I'm Kara Swisher in just a few weeks. I'm heading to Miami to drive Scott Galloway crazy and actually to have a conference with him. It's not because we like the beach, although we do it's because Miami is the perfect backdrop for pivot MIA, a brand new three day event hosted by us, of course, and also featuring the biggest and boldest names in tech FinTech, media education climate, and more. There's still time to apply to see speakers like Sandeep mathrani, CEO of WeWork, Kathy savit, president and chief commercial officer of boom, Meredith levy and president and CEO of The New York Times. David M Solomon chairman and CEO of Goldman Sachs, and many more so exciting we can't even announce them yet. We are always throw good events. Honestly, I've done for 20 years. Trust me on this one. It's pivot's signature hot takes and even hotter because like we said, we're at the beach in Miami, visit vox media events dot com slash pivot MIA slash podcast to apply to attend and see you in Miami on February 14th happy Valentine's Day. Don't tell Scott, I'm getting him nothing. All of course, be the one in aviator, sunglasses, although that's nothing new. Not even a gesture, you're not gonna be anything seriously. Not even a gesture. We're back with asmat Khan, who has investigated civilian casualties in U.S. Military operations for The New York Times and we're trying to figure out if The Pentagon is capable of waging its ongoing war on terror without killing innocent people. We asked asma what she found in her investigations. You know, when I first started doing this work in early 2016, I was on the ground in places that had been retaken from ISIS basically going door to door in different areas and sampling the air strikes that occurred there. You know, I went to the sites of more than a 103 air strikes and three different sample areas. And what I found was that one in 5 of these air strikes was resulting in a civilian death. That's 20%. And it's a rate that was 31 times higher than what the military was claiming. 31 times higher than the military's count of civilian death. And so what I did is I took all of the coordinates what I was finding and I presented them to the U.S. Military. I asked them, did you conduct these air strikes? Half of the reasons for the civilian casualty incidents were the result of poor or outdated intelligence. In one case, they saw children. On the roof of a home, and rather than relying on that to maybe question whether they had the wrong target, there was a ISIS location across the street. You know, they now determined that this house they were looking at with these children was an even more dangerous target than they identified it before. They thought it was an ISIS sleeping center. And now they're calling it a weapons manufacturing facility. And so they targeted it. And they said they saw one injured child. I went on the ground and everyone in this neighborhood. Said a family of 11 were killed that a little girl survived. And that people were injured in the house next door, including a different little girl who was permanently disabled. The Pentagon says it holds itself accountable and when they would publicly release these press releases in which they would admit, you know, maybe there'd be sentence long summaries of what they found about each claim. I knew that behind each of those was a longer document. And I requested all of them through the freedom of information act. What I wound up doing was suing The Pentagon and U.S. central command for these documents. And over three years, I started receiving these pages. In batches, every other month. And you know I was able to obtain more than 1300 of them. The majority of which they rejected these claims of casualty is sometimes we found for reasons as simple as they couldn't find some of these areas on maps. They couldn't identify them and determined that because they couldn't find this village or they couldn't find this neighborhood. That they were going to reject that claim. So some of them were summarily dismissed. But even within the credible ones, you know, you can see patterns. You can start to see what's happening and why. Can you give us like their total tally of civilian deaths versus something closer to the reality that you found? Is it that simple? The Pentagon says that there were a little over 1400 civilian deaths resulting from the tens of thousands of air strikes they've conducted in Iraq and Syria. Now I can't give you a precise number. But I know that back in 2017, when a colleague and I went on the ground to do a systematic sample, a sample that we believe is an undercount because of the areas we went to and because we simply could not count for example children of ISIS, right? We were relying on documenting what we had records for what we could interview people about. And for many reasons, this sample we did, we believe was an undercount. And from that, looking at strikes that had occurred through 2016. So I guess in the first little over two years of this air campaign, our inference came out to between 7 and 10,000 people, civilians, having been killed. And that was several years ago. Now, you know, I want to be careful because it's an inference. I want to be careful because it's a war zone, right? You can only sample particular areas that are accessible. They have to be populated. This is hard work to do. But if that many years ago, before we saw some of the loosening of restrictions on strikes, if that's what we were looking at, you know, you're looking at a much, much higher rate of civilian death. What do you see when you look at this stuff in aggregate? Do you see indifference on the part of The Pentagon? Or are you seeing sort of more ineptitude.

Miami Heather Cox Richardson Joanne Freeman Tony Morrison Scott Galloway Sandeep mathrani WeWork Kathy savit Meredith levy David M Solomon Pentagon asmat Khan The New York Times Kara Swisher asma Goldman Sachs U.S. central command U.S. Valentine
"syria" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

08:11 min | 10 months ago

"syria" Discussed on Today, Explained

"The war in Afghanistan's over, but the war on terror is not. You may have noticed a few days ago when you heard that U.S. forces had flown into Syria to kill a terrorist. So this is a man named Abu Ibrahim Al hashimi Al quraishi. And he was the current leader of ISIS. And this is investigative journalist asmat Khan. He was known for having played a role in the slave trade that ISIS ran of Yazidi minorities. He was also known to have been involved in encouraging different ISIS sleeper cells to stage prison attacks to release ISIS prisoners. And so he was somebody that was much coveted by the Americans and someone they had been watching for some time according to administration officials. Asthma says there was something different about this raid and she would know she's been investigating and suing The Pentagon over civilian casualties in the war on terror for years. On the show today, we're gonna try and figure out whether the U.S. Military can continue to wage this war on terror without killing innocent people. And we're gonna start with this one raid that took place a few days ago in Syria, where, again, things felt a little different. They had a tip several months ago that a senior leader was living in the top level of a home in northwest Syria. And they watched him for quite some time. They modeled his home. They say they planned for this attack. And when they carried it out, by that time, you know, they kind of took a different approach to what we've seen in which they had ground troops conduct this raid. Knowing that this terrorist had chosen surround himself with families, including children, we made a choice to pursue a special forces raid at a much greater risk to our own people rather than targeting him with an air strike. Officials say they did this so that they could minimize civilian harm. So that civilians who lived in this house, there were families, there were wives, there were children that they would have a chance to be spared. Two dozen commandos are deployed to this part of Syria. They arrive in helicopters. They land. They take out this house, this house where this leader lives on the top floor, they believe. And they go to houses next door. They ask civilians to leave the area. The grandson of one local residents told channel four news he was woken by what sounded like planes overhead. We were peacefully sleeping when we heard the warplanes. When I woke up, everyone was crying and frightened. The warplane was very loud. It sounded like an earthquake, and then I heard bullets. And then, using a bullhorn, according to many residents who'd been interviewed, they call out to those inside the house. It's a hard line. I love what would turn you with it. Basically say the equivalent of, you know, we want to spare the children. We want to spare the innocent, send them out. And turn yourselves in. And that didn't happen. So administration officials say that this particular leader detonated explosives on the top level that killed civilians. You know, they also say there was a firefight with one of his top lieutenants on a lower floor of the home that resulted that particular lieutenant's wife and children dying. It's unclear exactly what happened. Which deaths were the result of that alleged detonation in which were the result of maybe a potential firefight. But it is clear that there were some casualties, which may have been the result of either party. The strong indications are here is that the lives taken in this operation. The lives of innocence taken in this operation were caused by Abdullah and his decision to blow him himself up and everybody else with him on that third floor as well as the resistance of his lieutenant on the second floor. Were willing to take a look to just examine and make sure. Is the world safer without Abu Ibrahim Al hashimi Al quraishi in it? What was this guy doing in Syria? Was he just hiding out or was he organizing terrorist attacks or what? So we've been told that he was influencing many to attack. Prisons, prisons where ISIS leaders where ISIS members, fighters are being held in an effort to lead to a resurgence of the group. This morning scores are dead after a mass prison break at a jail holding suspected ISIS fighters in Syria. ISIS had set off a car bomb, a suicide bomb that resulted in pandemonium and people breaking free and there are hundreds who have been killed. We don't even know the full number yet. Some of whom were SDF fighters who were trying to retake this prison. Writers inside the facility clashing with security personnel, allowing hundreds of prisoners to rise up, seize weapons from their jailers and flee. We've also been told by several different organizations as well as reporters who've looked at this that he had been involved in the slave trade that ISIS conducted a VZ minorities. And so he's somebody who certainly has been involved in incredibly pernicious activity, but the question of are we safer? What we've seen is that when you target a high level leader, they are fairly quickly replaced. And you can keep taking people out, but that doesn't necessarily address the structural problem that we have to begin with. Do we know how many people died in this raid total? So I want to be careful about what numbers I use because we have conflicting numbers. I know that the white helmets, a group that was involved in some of the rescue efforts at the scene afterwards said that they had taken out 13 people, including 6 children and four women. And that the administration or The Pentagon specifically had said that they were the deaths of 5 combatants and four civilians. And you know, you have to be careful with the exact accounts here about who the government might consider a civilian and who they might not. But certainly we know that children were killed and I always say that it takes time. Especially at the scene to really evaluate what happened and who was killed. And so there are these competing numbers and I would just urge a little bit of caution and applying certainty to them. How did the U.S. government characterize this rate? What was their sort of verdict on how it went? So immediately afterwards, they called this a successful raid. So his death, we believe dealt a significant blow to ISIS. And as news came out that the white helmets were saying that children had been killed that there appeared to be civilians who'd also been killed, people started to call this into question. And so, you know, President Biden came forth to do a briefing about this, so did Pentagon leaders. And what we learned is that they had been planning this for several months, that they took a great deal of precautions. They say to protect civilians, even at the risk of U.S. troops by putting them on the ground rather than conducting an air strike or doing this from a distance. And while the cowardly actions of Haji Abdullah and a small number of his followers resulted in the death, the tragic death of at least three innocent civilians, the calculated efforts of our forces succeeded in protecting more than ten.

Syria Abu Ibrahim Al hashimi Al qura asmat Khan ISIS U.S. Pentagon Afghanistan Asthma earthquake white helmets Abdullah SDF President Biden U.S. government Haji Abdullah
"syria" Discussed on The Mad Mamluks

The Mad Mamluks

04:02 min | 1 year ago

"syria" Discussed on The Mad Mamluks

"Support your your efforts for the orphans and things like that. So how how can they do that. And do you take bitcoin. You've got you can get on. Bitcoin and bitcoin take bitcoin somebody to find like that. Trestle alabama song thing is h has recently closed all of the bitcoin people our trading bitcoin. In which is so crazy happened just like last week a lot of those best and mainly that saw in aleppo we could get big quick but if they don't want to go to www syria needs you don't come our cherry ponder that we work with is registered in turkey it's called government and he called beautiful which basically means bill for the murray. Get a beer for a bureau mola. you're you're from. The people of i heard he's sorry but now people are going to know for sure and the hawaii is big. Beer is one place you can make that mistake for. It's okay he had. We know where things are now. Brothers and sisters. Please help out talks in Every all the efforts that he's involved with real toscani. Please make sure you send us the links for whatever we can share with our listeners and we'll pin it in the comments section below and in the description of this episode so that they can be a platform to help you. In canada. lakers media is very important. So whatever we can do to help out even after the show if you want something comes up he context. I'll give you them as well to any to something comes up is important. Speak by get across will be had brave enough to talk about some of these topics saturday. You know one of the issues that we have in common is that you know we are kind of you know afraid. And i don't think we should be afraid of speaking about the issues because if we don't understand the ailments in the illnesses that we face from within never gonna find solutions but never going to be able to make those changes that we wanna see so yet to lasting. Was this out of all the people on this. Was this the most unique interview head from chill session. You had. yeah. I loved it. You guys must show but one day we meet in person shallow. Shallow elevators did all right folks. Make sure you send us your comments or thoughts to the episode. Maybe have a few comments or questions for our guests to let us know in the competition will make sure you Smashed add like button. You know what don't don't mash. Just put in a syrian prison and torture that really bad couple toward the end. Hey look at racing laughing role and picture my cousins holding joel. What kind of evil hearted people we would born troublemakers. He we we. We keep them in the show. They kind of keep us in line. Otherwise we'd just be off the rails so heavily. Blue eyed devil keeps us all right guys. We'll see you next time he saw..

toscani Bitcoin bitcoin aleppo syria alabama murray turkey hawaii lakers canada joel
"syria" Discussed on The Mad Mamluks

The Mad Mamluks

04:55 min | 1 year ago

"syria" Discussed on The Mad Mamluks

"I muslim second american. I most in second or you're never going to really be accepted in that zion law. Muslims need to wake up to them looking at places to invest within muslim lands. And people are gonna say. Where do we go. What can we do if you don't get up. You know the french of your ass and try and look for some solutions than you know. No one's gonna come and hand you victory you know in your hands. You got a word for it though. Yeah i know that's why a lot of people are are considering now. I'm not saying it is the most ideal place considering turkey. They're saying listen. you know what. They're offering an incentive for citizenship programs for people to buy property. And you can get our passports when you move there. And i mean people are considering options. Maybe maybe it is an option for the future low. But but what i guess i guess we were going with. This is that it seems to me that the answer is that we need more global. It seems to me that muslims don't have this long-term vision everything is reactionary. Something happens in syria. Donate money now happens. Flood happens in donate money but never planning on how to deal with it before it comes right the long-term vision and that's partly probably because we have bad leadership we don't have fewer political stability percent of it right. I mean it's probably because of that as well too but there's still people who are. Who are interested in people who are on the ground Like yourself to conduct this. They think about what things should we be thinking about long-term. What are some of the initiatives that we could possibly invest in or starting. I love the idea about lobbying. I think i tell muslims. America don't vote. I mean at least in the federal election just create a huge fund that lobbies people to make politicians acting behalf pay them. I mean this is. This is the name of the game the system to your advantage right. Of course you've got people that would kind of you know you've got different strains that maybe we don't believe in that i again. I think that we have to stop thinking out the box. We can't have the same kind of reactionary thinking where anytime with. Christ i mean. Look man you guys You said in your. I mean very these clear early very early barely..

syria America
"syria" Discussed on The Mad Mamluks

The Mad Mamluks

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"syria" Discussed on The Mad Mamluks

"Sometimes we can't even transfer money. I give you example. In the case at said zionist banks muslim charities and countdown reason if disappointing palestine and the muslim charity sector in britain counts four hundred. Twenty eight hundred fifty million years. It's them muslim communities the most chargeable communities the minority community in the uk. But yet it's the most giving said. I imagine those charities put their differences aside when it comes to politics and wherever you understand is but you would use these banks at one of these back closes you down if you take your business elsewhere. They're going to be forced to work with you. One hundred twenty million one hundred fifty million is that a goal elsewhere. They're going to be like okay. Hold up wait a minute. So institutions media institutions. Like what. You guys are sad the muslims. Today we can't even sell our narrative that's why from syria the kind of the media that we have the channel that we have on social one of the goals for us was that we want to show people. What's going on in the pump. It in syria first hand by. Just move people to look. This is what's happening. And it is so many different types of institutions that these are the kind of long term solutions. What can i do today for the next ten years. Fifteen years. that's going to help. Might the future. And the reason i came to this thinking is i remember. The first time. I saw a small young girl. Baby died trump. Is she died in my own coalition. Strike okay that was tugging toast. Cereal and room that moment time feeding so powerless and saying to myself upon this unmanned aircraft has killed this family taken up famine. This baby girl and a consumer advice now just died in my arms and we are powerless. Be do anything and got me thinking saying that. Okay i can't stop this oppression today but what can i thought doing today. So that in five ten fifteen twenty time. This doesn't happen to other muslims. Because i know today. I'm no never gonna stop in so this. This comes to lots of other institutions lobbyists think-tanks lobbies for example knife. sims affluent. Must've that we don't have a lack of financial resources. In the whole month dubai expos seven billion dollars or some nonsense like that. We don't have a lack of finance in the home of what we have is a lack of thinking so people started doing things. They don't have to come syria. You don't have to come to syria and be on the ground but you need to build institutions so that tomorrow when you want to help the obama that you're in a position to put pressure on governments for example. Now you've got these normalization of ties in bahrain and dubai and all of these basis but yet there's no way to put pressure on these governments. Imagine now all of the muslims in the west. Okay we're taking business away from dubai gonna.

syria palestine britain uk sims dubai obama bahrain
"syria" Discussed on The Mad Mamluks

The Mad Mamluks

05:21 min | 1 year ago

"syria" Discussed on The Mad Mamluks

"Isis killed them so this is one of the things i always say to be. Okay if you believe in this caliphate then why when people reach their. Why not need if it was. You know what it why. Why would they not let people leave. So many that especially florida's would never afford to join the ranks and they would never let w quick question allegations of dry dock nation through drug use like was as any merit to this like they were being distributed distribution of drugs. that made me people hallucinogens. Like they were making them is running merit to that. Do you know of any any Truth peta means to keep them awake and to keep them passionate about doing. And then i i don't know about drug use within their ranks and i haven't seen any group here as a policy utilized drugs that so be right automobile. When it's done fair bought the has been which is a complete different topic but a large issue when it comes to traumatized abuse and and painkiller musicals. All people suffer serious injured injuries out here. So yeah i mean. I know people that suffered really horrific injuries and ended up getting addicted to love. These kind of you know really powerful opionion. Yeah okay yeah okay. No that makes sense. I think i think. I wanted to touch on before we get the story of your issue that personally with the with the with isis. And i wanna i talk about like. When did you encounter him. When did you meet whether banana kareem like. When did that happen. That meeting is that before. Or after you were a picked up by by dash Other picked up by the hd. Before was this before after that incident long before no me and be la la villa again basic on men tools. One of my teachers allows me to have people like that around me. One of the most optimistic hardheaded tough individuals that you'll ever meet when it comes to mind set. You don't want to have anyone in prison. We've you except when someone like bit out. So i him must have been. I mean two thousand thirteen. I'm him very early in the conflict in in aleppo actually wall wait the low of these. In the beginning there was a lot of the territory's sixty percent of syria at freed and then areas were lost in the game and etcetera etcetera. So today will when we talk about aleppo way talking about the countryside of aleppo now go to the of is back with the regime but opd as the city of aleppo or eastern. The eastern part of the sea of an epo was wigged. Would win with the rebels in a sense so i met him in the city of aleppo alien on the conflict and basically he covered the story of meat of one of the first major media pieces..

la la villa aleppo florida syria
"syria" Discussed on The Mad Mamluks

The Mad Mamluks

02:34 min | 1 year ago

"syria" Discussed on The Mad Mamluks

"Allah kind of slogan is make noise make change and that's kind of based upon the fact that would have been modeled for the is is fucked wedding upon us and that's what sets us apart so it's not just about giving out food boxes you know it's forces always been about. We wanna try be mostly people that can fix and bring solutions at full. The muslims in the conflict would baby does the most innocence so when isis came about i mean that was a major fitna a major fit because we literally had people coming from all over the world wanting to join them because the idea of africa the idea of islamic state. It's very romantic for hosting of course which true doesn't want to live under the shade of snow. So i mean we were very outspoken media and a few of the people and i probably was probably one of the only western his inside syria oak against them publicly and that was because in two thousand and fourteen think. I'm really bad at date. So you got figure me. Two thousand fourteen or fifteen or would it be we boy aid convoy from the uk and there was about hundred muslims hundred vehicles. There was one christian man and heading and he was just a taxi driver he had you know felt emotion for the syrian also. The bubbas had kind of brought him along when he got to syria and they basically kidnapped him. So i so i was involved in talking to their. You know their scholars and trying to bogging tried to get him out and we found that these people were exploiting the versus of loss to for their own days. So they can. Can you pause for a second. So were they approachable. Like when when when you said. Hey listen yacob have some some some issues where they approachable to speak to in the beginning in the beginning. When you've got understand. Is that in the beginning. I was this massive powerful. It was different areas controlled by different factions. So everybody kind of had to Battlefronts in the beginning when people that they may run depicted as non muslims. So many people they would say that they know muslims in with senate groups and the date ended up. They shape battlefronts within themselves..

syria yacob africa uk senate
"syria" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

The Last American Vagabond

05:27 min | 1 year ago

"syria" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

"Roth of evidence that for example the uk for an office document leak showing the million dollar a blackout project against syria funding outreach agents to provide media in peoria for violent extremists armed groups that carried out war crimes and atrocities and ethnic cleansing programs against the syrian people if that allowing doesn't trigger them to question what they're being told by the mainstream media because all if the narratives that they are repeating come from the mainstream media they don't come from elsewhere They don't come from inside syria except from the voices that are being amplified by the mainstream media. If you spend time in syria almost everybody even those in opposition to the government. But who didn't take up arms will challenge those kind of conclusions. But those people on spoken to syrians like cookbook. Not given a platform syrians. That will give diverging views on not given a platform saw unfairly. These anti imperial pundits are no different to the mainstream media. Because they're d platforming voices that would challenge their own conclusions. Why because they wanna keep the debate at this reductionist level which protects the lebron's gives them credibility in that mainstream concensus right but it doesn't develop the argument. It doesn't help the syrian people. Actually that's the bottom line. That's what we all should be. Focusing on is defending the sovereignty of syria its territorial integrity an ex people's self-determination and if you're not giving them a voice then you'll not doing that. You're failing and you basically. This is dereliction of duty as a journalist in my opinion because you'll no longer talking truth to power your succumbing to power.

syria peoria uk government lebron
"syria" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

The Last American Vagabond

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"syria" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

"Yeah i mean. I think you know Kevorkian made some Incredibly pertinent points. Not only tonight but in various interviews that he's over the lowest. Wait for which you know oppressively. I'm very grateful because it's Enabled him to bring these points to the table for two people that have probably been deprived of these points. And why have they been deprived of these points because unfortunately as he pointed out in the beginning even among the so-called are left such as these days but the anti imperialist media block the independent media block. We are seeing the use of this terminology that Although they may beat defending one aspect of the imperialist hybrid were against syria that has been ongoing for ten years but of course was concocted in the holes of mix and cia Long before two thousand and eleven and when we see them so they'll defend one aspect of The war against syria and they will do a very good job at exposing certain aspects of the war against syria but unfortunately when they then if you lie bring up the cia and msa talking points. That effectively started the war against syria and have sustained the war against syria and will potentially be used to sustain sanctions against syria to sustain the blockade of syria to sustain the criminalization of allies of syria And potentially in the future to sustain future unrest future uprisings in the. Us is not known for letting go of its prey so we have to assume that they're our future projects designed to further destabilize syria to further economically Fragment syria to Further pressure on the neighbors on the friendly neighbors of syria light for example lebanon so in my view it is highly irresponsible to be maintaining the narratives that if you like in april the continuation of some degree of collective punishment of the syrian people. Because subjectively what is the result. And when the he's talking points are regurgitated without any context whatsoever right by commentators and analysts the majority of whom have not spent as vote mentioned anytime whatsoever inside syria..

syria Kevorkian cia msa lebanon Us
"syria" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

05:07 min | 1 year ago

"syria" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"It doesn't. It doesn't interrupt operations at all. Thousand represented actually voted with. Bipartisan support to repeal the two thousand him earlier this month the by administration kind of came in late in the game. The day of the vote. eric or perhaps the day before with a statement of administration policy endorsing repeal. Basically saying what. I just said that this isn't going. To impact current operations negatively in that. It's basically a good housekeeping measure that congress should leaves authorizations on the books that could be used and abused in different unexpected ways moving forward. That's the subtext. At least on the quite come out came out and said that and so the by administration i think may have anticipated that move in february and here certainly would be in a difficult position potentially if it came out and relied on the two thousand two af f. even after it said it should repeal it until there's that sort of political dynamic there. I also think you know. It's quite possible that a number of the lawyers in the by administration genuinely see this collective self-defense. Interpretation as stretching the envelope on the ams a little bit too far and in ways that might be a little bit problematic. Certainly i think actually a lot of people would accept that the president has article to authorities certainly defend us forces from attack. And there's a good argument. At least under the exact how the executive branch reads article to say that the president would probably have authority to use military force at least a limited nature to defend allied forces From outside attack relying on the amf isn't strictly necessary. In these cases and primary effect is actually to take transparency by getting around these reporting requirements that it would otherwise apply. So you know it might be as a more kind of legal policy angle to say. This is a better way to do this. And serves our other policy interests in this sort of situation more squarely in. What has the congressional response to the so far. Well it's interesting congress's very busy with the number of items right now in. This hasn't gotten quite as strong or as vocal response in all camps as a certain prior actions had including the strikes in february. I don't think i'm but we have seen a number of people primarily on at least most vocally among democrats actually saying that this is part of a trend that they continue to find concerning that the president while they support the president acting in defense of us personnel in us military troops. I don't think any member of congress is gonna come out against that. They say it's a problem that they don't appear to have coordinated with congress or or saw authorization from congress in advance before doing this at perhaps the most target critique actually came from senator chris murphy who said that look. This is one of several of a series of these were two strikes against these iran backed militia groups or lease allegedly run back militia groups in iraq that we seen basically since december two thousand nineteen when the trump administration started taking these sorts of actions and he said at a certain point when we see a whole pattern of these doesn't it rise to a level of hostilities a pattern hostilities. That under the power resolution requires congress to authorize it or else the sixty day clock that were partial solution. Impose will run. The executive branch will eventually kind of run out of authority. I think most people the executive branch probably don't buy that interpretation I think they would say that. These are isolated incidents that each that none of which are sustained enough Or continual enough to kick the sixty day clock collectively. I think many of them would also argue. Frankly that the president has a constitutional authority to defend. Us troops That can't clearly be limited by congress by statute that's a controversial point but certainly there are some people who maintain that view. But i think the key point here is that you know if congress wants that to be the view. The executive branch is going to take. It's clearly isn't the one now as hasn't been the one traditionally and it's probably gonna require further legislative action on the part of congress but nonetheless there are people in congress who voices concerns and say look. This is exactly the sort scenario where we need to see. The executive branch coordinating work closely with congress and perhaps ultimately get congressional authorization. So let's say scott you are yourself in congress now or your congressional staffer. What are the types of things that you want to know from the administration about what happened. What are what is this. Teach you in terms of stuff that you might wanna push. What are what are the lessons from this. Well i think the big question for member of congress to think about here is what this says about the direction of us military activities in iraq and syria. We have seen a number of these actions in recent years there's always framed as deterrent actions. They're deterrent effect. Is not entirely self evident. Certainly these shia militia groups are continuing to undertake these attacks at a significant enough pace to warrant these military responses and the united states has in response particularly since the january twenty. Twenty killing of qassem suleimani iranian islamic revolutionary guard corps commander who was killed in a us drone. Strike along with a number of senior officials from one of these militias. His know since then we have seen the security situation interacted deteriorate substantially that combined with global pandemic and perhaps some progress in the counter. I offensive counters. State offensive has led. The united states has coalition partners to significantly reduce their presence in iraq. Both the troop level wise and in terms of facilities. They maintain to be a little more secure..

"syria" Discussed on Ron Paul Liberty Report

Ron Paul Liberty Report

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"syria" Discussed on Ron Paul Liberty Report

"They felt they were covered by saying well. This is the right to self-defence. We don't get to claim self defense when you're occupying someone else's country. The troops are there illegally in syria. In also i would say probably illegally in iraq. The iraqi government having voted last year to expel the. Us new said. We're not leaving so the idea that self defense and i think it was k. Johnstone new pointed out if you break into someone's house and the guy tries to get you to leave and you killed him because you said well. I thought the house was mine. That's not justifiable domestic laws. You say article. Two of the constitution the authority of the president to protect us troops in iraq. Well if they're not there legally in the first place it's a little bit rough to justify it in that respect yes and a lot of people don't realize that We help create this monster from the very beginning. You know back in the early part of the century when they were talking about going to war in iraq and afghanistan and all the all these other places that you know taking iraq which was a suny country even though even though the majority were shia and giving it to the shia Why win this complicated mess over there. Get worse since it just happens that the iranians are she and You know they're even even what we try to sort out I think there are some basic rules. You can expect their our sympathies between she and she a- and That little war internal war with within the muslim world going on for a long time. Well you know a lot of critics of the war back then were saying ha how dumb the pentagon is You know the unintended. Victors of the evasion of iraq. Where the shia iran. You know how dumb how dumb. I didn't really offer that. Maybe i'm just too cynical. Dr paul i almost think it was by design because that guarantees the war will be Eternal they're you know if you if you one side against the other you push ones and we did that through the eighties with iran iraq war. We just want him killed to kill each other. So i'm gonna say they're sitting. Listen here trouble is your so often right but the one key part to put a couple of things and with the next one this is glenn greenwald..

iraq k. Johnstone paul syria last year afghanistan shia glenn greenwald early part of the century one key part iraqi government Two one side first place iran iraq war eighties muslim iranians each iran
"syria" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"syria" Discussed on Today in Focus

"Syria martin. Can we start by going right back. Tell me about assads life. Before he came to power the shah was the second son of hafiza lesser the serene dictatorship long standing. He deserves a western educated son. hadn't been seen as Material early on his older brother. Brazil had been killed in a car crash near damascus airport and he was brought back from abroad. Broadway had been studying ophthalmology. He was presented to his country as a mild mannered western educated leader. Who was prepared to introduce some reforms.

damascus airport second son Brazil hafiza Broadway Syria martin
"syria" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

03:34 min | 1 year ago

"syria" Discussed on Today in Focus

"Today following elections in syria we looked at the shah alam assad's brutal hold over the country after he survived the arab spring and then ten years of civil war year. Two thousand shar. Alyssa succeeded his father. As president of syria he was just thirty. Four years old had studied in london and some hope he would open up the autocratic country of girls allergic. He set the tone with an inauguration speech in which he called for new ideas. Indeed seem the new era for a couple of freezers. One young motivated and stick leader. The western educated nine also need some of the steps. He took like releasing political prisoners that his father kept for twenty years twenty five years in some cases muhammad. Al abdulla is a syrian. Human rights activist. Now he's living in the us but then he was studying law in the capital city. Damascus the the period of openness was called damascus spring but was a very short spring indeed if all along assad had reverted to his father style of governance muhammad was jailed simply as a result of his activism in the notorious prison. You'll be abused and beaten up and beating on the face slapping and cuffing to the back said in a solitary run for around two months under scanner ground sunlight of course that was a bad experience but also heating other being tortured others being tortured in a database. It's it's a very horrifying thing by the time. Demonstrations spread across the country in twenty eleven muhammad was living outside syria. But it was still a heady moment. I was excited scared. I was excited because the decisions were so so so so so so big. They were nice organized and peaceful them. It reassured me that we were not this country is oppressed people are oppressed. People are aware of this. Muhammad was also aware of what asset was likely to do next. Basically he's going to be brutal he's gonna kill people he's going to be violent he's going to use force against people and that is exactly what happened in a decade long campaign by the president against rebel forces and civilians sometimes adler on the brink of losing the country but time and again he held on and last week after an election western leaders called neither free nor fair he announced he had won ninety five percent of the vote for ten years. The guardians martin chula has covered the entire conflict. Shower lozad is largely responsible for the super war. Which is collapsed. Syria the deaths of five hundred thousand people in war the turtle disintegration of the economy and the displacement of more than half of series prewar population many of whom remained outside the country's borders even now from the guardian. I'm donna did i invite guests. How shall i last. Saad clawed his way.

Saad london Alyssa twenty years Muhammad ninety five percent Damascus last week five hundred thousand people martin chula syria ten years thirty Al abdulla Today Two thousand twenty five years Four years old assad shah alam