11 Burst results for "Sylvia Burstein"

"sylvia burstein" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"sylvia burstein" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"Meditation and mindfulness teachers. These pioneers from the west in the seventies are jewish again. He said that's a really good question and we talked about he said yeah. It sounds like a law firm and i just love to hear if you have any thoughts on why that is the case. Is it just coincidental. Is there something that maps from judaism to buddhism or otherwise. Do you have any thoughts on that. Because it has it uncanny happens tim ferriss. I have a lot of thoughts on this so these these people are all like really good friends of mine now and they go. There's a. I don't know how they feel about this name. But there is a name for this whole coterie. Which is the jews. The jewish buddhist and the prototypical. Ju boo is actually a jew. Who were say. He's a hindu. His name is ramdas. He his yes. A you will be as 'cause i know you're a real a connoisseur of supporter of Psychedelic or plant medicine and ramdas born richard helper alpert rather a jewish guy from boston. Became a harvard professor along with timothy leary. They got fired for running experiments on their students with either lsd or silla sivan and he went off to india. Richard did and discovered a hindu guru and named himself change his name ramdas and came back to the states. And and there's lots of good documentaries on him. I think some of them on netflix and was extremely influential and the slightly younger generation included. Lots of people. With like ju Chewy jewish names Like joseph goldstein. Sharon salzberg jet cornfield. Sylvia burstein mark epstein. Who's a psychiatrist in. New york city is written whole beautiful series of books about the overlap between buddhism and psychology Daniel goldman who was a harvard. Phd went on to write become a science journalist for the new york times and then wrote a book called emotional intelligence which is obviously a huge book on and on atar brock is a slightly younger iteration of the same sort of trend on and on and on. You have these great jewish meditation teachers. So what's going on here. And i say this as a path through barmitzvah guy what's going on here The jews have a cultural tendency toward anxiety. Which i would argue as well earned from the pharaohs through hitler and you know that yearning for some sort of remedy to this really difficult anxiety that plus the fact that judaism in america is largely tireless of course but largely secular. I think created both a hunger for answers to eighty. And maybe a sense. That there wasn't enough spirituality in their lives throw in the sixties and all the psychedelics and the and the vietnam and the and searching nature of that era and you get the jubilees. That's my sense. Of course they may all yell at me for being wrong about this. But that's my sense title dear opinion and perspective on the whole thing. I certainly not part of the club. So it's harder for me to have a strong opinion of any type about this. It's also been a long standing fascination of mine. I have a lot of jewish friends to observe this. What seems to be you fairly ubiquitous anxiety. In many of the families. I grew up around many of the friends. I developed close friendships with in high school and college. How much of that do you think is cultural. And how much of that is survival of the fittest in the sense if you think about jews as having.

Ju boo anxiety Sylvia burstein mark epstein tim ferriss harvard joseph goldstein netflix timothy leary Daniel goldman lsd New york new york times alpert Richard vietnam boston atar brock india america
"sylvia burstein" Discussed on Family Secrets

Family Secrets

08:49 min | 2 years ago

"sylvia burstein" Discussed on Family Secrets

"Shapiro and this is part two of special bonus episode of Family Secrets Speaking with journalist and author Libby Copeland about DNA discoveries. That unleash the long held secrets that affect so many of our lives. And how as a society we can learn to grow evolve change and understand one another. There is a pretty big leap of empathy that needs to be made for people who have never considered or had the experience themselves of that kind of disruption to their origin story Just thinking what difference does it make or a favorite line that was delivered to me on an index card in you know during a QNA Was what good is knowing and I almost laughed when I was like I actually kept index card and I had it pinned to my bulletin board in my office because what what good is knowing. It's everything and you know in family secrets In every episode whether it ends up in the final episode or not. I always ask my guests. you know. Who's like family secret? Were unpacking Do you wish you hadn't found out. Do you wish you hadn't known and not a single one in thirty guests thus far no-one one has said yes. I wish I didn't know no one In fact one of my favorite responses was from my friend Sylvia Burstein. Who is a mindfulness Buddhist Meditation teacher in her eighties and she just we were in person and she looked at me and she said do i. What do I do I want do? I wish I had. I mean she couldn't even understand the question of like. How could you possibly wish that you didn't know? And and that doesn't mean that it's not painful and hard but the relief that that people feel because that hole in the heart that you're talking about like. I think with people who have always known that they were adopted and who didn't have access to Their birth parents or their origin story The term in adoption literature is genealogical bewilderment Yeah the sense of sort of walking around just not knowing And so that's I would say. Probably what people describe of describe as the hole in their hearts but then there's the not knowing and the not knowing that you know which is the with so many people whose stories have been withheld from them and that is a different kind of hole in the heart. That's like a that's a hole in the heart that you don't know is a hole in your heart. You just you just have this ache. But you don't the the AAC doesn't have a name. It doesn't have a story attached and so when it does And this is not just. This isn't just my experience. It's experiences everyone that I've talked to. There's just a feeling amid amid all the shock and pain and confusion and disorientation of how publ relief like This makes so much sense. Yes yeah and kind of like people would talk to me about. There's a sense of excavating. So you make the discovery and then in the days and weeks and months. Follow there's this process of unbidden excavation of the past where these memories arise and all of a sudden you make sense these memories. You know of an interaction with your mom where she said something. And then you haven't thought about it in thirty years and suddenly you're putting that statement that she made into a different context and it's like pink and so there's this kind of emotional Archaeology that people would talk about where they were reprocessing reprocessing everything from once upon a time on forward and they were reprocessing it with the knowledge that put everything into a different perspective. And there's a term that you use And one of your interviews unthought known and I don't know if that's exactly what this is but it's like the sense of kind of sensing something but maybe not even a totally admitting it to yourself if I if I have it right yeah And so Again a number again. We're talking about commonalities right. And how how do these many many different experiences? Among many different people have different ages and different demographics. How do they align themselves with one another? Because that's part of the the amazing thing about this moment of the humanness commonalities human experience And one of the things over and over is that people would say to me and I'm sure they've said to you. You know I I kind of always wondered about that even if I never quite totally admitted it or I always have questions or Now it all makes sense right and there may be for some people. I did interview people who said they. They had never an inkling at all But enough of them. Who did that it may be that? There's a kind of a like a like a nascent knowledge. Like you said you know a feeling of Outsider ness or maybe little things that you pick up on that ad together into this this just this kind of I don't know diaphanous Ghazi sense of nagging question and then the DNA tests comes along and it's like there's the question solidified right there and there's an answer absolutely no that that's beautifully put and the the onslaught known which is a psychoanalytic term You know really refers to that which we we know we know it in our bones. We know it. We know it like when we talk about a six percents But we it's too dangerous to articulate to ourselves so we never actually consciously think it. It's more like why would anyone really ever entertain the thought that. Oh maybe this isn't my biological parent. It's just it's it's there's so much confirmation bias and so much need I mean I adored my father and And felt so incredibly connected to him and still do even though he's been gone for more than half my life but the two ever sink the thought maybe he's not. My biological father would have been impossible for me and and yeah and yet there is a way in which I knew you know that I never thought it but when I went back and read my early work as a writer. It's in there. It's like a trail of breadcrumbs. It's like it. It's like the unconscious made conscious Or the unconscious like on the page. There it is so I actually have something that even amounts to a kind of proof of the unthought known in my own in my own life but If if someone had put you know the given me a polygraph or whatever and said you know is do you think that your father isn't your biological father. What are you talking about what who could possibly give you that idea? I think that's why the fact that the various companies put a warning saying you may discover unexpected relatives. I think that's why those warnings don't take root. I mean you just sort of explained it so it kind of all clicked into place in my brain. There's there's of course even like even as you're saying even if you're someone who on some less than conscious level could have question. Did maybe questioned it you you a conscious level. So and so a warning is not. It's it's as good as a puff of smoke. We'll be back in a moment with more family secrets. We aren't really going out. These days at patterns have been interrupted disrupted and because of this. Our habits have changed. I used to listen to audible books in my car or walking the city streets or waiting to meet a friend in a crowded restaurant not so much these days these days. I'm doing my listening while cooking or folding laundry or even when taking a bath. I'm longing for the company that an audible book provides and.

Family Secrets Libby Copeland Sylvia Burstein Shapiro writer
"sylvia burstein" Discussed on Family Secrets

Family Secrets

08:44 min | 2 years ago

"sylvia burstein" Discussed on Family Secrets

"I've been thinking about coming here and doing this. Special live episode of family. Secrets with vessel is my guest and I was thinking about. I love full circle moments and this feels like one to me about three winters ago I reached out to vessel. We have a mutual friend. The Yoga and Yoga philosopher Stephen Cope and I was in a complicated state. I had recently made the discovery about huge families secret of my own after casually doing DNA test recreationally doing DNA tests way. I think of it and discovered in Pretty Short Order. That my beloved dad raised me had not been my biological father which was something that had never entered my mind and so I was in this state of really almost a kind of relationship to my own self my my identity. My Body my face in the Mirror. That felt traumatizing and shocking. And I was walking around. Really fueling the physical symptoms of that the dizziness the lightheadedness the floating and so I reached out to Bethel and he very kindly agreed to meet me and we spent an afternoon talking by a fire on a winter day. And I couldn't have imagined as it's been true in my life so many times that it would just three short years later and I would have synthesized this metabolize this experience into a book inheritance and then I would simultaneously create this podcast which was a happy accident. Just really briefly. I wrote this book about my family's secret about my being family secret and then all of a sudden people started telling me there's and the very first time that that happened. It was a friend of mine. The Buddhist Mindfulness Teachers Sylvia Burstein attened. She had just read the manuscript of inheritance and it prompted her to tell me a story of a family secret of hers and I was on the other end of the phone and I thought I wish I was recording this. And that is the entire way that this podcast was born but one of the things that I've noticed in now to going on three seasons of the PODCAST says thirty. This new season is launching next week. It will be thirty guests that I've spoken to which is not. It's not really a scientific sample. But I've noticed a few things and one of the things that I've noticed. Is that every guest of mine at some point or another no matter what their story is does use the word trauma and I guess. I wanted to begin by. There's a there's a line from the body keeps the score. Which I reread and re underlined and felt new things about I think the body keeps score is a book that you can probably come back to multiple times in your life and read it differently and have different different moments in it and different concepts in it that are underscored but I figured that you wrote the book probably in around two thousand thirteen and you wrote that. We're undo years over ten years. Yeah you didn't write it in twenty thirteen but but as you're writing this at this point you wrote. Were on the verge of becoming a trauma conscious society so I guess I wanted to ask you what you meant by that. Then and how does that sit with you now? Seven years later. Well I think that's a very tough question because live in this sharply divided world and at the same time that I know hundreds of people around the country who are doing amazing work. I know people who have these yoga programs in the Baltimore. Inner City schools and know people who have shakespeare programs in Kansas City. Kansas prisons and just mazing Singing the soldiers Working with horses with peabody is enormous layers of cautious and be getting it. And then our mainstream society becomes more and more rooted in is destructive capitalist world of how can we make more money and destroyed a little bit. Faster could make more money. We should just stop including medicine itself of course Psychiatry very much of living. Visit crazy diagnostic system giving people labels as make any says have no signs of validity and at the same time this other group of people go get paid by insurance. You know who don't part system beady discovering a lot and they see a difference becomes a larger and larger way And I don't get see them so it becomes a little right now so the comes larger and larger and yet at the same time there's more and more of an identification of an experience a piece of history apparent aspect of childhood as as being identified as trauma willing more and more. It seems I mean your book. Has its came out three years ago four years ago. And there's a reason why your book is occupied the top three spots of the New York Times Paperback Nonfiction Bestseller List for an entire year. People in airports are thinking. I know what I'm going to read. I'm not going to be Danielle Steele. GonNa Really Danny Shapiro. No Shapiro also. Because it's the next book you read books so what? What do you think that that that hunger is about does get? It's a tricky question. I see it I see. I'm so impressed at a live in a particular world people. Ask me all the time what's happening in the world. I don't know I just don't do people who I know and other people come to see me to people who I hang out his two people want to share that work for me and I always lightened face. Also very mindful people descended people. Why don't see he your stories. That don't know how large this and so I don't know but they noted that many places almost every place I go to. I mean people who do amazing things in terms of getting into your body telling the truth speaking openly try to lead authentic life interesting the also in Silicon Valley which is stubhub in some ways. Where there's all the money and all these immature people doing amazing things in craziest things and yet people are also really searching for hobby. Keep ourselves together or do we pay attention to each other and so very serious effort to understand how we can make it safe and energy places for each other my mind just went the quote unquote wellness movement as something that kind of adjacent to this. In a way where I think we meaning we who think about these things are thinking about the body more and more as the place. That is the locus of where it all gets expressed. I mean there's moment in your book probably several you talk about gut instincts right or am I remember. When I was reading this in King I have never in my life had gut instinct and followed it and been and regretted it and I have had gut since and ignored them and that leads to walls and trouble. I think the idea that we're listening listening to our bodies more. Yes we are. You know in certain circles at the same time..

PODCAST Danny Shapiro Stephen Cope New York Times Paperback Nonfi Sylvia Burstein Danielle Steele Bethel Kansas Psychiatry stubhub Inner City schools Baltimore Silicon Valley Kansas City peabody
"sylvia burstein" Discussed on Family Secrets

Family Secrets

10:28 min | 2 years ago

"sylvia burstein" Discussed on Family Secrets

"Thank you for coming on my show today. Well thank you for you. Know thinking of something else to do Besides the myriad things you already do because you are a card carrying wife mother human as well as your sort of day job. He Amy enough about me. How about you Jamie? So you know the idea for this show really came out of an awareness that I was feeling so deeply that all we want so much to gather just a little over a month ago and this is so crazy to like just realize how recent it was because it seems like a galaxy long ago and far away you and I were having lunch with friends on a beautiful sunny afternoon. La We were together and now those kinds of gatherings feel like they're a little bit for the moment in time capsule so invite us into your home and your life right now. Where where are you right now? Where are you sitting what you see? Who's with you during this period of time? So I'm in my harmless Angeles. I've lived here with my husband. Christopher for a very very long time I've lived in Los Angeles my entire life I've raised both my children in this house. I am sitting in a room. That is my office Which was originally an out door eating patio that had no windows but was covered and I changed it almost immediately when we bought the house into an office for myself very bright I look at trees which then of course brings birdlife and nature to me. I live nearish the ocean I can hear the ocean. I don't see it and that's where I am Christopher's I believe watching the replay of the masters in the other room. I just woke up from a little nap. It was so funny because a friend of mine is named Joe Pool Yeezy. Joe is a fantastic photographer. I have loved his work. Both Christopher and I have collaborated with him on projects and he as a way to deal with this forced isolation decided to start taking portraits of people in isolation and he. He just started contacting friends of his and saying. Can I just literally drive by Your House and put my camera like over the fence and it was beautiful series of photographs with you shocked for Instagram. Did he just did as a creative person as a way to comment and the reason I bring it up is that then. The Hollywood reporter saw some of them on instagram. They asked him if they could publish it in their journal. Two mornings ago. I woke up with a text from a friend of hers saying Cool Cover and I said what and the reason I brought it all up is the it was my husband and I on the cover of the Hollywood reporter in this portrait. The Joe took in twenty three seconds between. I'm here the text when he said I'm here to me opening the front gate. Twenty three seconds later he said goodbye and now this picture was on this magazine but the words they described were alone together. That's why I brought it up because what this has yielded is that my and I are alone together. Our schedules are off and they're just sort of always been off and now they're more off so I get up at five. Am for thirty five am every day and Christopher goes to bed at eleven thirty every day. So I go to bed at seven thirty eight o'clock and you know and so we're having this interesting time where I spend a lot of time on my own in my home even though Christopher is in the same house. That's what's been the reality which is very much our marriage. But it has been highlighted by this Forced `isolation. I mean I think so. Many things are getting underscored or deepened. During this time then there are these deeper Understanding that are going to be explored in our main relationships and it was just an irony to me. If that's the correct use of the word you went to college. You write books if alone together is it really would be a portrait of how we are so I spend a lot of time alone and the one aspect of this that has been the most challenging for me. This has brought me to my knees and I literally say quiets Scottish. It's it's touched me I I. I don't do the phone very well. The phone you and I've been friends for a long time. Have you ever gotten a text longer than two words for me? It's usually you know K I usually use even though my friend L. Yankovic would hate me for it. I use K For an acknowledgement. I speak an emotional Haiku. I hate phone I hate it. I have never ever prior to three weeks ago. Done face time. We'll try to facetime me. I laugh in their face time. I'm like took that away my daughter three weeks ago. I posted a picture where my daughter taught my husband and I how to Work Zuma and how to be in a video conference now. I do recovery meetings every day on them. I'm now like miss. I'm lucky I don't know. Go to Speaker View. No no no yourself. I mean but that's not me. Yeah and it has. It's his demanded that I participate in a way that is unnatural for me and that has been very challenging. I'm just not the person also you know just thinking about you and you're a hugger. I'm a hugger. I can actually like call to mind what it feels. Like to get. One of your hugs. It's an embrace it's warm. It's like pillowy and enveloping. I'm tactile. Yeah Yeah and emotional and tactile. This is required other parts of me. Which I don't feel are strong. I was speaking recently with my friend. Sylvia Burstein who is someone that I hope to have on this podcast? We were talking about what's happening with technology and the way that we are all obscene each other whether it's in classrooms or it's in recovery meetings or other kinds of meetings and she said you know we are creatures who operate with five senses and we only have access to two of them when we're talking to and seeing someone on screen we're only seeing and hearing we can't smell we can't touch we can't taste we only have those two dimensions. I guess one of the things I really wanted to ask you. And it's funny because I had literally written the question down what you find most challenging. You went straight there and I I knew you would. But what do you hope we learn? I mean do you. Do you have any thoughts about what might come out of this? I am concerned that there will be a generation of Germaphobe and that this the orthodoxy the great dacians of color of how people take the possible threat of human contact being the source of illness. One moment occurred. That sort of changed everything for me. And it was the day that Princess Diana died and it was August and I had heard this news and I remember sitting The phone rang and it was my sister who had traveled with me and she said yes thing turned on the TV. And I just remember the moment of of the voiced the face and the voice of a young man who had to read the official news that to the assembled press corps she had passed away I remember sitting on the edge of my bed and then I I turned the TV off. Because I knew what the TV would do. I knew what was about to come and there was a book next to my bed. Now I'm GonNa cop to this on your podcast please. If you run into me in person. Please don't ridicule me harshly for what I'm about to say. But I was so uninformed that I used to leave books next to my bed so that if by chance you came over to my house you might go. Wow look what. She's reading next to her bed. I think there was Warren Peace and something else I mean it was heady intellectual work And at the top of the pile was a book about insight meditation. My Joseph Goldstein and Jack Cornfield..

Christopher Joe Pool Hollywood reporter Jamie Amy Warren Peace Los Angeles Joseph Goldstein Princess Diana Zuma Sylvia Burstein L. Yankovic official Jack Cornfield
"sylvia burstein" Discussed on Family Secrets

Family Secrets

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"sylvia burstein" Discussed on Family Secrets

"So and his that experience part of your decision to go to social work school you know it was part totally part of my decision and I I have and I had a great therapist who administered it and helped me through so much of it but also I think when I found Peter and I was kneeling by his body. It it may sound odd but at the time that I saw that I realized that he was dead. I thought I can't keep doing what I'm doing anymore. Like I just felt like I'm going to have to change my life. I was writing a lot about startups and technology for the times and other publications and I just thought this doesn't feel meaningful to me. I think I need to write about other things and I think I need to be more involved with end of life things and I just I kept thinking you know ex husbands and ex wives. There's a lot of. It's hard to be divorced and Peter was my friend and also sometimes my biggest nemesis but I loved him and seeing your friend there like that and thinking was he scared we see in pain was you know was regretful. Like I thought I couldn't have saved him at that point but I could have held his hand so he wasn't alone and I've always been an activist and so I thought I'm going to go back to work for social work and think about end of life care. I guess as a way to make up for what I couldn't give Peter. Because I didn't see what was happening. I didn't know his secret and I have but I wound up my first year. They said you know. Where would you like to do your fieldwork and I said anywhere but the dish? I don't WanNa do addiction. That's exactly what I did and it was actually remarkable and rewarding and I learned a lot so that was where I made that pivot. I think we all know we're GONNA die. I've never seen someone dead. I was like this is GonNa Happen. May Not happen this way and it may not happen tomorrow. But it's like this is really going to happen and so. I have to think really carefully. What do I want the rest of my time? The look like my friend. Sylvia Burstein who was my guest during season. One of this podcast. If you haven't heard her episode go back to season. One and listen to her episode called. Don't duck you'll thank me later. Anyway Sylvia who is one of the most beloved teachers of mindfulness. Meditation in this country recently told me a Buddhist parable.

Peter Sylvia Burstein
"sylvia burstein" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:34 min | 3 years ago

"sylvia burstein" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Chris to Tiffany. This is on being today for mother's day with Jewish Buddhist mother grandmother teacher and psychotherapist, Sylvia. Burstein? I happen to have the experience of having my first time my daughter while I was at seminar studying the which was a really interesting thing to do to be reflecting the logical and then going through this experience of bringing life into the world. And one of the really strong reactions. I had after she was born was religion. I'd grown up using this language of goddess father. And that is not very or to reflect on what we mean. Because this father God who I always thought of was so sovereign so powerful, right. And the experience becoming a parent is is one of excruciating vulnerability and loss of control. And to be able to this whole thing of worrying and catastrophes being fearful gives you all kinds of rich new reasons. Really affect one of the people who. Women who came regularly. I teach I teach is Iraq meditation center out in California, and the classes kind of a regular Roop of people that comes every Wednesday and women came who was pregnant with a first child and the whole group was looking forward to her having her baby. And she took some time off after the baby's point. Then she came back breath baby there, and she talked about she said, you know, when I became pregnant. Everybody's said congratulations great-great-great fake day. And when I had the baby risk. Congratulations. Great-great-great fake great. Nobody tells me that I had at that point mortgaged, my heart for the entire rest of my life because my happiness now depends on this baby being well and healthy and nothing bad happening to nobody tells you that they don't say when they hear say oh, brace yourself. Station graduated because he both this converge relations. It's the most amazing thing we can do as you said feel speaking to create a new life that comes out with fingernails and lashes all all its fingers and toes, it's amazing thing. And it's extremely awakening in the sense of knowing how vulnerable we are sent when you say goodbye to somebody says he's in and you've actually never know. And it would be grim. Do you think about that? All the time. But if I think about that enough time, I think the result of my thinking about that a lot is that I try very hard not to harbor any grudges and not to leave anybody in the not good way. And to say, I love you as much as I can when people and when I talked to my children, or my grandchildren. I think that's actually the thing about the effect of being aware of how fragile in fed how fragile and strange unpredictable life. In fact, in fact, that that the cracks is what the tot is really is realizing that everything passes including these lives, and it's it's not it's not a gloomy Macab kind of philosophy. It's really an understanding. But that's what's true and knowing that's true. I think we have mandated not to waste any time with 'em the negatively or grudges it so easy to make a grudge list. And then. Richard. The world has changed pretty rapidly in the sense as well. People tend to you'll often have mixed families of one parent is religious. The other is not or they come from different traditions, and their extended families may have ten different traditions. But then when people become parents, they often still start asking this question. Do I want to have something on or what do I want to pass on? A rabbi sandy Sappho said to me once that many of us not all of us have a mother tongue a tradition we grew up in and we may have rejected that, but she said don't let your tradition be defined by people who may have ruined it for you that that probably is a first place to look. Actually, the truth about me is I didn't come back to I've never left. Many people come back. That's true. I actually never left. I had always a very cordial and warm relationship to Judaism, my family was a comfortably a fairly traditional Jewish families. I grew up. I never questioned that. I was fundamentally in the sense of my native language is sandy says say I actually was introduced to a couple of meditative pads that didn't particularly speak to me. And then I met my teachers and I went on retreat, and I was very touched by what they said. And particularly the understanding about the difference between a life inevitably challenged by pain and complications, but free of suffering that there would be a way to train the mind to not make more suffering out of the inevitable challenges of life. And it just sounded exactly true to meet made tremendous sense of Hugh, someone understands that this something anxiety provoking about life. And I thought that my private hangs out. He was mind nobody else had it. And I thought about becoming enlightened that if I practiced meditation enough that the challenges of life and the pain and the disappointments of it, which just I would say over them with great nitty didn't happen that didn't happen. I tell people I tell people that I could have the most profound equanimity, and I am two words away from losing it completely. Then they say, what are those two words as what you have to understand the first phone has to ring ring ring and big of the phone and avoid says, Hello, mama. And.

sandy Sappho Burstein Sylvia Iraq meditation center Chris Macab Tiffany Hugh California Richard
"sylvia burstein" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:28 min | 3 years ago

"sylvia burstein" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Today for mother's day a conversation that has shaped and guided me as a parent for many years, Sylvia Burstein is a Jewish Buddhist teacher psychotherapist, a mother and a grandmother we soak up her wisdom on nourishing, the inner lives of our children and her insistence that we tend our own inner lives for their sake. Nobody tells you that they don't say when they hear this. Oh, brace yourself. They say they say, congratulations because, you know, percents both this, congratulations. It's the most amazing thing we can do to create a new life that comes out with females eyelashes all all its fingers and toes. It's amazing. And it's extremely awakening in the sense of knowing how vulnerable we are. I'm Krista Tippett. And this is being stay with us. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Jack Speer, the US China trade battle has a lot of constituencies concern that includes Georgia's P con farmers as Jim bursts reports from member station W A B E in Atlanta. The heightened tensions come at a difficult time historically, China has claimed as much as two thirds of the state's annual con output, but tariffs imposed last year dropped both demand and the value of their crop and in October hurricane Michael hit. It all means unprecedented. Struggles for the state's beacon growers says Jason Rourke with the Georgia chamber of commerce or already dealing with a lower price because of the lack of an ability to export to the Chinese market. And then they got hit by this massive storm that hurt their supply. So we've seen pecan prices dropped thirty percent. That's too much for some farmers who say they're not sure they'll be able to hang on. For NPR news. I'm Jim Burris in Atlanta. President Trump today said he would take steps to help you farmers being squeezed by the trade war who Saudi oil tankers. Norwegian flag ship sustained damage. What Gulf officials are calling a sabotage attack off the coast of the United Arab Emirates the incident, highlighting the wrist to shippers in a region that is vital in terms of global energy supply, and it comes amid the heightened tensions between the US and Iran over an unraveling nuclear deal, which the US pulled out of last year while Gulf officials aren't saying who they believe was responsible. The US has warned ships that Iran. It's proxies might target maritime traffic. Actress Felicity Huffman known for her role in desperate housewives broke down in federal court in Boston today. She pleaded guilty to a scheme to boost her daughters. SAT scores NPR's tovia Smith explained. She's one of dozens charge in a sweeping conspiracy. And bribery, case Huffman pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit mail fraud for paying fifteen thousand dollars to have someone correct or. Daughters SAT exam. She cried as she explained to the judge that her daughter knew nothing about it. And that her accommodation for extra time on tests was legit everything else. She said I did huffman's apology expressing deep regret and shame will help her at sentencing prosecutors are recommending four months and a twenty thousand dollar fine another parent LA businessman. Devon Sloan also pleaded guilty to paying two hundred and fifty thousand in bribes and using Photoshop pictures of his son purportedly playing water polo to get him recruited to the USC team. Prosecutors want him sentenced to a year in prison. Tovia Smith, NPR news. Boston supreme court says US consumers can pursue an antitrust lawsuit claiming apples unfairly monopolized the market for the sale of iphone apps just to spread cavenaugh joining the courts for liberals in rejecting a plea from Cupertino California-based apple and the lawsuit over the thirty percent commission. Charges software, developers was after sold on the company store on Wall Street, the Dow plunged six hundred. Seventeen points. This is NPR and this is WNYC in New York com. Shawn Carlson almost two inches of rain has fallen in New York City area over the past two days. And that means some untreated storm and wastewater is overflowing into adjacent waterways. The city issued water quality advisories for at least two dozen location. Some lasting well into tomorrow. Some of those include Coney Island creek, flushing creek and the Newtown creek. A New Jersey doctor who I who himself as the El Chapo of opioids is facing federal charges. The US attorney's office alleges that rubber Delgada prescribe. Opioids for patients without seeing them and often allowed them to choose their own dosage. He's also charged with altering medical records to hide his activities. Both charges are punishable by up to twenty years in prison. Some New York lawmakers are drafting legislation that would decriminalize the buying and selling of sex. But that idea is receiving resistance in the enemy is the executive director of the coalition against trafficking in women. She says commercial sex increases the chances of violence against women. This is not progressive legislation. This is the most reactionary regressive vision for women girls, and particularly women and girls of color, one of the bill's sponsors assembly member, Richard gut freed says that keeping sex criminalised undercuts the ability of workers to screen, clients and control their work environment. He says the Bill keep sex work a legal if it involves minors or trafficking for tonight here on area. We will continue.

NPR US Felicity Huffman New York Jim Burris tovia Smith Atlanta Sylvia Burstein Krista Tippett Iran US attorney Georgia chamber of commerce Jack Speer China United Arab Emirates Jason Rourke Shawn Carlson Washington Bill
"sylvia burstein" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:30 min | 3 years ago

"sylvia burstein" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Krista Tiffin. And this is on being today for mother's day with Jewish Buddhist mother grandmother teacher and psychotherapist, Sylvia. Burstein? I happen to have the experience of having my first child my daughter while I was at seminar while studying the allergy which was a really interesting thing to do to be reflecting the logical and then going through this experience of bringing life into the world. One of one of the really strong reactions. I had after she was born was realizing that I'd grown up using this language of goddess father. And that is very or don't reflect on what we mean. Because this father God who I always thought of so sovereign so powerful, right. And the experience becoming a parent is is one of excruciating vulnerability and loss of control. And to be able to know this whole thing of worrying and catastrophes being fearful gives you all kinds of rich new reasons to. It's really affect one of the people who. Women who came regularly. I teach I teach is Iraq meditation center out in California. And the classes kind of a regular group of people that comes every Wednesday and women came who was a pregnant was at first child and the whole group was looking forward to her having her baby. And she took some time off after the baby's born. Then she came back brought the baby there, and she talked about she said, you know, when I became pregnant everybody said, congratulations great-great-great fake day, and what I had the baby Rizek, congratulations. Great fake fake. Nobody tells me that I had at that point mortgaged, my heart for the entire rest of my life because my happiness now depends on this baby being well and healthy and nothing bad happening to it. Nobody tells you that they don't say when they hear say, oh we brace yourself. Stationed graduated foes this converge relations. It's the most amazing thing we can do as you said feel speaking to create a new life that comes out with fingernails, and eyelashes and all all its fingers and toes, it's amazing thing. And it's extremely awakening in the sense of knowing how vulnerable we are. You know, sometimes when you say goodbye to somebody sales. He's soon and you've actually never know. And it would be grim day. Think about that all the time. But if I think about that enough time, I think the result of my thinking about that a lot is that I try very hard not to harbor any grudges and not to leave anybody in the not good way. And to say, I love you as much as I can when I leave people, and when I talked to my children, or my grandchildren. I think that's actually the thing about the effect of being aware of how fragile in fed how fragile and strange unpredictable life. In fact, in fact, that that the crux of what the tot is really is realizing that everything passes including these lives, and it's it's not it's not a gloomy Macab kind of philosophy. It's really an understanding. But that's what's true, and knowing that's that's true. I think we have mandated not to waste any time with 'em the negativity or grudges it so easy to make a grudge list and the nurtured. The world has changed pretty rapidly in the sense as well. People tend to you'll often have mixed families of one parent is religious. The other is not or they come from different traditions, and their extended families may have ten different traditions. But then when people become parents, they often still start asking this question. Do I want to have something on her? What do I want to pass on? A rabbi sandy Sappho said to me once that many of us not all of us have a mother tongue a tradition we grew up in and we may have rejected that, but she said don't let your tradition be defined by people who may have ruined it for you that that probably is a first face to look. But actually the truth about me is I didn't come back to Judaism, I've never left many people come back. That's true. I actually never left. I had always a very cordial and warm relationship to Judaism, my family was a comfortably a fairly traditional Jewish families. I grew up. I never questioned that. I was fundamentally Jew in the sense of my native language is sandy Sasso say I actually was introduced to a couple of meditative pads that didn't particularly speak to me. And then I met my teachers and I went on retreat, and I was very touched by what they said. And particularly the understanding about the difference between a life inevitably challenged by pain and complications, but free of suffering that there would be a way to train the mind to not make more suffering out of the inevitable challenges of life. And it just sounded exactly true to meet made tremendous sense of like, Hugh, someone understands that there's something anxiety provoking about life. And I thought that my private hangs. He was my nobody else had it. And I thought about becoming enlightened that if I practiced meditation enough that the challenges of life and the pain and the disappointments of it would just I would sail over them with great nitty. I didn't happen. It didn't happen that didn't happen. I tell people I tell people that I could have the most profound equanimity, and I am to words of way from losing it completely. Then they say, what are those two words as you have to understand the first phone has to ring ring ring. And big of the phone voice says Hello Aloma..

Krista Tiffin Burstein Iraq meditation center Sylvia sandy Sappho sandy Sasso Macab California Hugh
"sylvia burstein" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:42 min | 3 years ago

"sylvia burstein" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"When I was first having idea for this show her book, that's funny. You don't look Buddhist. Sylvia is one of the people who literally brought Buddhism to the west to the United States in the nineteen seventies and was Jewish like a lot of the people who brought Buddhism to the west in the nineteen seventies. A lot of people who we still are household names with autism in the United States. But she's also written over the years about how she has come back to really richly integrate that with her Jewish identity finding again in two days, the imagery and poetry and ancestry and continuity that nourish her and she's also passed onto her children. So when I thought of Sylvia's, this wise person, I started googling to see if you ever wrote about children and parenting and grand parenting. What I found is that in her bio description everywhere, I could find it. She lists herself this way, she has lots of credentials, but it started out, Sylvia. Burstein is a wife, mother grandmother. Author teachers psychotherapist, and I thought that's it. This is our person. Actually, I'm happy. I'm happy that you discovered that. I have I think it's true. I normally described myself that way. And I find that when people say, what are you proudest of in your whole life? The it's clear to me that I am most proud of the fact that might might children now really adults all of them. Now. Three of the four of them are in the fifties. So that's a substantial credential, and they're all very very nice people. And that is my best. That's what I'm proudest, and my grandchildren are coming along. And they have very good people. And I'm so proud of that this this. I don't think I've done I have certainly haven't done it alone. I've done it the father, and I've done it with their teachers without community. But they are. I think my most important work in my life. I'm gonna grandchildren. Do you have seven? So you know, one thing that I enjoyed reading in figure was in your book. That's funny. You don't look at your father's mother. That would have been your Jewish grandmother was your first Buddhist teacher that she used to tell you where is it written? We're supposed to be happy all the time. In fact, you have to know that I grew up in a post depression house, both my parents had jobs, and I'm an only child from my parents, and my grandmother who was widowed. My father's mother, and my parents went off to work. So my grandmother did a great deal of the mothering of and she was very very solicitous. So that I remember her as bathing in washing and dressing me and making braids and preparing the kinds of foods that I like the only thing that she was pretty not moved to respond to was the coming and going of childhood bouts of I'm not happy. I'd say, but I'm not free. And she'd say that it my grandmother was not a learned woman in that sense. But it's a it's an ethnic thing to use that time you to turn the phrase, and she'd say, where's it written that you're supposed to be happy all the time? And I think it was the beginning of my my virtual practice that life is difficult. And then forty years later, I learned that the Buddhist said the same thing in life is inevitably challenging, and how are we going to do it in a way, that's wise and doesn't complicate it more than it is just by itself. So I wanna talk tonight about about that wisdom that you've learned and how it might apply to our lives as parents, not just the spiritualize. If our children are how we nourish ourselves, right? As we are present to them. And as we impart what we want to impart to them. I I have to say, Sylvia, you're sitting here you are. So so calm, and and and you you radiate, wisdom and your books radiate wisdom, but so it was somewhat comforting for me for you to also describe yourself as a lifelong warrior. Threat full comes naturally because you've talked about that from your own childhood that your mother was ill. Reason to be actress as a child my mother did have a what they call them. Those days a week heart she'd had rheumatic card she had rheumatic fever as child and she had the consequence of a she's with a chronic Karner insufficiency, and I worried about that. And she actually died when I was in my very early twenties. So I've passed more than fifty years now without a mother, and I I wish I'd had one longer. But when I was a child I worried about it a lot. But you know, what I've found Krista that there are people who are given to fretting without a fretful environment. I think it's actually it's a it's a genetic glitch of neurology. And that it happens to some people and that for other people actually, the Buddha's said, we have one of five genetic fullback glitches when which he said, some people Fred. Some people get angry, some people lose heart, and all they read energy goes. And they don't have to do with themselves. Some people think oh, it's me. I didn't do things. Right. It's always my fault. I mess things up. And some people need to be sensually sued. They think whereas the Donut shop whereas pizza. People had different different tendencies. It was very, very helpful. For me is that adult to learn that because it's completely comes without a judgment. I don't have to say, I am a chronic fritter. I could say, you know, what I'm challenged fretting arises in my mind, and it's not a moral flaw, and it's very good for people who have a short fuse to be able to think, you know, I have this unusual that naturally arise. This is what happens when I'm challenged. But to take it as a I tell people that visit Mike Lynch is I I when in doubt worry. I said it came it came with the put -ment, I'm also sure that I have Brown eyes. And the if I could see that in the same neutral, it just came with the equipment, then I don't have to feel bad about it. But I can work with it wisely. It's that's really the important part. When we see as adults. What it is that our fallback glitch is say, oh, I think at a certain way that's a sign of wisdom when you begin when when a person begins to be able to delineate this is what happens to me on detention piece of self knowledge is a piece of self knowledge that that makes a break in between a certain next step. And that next step is, oh, so what I'm going to an airport, for instance, or if I come to a place where I've I've agreed to meet my husband on the corner of a certain street at five o'clock. I come there at five, and he's not there in the five five, and there, I could start to think maybe this. Maybe that maybe this maybe. But I think to myself, wait a minute. That is just my peculiar neurological glitch kicking in probably not I could just wait here quietly. I can look at windows. I look at the people I could say relaxing, phrases to my own mind. I could wish well to the passes by they're just lots of other things I can do..

Sylvia United States Burstein fever Krista Mike Lynch fifty years forty years two days
"sylvia burstein" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"sylvia burstein" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Government to bypass public contract regulations as well as strict historic preservation laws. Macro wants to finish the Notre Dame cathedral restoration within five years in time for the twenty twenty four Olympic Games in Paris Philippe plan new an expert of historic architecture worries. The government won't use proper monuments specialists for until. Who's fish? Specialists who know what they're doing. He says we're afraid they will go to quickly. Then you have to redo it in ten years. A recent poll by Doxa showed seventy two percent of French people are also opposed to fast-tracking reconstruction for NPR news. I'm Jake sagana row in Paris a pilot for me and mar national airlines being praised today. The pilot safely landed a passenger plane using only it's real wheels after the front landing gear failed to deploy local media say there were no injuries among the planes. Eighty two passengers and seven crew members. Video the landing shows the plane touching down its nose kicking up smoke on trial Snyder NPR news support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include the William T grant foundation working to harness the power of research to make a difference in the lives of children teens and young adults from more than eighty years. Learn more at W T grant, FD N dot org. A few years ago. I was invited to do an event in Detroit a city influx in an age of flux on the theme of raising children the conversation that resulted with the Jewish Buddhist teacher and psychotherapist, Sylvia. Burstein has accompanied me from that day forward..

NPR Notre Dame cathedral Paris Philippe Burstein Paris Jake sagana Doxa Detroit Sylvia William T seventy two percent eighty years five years ten years
"sylvia burstein" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

12:11 min | 3 years ago

"sylvia burstein" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Thank you so much superintendent Mahara. I so appreciate it and respected the way this invitation was framed in the way, you've framed this gathering about love, kindness and education strangely. Three words. We don't often see together, right? It's a little bit counter cultural, and there was language in there about restoring the richness and meaning of love and the role that it plays in education. Now, Richard Davidson who and we've known each other across the years, we we did a previous interview in two thousand eleven and he goes by Richie. And so I'm gonna column Richie today. And he was one of the people who contributed to really the discovery of the science of neuro plasticity, which I think is one of the most exciting discoveries of my lifetime. This idea that our brains. You know, I think when I grew up when many of us grew up you had this idea that our brain stop forming at some point when you're eighteen or twenty one, and it turns out that our brands form and can change across the life span, which I think is as wonderful news for somebody in their fifties. As in their twenties. What we practice we become and then we can change our brains are behavior. So we'll we'll get into that. And and Richie. I wanna ask you just before we start because I like to ground things and the personal in personal history. If you think about the words, love, kindness and education. Did you have an experience of love and kindness in education, or how would you identify that in your earliest life in your childhood? Yeah. Well, let me just first say before we answer the question. It's just a delight to be here with you. I've been interviewed by so many people in my life. No one too. I enjoy being injured more than Krista. So it's really a pleasure, love, kindness and education. Is you say have I've not heard those words put together before and it's refreshing, and it's a testament to your visionary stance here in Orange County that you have chosen to Melbourne together in my own life. I actually went to a Jewish day school for the. The first eight years of my life actually, nine including kindergarten and for the most part except for I'd say one teacher who I remember, very distinctly. I don't have a sense of love and kindness at all in one of the things that's made me so passionate about education is my own kids education for my son was was really difficult, and it sensitized me to the critical importance of bringing love and kindness into the classroom in a way that honored the differences in variations among us, which is so prevalent when we actually opened our eyes and look. I think it's worth spending just a little bit of time kind of understanding where we came from on this because you know, until not that long. I'm in the nineteen sixties would have been kind of it was the heyday of behavior ISM you've said to me once you know, the environment was emphasized so heavily. There is no attention to the mind. No attention to biology like what was going on inside the child was just not that relevant. And I feel like you are right in on the front lines on this new frontier of science that is helping us understand how and why this kind of intelligence kind of learning is as important and relevant as are other kinds of intelligence and learning so. I was reading about that. What neuroscientists speculating is that brain circuits that are important that interact with for social and emotional learning interact with brain circuits that are important for cognitive learning. Absolutely one of the really important insights that is packed in. That statement is that the brain does not honor the kind of anachronism distinction between thought and feeling fought and feeling are absolutely intermingled in the brain. And so there are no areas of the brain that are exclusively dedicated to one and not the other. There's a lot of interconnectivity. And so when you are when a child, for example is subjected to adversity and the adversity gets under the skin it will. Impair cognitive function. In addition to producing emotional difficulties. And so these are inter intimately interwoven in the brain. Is it? I think so much also about how the twentieth century. I mean, we wanted to think we could bracket emotion out, you know, out of schools out of workplaces out of politics and we failed biology. Right. I mean, it's kind of the way we wish the world were because it would be neater and cleaner and less messy if emotion and intellect worn intertwined that there it is there it is. Yeah. And you know. There's a very famous psychologist to did work on decision making. And he actually got a Nobel prize in economics. His name was herb Simon. He and he worked in the in the nineteen sixties and seventies. In the way. He thought about emotion is that it was an interrupt. There're it disrupted cognitive function. And and we know now that when we think about the really complex decisions in our lives. So for example, if we think about whether we're going to partner with a certain partner or get married to a certain partner. That's the kind of decision that we cannot make based on a cold cognitive calculus. We consult their emotions for making that decision. And if our emotions were disrupted, it will really impair our capacity to make those kinds of decisions. And so this is led to the insight that emotions actually play a really key role. They can be both facilitating of our behavior and cognitive activity. And they can also be disruptor. So it can go both ways it's not one way or the other. But they're an intimate part of everything that we do. And I think that this must be flowing into. Another Californian dominance doing some wonderful work with understanding trauma as a public health issue. And again, this way we've punished behavior. In classrooms, and understanding that another way to think about it is to actually address that child as a person and help them learn to calm themselves and manage their behavior rather than just treating them as a disciplinary or scholarly problem. Yeah. Well, I think that's that's really such an important issue. And how we address those kinds of difficulties and the way teachers respond to those kind of difficulties will have an enormous impact on the brain on their expression. And you know, one of the things I often say is that the very mechanisms in the brain that allow adversity to get onto the skin are also the mechanisms that. Enable awakening. They're the same mechanisms. And so we can harness this power of neuro plasticity for the good. Bye. Cultivating certain kinds of virtuous qualities but neuro plasticity in and of itself is neutral. So you believe have taken these ideas into school settings. And you've actually asked the question can we, cultivate, compassion? And have you found I remember you saying to me years ago that you believe that we are hard wired to learn compassion. As we are hardwired to learn language has that burn itself out. Yeah, I'm happy. You remember that? It's I think the evidence today is even stronger than it was when we spoke about it last. But the reason I like Anne into language is that we also know that we come into the world with a biological propensity from language, but it requires that we be nurtured in normal linguistic community for that propensity to be expressed. And there are case studies of feral children who've been raised in the wild. They don't develop normal Anchorage. And so even though there's a biological propensity. It requires this context of the appropriate context to nurture. And I think the same is true for kindness. I think we come into the world with his innate propensity. But for this propensity to be expressed it requires nurturing, right? Yeah. Because we we don't we don't actually learn language. I mean, yes, there's an aspect of being taught language, but it's more just that people. Do it around us. Yeah. And so if we're in a context where people are doing kindness around us, we will as modestly absorb it. And it will be nurtured. And I mean that that then has implications for if this is brought into a classroom, and that it that it is also about. The teachers really embodying this not not just it's not just a lesson plan will and that's really one of the powerful things. Teachers change, students brains. When teachers interact with students, they're changing the brains of their students and not just functionally, but actually structurally, and this is not a radical statement because we're changing each other's brains. All the time we know that this occurs in a relationship between a parent and their offspring it occurs in any kind of sustained interpersonal interaction. So so I wanna hear I do want you to tell us about the the work you've been doing it with children in classrooms about teaching this. I want to say this reminds me of when. I think it was actually, Sylvia. Burstein wonderful Jewish Buddhist teacher who said to me. You know, your children really aren't listening to what you say. They're actually just watching what you do. And. That's kind of depressing. Right. That's the hard. It's easier and harder. But on the other hand what it does is it it gave me permission to say. Well, me investing in my spiritual health in my how I'm changing my brain what I'm practicing towards a character is not time or energy. I'm taking away from my children, but giving to them, and it's I guess it's the same kind of. Absolutely. And I think that kind of implicit learning that occurs. It's really implicit social learning that occurs through embodied practice taking on these kinds of characteristics.

Richie partner Richard Davidson Mahara superintendent Nobel prize herb Simon Krista Burstein Orange County Melbourne Anne Anchorage Sylvia eight years