3 Burst results for "Swiss Society"

"swiss society" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

06:09 min | 8 months ago

"swiss society" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Than it seemed ten days ago, probably, but still it is important for many American Macron to confirm his legitimacy if he is reelected. I think there can be any questioning of that. And so he will you will need to compose a majority you need to prepare for the parliamentary elections in June and he'll need to show that he can be the president of a national union that he'll be able to defend all the French people. I think this is where the probably the struggle still lies for him in the next two days. But according, sorry, I'll just adhere to the polls over 60% of people who watch the debate found him more convincing than her. However, thank you so much for joining us on the line from Paris. Still to come on today's program we go through the day's papers. Check in with our team at the Venice Biennale and Matt Wolfe during me to tell us what we should be watching in theater land. Stay with us. UBS has over 900 investment analysts from over 100 different countries. Over 900 of the sharpest minds and freshest thinkers in the world of finance today. To find out how we could help you contact us at UBS dot com. To Finland now, where yesterday the country's parliament debated the possibility of joining NATO. At the same time, its neighbor, Russia, issued a warning of the consequences should either Finland or Sweden seek membership of the military alliance. Or joining me now from Helsinki is Charlie saloni's pasternak, who's a senior research fellow at the Finnish institute of international affairs, and we're also joined from Zürich by Emily Italy, who is a program coordinator for peace mediation at Etihad in Zürich. Good morning to you both. Good morning. Good morning. Very good to have you with us both. Charlie, for can begin with you. What exactly was said yesterday in the finished parliament? Long debate, and of course this was the beginning. The beginning that we'll probably hear from in a little bit. Let me go to Emily where we try and sort out our line. Emily, you were across this as well. So what were the main points made in the parliamentary debate yesterday? So this is, of course, based on the government report that was published last week, which is essentially meant to pave the way for Finland to make a decision on whether or not to apply for NATO. But if you were listening to the various politicians expressing their views yesterday within the parliament it becomes very evident and clear that Finland is indeed on its way to NATO. You didn't really hear any critical voices from any of the ruling parties, even the social Democrats that have been lukewarm to the idea of NATO membership. Traditionally speaking, there is spokesperson for the parliamentary group until inman said that Russia has pushed Finland many steps closer to military alignment and really the only very critical voice I could pick up in the debate was from anno tortilla in and who himself was too radical even for the Finns party and then was expelled from that. So again, there seems to be rather broad consensus on the need to strengthen Finland's defense mechanisms through alignment. I'm delighted to say we have Charlie back. Just listening to that, Charlie. Emily making that very important point that for so long, the lukewarm response to the idea of the lukewarm response to the idea of joining NATO is on the one thing, but on the one hand, but now we have no critical voices at all. Are we looking at a situation where there is now no turning back? I would say there is absolutely no turning back. I agree wholeheartedly with the analysis of yesterday's discussion. So one might ask, why is this being done then? I think it's critical for the democratic consensus building aspect. What's being built now is a speech by speech, a consensus across the political spectrum, and the consensus is needed just in principle, but so that irrespective of any future election results every government will without a doubt stand by this decision for the years to come, but it's also important for the coming months when we're likely to see Russia's reaction to this so that no politician or party feels feels inclined to kind of slip from the united front. Tell me a little bit Emily about how this affects the way that international relations are now formed because for so long we had this example in Finland of a country which maintained dialog, which developed business relations with Moscow. On the understanding that that would keep the peace, how does this change in direction now change the way that the rest of the world approaches international relations? That's a good question and actually I've been approached by colleagues here in Switzerland, where of course neutrality or being military on the line is a key value in Swiss society. So they're curious to find out how is this discussion taking place in Finland? And I think what's interesting from a Finnish perspective when you listen to politicians, they're making the point of Finland hasn't been politically neutral ever since it joined the European Union and then what we've been is militarily none aligned even if we have been part of the partnership for peace. A group within NATO. And now we would very much join a defense alliance. So that has been of key importance to many politicians speaking on this matter. That they see NATO being a defense alliance, not often, and that's the emphasis that they would want to play within NATO if Finland were to join. But of course, for relations with Russia, they will remain crucial for Finn and we do share a border of more than 1300 kilometers. So for any future president of Finland, it will be of utmost importance to maintain some level of dialog with our neighbors to the east, but of course in the immediate when it comes to for instance business.

Finland Zürich NATO Matt Wolfe UBS Emily Charlie saloni Finnish institute of internati Emily Italy Charlie Russia Venice Biennale Finns party military alliance pasternak Etihad Helsinki Sweden Paris
"swiss society" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

05:15 min | 1 year ago

"swiss society" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Those days headlines back to emmer and Zürich. Thank you very much indeed, Emma in London. We're going to get a round up now of the stories making news in Switzerland with our regular monocle 24 contributor Florida Florian is senior associate at the Swiss foreign policy think tank for House. And he joins me here in Zürich hello. Lauren good to have you with us. Hello, Emma. Right, let's begin with a very strong business related story that's in the targets and Tiger today. We were talking a moment ago about the decisions and the complicated paths that businesses have to tread in this resurgence of COVID. But one company has decided to strike out on its own in terms of the admissions policies. Yes, indeed, and I think it reflects well with Tyler has said before in terms of companies trying to second guess what's happening. So this weekend actually the first event was publicly announced that is officially two G so tests not allowed. So you have to either be vaccinated or you have to have had or have to have been tested positive with COVID. And just ask you to explain to us, those who might not know what two G and three G is what the system is in Zürich. In Switzerland. In Switzerland is three G, which is infant gene or get tested, which means either vaccinated or tested positive in the past or negative now, right? Okay. And so in Austria, that's a huge debate in Germany as well of whether to take away that third cheese or that testing G and Switzerland, there is clearly no majority for that, also the experts are advising against for the moment even one of the most vocal experts Christian altars of the university of Bern, who was always a very strong supporter of very strict measures and even quit the official task force because it was too lax in his opinion. So even he is against us now, but yet still be learned. The major business magazine in Switzerland is launching this event on 2nd December, where negatively tested people will not be admitted. So you have to be vaccinated or you have to have had COVID in the past. And one of the guests is even a vocal opponent of the certificate. So I just think that this is going to stir a lot of controversy as to what extent businesses are free to be more street restrictor than the general rules. Because they are striking out alone with this decision. They are. It's the first of its kind. It's the theory that if you can only go in if you're either recovering or vaccinated against COVID, that it actually is a stricter policy than merely a test. That is the idea, but as I said, experts are really not so sure whether that's actually stricter or not. So I think it's really also a political sign to some extent to be strict, whether it is really strict or underground is really doubly, I think, and the effectiveness of these measures is data able to. But perhaps, again, to speaking to what Tyler has said, again, somebody had to make these decisions so you see CEOs of these companies or hear a business magazine. Actually asking themselves, a lot of these questions of how to host events or how to open up stores and businesses to people so that people are actually feeling confident attending and going there. And so being placing stricter rules then overall might be one of the things that people think they can attract more people into their businesses or two their events. Let's look at a campaign now by one of the oldest organizations in Switzerland to get everybody to was it enough of hostility threats and violence better constructive than aggressive. There's a nonprofit society, telling everybody in Switzer to be Switzerland to be nicer to each other. What is that all about please? This is just this is just an amusing story that has caught my eyes because at the top of the show we've heard them bicycle piles up in the Netherlands. So that must be about the maximum of rage in the Netherlands, right? As if bicycles pile up. So I think everything around these COVID restrictions or policies is still very civilized in Switzerland we've had a demonstrations of just 2000 people outside the city center in Zürich. Yesterday. So that was about as angry as it gets. And yet, the Swiss society for the common good. Which owns directly with funny enough is the alleged place where the three Alpine cantons 1291 swore the oath of the confederation. So it's a very mystical and historical place where also the national day is celebrated prominently et cetera, et cetera. So this institution that owns this kind of founding place of Switzerland has now issued a call for a more tolerance for more respect and for more dialog. And already I think about 20,000 people have signed it. It was all across the newspapers, the TV. There are ads everywhere. And I just find it striking that even in such a civilized kind of situation as we are now, I would argue in Switzerland, there is really already the civil engagement coming up and organizations popping up trying to remind everybody to be polite and to discuss without accusing the other side. So I just think it's a nice picture of this country. Florian, thank you so much for joining us. That was Florian egle from the think tank for us. Yeah, listening to.

Zürich Switzerland Swiss foreign policy think tan Emma The major business magazine emmer Tyler COVID Florian university of Bern Lauren Austria Florida London Germany the Netherlands Swiss society Switzer Florian egle
Locked Down in Switzerland and Belgium

Travel with Rick Steves

05:29 min | 2 years ago

Locked Down in Switzerland and Belgium

"Start with Stephen mcfeely he operates being be on Ireland's dingle peninsula in just before the pandemic head Stephen an interest in the hotel Oberland in October and Switzerland that's where he's had to ride out the first few months of the global lockdown good and. My goodness. My Irish friend is learning Spitzer dykes. Good here in the Alps where I've been for four months. Now in splendid isolation, my plan originally was just to come for February and March, but I've I'm still here right well, what does the vibe in Switzerland right now there's a positive vibe. The society is reopening. Tourism travel has started again just no we're on the same level as it was before we had two weekends where there was crazy crowds here huge big crowds from all over Switzerland everybody who was here was from Switzerland or had to be from Switzerland. They weren't necessarily all Swiss because there's lots of international people living in Geneva and Derek and whatnot but everybody from within the barger of Switzerland over with crowds, and then it just died and Monday to. Friday went back to being really really quiet. Okay. Well, this is sort of the very beginnings of the rekindling of tourism I would imagine it'll be people traveling with within their own countries first, and then traveling within Europe, and then finally international travel and transatlantic travel. Yes. That's exactly what we're seeing. The borders here have just reopened. So we're expecting Germans and some Austrians and maybe some French to come now also, I don't anticipate huge numbers like that would have been heretofore. One. Very noticeable thing in the Valley of course, there's no American visitors. As you know, the valley also is very popular with. Chinese travelers Indians many people from Dubai and Saudi Arabia would come here and they're not here this year. So there's a noticeable difference there. So the people getting the real cultural change would be the French speaking. Swiss. German speaking part of his Switzerland and not even leaving their own country exactly. Fifty percent of our guests. Last week were French speaking Swiss and it was the first time I've ever actually met those people and I would say to them. Are you French Swiss would say no, no, we are. All MOM and so I I learned something new immediately the K. The identify as swirl. They were saying exactly what you just said they said it's like we are in a different country it's very dramatic here it's different toossion either those on the do shut down it was really cool. They were very excited to see a different part of their own country. So that was wonderful. Now Stephen you own a hotel in Ireland in Dingle Peninsula and now you own a hotel in Switzerland in Loudoun valley two of my favorite places as a businessman working in both these countries how do you compare the support getting from the government and how the two governments are dealing with this crisis? Well, the difference is. Very. Big. I'm still on team. Ireland. So I want to be positive about my own country, but there's not a lot of support coming. Heretofore in Switzerland for example, within two weeks of the crisis occurring. The. Swiss Federal Council which is the Swiss government offered ten percent of the previous year's turnover and So that's quite a considerable amount of money and they offered that as a loan which was repayable over seven years. Zero percent interest. So they're not looking to profit from it and in Ireland we really struggled to get some assistance. And we got ten thousand euros of overdraft line of credit and but repayable at seven and a half percent interest in Switzerland. We got three hundred thousand. So it's quite a big difference there no-interest at all. No interest at all. Of course, Switzerland may have much stronger and deeper reservists than Ireland, but they were able to immediately come up with assistance very little bureaucracy paperwork, and they immediately got to help us in Ireland. The experience was just simply much different to the government really weren't as proactive for as immediate as were here in Switzerland. The roots here what's around her a lot less strict as well There is a two meter rule here, but I haven't seen anybody wearing masks very much, which is kinda shocking for me because I know in Ireland the whole north of is people should be wearing masks. People definitely are observing social distance. One of my friends said to me that the two meter rule has actually brought Swiss people closer together so. That is so insightful to the Swiss society. It's more difficult thing. It's more difficult thing for Irish people or Italian people are Spanish. Two meters distance than it would be for this people or maybe the. Scandinavians. I can see by home people are wondering. Is the Irish pub culture ever going to come back the way it was with social distancing whereas in. Switzerland. Here for me like I'm I'm in the Alps I'm surrounded by fresh air and. Of of lovely space and it's been a wonderful place to be stranded, I don't even want to complain about it because although I I was stranded here for four months. It was the perfect place I felt very safe. I might have felt different if I was in the middle of Zurich or something or Geneva but I felt very safe. I'd in the Alps and it is lovely and peaceful and quiet, and of course, that's what people are coming here for anyway

Switzerland Ireland Alps Stephen Mcfeely French Swiss Dingle Peninsula Swiss Society Swiss Federal Council Spitzer Europe Geneva Swiss Government Dubai Zurich Saudi Arabia Derek Loudoun Valley