31 Burst results for "Sympathetic Nervous System"

Experiencing Bad Dreams

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

03:18 min | 2 weeks ago

Experiencing Bad Dreams

"Welcome to kiss myths and Mysteries. I'm your host kit Crump today bad dreams nightmares night terrors. Have you ever had a nightmare or night terror the kind of dream where you wake up in a cold sweat and can remember every detail. What was it that scared you and how scared were you really? Can you be so terrorized that you have a heart attack? Could you die in your sleep due to a nightmare the answer is yes. Yes, you can be scared to death. It's called parasympathetic rebirth parasympathetic rebound is the delayed reaction of the parasympathetic nervous system during intense and or prolonged stress to the opposed sympathetic nervous system. Now, let's take a look at dreams most of us dream every night. Even if we don't remember doing so sometimes dreams feel super short. Usually if they're about something really good like the perfect game. Your celebrity crush other times they can feel like they're going on forever the entire night which can be particularly annoying if they're scary are causing you anxiety wage. If you've wondered about the actual length of an average dream, you certainly aren't alone. There are a lot of mysterious questions about dreams researchers are still trying to learn what science does not know about dreaming is this dream should basically a mental exercise that happens while someone is sleeping dreams that occured during the rapid eye movement or Rim part of sleep which account page about 20% of the night. No one really knows exactly why we dreamed though. There are a lot of theories out there according to some researchers dreams exist to process intense emotions or facilitate consolidation of emotional memories some believe that dreams help show us daytime threats so that we can learn how to avoid them. Or show us counterfactual simulations to daytime events so that we can learn lessons. There are also researchers who don't think dreams exist for any reason at all. Oh really? They they're just there and what are nightmares nightmares are scary or terrifying dreams of typically occur in REM sleep and leave the dreamers shaken or disturbed to some extent upon Awakening some researchers maintain that for a dream to be a nightmare. It has to be disturbing enough to awaken the dreamer other experts point out that many not scary dreams erotic sad Nostalgia creative spiritual can be intense enough to awaken to Brimmer also, so now let's take a full circle. What is one of the key factors that would wake you up answer over-stimulation of the parasympathetic nervous system. And what is the parasympathetic rebound but a delayed reaction of the parasympathetic nervous system. To overstimulation perhaps if you dream you die, but wake up shaking and in a cold sweat there simply wasn't enough extreme long term stress to cause parasympathetic rebound, but could you be scared to death by a nightmare? The answer is a resounding? Yes

Sympathetic Nervous System Crump Brimmer
Finding Your Own Unity

The Daily Meditation Podcast

05:10 min | Last month

Finding Your Own Unity

"In this week's ceres, we've been exploring the ancient wisdom of one of the most famous Indian sages. Tanjile who wrote the classic Yoga Sutras Yoga, means, union, or unity and the Yoga Sutras. Are Representative of living a life with a higher state of consciousness. Feeling unified or connected. And in today's episode, you're going to discover a meditation technique to help you. Feel not only united or connected within yourself, but also with others with the world around you. And in these days. Of certainty. where? There's Not a lot of trust at least where I live in the United States and I know in many other countries as well. With many of our major institutions such as our political economic. Health Care Education. Even our spiritual and religious institutions have. disappointed. US In many cases not to say that we have given up hope on everything necessarily I'll vote there is that too where there's definitely that going on today. Potentially, offers with the Yoga Sutras a way for you to feel unified within yourself. To feel connected. This is through living. A life where you incorporate a lot of the principles of. Yoga and meditation which he called the Yomise. And we explored the first Yama. A few weeks ago of non harm or loving kindness. And the Second Yama. In last week's series and that had to do with. Non Line or truthfulness. Well this week you are exploring non stealing. And this is in regard not only to. Taking away something from someone stealing but also Greed. And negative thoughts and actions. which take away from the quality of your life. So think about. Your emotions this week you have had a challenge. Your challenge is to notice when your emotions are. More. In regard to your sympathetic nervous system where you're feeling them spy where you have this. Rush. Shoving Or your para sympathetic nervous system where your emotions can become. Even to allow. Where you feel as though, you just can't get out of bed or you see no hope. This is like a roller coaster. You may feel the you are on these days. And that is norma when we rely on. The world outside around us. To make us feel secure. When you begin to as tangibly was suggesting begin to. Develop these qualities within yourself. That make you a better person. The world becomes a better place, and if enough of us do this, we create a new life. Let me share with you what of Pantano lease quotes? He. says. When you are inspired by some great purpose, some extraordinary project. your thoughts, break their bonds. Your mind transcends limitations. Your conscious expands in every direction and you find yourself in a great new and wonderful world. So. As you settle yourself down and get ready to meditate. I invite you to focus on a chocolate your seventh Chakra, which is at the crown of your head. This is your highest Chakra Chagas are considered to be. Energy within your body were you harbor emotions and

United States Yoga Sutras Sympathetic Nervous System Tanjile Representative Pantano Health Care Education
Tuning into Our Breath

Hay House Meditations

03:55 min | Last month

Tuning into Our Breath

"Practice. Simple breathing techniques like inhaling through the nose for four count holding our breath for six count and exhaling out the mouth for an eight count. Can have measurable effects on our relaxation response. In fact, let's just do that right now. Just. We're going to just do one just one round where we're going to breathe it in for four hold for six in out for eight. Okay. So. Everybody exhale together. exhale. Now breathing through the nose for four in one, two, three, four, hold your breath for six, two, three, four, five, six, exhale out the mouth for eight three four. Five, six, seven, eight. Even. Just one breath we can feel how the pair sympathetic nervous system that relaxation response. Is affected. So we'll be practicing this method in our facebook live group, this four, six, eight which if you haven't joined the facebook live I encourage you to do. So it's a great way to connect with other meditators in the challenge and to ask any questions you have I'll I'll answer any questions that you have about meditation. But back to the breath now. Why is there so much emphasis placed on the breath in meditation. There's a few reasons, but the principal one is because the breath is what is with us even when we're not aware of it. That is to say is an audit function. This makes the breath the ideal companion on our meditation path because it's so reliable it's always there for us. So I, encourage you to get acquainted with your breath and rely on meditation practices that utilize the breath. Your breath is your ideal ally on the spiritual path. Also, the many scientific studies now show what Yogis and meditators and mystics throughout the ages have known. Focusing on the breath slows down the racine thinking mine because the relaxation response is immediately stimulated when we place our attention on the breath. I often encouraged people when we're practicing mindfulness of breathing. To rest your attention on the breath they're lightly. Like a butterfly landing on a flower, it's very light touch but one that has beautiful results. During the facebook live group, all-share a couple, other breeding techniques and will discuss. Other Meditation Practices. So today's guided Meditations for day three are by a real maestro of meditation. The morning meditation is Who Many of you will know and be very familiar with that's David G. David G shares a beautiful guided morning meditation in his classic style where he brings together. So many gems of instructions into a flow of inspiration, which is an absolutely perfect way to begin your day. The evening meditation is guided by me and we meditate on what I call the spacious out breath. Breath in and out there are slight pauses at the top of the breath and after we exhale. So we use those pauses in our meditation practice we practice resting. Expanding into those pauses in that spacious

Principal Facebook David G. David G Sympathetic Nervous System Racine
Stimulate This 'Unique Nerve' To Experience Deep, Healing, Relaxing And Restful Sleep

My Seven Chakras

04:56 min | 2 months ago

Stimulate This 'Unique Nerve' To Experience Deep, Healing, Relaxing And Restful Sleep

"One of the biggest challenges people have these days is that they're not able to get deep healing relaxing and restful sleep is that you? It seems like a puzzle that's difficult to solve. What should you do to relax? How can you switch off your stress? Is that a way that you can tap into your inner pharmacy to create a natural sleeping bill in this episode, going to share with you a quick natural technique that you can use at your home to feel completely relaxed in minutes and get good quality sleep. But before we begin if you are interested in this topic and About how you can use ancient wisdom to calm your mind relax your nervous system and distressed to make sure that you hit the subscribe button on your apple device or if you using another device, make sure that you share this with your friends and family. When you hit subscribe does something special to the Algorithm which ensures that people who would not normally come across this part caused actually come across it. So make sure that he supporters and hit subscribe Quick story before I, begin giving you the exact technique yesterday I was doing a livestream with an facebook group demonstrating this specific technique, and after that I went straight to working on my computer, and this was about ten fifteen pm. But as soon as I went on the computer and started doing my work, I began to feel a bit drowsy I began to feel sleepy. And my head was getting heavier and heavier until I just brought my head on my table. And it didn't make sense until I realized the fact that I had just done that technique. I. Demonstrated that Technique Did Accident Dia Body and prepare for sleep. So this does work and I would encourage you to try out yourself but promise me one thing don't attempt to do this technique while you're driving or if you're in water or a place that needs your full attention because this is it bar for technique do this only if you're at home and need to fully relax where you not be disturbed because this is awful and it will change your state in minutes. So let's begin stepped one. Especially, when you're doing Brett work and throughout the day, make sure that you're breathing in through your nose breathing through your nose ensures that you get just that I'd quantity of oxygen and not too much because too much oxygen can cause more damage than good as explained in previous episode oxygen is like fuel for yourself you need just a right amount of. Fuel to produce energy do much few land. It could lead to oxidative damage to your tissues and organs, and you don't want to damage your against the other benefit of reading through news is that your nose contain these nose hairs right which act as filters. So you're ensuring that the quality of air that you're breathing is good and because of those same. Filters and the structure of your news the that's coming in is nice and warm, which again is conducive to relaxation fort benefit of breathing in through your nose is that when you breathe through your nose, there's nitric oxide the guess created from the back of your nose and your sinuses, which then goes into your lungs and this helps dilate your air passages. In your lungs annual blood vessels allowing the oxygen, which you're inhaling to go much more effectively into where it's needed for energy production. So the oxygen goes into your Mitochondria, which is the powerhouse of your cell that leads to energy production line breathing in through your nose is good for you when you breathing out, make sure that you're breathing out through your mouth. How and when you're breathing out, imagine that you're breathing out through a straw or that you're fogging a mirror. And you can make this salad old because it really enhances the expedients. Now, adding this slight resistance, right when you're making the shape of a straw as you're breathing out as the effect of activating your batter sympathetic nervous system, the part of your nervous system that is responsible for resting they're responsible for digesting your food for healing for cellular repair and most barley immune building because guess what it is a pandemic season, you are very your masks, but also you need to boost your immune system.

Nose Breathing Sympathetic Nervous System Facebook Brett Apple
Sleeping with Fear

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

03:24 min | 2 months ago

Sleeping with Fear

"Listening. Welcome to kiss myths and mystery your host Kit crump apparently a podcast I. Did a couple months ago of kept people up late at night including one woman from. SEATTLE. Who asked me to repeat this podcast and she signed it sleepless in Seattle the podcast is about night terrorists have you ever had a nightmare the kind of dream where you wake up in a cold sweat and can remember every detail what was it that scared you and how scared were you really can you be so terrorized that you have a heart attack could you die in your sleep due to a nightmare? The answer is, yes. Yes. You can be scared to death. It's call para sympathetic rebound. Paris sympathetic rebound is delayed reaction of the Para sympathetic nervous system during a tense and or prolonged stress to the opposed sympathetic nervous system. Now. Let's take a look at dreams most of US dream every night even we don't remember doing. So sometimes dreams feel super short usually if they're about something really good like the perfect date with your celebrity crush other times, they can feel like they're going on forever the entire night, which can be particularly annoying if they're scary or causing you anxiety. If you've wondered about the actual length of an average dream, you certainly earned alone there are lot of mysterious questions. About Dreams and researchers are still trying to learn to answer what science does know of Audrey Muniz. This dreams are basically a mental exercise happens while someone is sleeping dreams occur during rapid eye movement Aram part of sleep, which accounts about twenty percent of the night. No one really knows exactly why we dream there are a lot of theories out there according to some researchers dreams exist to process intense emotions or facilitate consolidation of emotional memories. Some believe that dreams help. Show. US. Daytime threats. So the can learn how to avoid them or show US counterfactual simulations today time events so that we can learn lessons. There are also researchers who don't think dreams exists for any reason at all really they just do and what are nightmares nightmare scary or terrifying dreams that typically occur in Rams sleep and leave the dream of shaken or disturbed to some extent upon waking some researchers maintain that for a dream to be a nightmare at has. To be disturbing enough to awaken the dreamer other experts point out that many non scary dreams erotic. Sad nostalgic creative spiritual can be intense enough to awaken the dreamer also. So now let's take this full circle. What is one of the key factors would wake you up answer over stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system and what is para sympathetic rebound but the delayed reaction to the Para sympathetic nervous system to over stimulation perhaps if you dream you die but wake up. In a coal sweat there simply wasn't enough extreme long-term stress to cause para sympathetic rebound but could you be scared to death by a nightmare? The answer is a resounding. Yes and they're sleepless in Seattle is a repeat of my nightmare

Sympathetic Nervous System United States Seattle Kit Crump Audrey Muniz Aram Rams Paris
"sympathetic nervous system" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

06:02 min | 3 months ago

"sympathetic nervous system" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Okay. I was being coy. You said stage very nicely, okay? So if your body It's will say some bad bacteria gets in it. Yeah, and your body is alerted warning intruder is coming. Your immune system kicks into gear. And starts producing this biochemical material called PIRA Jin OK. This is My new favorite thing. The body does. Oh, yeah, yeah. You knew that before, Right? Or did you just not know the mechanism? I mean, I knew humans get fevers. And I knew the fever was kind of like, cook out everything. I didn't understand the mechanisms things. Your quest will take this part then. Oh, you can sew these pirate Jin's right. They are, um these biochemical markers that are released by the immune system in the body or and this is why I love this. There's some bacteria, some pathogens that make human sick that produce Pirate Jin's naturally, so when they show up, they just start releasing. I mean, and they just give themselves away. It's their big dummies in that way, right there like Hey, where's the party? They kick open the door carrying like a pony keg under one arm. Yeah, their guts sticking out is just that's that's like that kind of bacteria, right? So the pirate Jin's enter the bloodstream. They traveled to the hypothalamus, because, remember, the hypothalamus controls your your body temperature. And this is what they do. Chuck. Are you ready for what? The Pirate Jin's do? Yes. They Go to your hypothalamus, and they Dampen the heat sensing neurons in the hypothalamus, and they excite the cold sensing neurons in your hypothalamus, and they trick your hypothalamus into thinking your body suddenly gotten very, very cold so that your hypothalamus turns the temperature up and says, Don't let any of this heat out. We gotta we gotta warm back up. It tricks, your body, your hypothalamus and creating a fever. That's right. And they do this because well, they don't do this because, but What happens from there? Do this because you're dumb, But what happens from there is like he said. The fever what a fever is and why you want that fever for at least a little while that it does. It's it's trying to cook and burn. Bake that bacteria until it dies, right? It is your body's fighting. Like when you hear, you know, like your fever broke. It's usually a good sign. That means that your fever did its job and it's cooked all that bacteria up and you're going to be on the mend soon. Yeah, Eso. Basically, that's what's happening. And this is the great thing about a fever. But You know, fever makes you feel like crap because it's a lot of Hard work to kill all those things. Well, it is. There's a lot of your sympathetic nervous system has kicked into high gear, which I found out is one reason why they say you want to feed a cold, starve a fever. Because you don't want to introduce digestion because it requires the parasympathetic nervous system, Right? Right fight or flight And you don't want those two things going on. While your body has a fever. It's just a lot of extra work for it right. But one of the one of the things that is going on when your body has a fever. When that temperature rises, it's hard enough on your organs. But it's also hard on the level, just the fact that they're operating outside of the normal operating temperature, and that makes it very hard on them and can actually cook some of the ingredients inside yourselves. Yeah, I mean, it's like working in a Two hot oven environment. Just never fun for anyone, right? Although I guess some people love that stuff. Yeah, but they're still they might like it, but they still aren't working fast. Yeah, that's true. You know, they might be happy, but they're slow. Eso. If you have a fever, what's considered a fever now? 2017. If you're an adult, and you're aural temperatures above 100.4 Or if your rectal Or air temperatures above 101 and that's considered a fever of your kid. Good luck getting anything besides the rectal temperature because it's just tough. You have basically no right. Well, whichever's wiggly kids who aren't like, sure. Stick something in my ear for for a second. Yeah. But the kazoo there's not really anything to do about that. All they can do is say Glaber and, yeah, exactly. So the rectal temperature for a kid above 100.4 and with adults like you don't have to. Really Worry about your fever to much if it stops 105. For you know any period time. You probably want to do something about that. That's what I saw was 105 F. Mark was about where you should start to worry as an adult, and you're going to feel so awful if your temperature is one of five. You've probably already been to a doctor. At that point. Let's hope so for kids is different than if you don't want to let your child get upto 105 That's bad, bad, bad. So what is it for kids that you really want to start worrying about is you say, you know what? I'm not exactly sure. I mean, it probably depends on whether you're a first time parent or this is your second Well, and it varies with the age. You know, it's like 0 to 18 months. That's something I guess you like. What you should do is so that your doctor? Yeah, exactly. But you know any kind of temperature you should for a child. You should kind of be a little more alert about Right, But we're not medical experts here. Nowhere now and everything we're saying assumes that you have healthcare coverage. That's right. Um Right. So that's fever in general, you got anything else on that? Yeah, One other thing. Thea Ah, The pirate Jin's, um Cairo. By the way, it's no mistake, man. I did have some coincidence. No, it's not. What is the Latin for Fire? Greek word for fire? Yeah,.

fever Jin sympathetic nervous system Chuck Thea Ah Cairo Glaber
Why Food Is More Powerful Medicine Than Drugs with Maggie Ward

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

05:54 min | 6 months ago

Why Food Is More Powerful Medicine Than Drugs with Maggie Ward

"Tell us a little bit about this first patient that you've had that you wanted to share a little bit about what their struggle with a rate. You know these this case I picked it because it's fairly common to what we see. I mean we see a little bit of everything especially the ultra wellness center but it gets a kind of common theme especially for people that come to see me just burned nutritional nutritionist. So this woman she says sixty four year old woman who I've been working with for a while Dealing with a weight gain. That was one of her main concerns. I mean mild about twenty pounds overweight and it came on around menopause for her ambitious. Had a very long history of reflects had been onto our birthright Harper Harper now called reflects the whole industry of drugs and it's like the third most commonly prescribed class of drugs out there with the acid blocking drugs. Little Per Bay right and many you can get right now over the counter to some people are taking it. You know even without a doctor's prescription and You know sometimes needed for short term but unfortunately a lot of people have been these medications a long time and I think you know we see the the negative impact that so much at our center so she in a shed a long history of the reflex in also dealing with lower energy She's been on many diets which we hear so often people come to us trying many many different things in the common theme here as the way beating. This wasn't sustainable. And obviously we use the word. Diet you know just to kind of have that language. But I really don't like that word because I think we tend to think of food is lacking white. We're either on a diet off diet and initially might be asking people to walk a kind of a finer line with the food choices to get them dealing better winter but ultimately eating whole foods. Kind balancing those macronutrients eating every maybe four hours once you. You're eating during the day. I mean those are things that you Kinda WanNa make your lifestyle and that's ultimately what we really talked about is. How do you make the sustainable reflects cases so common? You know the number one reason that people go to the doctor in America is for digestive problems and reflexes. Right up there among them. So what are the causes that you see Maggie for Harper and reflex which is so common in our patient population in the country? I think it's multiple things. I mean from a dietary standpoint when we know a lot of the foods that can cause indigestion. Reflux dairy is a gluten so big one so we do a lot focusing on taking out those foods at might be more more irritant to the guide in front like allergies true allergies may be sensitivities were sensitivities. Exactly I mean. People do definitely have true allergies by at what we see is just different ways your immune system can react even intolerances where you just don't digest the food while dairies. A good example that were lactose eventually gives everyone issue and it can cause things that reflects in voting gas. So that stuff's subway gonNA mean obsolete working with providers doing more testing around breath testing and stool tests and get a sense of disposes. It's a very common thing that we see. What's this bio suit me as win your bacteria's at a balance in your body and also can often be in the wrong plates in your usual right right in your gut. Many people what we see they had small Hessel. Bow Overgrowth what we call the CBO bacteria and even used to move further up into the Upper Gi and doubling caused a lot of distress. They're normally normally. There's a lot of bacteria in your lower intestine. Your but not so much in your small intestine you've got twenty. Two feet of small intestine starts at the end of your stomach. In when the bacteria migrate up for different reasons motilal issues low magnesium strasse whatever you end up with this overgrowth of bugs in small intestine and someone. The food hits there it should be. It should be sterile. But when activity in there? They they go to town right. They go to town and they ferment. The starchy foods that you're eating and you get this thing called the food baby. Everybody knows that that is you eat. And you get this bloating. This come for That's called CBO. Which very horrible condition it. So many people suffer from right right and that's still people I mean. All bacteria produce gas. It's one thing it's down your coal in any current lease it when it's in your upper gi making 'cause a lot of discomfort so we see that a lot anything that is again a big a big issue with the reflux also mobility issues. I work with a lot of people talking about how you eat slowing down chewing food while doing some deep belly breathing before you eat. Takhar relax bagel nerve that runs along the whole digestive track. I think that goes a long way. I've had multiple people. Tell me just by slowing down and chewing. Better reflects gone on a lot of. What was your stress sympathetic? Nervous system is your fight or flight nervous system and one of the things does is shut down your digestive system because when you're running from a sabertooth tiger you don't want to be digesting your food. You want all the blood to build your muscles and and be able to run as fast. You can't so that's what happens when you eat under stress and this is this is why these practices. You're talking about deep breathing. Taking pause called. Take five take take five breasts before every meal and see what happens It's a very powerful reset in fact what was interesting when I was writing my book. Ultra metabolism. I found that there was this paper that showed that the sympathetic nervous system attack connects to the fat cells. So this is the stress response And and when you're stressed it inhibits the fat cells metabolism so literally slows your metabolism so being stressed literally Metabolism make you gain weight

Harper Harper Allergies CBO Reflux Little Per Bay Sympathetic Nervous System Hessel America Bloating Maggie Sabertooth
The Medical Reason You're Craving Carbs Right Now

Art Beauty

04:48 min | 7 months ago

The Medical Reason You're Craving Carbs Right Now

"Speaking of back to basics and the simple basics of life. Today's guest was kind of amazing. I learned so march. Yeah Dr Eldridge Taylor. And he is based in Atlanta. He's a board certified holistic doctor he started as an Obgyn and started to realize that you know there are a natural ways that we can really fortify our bodies in sort of get back to the basics as you said So he's got some great tips especially during this time of stress To number one boost immune system and Have a potato chip and know why it's okay. You're doing the right thing. Okay well stress. I mean almost. Everybody really understands that when they're under stress they're more likely to get a cold or flu or any other city or you know eighteen hours a day for two or three weeks. Are you're flying around? You know you're on a bunch of the sales calls all know you come? Home is more likely to get sick because stress and cortisol suppresses the immune system but we get works. Is that when the body is under stress? It is worried about dying right in there and it is saying. Hey we don't need to worry about something that's going to happen along Tam from now we've got to have all our resources toward whatever you're doing is eighteen hours of work. Whatever we gotta devoted so the immune system is suppressed so The first thing you need to do is to not panic. Panic one makes you make bad decisions. It CAUSES CORTISOL TO INCREASE CAUSES SYMPATHETIC. Nervous System TO BE ENHANCED. And so yet looking at you know it's great to look at the news and to be informed but looking at it twenty four hours a day is not good for. Ya told. I was on interview the other day. And said you need to binge-watch Nip flicks comedy special? You know but I do these days is I watched the morning news. First of all the morning news is always going to be friendlier than news. The evening is as working in immediate used. If if it bleeds it leads right so there it is what it is folks but the morning news generally tends to be a little bit more upbeat while you can still get those key headlines for the day for I don't understand why everybody a Netflix are. Watching shows like contagion were doing. We're living in living contagion. You need to laugh. You need to play. You need to go outside six feet away but you need to actually go outside. So what can you do? Here's how you can boost your immune system. Seventy percent of your immune system is in your gut and good. Bacteria in the gut will help control the immune system because what is happening with this virus by people at AMC is that their immune system is going. Overboard is being uncontrolled. It's actually attacking healthy tissue instead of just the hours. So probiotics will help to control the immune system so that doesn't go overboard now when it comes to things like vitamin C. Do you find that it's better to get it. From natural things like oranges or citrus. Or you should we just go for a supplement. Yes it's you know. The thing is I mean you'd have to eat a lot of oranges to get enough vitamin C. To really now it would be enough for the daily requirement but then daily requirement is to prevent scurvy. But if you look at the research When you're talking about is antiviral capabilities and and other things. You have to use more than talking about somewhere between a thousand and four thousand milligrams on pretty much consistent basis this. In order to really boost the immune system said that bag of mandarins bought yesterday and that had been just like funneling is is a joke me. In how many how much? I'd rather do that than the candy all day that would rather for. You've much vitamin C. Is in wine orange or Mandarin ballpark. Do you know you got me on that one okay. I'll have to look so on. That probiotic tipped you you. You know that was in the arsenal that you discussed. I get confused. An ICY probiotic in the Little Strawberry Yogurt drink. I give my daughter in the morning and then I see it in the vitamins that are not so active looking and then the other day I was in whole foods all gloved up and looking crazy and I noticed this really butte.

Dr Eldridge Taylor Cortisol Atlanta Netflix TAM FLU AMC Cold
Facing Pandemic Fears with an Awake Heart

Tara Brach

09:56 min | 8 months ago

Facing Pandemic Fears with an Awake Heart

"Poet Martha Pasta Wages. Create a clearing in the dense forest of your life and let these moments right now. Be a pause were you inwardly and feel what is here. What wants attention. Been unwilling to feel. Let yourself touch. What really is living in you right now. Your own perhaps sense of owner ability sorrow fear. You might ask the question that as I as I face. This collective suffering what is being called forth in me. What is it that's being called for? How do you want to be? Who Do you want to be in the midst of this? These are important questions. My French important. Because our prayer as our sensing who do I really WanNa be through this? That has the power to guide us. Many of you know in love this teaching from Zen Master On I circulated at some in the last week or so and it helps me every time I reflect on it. He writes that when the crowded Vietnamese refugee boats met with storms or pirates. If everyone panicked all would be lost but if even one person on the boat remained. Calm and centered. It was enough. It showed the way for everyone to survive. So here we are. We're in the midst of this huge unprecedented uncertainty reactivity in fear and confusion a lot more. Can we be that person? Because in a way we've been training for this each of us in our own ways we've been training how to open more in our personal life to the joys and the sorrows to the fears to the losses within away car. We've been training so if you're intentional right at this juncture in time. If you're intentional how you want to move through this the suffering that arises concern you towards your deepest resources we kind of get back into it into our bravery and into our wisdom and our our love and I'm sure you've seen it in your own life how it's often the periods of suffering the real losses the failures when we actually grow when our consciousness wakes up SOM- so we'll look together now at how these very circumstances of our times the dangers that are presented to our bodies our health our life our loved ones or financial security have these various circumstances can be grounds for compassion. We'll explore that together and I'd like to do this in two parts. I how what's going on and what's coming up in us how we can then create find an inter refuge of love of presence. How can we do that? And the second part is how we can find refuge with each other because if ever there was time for Sanga Ev- ever this world is going to experience truly moving through something holding hands. Whether it's we might call it. Virtually but our hearts together. This is the time so we start with the first and I'd like to name that it's important as we practiced with the fear succumb up as we seek in refuge that we remember that fear is utterly natural and appropriate. When we're facing danger loss I love the language. It's nature's protector. It's telling us to take good care. And in many ways in some parts of the world and with some of US say the United States. We haven't been awake and scared enough to do. We needed to do to prevent as much loss as may becoming. So fear's intelligent part of us and so often when it comes up. There's a sense. Oh I shouldn't be experiencing this. There's something wrong with me for feeling fear in a sense that we should just try to get rid of it so for me. One of the most powerful little practices I do when fear comes. Up Is Mentally. Whisper this belongs. It's like it's a wave in the ocean and it belongs so fear's natural it's intelligent and the challenge as we know is that if we don't know how to be mindful of fear. Fear possesses us. Panic can become truly debilitating when we get hijacked by fear we lose contact with our with our most recently evolved part of our brain our frontal. We we lose contact with compassion. We lose contact with perspective with humor with all executive functioning. So I'm it's matter matter of degree of course but fear when it takes over causes a tremendous amount of suffering and in a pandemic it's contagious so can become widespread and it becomes one of the greatest dangers of pandemic. So again that question. Can we be that person in the boat who feels the intelligence of the fear but knows how to hold it with? Mindfulness and with compassion. Because this is where the training and mindfulness comes in and we're going to explore it bringing rain which is a we've of mindfulness and compassion to fear at first to say on many of you are probably aware that along with my colleague Jack Cornfield. I teach a mindfulness teacher. Certification Program and a number of people in the current cohort are from China and several of them reported in. They told us that the Chinese government has just officially recommended that to reduce stress and report community during these times. Everybody in China. She practiced mindfulness meditation. So I heard this kind of celebrated. It's pretty cool. And some of you might know that I and a couple of colleagues are currently offering webinars. Mindfulness webinars to the House of Representatives and staff. So here we are now waiting for the official word that we're supposed to do physical distancing washing hands quieting our minds and arriving in presence. May It be so so? Let's take a look at. We find that inner refuge of calm in the midst of the storm for ourselves and for the sake of others and we begin. I'd like to start by saying when fear is really strong. When it's the level of panic and trauma were what's called outside the window of tolerance. And that's A. That's a phrase from my friend and colleague Dan Siegel Great Psychiatrist. And he describes the window of tolerance for within a fears within it. Then we can bring mindfulness and compassion and really transform our relationship to it but when it gets outside the window of tolerance we first need to calm down our nervous system. We need to do some a reducing of the activation of the sympathetic nervous system of fight flight freeze so there are a number of ways we can do this and you are probably familiar with them. They're all forms of nurturing ourselves. Helping US feel some sense of safety in love and one of them that is so helpful is breathing along deep breath breathing and counting to five and the in breath and then coming to five and the out breath and if you can do that for a few minutes ten minutes fifteen minutes you totally shift your nervous system. Route other ways of calming fight flight freeze grounding and that means feeling gravity feeling your belonging to the earth part of grounding might be to touch the fabric of what you're wearing into sense the the surface of the desk or the material of your chair named something you're seeing in the room so that you're bringing yourself into the here now with your

United States China Sympathetic Nervous System Martha Pasta Sanga Ev Dan Siegel Jack Cornfield Executive Chinese Government House Of Representatives Official
The Thermic Effect of Food

20 Minute Fitness

03:40 min | 8 months ago

The Thermic Effect of Food

"Thermic effective food otherwise known as t.f all specific dynamic action all fellow genesis refers to the number of categories needed while your body to digest absorb unprocessed the nutrients in your meals and this is the increase in metabolic rate because off a meal so was causing this if you look at it more detail as the stimulation of ATP hydrolysis during Intestinal Absorption and the initial metabolic steps in the neutral storage which is responsible for the food. That facts is one of those. Things are responsible for. The increase in calories burned off. Do you eat a meal. So research showed that protein-rich foods increased he after most. So they generally give cystic DOTS proteins. Increase your metabolic rate from anywhere between fifteen to thirty two percent compared to five to ten percent off on zero to three percent fats fats. According to a study notice the Third Reich affective foods or reviewing number studies suggest that the t.f is increased by larger meals sizes as opposed to frequent small meals at the intake of carbohydrates and protein as opposed to to dodge Fiat and HR fiscal activity. Also play a large role in. T. E. F. And as you all know the food you eat affects your metabolism and the speed at which you losing gain weight. But they all primary determinants. It's all about kind of deficits calorie surplus. Are you expanding more genial? Taking and so the thermic effective food and sympathetic nervous system activity in humans. Found that T. F. accounts for approximately ten percent all total daily energy expenditure. We must part of its as T. D. E. as well as macro groups having different effects. The level of processing of food also contributes with studies showing that the FEM INC effects of highly processed foods is substantially less than the whole foods county pause so people that are eating processed foods fall foods and not fresh organic ingredients on lots experiencing the full FEM INC affect food and have not spiking the metabolism after they eat there are a number of food which is said to have a higher fabric effect than others aside from you know saying whole proteins which can give a slight spike jewel of metabolism post consumption. That's things like spicy foods. So Chili Peppers capsicum and in Fact Review of Twenty Research Studies reports. Capstan can help your body around fifty extra calories per day. Coffee IS WELL STUDIED. Support that caffeine found. Obviously in your coffee can help to increase your metabolic rate by two eleven percent. There's apple cider vinegar different sorts of teas and so on but we do need to remember as Mike Matthews for legion. Athletic says that eating more energetic foods isn't the secret to that dream. Body giveaways hitching your mind. It's potentially a to help a little bit without sticking to the the the basic principles not games be a. He identified progressing finish journey. You can years thermic effect of food or volunteers by each Diet and this will help accelerate your weight loss. Butler said it sold ways down to the coal principles but practically speaking the wage do that It would eat high protein high carb moderate low fat diet so I hope that helps you understand a bit more about your diet on the food so that you'll understand why people say metabolism spiked up to the eighteen understand. Why and you may consider your food choices more Kathleen in the

Mike Matthews T. E. F. Fact Review Of Twenty Research Fem Inc Sympathetic Nervous System Caffeine Kathleen Butler T. D. E.
'Fight or Flight' Nerves Make Mice Go Gray

60-Second Science

02:15 min | 9 months ago

'Fight or Flight' Nerves Make Mice Go Gray

"They say that Marie Antoinette's hair turned white the night before she lost her head to the guillotine but constraints really have such a dramatic effect on hair-color a new study in mice concludes at Ken and credits overactive. Nerves with stripping the color from the animals locks and possibly hours researchers at Harvard Stem Cell Institute. Were interested in these stress and hair color issue so they decided to take a closer look at the stem cells that give rise to Milan. Ascites the cells that pump pigments into each hair follicle stem cells. Were an obvious target. Because changes in the stem cell population translates to try and justify hair color which very visible and easy to identify. Jacek sue the study senior author to start. She and her colleagues subjected mice to some rodent sized stressors like having their cage tilted their bedding dampened or their lights left on all night. So what did we find? We found stress indeed leads to premature hair grain in mice by took a long time for us to actually narrow down how occurs first they thought it could be the immune system attacking the millennia site stem cell population however mayes lack immune cells steel. Shell premature here graying under stress than they thought the key factor could be cortisol. The quintessential stress hormone the one way removed from the mice so that they cannot produce quarter so like her mows. The hairstyle turned gray under stress. That's when they turn their attention to the sympathetic nervous system which or constraints the body's overall reaction to stress including the classic fight or flight. Response those nerves reach out to our muscles organs and yes even our hair the nerve terminals wrap around each follicle like a ribbon and sooner team cut. Those connections the stem cells were spared and the animals kept their shiny black coat even in the face of minor discomfort. The findings appear in the journal Nature. It's unclear whether the same sympathetic nerves make us gray as we age but the results provide hope that we may someday be able to fight to hold onto our natural hair color and avoid that monthly flight to the hairdresser.

Harvard Stem Cell Institute Marie Antoinette Sympathetic Nervous System Ascites Cortisol Milan Jacek KEN Mayes
The Generosity of Scars with Scott Mann

The EntreLeadership Podcast

09:21 min | 9 months ago

The Generosity of Scars with Scott Mann

"I'm your host Alex Jones and today or conversation with Scott Man he's a retired green beret. Okay who is waging war against the loneliness epidemic by focusing on an answer that says old as time itself human connection and as as with most lessons of enduring value. This is one that Scott didn't learn in a textbook or in a classroom. It's one that he learned through pain through suffering suffering and through his own personal experience of rock bottom. Yeah I was standing in a closet. It is where I found myself my lowest moment coming out of the military holding loaded forty five pistol in my right hand and no intention of coming out of there alive. I had I stood there wonder. How in the heck I got to that point? You know. Just a few years earlier I had been a green beret. A career Green Beret. At the top of my game I had operated in at risk high-stakes places around the World Columbian Afghanistan and had led. You know very strategic missions and just in a short period of time just a couple of years. I had spiraled into this place where I was devoid of purpose. My mood swings were so unpredictable but that my wife and three sons would just literally get up and lead any room that I walked into my house awesome. I was starting to really question my relevance on this Earth that I had run my course you know my contributions were done and my time was over. There's just nothing left for me to give. The survivor's guilt had really come through strong the post traumatic stress. All the things that I had pushed down for years I once I got to this place where I was disconnected from purpose and and and really struggling then it came on full force and I just didn't know what to do with it. I had become severely isolated from Pierce Pierce in all of those factors created a very very nasty cocktail and so it sounds like you were in a place where you had literally lost. Hope for for the teacher. Yeah I think I think that's accurate. I had lost hope. And you know for a special operator. We pride ourselves at playing at the highest level and being super relevant to strategic situations. And I just couldn't see that relevance anymore and had it not been for the voice of my Middle Son Cooper out in the hallway I I heard his voice talking. He'd come home from school and it just totally jarred me and shocked me. I looked down at that pistol and I was just just so ashamed and so just at the bottom of the barrel when I saw that and and so on shuffled out of the closet. But I still wasn't where I needed to be. I mean there were many more moments like that that followed but that's the moment that sticks out in my mind and you know as as a point where in really I you know. I'll be honest with you. I never told that story. I I did it at a Ted talk just recently. Yeah I'd never talked about had not talked to my wife about. It had not talked to my kids about it because I had moved on. I'd found it was actually sharing. That story with a buddy who who was considering suicide himself had served in combat together so he told you this he did. We were at a conference for helping veterans transition and we pulled off to a corner and we were talking and he made it very clear that he was he was close to check it out. He told you that and at that point. Is that when you shared literally. That's the first time I had ever shared shared that story and when I did the color came back into his face I could see that he realized he was not isolated. And in that moment for just a moment I got a glimpse camps of what storytelling you know or what I call being generous with your scars. can do if you're doing the service of others and it was just a moment but I felt connected naked and there was something to that and so I just kind of kept pulling that thread for the next few years I started. I started pursuing storytelling and sharing lessons from my past in the military. That were not necessarily pleasant lessons but lessons where I had learned lessons where I had changed lessons that could serve other people and I used storytelling to do it and it really pulled me out of that dark place until finally just this past year. I made the decision to share that story about the clause in sole reason Alex's because because I've lost so many friends to suicide in the last few years were high-performers Navy Seals Green Berets. And I thought you know what if I can share my story about that dark place I was and it can help someone step into the sunlight. Let's do it you know I love that specific point where you tell your friend the story of where you had been. And you describe it as his eyes lighting up. Because it's like we've got two guys sitting in a corner of conference telling each other that they've both both had thoughts about ending their life. Yeah I would not think that that moment is when people's eyes start to light up but it sounds like something happens internally early in a person's heart and soul that I know the word you used was connection that creates connection absolutely you know one of the major things that I teach as a former the green beret in leadership around human connection. Is there certain things that draw us together right whether you're sitting down with a teammate from the military or whether you're sitting being across from a client where you're talking to your teenager struggle is a universal singular that binds us. I don't care what your religion is. What your ethnicity is is where you come from? We're all creatures of struggle. And if we have the courage to reach down and lead with our scars you know the things that scuff us up up in our life and we share those in the service of other people. It accelerates trusted accelerates connection and it makes you relatable to the people you serve and and their armor comes down and it's one of the most powerful tools that leaders can use today in almost none of them do and I love how you use the word scars so as we kinda China dive in to. How do we make this practical for people? I'd love for you to tell us. What is your personal definition of scar as it relates to all of this this and then how do people start to identify these in there so I started speaking in storytelling? As I came home. You know and using stories from my past brothers others. I'd served with lessons I'd launch. Did you ever think you would do whatever now acting. And and that's about a mid life crisis but all of that stuff you know do what scares you. I lost so many friends in combat and I think what they say to me still is hey manduwa scares you. Don't pull back because because they gave up so much at such an early point in their life that you know. I'm I'm still here. I'm still here and I'm still running and I think the best way that I can live a life that they'd be proud of is to do what scares me a healthy way. Yeah it's it's crazy to think about the fact like you've been shot at Scott and the thing that scares you is telling a story but you're you're being serious but you know there's a reason he's in that most people fear speaking more than death right in it's again it's because go back to human connection. We are status creatures. We worry about what the other people around us. I think it's how we've survived for for Millennia and so those things that we feel when we get up in front of people that we feel nervous about anxiety and our hands are sweating before that sales meeting or that call where we have to get up and give a keynote. Those were real physiological symptoms that we feel like we're GONNA die right. It's fight flight or freeze. The sympathetic nervous system is kicking in and the same thing. She fell in combat. It's the same symptoms right and it's because we don't want to be voted off the island so I started pursuing that it scared. May I love the way it felt. It had that familiar. Feel to run in missions. You know and so speaking to other rooms and groups of people in storytelling in particular. Just really let me up. I did a talk called rooftop leadership which really talks about how Green Berets go into these rough places and they helped villages to the rooftop and fight back and how does that work it it was a tedtalk and when I got invited a few years just recently to go back and talk about where the Ted speakers are now. I told the story of scars generosity of scarves because I wanted people to understand it from me. My rocket fuel in this world is it is that it is tapping into the struggle and leading what that struggle. That's how I define a scar and the scar you know webster in Google scholar is like a superficial mark on the skin. I define a scars mark on the soul. You know that has really scuffed us up but it has the potential to bind us to other people so our scars universal absolutely. They're absolutely absolutely universal. You won't find anyone that hasn't been scuffed up. That has an incurred those internal scars in their life. It's just part of living but what happens. Is We live in a society where we are conditioned to put those things away. Push those things down. Do not show those scars. Do the Selfie look at me. Look at what I've done. Look at what love accomplished in these five easy steps you can do. This people are so tired of that it's unwatchable we're already in a low trust society so if we're not willing to lead with our scars ars and be authentic in how we communicate where we've been in our life. It's very hard for people to follow where we're

Scott Man Alex Jones TED Scars Navy Seals Green Berets Pierce Pierce Columbian Afghanistan Sympathetic Nervous System Cooper China Google Webster
Tools For Faster Recovery: Sound Therapy, Vibration Therapy & More - With Guest Ben Greenfield

The Model Health Show

05:51 min | 9 months ago

Tools For Faster Recovery: Sound Therapy, Vibration Therapy & More - With Guest Ben Greenfield

"Listen have you ever thought about about what the true limits of human potential are are we limited by our physicality limited by our ability to think differently and are we limited by our ability to express health and wellness or our ability to recover quickly from the things that we go through. Well today. You're going to find out out that the human potential is actually boundless. We are boundless individuals. Even our brains capacity to learn to process information. We're only scratching the surface on what we are realizing we're capable of doing. You might have heard the statement that we only use maybe ten percent of our brain. But that's not actually true. We in fact us a hundred percent of our brains every day even were sleeping. They're different parts of our brain that going into overdrive doing a lot of work and even a lot lot of housekeeping but the sad reality is we use one hundred percent of our brain but we don't use it very well we don't use it to one hundred percent of its capacity. And that's one of the things we're GONNA we'll be talking about today is how do we actually improve that amazing organ that's governing our entire life or at our brain is where we're able to actually really see right. We're taking in information we have these optical receptors but we're seeing inside of our incredible brain right so it's like a a a screen inside of our brain. They were really watching these things. It seems like we're seeing taken to the outside world but that visual of our brain is actually towards the back of our brain. That's one thing how we're seeing taking information. Site sounds our senses but also our brain is controlling our metabolism if we talk about the Hypothalamus for example which is Kinda master master gland and our brain it determining in communicating with our thyroid which is regulating our metabolic rate our adrenals which is determining different hormones. Are we in a state of stress where we are potentially breaking down Tissue in our bodies our muscle tissue and turning it into glucose for fuel because because we're running in this hyper sympathetic nervous system so your brain is controlling based on your perception of reality and the awareness of the nutrients we have available in our the system and the list goes on and on is controlling metabolism right and so those are just a couple of aspects are emotion or mood how we feel we have these neurotransmitters and hormones and your hypoth- ou- Mrs Actually the interface of all of those things are neurotrophic transmitters in hormones in determining how we feel and how our cells communicating with each other which is kind of important and so again us understanding and supporting our brain health and also our physicality you know the stuff from the head down what's up there. How can we perform better? How can we increase our rate of recovery? What if we're injured? What can we do to get better faster faster? And so we're GONNA be talking about all of that today. With one of the foremost experts on the planet and his new work is going to talk about and teach you how to become boundless. And he's just going to provide you with a ton of new things that you can have at your disposal throughout your entire life and before we do that. I WanNa give a quick shot. It's one of the things we're going to talk about today which is helping to regulate your sleep and today more than ever humans we're traveling where cloud hopping we are moving around at a pace that our ancestors didn't even know was possible via train plane automobile. All right we can move around and the crazy thing is that your body is always looking for its place in all of this. It's looking for its ability to sync up with the environment. We are hardwired to connect with their environment to circadian rhythm. Your Circadian Rhythm is matching up with the you know the Journal Nocturnal Patterns of the Earth every single day. And when you go when you jump into a different time zone the earth in like your body trying to locate each other to get sinked up again. That's determining win. Your hormones are getting secreted. Certain neural transmitters. Doing their job. Your mobility in your gut. All of that stuff is trying to sink back into a rhythm in so this is why why. I'm a big fan of helping your body to reset when you travel so today. A lot of people are leaning towards reaching reaching towards Melatonin to help them to sleep better. And there's an issue with this. Because according to a study published in the Journal of Biological Rhythms found that faulty timing timing or large doses of Melatonin can cause desensitization of your melatonin receptors. Basically your body. We'll continue to produce Melatonin and you can have melatonin supplements but your ability to actually use. It is going to go down and when that happens we can run into some serious problems problems and so we want to be very judicious and cautious about our use of Melatonin. Now I'm a big fan of Melatonin in spot cases or there is some evidence towards microdosing however in those spot cases especially when travelling changing timezones. That's a great time to utilize melatonin. Oh Tony because it helps your body to sink back up in the Melatonin isn't just about sleep. It's not a sensitive it's about regulating your circadian timing system and so for that I'm big Fan of sub lingual spray under your tongue. Hold that in their high quality earth grown nutrient source of Melatonin. That's something synthetic just because you could buy whatever. Convenience store or pharmacy does not mean that that it's high quality in also. The dose can be problematic. especially if you're taking pills like to find the right dose for you versus a couple of

Melatonin Sympathetic Nervous System Journal Of Biological Rhythms Tony Journal Nocturnal Patterns
What Worry and Meditation Have in Common

Pep Talks

10:20 min | 9 months ago

What Worry and Meditation Have in Common

"What worry and meditation have in common? We live in a world where people are chronically. Stressed people are activating their sympathetic nervous system that fight or flight response on a regular basis. In fact I believe for many of my clients. They're just living in a chronic state of fighter fighter flight particularly for my clients who grew up in an abusive or dysfunctional homes. I believe that they are living in this place of needing to assess for danger and have a have a very difficult time. Activating their Paris sympathetic nervous system. So the sympathetic nervous system assists us in fighting or fleeing. If we have an animal chasing us we need that sympathetic nervous system to release cortisol and adrenaline to help our body to prepare to fight or to flee we. We need our respiration to increase. We need increased blood flow to our arms and our legs. We need to be able to fight or to run in the Para sympathetic state state. It's referred to as rust and digest because our immune system and our digestive system are activated during the Para sympathetic state. They about it this way. If you are running from an animal is your body really all that concerned about digesting food or fighting Often pathogen when you could die because of this animal chasing you so we were in the Para sympathetic state were in that rest and digest state when were in the sympathetic state were increasing inflammation in our body because we are releasing all of these stress hormones in an attempt to protect ourself. The sympathetic system is extremely important. We needed what we don't need is to be activating it regularly and that is what I believe a probably most all of my clients are doing and what we need to be doing is getting to that Paris sympathetic state because because in that Paris sympathetic state that rest and digest state. Our bodies are able to heal we're able to rewire our brains scenes. Were able to digest. Foods were able to fight off pathogens. That is a state of health when we're in that para sympathetic state and one of the ways that we can activate the para sympathetic nervous system or that Rushton digest system is through meditation and last last month I was encouraging you to think about twenty twenty and what you wanted to do differently this year and one thing I would encourage wjr everybody to include in their life. is meditation meditation. The research is it's it's it's it's amazing what. The research search shows of what meditation does for our bodies it truly is a healing practice. It increases our our immune in system's ability to fight infection. It decreases inflammation in the body and inflammation is at the root of all diseases it assists with sleep. It assists our brains in being able to critically think. In fact I was listening to a podcast with Dr James Gordon. And he indicated that because meditation increases the activity in the frontal CORTEX. We have an increase in judgement self awareness and compassion. I think all of us could use an increase in those three areas in our life life and when I encourage people to meditate frequently what I hear people say is I can't I just can't meditate my. I'm I'm just not able to do it. It is impossible not to be able to meditate. And I mean that in fact if you're someone who worries stories you're meditating. Now it's not healthy meditation nonetheless. It is a form of meditation. So if you're a worrier no more excuses no more excuses. You're able to meditate and and think about that for a minute if you are concerned about a problem if you have something going on in your life and you're just going over it over it at. Let's say you're concerned about losing your job or your concerned -cerned about a relationship or finances if you're just sitting in that and going over it and over and over at. You're meditating right so meditation meditation and there's all sorts of different interpretations of what meditation is. I like to think of it as a way to simply calm the brain that were really working on directing our focus so that we can call the brain. Now I hear some people talk about meditation. As you know blanking linking out the mind I can only speak for myself but I know I'm not capable of blanking out my mind. I am an. I'll use an always here. I'm always just thinking about something so with meditation I think about it as the quieting of the mind. Me Focusing on something that's helping took quiet so for example it could be listening to music. There's by Naral. Sounds which means it's the sounds in one ear is different than the sound another. It reminds me a lot of em Dr. And if you've worked with me directly you know I'm a huge proponent of amd are because it's bilateral movement so with the by Naral sounds. The belief is that it is actually helping to change the brainwaves and helping to calm palm the brain so for me that gives me something to focus on. It gives me something to listen to so that when my mind does wander. I'm able to bring bring back to focus. The sounds that gives me something directly to bring my my focus back to and then work on breathing of course while comparing it with the sounds. If you're a worrier you are sitting. And you're thinking about the problem and you're going over it and over it and over it and think about I mean we really if you've worried about something recently. I bet if you sat for a few minutes you were all in right. You were consumed completely with. What was you were worried about? You weren't distracted by anything. You were all into the worry. We'll that's what we want to do with meditation when you're worrying worrying you're activating that sympathetic nervous system. You're activating that potentially and I think for most individuals they are your activating that sympathetic nervous system. That that fight or flight response you. There's fear associated with it. If you're worrying about something you're fearful of it you're definitely not in that para sympathetic state. So you really think about that for a minute. If you have the ability to sit and be lost in your fear you have the ability to work at being lost in a sound wound or in your breath or even a word if you wanted to focus on one word even saying it over and over is a way to do meditation. Where again with meditation were working on quieting the mind? So if you're thinking about a word and you're it let's say it was joy and maybe you're even saying joy and you're thinking about how it feels in your mouth and you're thinking about how the sound sound wound and how you feel it in your body while you're breathing. That's a form of meditation. Dr Mark Hyman who. I'm a huge fan of. He is a functional medicine doctor and he believes in the body's ability to heal and he also also believes that food is medicine. Which of course I think you know that I believe in that? And he says that meditation is medicine and that it's it's so important for us to take time to work on quieting the mind because it has such a profound effect act on her physical and emotional health. It was interesting. He's he commented that medicine shuts off a pathway or or it blocks something in. It's actually interfering with your biology to stop a symptom. where meditation and food also Soviet? He was referring to meditation. And this moment is actually suggesting to to heal the body. It's working with the body and helping the body to activate its own systems so that it can heal itself and he talked about how one's immune system you know increases how the inflammation decreases. How sleep improves? Because the and and how there's also rewiring of the brain are that that neuropathy of the brain allows the brain to be rewired and over time just as though you can be wired to be a worrier over over time. If you're doing meditation you can rewire your brain to be to be healthier. In fact Dr Hyman was talking into Emily Fletcher. She's an expert in the field of meditation and she explained that meditation neutralizes is the adrenaline and Cortisol. While it floods the brain with dopamine and Serotonin so those feel-good right neurotransmitters metres. Meditation helps to release those so again. We're not with Meta medicine. You're altering those were with meditation. You're actually assisting your body in doing the its own processes that it knows how to do. We've just kind of hijacked it with worry.

Sympathetic Nervous System Inflammation Paris Cortisol Dr Mark Hyman Dr James Gordon Naral Foods Dopamine Rushton AMD Twenty Twenty Emily Fletcher
"sympathetic nervous system" Discussed on Early to Rise Radio

Early to Rise Radio

02:49 min | 1 year ago

"sympathetic nervous system" Discussed on Early to Rise Radio

"Make changes that fast number five learned breathe properly. So I've noticed this about myself. But I'm always tensed, I'm always country, my fists, I'm always, you know, not grinding my teeth, but my jaws generally clinched when I do my videos, I've got a scowl on my face. I'm so embarrassed by it because I just have my sympathetic nervous system that one that that causes contraction the fighter flight mode increases your adrenalin your body, or is increased by drowning your body. Well, when that is always on you were going to end up with and stress and drilling through the roof. And your breathing is going to be shallow and short, and that causes things get even worse. So when you're stressed when you're hunched over and you're taking those short shallow breasts. It causes you to become more anxious. So you need to relax you need to open up your hands, shake them, shake them by your side. Do this with me right now, I'm doing this. I'm doing this sitting upright in my hair my hands down by the side. I'm getting loose. Oh, yeah. Get loose. Get loose get loose. Great. Now. Police shoulder blades back police shoulders back and take a big deep breath in through your nose for four count. Philip. Your belly Philip your belly? It's a nice big breath. Right. Feels good and now slowly sale for six and once you do that once you do that, you can always say already start to feel loose, right? A little less tense. Do that six more times four in six out? Nice and loose through the belly. Big big Buddha belly when you breathe in an exile. Excel excel the way to the world's can be off your shoulders in a minute of doing that. Now, there's other ways of doing that breathing. Sometimes I'll do four seconds in do a seven second. Hold eight seconds out in one minute, two minutes. Three minutes you practically in a fall asleep. I also heard you take a meditation guided deep breathing what I use meditation for some people use it try and clear their minds, but for me with my background. I'd do it to clear mining society. Clear my stress slow things down and thoughts come into my head. I don't chase them away. I just I just go, and relax, and I do that breathing in calms. My sympathetic nervous system down helps Paris empathetic nervous system takeover, which calms me down lowers my stress levels. My blood pressure is about now one hundred fifteen over seventy most people think oh hundred eighty one hundred twenty eight good actually, it's not that's like the high end of normal. You wanna have it lower? Than that. And if yours is higher, please do something about it. Do this breathing? Make sure that your caffeine intake is not through the roof..

sympathetic nervous system Philip caffeine Paris Three minutes eight seconds four seconds seven second two minutes one minute
How to Control Butterflies in Your Stomach

Curiosity Daily

02:05 min | 1 year ago

How to Control Butterflies in Your Stomach

"A scientific reason why you get butterflies in your stomach, and we've got some advice for controlling it. There's also a reason why you get the same feeling when you're standing on a high ledge that you get when you've just walked is with your crush in L comes down to your nervous system. You've probably heard of your fight or flight response. But have you heard of rest and digest? These are nicknames for each branch of your nervous system, which controls bodily processes without your conscious input fighter. Flight comes from the sympathetic division that prepares your body for emergencies by increasing your heart rate, widening your Airways and making your palms. Sweat and pupils dilate the para sympathetic division has the rest and digest Monica because it's what controls your body during ordinary situations it essentially slows down your heart rate, and breathing and. Decreases your blood pressure, but in order to help you survive in emergency. Whether that's a sabertooth tiger or a parking attendant approaching illegally parks car. You're sympathetic nervous system has to make some sacrifices when it seized the Android coming it triggers. The release of adrenaline and cortisol which increases your heart rate, and shunts blood, your heart, and leg muscles and away. From your digestive system. The blood vessels surrounding your stomach and intestines constrict in the digestive muscles contract. It's that drop in blood flow. That makes you feel like winged insects or fluttering around in your stomach. The reason you get the same fluttering feeling when you're strapping in for a skydive, the you do when you go on a promising second date is because they triggered the same physiological reaction. Sweaty palms or racing heart dilated pupils all that stuff. And hey, considering the fact that procreation is the end goal of evolution. It makes sense that the site of a potential mate is an emergency situation for an organism like you. But just because your body reacts the same way doesn't. You mean you've lost control? How you interpret those reactions matters. So the next time you're a bundle of nerves before a big performance or an important meeting or a hot date reframed, the feeling think about how incredibly excited you are about the opportunity that way, you can channel all that sympathetic nervous system energy into doing your very best.

Sympathetic Nervous System Sabertooth Cortisol Monica
"sympathetic nervous system" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

03:18 min | 2 years ago

"sympathetic nervous system" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"Wherever you can go to get your periphery involved. Is an accelerated or inactivation potentially of the sympathetic nervous system. Which is I'm sorry. The para sympathetic nervous system, which is more of the rest than digest systems in our brain than the the stress from the sympathetic nervous system. So okay. So a couple more questions, and it really I want to get to this one for you. How do you think about mastery? Yeah. It's it's a great question. I've been thinking a lot about it. And I think that as you would know the definitions very different for everybody to me mastery. Is you get to a certain level where things happen in terms of like flow, and you can get to a place where it becomes easy. Like, I don't wanna say easy. But it's it just comes naturally to. You're not forcing it. You're not struggling for. So for example, when I talk about you, and I sitting down and going through your hook points. Like, I literally in ten minutes can do that where when it first started out. Maybe it takes me hours or days to do that. So there's that level of you're doing something so much that it just becomes natural to you. But I think also the important aspect of that definition to me is your constant learning in your challenging yourself because that's what's critically important to me as an individual. Is that learning experience never stops because I will personally get bored in his why can't work within the confines of an organization as it behind the desk because. You're not constantly forced to learn into try things in that. I think that that's where I sell in working with corporations or CEO's in coming in because I can come in with a fresh new take in bring that kind of like hustler spirit or mind set of thinking about things in different ways. So it's critically important to me that mastery is never defined as an angle, but it's something that you're constantly. I don't wanna say chasing constantly evolving. And again, it's a cliche. But it's literally the more that I learn the more I want to know because it just shows you different ways in different ways of thinking of things like when I talk about PC, Amer human behavior psychology of only been studying that for eight years in diverted in eight years is is been remarkable. And I want to learn more. And I'm always meeting new people every day and learning from them and trying to improve everything that I am. So I can provide the most value to to the people I work with when you Sit Aye. Cross from world class thinker or doer somebody that's extraordinarily what they do. And let's create a scenario that you're sitting across from them in you have one question. What is that one question? I would say that that one question is who do you want to be what do you want to achieve? What is your that's through? Yeah. In the same vein. I want to understand what it is that they're lacking. What it is. They're trying to really get out of life or achieve so that I can figure out a way to provide that for them. Okay. So is it is the the first one that came out your mind mindlessness start. There was who do you want to become? So when we turn that on you like who is it that you're working on becoming to me again. I love the process of providing value to people might dream is that I can wake up every day and.

sympathetic nervous system CEO eight years ten minutes
"sympathetic nervous system" Discussed on My Seven Chakras

My Seven Chakras

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"sympathetic nervous system" Discussed on My Seven Chakras

"The defensive mode blood. Close to our extremities are pupils pinpoint are breathing gets more rapid and shallow and focused because we're either gonna fight that tiger or gonna run like crazy from the tire. And so this is the fight or flight mode. And what this does what what this is activated by the in the sympathetic nervous system is releasing adrenalin throughout the whole body cortisol throughout the whole body. And and I'm sure we've all had moments when we were really scared. You know, somebody slam on the brakes in front of us, you know, unexpectedly and we narrowly missed a collision or something and afterwards were trembling. And we're not sure whether we're trembling with rage, or anger or fear. But what happened is that you are are are are sympathetic nervous system had released a boost of cortisol and adrenaline to protect us than to have us working. Now by maters design when the sabertooth Tigers gone or the gang members turned out to be a prop set for movie, or it turns out that. Oh, no. It was John Smith. That's losing his job, not Maine or whatever other misunderstandings that after a while we're supposed to go back to a relaxed state kind of the thing. So in other words, the the sympathetic nervous system is supposed to have an on and off switch, but John Bradshaw who is a therapist the eighties made the wonderful observation that instead of it being on or off in this day and age this fast paced and age where there are so many demands of on us that instead of being on or off that it kinda functions. More like a pilot light in a hot water heaters, always just going. And so as a result, there's always kind of a low grading Zayed. There's always just a little bit of anxiety a little bit of adrenaline a little bit of Korda's. Zoll always going through which is why. Then when we get stressed out are stressing to Zaza bait so quickly, and that's why you know, we develop ulcers and all kinds of psycho genyk illnesses because we have these very powerful chemicals constantly corden through our body, not at the the level of, you know, the immediate threat, but it like I said like the pilot light on on a gas heater. It's constantly going. Well, the other function and other function of the central nervous system is what we call the para sympathetic dervishes. Okay. So if you had the sympathetic nervous system, which is for art conversations a fighter flight adrenaline, cortisol stress. Worrying Zayed's, you know, force content kind of stuff. The Paris pathetic nervous system has has been what is activated has been called the feed or breed. Read syndrome. So compared the fight or flight to the feed or breed in other words in the wild when a deer feels threatened. It's going to fight or flight from whatever the predator is when the deer finally feel safe it will stop, and it will eat it will rest it will procreate. And this the same thing with us as humans when we go from fighter flight to this. Feeder breed WinCo from the sympathetic to the para sympathetic nervous system, then oxytocin and a whole different range of endorphins flood our body our heartbe returns to normal. Our creativity increases our ability to appreciate the people that we love increases. And so very often my work in the beginning stages of Noces is to teach people how to move. Live from this anxious worried sympathetic nervous system into the relaxed para sympathic system because that's when the subconscious mind opens to us. Mournful a love that explanation..

sympathetic nervous system cortisol sabertooth Tigers John Smith Korda Maine Zaza John Bradshaw Noces Zayed oxytocin Paris
"sympathetic nervous system" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

13:16 min | 2 years ago

"sympathetic nervous system" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Music lane is what we're doing. However, we have lots to do on the show tonight. We have lots of things to discuss and we are joined now by phone by Tiffany Seibert who is the founder of a program called cop to yoga, which is a fascinating program. And it is exactly what it says. What it sounds like right? It is bringing yoga and meditation and centering to Chicago police, Tiffany, welcome to the program. Thanks so much for being with us tonight. Thank you, Amy. Thank you. Yeah. Thank you. Thank you for joining us. First of all, how did you even think about bringing this this program about how did this happen? Well, you know, I was I was sitting on my met one morning, and it was right around thanksgiving two thousand fifteen when the violence on the streets was every day on national news. And it just it was like a bell rang. And I said, oh my goodness. The police need to do yoga. So I call that Jay. And they said, you know, one can you come over? And I said, well, you know, whenever it's convenient for you. And they said can you come right now? So that was in the twenty fourth district, which is in my neighborhood. And that's really the the beginning of it. And they were very very open to it. And the program has changed a lot, and it's evolved into what it is now, which is basically a seven minute meditation after roll call. So that's where we are. You know, it started out on match and it evolved into just yoga breath meditation. While the cops are just sitting at the roll call to lasting they do before they get into the car and. And they really like it. It's it's worked incredibly well. Well, you mentioned that that it was really well received. And I think we think of cops being these like tough, you know, non emotional like yoga would not be something that would necessarily be something a cop will be open to. But but it sounds like that was not the case. Right. Yeah. Well, you know, I mean, it's not across the board. It's not one hundred percent. But it's it's close to one hundred percent because it's very straightforward. I'm as far as you know, yoga. There's no soccer talk. It's it's super bullet point. And and and as a result, they get it because it's evidence-based, you know, I'm telling them exactly what what's happening that. They're activating sympathetic nervous system. Responser activating the underclass, and this has this particular now chemical effect, and so they're on board with that walk us a little bit more slowly through that. But you just put a lot of multi syllable words out there. I've got I got my dictionary open, but I couldn't get to all of them quickly enough. But it's true as their science behind the. Thank that. These things can have when your stress hormones, especially when you're Trenton, pumpkin. What does the science behind this? Exactly. So what they're experiencing each day is just the unknown and unknowable. So that in itself is stressful. And then you back it up with the actual seeing. Right. You're going from a Bank robbery to barking dog to maybe a domestic dispute everything in between. So they are in cider flight a lot. So kind of almost like a PTSD state and long deep breathing which is exactly what we start with. It's activates the sympathetic nervous system, which stops the production and flow of the stress hormone that flood the system during fighter flight or sympathetic near the system. So it just brings you back to center says like the antidote, and so that's the first thing. And that's the easiest thing. So that's the first rats work on then we we go into a second breath work, which is a deeper com. So we're just really breeding on the left side long tape reading on the left side. And so that takes them deeper. What's different? I think about this census breathing is that we're focusing a game in the middle of the forehead, which is a specific energy center in controlling the yoga in yoga in in particular that that activates the under consistent. And so the pressure on the patisserie gland Glen, this is forcing these lands to secrete and create an overall sense of balance and censoring, and it ends up. Really just that's where the neurochemical change happens. And so there's really no way and they're feeling one hundred percent whole again after this. So there is a little bit of Socrates talk, right? Shock. Yeah. How were you able yet? Then something this involved into seven minutes because this forty minutes. How do you get all of this goodness down to seven minutes and still allow it to be affected? Well, it's affected really pretty much after about three minutes. So that's all it takes. And so when someone says, well, you know, I really can't do this because looking at my phone, and like, you know, what you're inhaling an exiling anyway. Right. Yeah. Right. So if you just yeah, if you say I'm going to just for the next three or four minutes. Do this spend you really doing something? Good for yourself that has a benefit that you feel and what are the results that you're seeing so far? I'm seeing people walking out really really grateful for this. You know, saying thank you a whole lot. You know, which is really really nice that they're saying gosh, I feel so much better. And starting my shift on a high note when we are in really intense situation, it helps prevent tunnel vision. You know, which is these guys are dealing with the whole lot of stuff. Right. And it helps them to prepare for stress, and it helps them to recover for stress stress. So it's going good before during an after. And what I've tried to drill into them as far as you know, folding into this building this ended their techniques that when they're walking from the car to the door when they're walking from the door to the door of their house when they're walking wherever they are to just take a few deep breaths to keep even within their days. So it's not so jagged. You know what I'm saying? And and so I, you know, I see a lot of police all over the place in my neighborhood. And I stopped them all the time. And so, of course, they see me they swear that they're breathing. You know, so. It's a good reminder. But, but they are you know, what I've got cards that they've got that have all the curriculum on it. And I think that slowly. But surely because I'm a broken record. I'm just saying breed all the time. And so that starts to sink, and that's how we learn by repetition. We're talking to Tiffany cyber the founder of cop to yoga, and she teaches police officers how to breathe collect themselves before they have to go out there, and and do their jobs in most of us don't have jobs as intense as police officers. But what can I dunno talk show host dude de-stress were shows, what are some steps that we can say that are pretty easy better. Walk us through some of the things that you talked about. So we can get these soccer as well. I think one of the best things that you can do. And it's super simple is long deep breathing. So breathing inhaling an ex hailing in and out of your nose and what you're doing. When you do not is. Is breathing into the belly. Chest neck had all the way up and all the way down. And by the time, you get to your second inhale, you realized that your breath has naturally deepened. So you're activating sympathetic nervous system naturally. This is not a belief where people are saying gosh, I don't believe in yoga magnitude is this is biology. This is yoga science. This is how we're built we just were not top this from you know, in school when we were four years old five years old. This is how we're built. And this is why it works. It never doesn't work. So if I'm gonna use a double negative heritagest underscore, the fact that it does work it always works period. So as someone that's working in your stressed out. Everybody's stressed out. Everybody has different stresses. If you just take a couple of minutes, debris every hour every couple of hours when you think about it long deep breathing into your belly into, you know, all the way up that's. Thing that works. We just did it just now. Both took this giant breath. We did it. Yeah. Is it always works? So the thing is it's just. Doesn't work. Powerful about the double negative. That's right. Yeah. Tiffany what you're doing is. So very important, especially right now, we're seeing headlines like just the other day we saw about a headline about an officer who had taken her own life. And we're seeing the impact of these kinds of stresses on on people doing this work. And it's so very important to you know, to be able for anyone in any field, especially in in a field that literally as a matter of life and death with every decision to be able to have that kind of center, and that kind of recovery from stress, right? Yeah. I I agree. I certainly couldn't do it myself. I mean, it's it's so much stress. But you know, that's the stress on top of just the everyday stress that people have when you know, you're married. You have children you're living in the city, you know, with everything going on in our collective worlds, you know, all the things that we're dealing with. And then to have this on top of it. It is it's a lot. So as an occupational hazard, you know, I think that this needs to be part of. Of just their cysts. And so it's kind of why I started it. I thought it'd be this'll be a really great a great idea for them to have it be part of their eight hours on the job. You know, this is what you need to do to take care of yourself because your job is it's got such corrosive attribute to it you, you know, to you as a human being. So this this helps seventy you've been in working in a couple of different sectors, though. I mean, the business magnate all over the world liberal arts. I mean, your background is extensive. How did you even get into yoga for yourself personally in the first place? Well, I started doing it. When I was eighteen my mom got me into it. And then, you know, moving to Chicago and Amy can tell you certainly got so many amazing teachers here, and so I started studying at pre yoga with Santa's Aleman I studied. With Paula white. Just you know sucked to car at a yoga in the loop. Amazing amazing teachers that are real guides for me. And so, you know, you just want to do all the time. So there was a point where I was doing, you know, taking nine yoga classes a week and that was a bit radical. And so I'd like breathing for a living is that what you're telling us kind of breathing for a living. Yeah. I wouldn't oppose for a living. I suppose her. So that I really thought gosh, I really want to do this for myself. I wanted to take a teacher training for myself because I liked it so much, and it was so helpful and believe he really spoke to me 'cause it the true basis. Kindling yoga is said, it's just ancient yoga science. So that's why this works, and that's what I found to be kinda the most direct route and effective in the shortest period of time. You steal these texts from it. I love that. I'm cure bar junkie. I mean, I do that for like hardcore exercise, but that was no joke that is what was here bar. What's you're going you're doing? Uh-huh. What is this? I'm scared. If you put like, very, heavy duty, ballet and aerobics and Pilates together. That's pure bar and push ups in boot camp stuff. Yeah. Yes. No joke. Okay. I thought it was going to pass out the first time. I went there. Like if this is your first time, take it easy. I was like, I'm very thank you. And then five minutes later. I was like I'm going by. Hi, Tiffany, just hold on one second. We're going to go to break. So Andy can give me a crash course in push. But what can we do this like in the break? Can you show me some things, and then we post on Twitter us up? Why did I just sign myself up this use your idea, man?.

sympathetic nervous system Tiffany Seibert soccer Chicago founder Amy PTSD Jay Twitter Socrates robbery Trenton Paula white Glen Andy officer Santa
"sympathetic nervous system" Discussed on The Healthy Moms Podcast

The Healthy Moms Podcast

04:39 min | 2 years ago

"sympathetic nervous system" Discussed on The Healthy Moms Podcast

"I think is the more effective way to go cardio really puts you into your sympathetic nervous system, which is your fighter flight zone. And when you're in fighter flight zone, your body doesn't worry about proper digestion. Your body isn't worrying about what it needs to do to keep you. Live long term. It only worries about what it needs to do to keep you alive short term. And so it worries about the immediacy the here now, and that means high levels of adrenaline pumping out so that you're alert because when you're in this fight or flight mode, you're looking for danger wherever you are, and that's not a safe place for us to be all the time or even fern our so say, you go for an hour run that sympathetic place is not really that healthy for us. We want to stay in a Paris pathetic place, which is a rested digest place, and you can access that place while doing strength training work so you can get fit while not aggravating your system. That makes total sense. Is there any kind of general recommendation that you would give across the board of things those without on your disease should not do, or is it more case by case? Well, I think it is case by case in the idea that it it sort of depends on where you. Are in your healing process? I know that generally, I say that high intensity interval training is probably not your friend intense cross. It is probably not your friend, you know, you can lift, but like going to a cross fit wide where they don't really take rest breaks and they keep the intensity level up really high that has that can be very dangerous spinning classes, even power yoga, like anything. The theme here is any high-intensity work is going to aggravate the symptoms and put you potentially at risk for a flare that said, you know if you have built up tolerance because here's the thing is that you can actually build up. You can't increase your exercise tolerance over time. It just takes a really long period of time. So if you've increased your exercise tolerance over. For time and you're autoimmune condition is being managed than it might be possible that you will do okay at those things. But generally, I say those things are probably not the best forms of exercise, and I know that disappointing to a lot of people like me because with other mean conditions to like a lot of times, we have a lot of anxiety or at least I had a lot of exactly and those types of high intensity workouts were really wet used to manage that executive piece. But ultimately I found that I could manage my exactly actually better by taking those components out and spending more time controlling what I ate, meditating and doing more intensive deep tissue work like foam rolling or the abdominal bracing exercise that I was talking about, like you can still get the same. Neurotransmitters being, you know, those happy hormones being released by doing the less intensive kind of work that took me a long time to understand. Yeah, I think it's a hard concept until you experience to really grasp that. I know like for me, writing on Wallis was born out of a need, like I needed to learn the stuff in it wasn't out there. So I started researching writing it and I know that you've had sort of the same experience with your auto immune strong programs. So can you walk us through a basically kind of what the program is in how it's structured in basically how someone can work through it? It was born out of a need just like you're saying, I was desperate to find someone who could help me get strong without putting the into these exercise induced symptom flare ups, and couldn't I looked everywhere I couldn't find it. So that's finally when I was like, fine, if it doesn't exist, do it myself. And and basically the program that is. Is up. There is is basically what I used to to heal myself. So if you go to the website which is WWW debt get automates drawn dot com. You have access to what's designed as a three month..

sympathetic nervous system Paris Wallis executive three month
"sympathetic nervous system" Discussed on Early to Rise Radio

Early to Rise Radio

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"sympathetic nervous system" Discussed on Early to Rise Radio

"I'm to give away copies at my retreat and November, perfect and mice. Little coming to that speaking on the second baby. Wonderful. I just needed a little edification, so I. Advocation come running low. No, but but you're gonna give away copies in November, and the book is all about ings -iety and society today suffers, at least we hear society suffering more from excited than ever before. Why is that? It's because I well, first of all, I think that it's diagnos more, you know, it's people are more open about it. So thirty years ago, you had anxiety. You're not gonna show that weakness, right? Right. So first of all, there's that second of all social media guy to have something to do with it. Third, the comparison syndrome, that's what I call the first world problem. The number one cause of friction and most people's lives mostly though is because we're misaligned, so I was misaligned. I was saying one thing I'm Craig Ballantyne men's health fitness expert. I was making the videos. I was training people. Oh yeah. I'm gonna go and binge drink every Friday or every Saturday, every Friday or every Saturday. And you can't hide that. It's like the preacher strip the, you know, the waitress, you're not getting away with that for values. Misalignment. Yes, absolutely. So values, goals and actions are misaligned that causes internal stress or you know, it's like, oh, I want to write a book and you never get around to write causes internal stress. So get internal stress. We have all this stimulus in our world caffeine on no sleep. All these choices. All these electron IX hyper. Sympathetic nervous system response. We don't know how to breathe properly. We aren't coping properly. There's a million factors and that's why it's become so prevalent today from. I mean, it's really, really bad and teenagers, it's really terrible in America. Forty million Americans more than ten percent of the population, and it's probably just gonna start to get worse. So the Craig Ballantyne that I met in the Craig Balentine that you've become, who stands your next me right now running empire podcast and running the empire. Mastermind with me, you're such a joy to be around, honestly, I love you then, but I love you now. What's missing in this Craig's life? Oh, I think it's it's what's what you have in your life that I look up to more than ever now, which is that partner in that support. So I loved it. When you were running fitness business summit, I'd I'd go down there. I'd see you behind the scenes with Diana and it'd be like it'd be Diana and Badri us against the world. Yeah, Diana baiters against the world and seeing that true partnership is very inspirational to me seeing Joel leases. True partnership is very inspirational to me. So that's what's missing. It's like the last little piece of the jigsaw puzzle and than just be exactly as advertised. Perfect. Well, I'll tell you what, as here's a call to action to all of our listeners and viewers of the entire podcast are if you know of someone. What? What is the perfect MRs Craig Valentine look like? Because if we know of someone, we should probably make an introduction, the girl next door..

Craig Ballantyne MRs Craig Valentine Diana baiters America Craig Balentine Sympathetic nervous system caffeine partner Joel thirty years ten percent
"sympathetic nervous system" Discussed on I Don't Get It

I Don't Get It

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"sympathetic nervous system" Discussed on I Don't Get It

"Yeah so i think one of the best things to do is to do what works for you you know because when you're having a panic attack what works for one person is going to actually make another person anxious definitely so a lot of people say oh well i know that shoeing on ice is the thing that like helps me to like interrupt the panic attack okay great so join ice what are some examples of things people do so it may or may not work for anyone die for matic breathing i think is a really good one so when you're nervous system you know really what a panic attack is is really a surge of stress hormones and it's it's the it's the sympathetic nervous system taking over and just surging way too fast so when that happens the sympathetic nervous system because it's thinking it's preparing you to run away for entire it's thinking that needs more oxygen so you breathing's going to get way too fast so instead of the becoming inhalation dominant you want to shift your brain to become explanation dominant so really simple way to do that and this is great even people who don't have panic attacks is to make your ex hail twice as long as you're inhale so i recommend three six breath so just inhale to the kind of three let's do one two three xl one two three four five six you see how out so it feels so foreign right because we're used to like right but that out breath and you can it doesn't have to be exact to my count but just make the x hell twice as long because that is going to it's going to trick your brain into thinking that the danger has passed and you're okay.

sympathetic nervous system
"sympathetic nervous system" Discussed on The Model Health Show

The Model Health Show

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"sympathetic nervous system" Discussed on The Model Health Show

"And so when that lecture on is provided helps to reduce that inflammation as resulting from the free radical activity all right so at some point we'll do a whole masterclass on this topic but i want you to get the the overview of what it looks like and what grounding is and how it works but also wanna share some of the research so this was a study published in the journal of environmental and public health researchers found that test subjects that were grounded quote had rapid activation of the para sympathetic nervous system and corresponding deactivation of the sympathetic nervous system come on please understand this is this is clinical data here this is just like airyfairy i think this works by getting yourself in contact with the surface of the earth you actually have this intrinsic rapid activation of this relaxed response you know your para sympathetic nervous system immediately us incredibly valuable all right and deactivation of the fight or flight sympathetic nervous system but are you taking advantage of this because it's free you know that's one of the things that we know generally can't wherever minds around especially if it's for your free access to and by the way before we go any further wanna make sure you know what's conductive dirt dirt is conductive it's one of those things dirt grass mud all right soil those are conductive surfaces all right we've also got sand this is why many people have the experience of like going to the beach and they're getting relaxed very relaxing sleepy thing is just the serena environment but has actually this might be one of the rare time to somebody is getting grounded in their activating sympathetic nervous system immediately bodies of water same thing you know if you're getting into the ocean getting into lakes concrete is semiconductors all right semiconductor asphalt is not conductive would is not conductive so.

sympathetic nervous system journal of environmental
"sympathetic nervous system" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"sympathetic nervous system" Discussed on Good Life Project

"Human strength run really fast or be in a super capable of things that this is the system that pulses changes in chemistry through your body that let's that happen and that's really good every once in a while and if you immediately use all that chemistry to do the things you need to do and have it dissipate quickly and return to normalcy problem is when this same thing is being triggered by high levels of noise and then it's being sort of a kept there aren't a sustained basis will that stress response that sympathetic nervous system after ovation and all of the chemistry that it releases through your body can lead over time to things like hypertension and diabetes and oxidative stress meaning literally like your inside start to rust and all sorts of things that star to relief factor quarterback go system and the health of your cardiovascular system and scientists believe that the relationship then between this noise and heart disease comes from the fat that high levels of sustained traffic noise can trigger soared this sustained sympathetic nerve assistant activation which courses these chemicals through you which become massively destructive to nearly every system your body if they're sustained over time so what does that mean well what do you do about that that is my big question as a city dweller what am i going to do about that does that mean i'm gonna move so i can can live out in the bucolic park like place or black to the suburbs where i can open my windows all day every day and just hit it chirping of the birds in the rustling of lease maybe i actually really like that what's interesting is that i don't really can notice the sound in new york and he more you habituate to it.

hypertension new york sympathetic nervous system
"sympathetic nervous system" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

The Obesity Code Podcast

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"sympathetic nervous system" Discussed on The Obesity Code Podcast

"So after leaving the stressful job cheryl continued to put on weight and was not able to take it off the stress of her failed marriage in the fact that she couldn't be with her son added to her professional stress level which was making it hard dr jason fung talks about the connection between stress and weight gain one of the things that we've increasingly recognised over the last few decades is the role that stress and in a related hot topics sleep may contribute to weight gain so when we talk about stress now we talk about cortisol which is sort of the stress hormone in it's the sort of general activator so remember that is a humans as we evolved activated a certain number systems in response to stress so say you see a lion you activate your sympathetic nervous system which sort of floods your body with energy as you prepare to either fight or wrought so it's called the fight were flight response in either case as a general activator of the body you know your pupils died late your muscles they shunt the blood to the muscle sometimes you relax the bladder so people can p themselves that kind of thing and then as you face at lyon you either have the energy extra energy and the extra awareness to fight it more to run away in the sort of paleolithic times all stresses word in general physical in other words these are shortterm responses that is if you have that lyon in front of you you will either fight it successfully uh or you'll be debt either way it doesn't matter this stresses over.

cheryl cortisol sympathetic nervous system lyon dr jason fung
"sympathetic nervous system" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"sympathetic nervous system" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Our fear responses modular or condition in other words are our fear responses and are monster fears instinct she will born into us or the just learned in conditioned by culture and experience and just to rephrase from the beginning i think one thing we can eliminate is that it's quite obvious that at least some of our fears are conditioned or learned like there is no way you were born with a fear of airplanes right uh that's not part of your evolutionary heritage so though you might have you know you might have an inborn fear of heights you could see here could not heart of evolutionary hair like silver machines filled with other humans right barreling through the sky right so there might be instincts will elements that go into that fear but the fear itself the content there is clearly conditioned or learned but the real question is are any of our fears modular or instincts you will or the are they all conditioned or learned so asthma kicks off his favorite vice by premature stating the obvious fear exists in our bodies and minds yeah fearful stimuli stimulates this sympathetic nervous system so perhaps a freeze in the face of fear maybe you'll flee maybe you'll you'll suddenly have this burst of bravery in return on a fight but the object of terror gives as a physical jolt and it demands reaction and he also points on tuesday strong hormonal component entailing the corticotropinreleasing hormone or c r h cortisol and adrenaline asthma points to a study in fact in which scientists inserted a gene in mice that makes crh resulting in more fearful mice or removing it to make quote an extremely fearless mouse i would i would venture to say that both prospects are horrifying.

sympathetic nervous system cortisol
"sympathetic nervous system" Discussed on Outside Podcast

Outside Podcast

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"sympathetic nervous system" Discussed on Outside Podcast

"Strength and conditioning coach is an exercise physiologist a nutritionist helping them designer program and in on these guys it have six pack abson your muscles on their muscles and they and like they're you know physically they look like they're you know they're ready to conquer the world and then i look at their lives and their insulin sensitivity it's like prediabetic rain through just league they're on the there are on the verge of somebody to near neiafu is a thirty pound overweight fifty year old man i would i would be counselling on metabolic syndrome and near prediabetes in diabetes but that's obviously now what's going on with these guys and it was it was asleep issue this not just seals having these problems having a few years ago outside did a story on a strange phenomenon in the ultra running community we're an athlete would dominate the sport for a handful of races and then completely crash as an you weren't even competitive anymore dr scott overtraining syndrome and it's a combination of excessive exercise or an inadequate recovery even when they're not racing for 24 hours straight ultra runners of the type of people who deny themselves rest in order to train that eventually the buddies pera sympathetic nervous system which controls inflammation goes haywire but if you if you look at the ultramarathon it is a couple of things going on right so they are depriving themselves asleep but any time you deprive yourself of sleep your body then has to mobilise energy from somewhere else the next day right you didn't get all of your anabolic repair basically when you sleep energy gets stored away in sells for later use.

neiafu metabolic syndrome sympathetic nervous system dr scott thirty pound 24 hours
"sympathetic nervous system" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"sympathetic nervous system" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"The process now that kinda got you on the road to more tangible results i believe those uh definitely a cumulative effort uh we were talking earlier that i went and sought help when i was on the military and i recognize a difference of me so um that started a chain reaction i think can just a a fight to get better and that's really what it was it was a fight uh it wasn't just i found the special pill and was able to take this and then everything got better it was here's a doing you know carbon behavioral therapy and speech therapy and occupational therapy and brush reality prolonged exposure therapy and shots my neck called selig england blocks reset my sympathetic nervous system and uh the mindfulness therapy fans at it'll meditation not to mention of the whole time on a mixture of medications from the to the mental health department or later when i got out the va so there's no shortage of effort now was going forth and i went to school and got a degree in psychology uh wanted to just figure it out on myself i was getting better from the therapies those n and it wasn't that i wasn't getting better it was dale had a little piece that they offered cognitively soy i learned some more things i had great insight has had the right perspective but the biggest problem for me was not being able to feel what i knew in my head was the right answer so uh for example i would know that no one's going to run into the studio right now with a gun and and shoot me but i would be in my head talking myself down with the right answer that i knew him ahead 'cause i feel something wrong inside um so i was very frustrating to have this back and forth battle um and then also took me out of the the game a lot when it came to interacting with my friends or family i felt very unconnected to people because i was in my head a lot as trying to talk my sought to feel calm so um he had mentioned la times wrote article and um as a.

selig sympathetic nervous system dale la times
"sympathetic nervous system" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"sympathetic nervous system" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

"So head straight to the gym and usually work workout for about an hour and then i immediately go to meditation and i am certainly not explaining the benefits of that for for he your sake but i find that the juxtaposition of working out and being in the sympathetic nervous system and trying to rapidly get into the pera sympathetic nervous system and that that juxtaposition has been really effective for me in everyday life is somebody who has struggled with anxiety to be able to get call very fast serve me very well and after i meditate i do what i call think attaining so one thing that i found frustrating about meditating was i get into that calm creative state and my mind source hitting on great ideas but i'm trying to bring myself back to the breath back to the breath and so i found that if i knew that okay once i'm done say twenty minutes the about how long and meditate if i know one time done i'm going to have the time to let my mind wander on these things i'm not going to try to stop at and i'm going to take notes that like allowed my brain to go don't worry about thinking of us up now lake will will do that in a minute and so that's become very powerful and all think it paid for you know say twenty to forty minutes slow sometimes i am of doing that up to twice as long as my meditation depending on my mind is really hitting on things that are quickie for me on that i feel like a making progress on a given problem and then after i do that i read which is.

sympathetic nervous system twenty minutes forty minutes
"sympathetic nervous system" Discussed on Future Thinkers Podcast

Future Thinkers Podcast

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"sympathetic nervous system" Discussed on Future Thinkers Podcast

"Oh yeah so this is like the first place that functional medicine doctors and naturopathic doctor talked to people which is understanding how the hp access works ended the dysregulation hp access usually starts at the eight at the adrenal side emmett roughly you can say the sympathetic nervous system enervate sti adrenal cortex and the primary hormone there's many coming in that process as cortisol and the pera sympathetic nervous system enervate seadream mundul up and there are oregon mini hormones are coming out but the primary one is dha so the ratio of cortisol to dha as hormones the endocrine system in the blood representing stomach defects is roughly equivalent to the sympathetic pera sympathetic ratio of the system as a whole man you know related to chronic stress so in early phases of chronic stress cortisol goes up in the precursor to cortisol in the brain e c t h gaza after that's been the case for little wild dhea starts go down because cortisol and each year both make from the same precursor hormone of pregnant london to rate limited hormone defined that amount of it after a while if someone stays in chronic stress cortisol starts dropped to simply because he brunel bunch of the teat and now dhea its way lower so you can see people in high or low cortisol adrenal stress states depending upon how long they are met up with all aji but too so you can you can give someone by identical hormones or things support hormones to give them in the rate range quickly and make the person feel better secede do out of blood or a salivary hormone lab took it a greenalls you can do that but the big things just gonna be dropping stress slow.

cortisol hp sympathetic nervous system oregon
"sympathetic nervous system" Discussed on The Sheepdog Project

The Sheepdog Project

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"sympathetic nervous system" Discussed on The Sheepdog Project

"Uh not a good example is the doctor so don't take that is medical advice but what i'm saying is be healthy okay this is the reason to be healthy don't wait until the moment of the fight or flight response to put your body through that cardiac stress test you need to be stressing herself before that and making sure that your body can handle it the other thing that you need to do is you need to train harder and i'm not just talking about your physical training i'm talking about your martial arts training i'm talking about your weapons training you're armed and unarmed combat skills you need to train those harder and train them properly because you need to build those good habits now when you are arrested and when you're not fighting against your own sympathetic nervous system need to build that muscle memory we say this time and time and time again when the chips are down in times of high stress you're going to resort remember it's the primitive brain it's taken over your primitive rain is calling the shots so you have to have those patterns of muscle memory established you have to have trained properly up to that point because the cognitive senators of your brain are largely bypassed especially during those first few seconds so you have to train properly and train harder train train train i can't emphasize this enough so that when the chips are down when you're in that highstress environment you're going to do what's right because your body knows what to do without the prefrontal cortex without thinking about the other stuff is just going to do it you have to build these pathways these these these neuro chemical pathways need to get established in your training so that when you need it it's there you don't even think about it you just go.

sympathetic nervous system