29 Burst results for "Swiss Government"

"swiss government" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:48 min | Last month

"swiss government" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Of legacy We have fantastic businesses. The world's management business we have asset management. So this is the core of the group. And we are going to strive again, so we don't have any takeover discussions and at that point we truly believe we want to stay independent. You speak about wealth management, which is always been your historic strength. It seems to be now some investors that are still quite nervous about the stability of the bank. Many are holding off from bringing in new money, business with press release until you have your house in order. What happens if those clients don't come back meaningfully before 2025? No, look, first of all, yes, there were a lot of rumors about credit that was spreading the word. That was really, I think, unfounded. Do you look to our liquidity ratios, look to the balance sheet strengths, and now even more so as we strengthen the balance sheet and you clearly saw the reaction which was one of the key objectives of the announcement was that 81 spread CDS spreads came significantly in the down. So that's a very strong signal of comfort. There was a significant amount of outflows, the first two weeks of October. The firm has said that things have stabilized, but not quite reversed. Are you expecting those outflows to reverse? Yes, they build a reverse. It's true, a beginning of October with that social media storm we had outflow that has clearly stabilized and even see some inflows coming and I would anticipate that we will have further inflows in the weeks and months to come. It seems like you're exiting on a business where maybe more profits were coming from. What's the logic in cutting cutting cutting? Going forward criticism is really a wealth management centric franchise centered around entrepreneurs wealthy clients and we don't need that type of businesses that are quite isolated from the rest of the group. As you know, we are in exclusive discussions with Apollo and with pin cross I'm highly confident that over the next week we will come to agreement. What about for the asset management side? Is there a sale or parts of it? These were all rumors we are the belts manager. And asset management goes very well alongside we need to have an VR and multi specialist asset management. So we don't need to be the biggest globally, but we need to have those capabilities that we need also from a product and product provider perspective for our wealth mansion clients and for institutional clients. This restructuring is being funded by a new investor, the Saudis. There are some questions being raised around the Swiss government and allowing this sort of stake just given the Saudis, human rights record. How do you address the sort of geopolitical conflicts? First of all, we are very happy that we have an investor like the Saudi national bank. It's a private institution. And I think this is also a region that is growing sprawling region so we are very happy that we could really secure that type of investment into what they believe is a great franchise. In terms of just the year that you've had, you joined in January, how has it been for you as a chairman? In dealing with all this. No, look, when I took I joined the board of credits a year ago first as the chair of the risk committee and then took over as the chairman in January it was quite busy as you can imagine, no 2022 last year was a nightmare year for credit Swiss the whole banking industry had super results and we had our biggest loss ever 5 billion. So you can imagine that that keeps you very, very business. We had just too many shortcomings in the past call it too many crises as well. They were all popping up. So it

Swiss government Saudi national bank
"swiss government" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

08:19 min | Last month

"swiss government" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"7 36 here in London, let's have a look at the newspapers and joining us having had a look at what all the headlines are talking about is Stephanie Bolton, his UK and Ireland correspondent for deval. Good morning, Stephanie. Good morning, Emma. How are you? Very well. Thank you. I'm glad to have you with us. We mentioned in the headlines that the Israelis go to the polls today at the possibility of a comeback for Benjamin Netanyahu. What are the papers saying? Well, first of all, it reminds me I didn't know if you saw the news this morning, but perma crisis is that the word of the year in Britain. And I think we have found perma crisis everywhere. So Israel is now going to its 5th election today since 2019 and actually the papers are saying that they are not sure the last election there might be another election at 6 election very soon. The polls predict actually a debt lock again and what is especially interesting about this election is that Benjamin Netanyahu is running again while actually he's on trial on charges of fraud, breach of trust and accepting brides, but nevertheless he's running. Caretaker prime minister is so to say his opponent, but he had a very, very fragile, very diverse coalition. So voters will look at his party and think, do we want this kind of instability again? But if you look at the options that Benjamin Netanyahu has, if he wants to form a coalition, it looks likely that he needs to go into a collision with religious Zionism. And the head is itama, Ben gear. And he actually has a long history of anti Arab rhetoric. He was convicted for incitement and supporting terrorist group. So it's a very fragile situation and whatever the outcome, it doesn't look like Israelis going into a more stable situation. Just explain to us this idea of stability within Israel. It is something that we have come to expect not to be around. And what you've just described there doesn't seem to suggest that anything stable is around the corner. No, and especially if you look at the last month where tragically, 20 Israelis have been killed in terrorist attacks. So of course, Israel has always been a place with the very diverse political coalitions, but we have seen because of the situation, the domestic situation, which has become more and more fragile and more security issues. And then, of course, also the surrounding of Israel, the interferences of Iran, the situation in Syria, the tensions with Lebanon. So it is not looking likely that they will get off the so called perma crisis. Let's move on to a row, a disagreement that's taking place between the Swiss and Germany in terms of the involvement that each country is taking in Ukraine. Yeah, that's a very delicate story. Also for the German government, as we know, we have discussed in the past about a lot of criticism of the German government not being as supportive as they should be of the Ukrainian government, Kyiv has been very, very outspoken criticizing, especially German Chancellor hola Scholes that he was slow to agree to deliver the weapons to Ukraine. I mean, to be fair, if you now look so many months on from February at the record of Germany helping Ukraine, I think it's fair to say that the half really stepped up and there's a lot of defensive weapons going into Ukraine, helping the Ukrainians to push the Russians back, whether it's in the east and in the south. But this is around ammunition that Germany has promised to Ukraine to help especially in the south and Germany is also claiming that this ammunition is needed for some tanks to help the export of grains from the port of Odessa. But the Swiss, the Swiss government, has decided that they are not giving these ammunition to Germany because of their neutrality principle, which says that they are Switzerland is not allowed to export ammunition if these ammunitions then will be used in an international conflict. And so, I mean, looking at the rhetoric coming from Germany, it's pretty stark. For example, an FTB FTP is liberal coalition liberal politician in the defense committee. And he's saying that Switzerland will pay a very high price if they don't agree now to giving this ammunition to Germany and that Germany might as a result not by any more weapons from Ukraine. And there is a number which speaks for itself that actually 23% of Swiss arms exports are going to Germany. So it's a difficult one, but it's going to be interesting to see what ban the capital or the government is doing. Weighing up the neutrality argument and the consequences it might have to say, don't find an agreement with the German government. And it's actually a strange or a new development for Germany, which up until now in many of Europe's European ice has not been acting as quickly and as in accordance with the rest of the European Union. So there is this huge sentinel, isn't there that countries are acting unilaterally in their response to the Ukraine war, which is quite destabilizing. Yes, it is, but in a way, it's not surprising because the war is now going into its what 8 months. Populations in public are getting more and more wary. Of course, there is a big, big, big question of the winter coming and people are questioning whether it's the right thing to do to support the Ukraine because of the sanctions and accordingly then energy prices going up. I think, as I said in the beginning, Germany has stepped up much more and is actually now one of the main providers of arms to Ukraine. But of course, the Swiss government looks at its laws, by the way, that's law I looked it up, I think, from 19 O 7, which says that there have to be neutral and therefore the agreement from 1907. They are not allowed to export weapons to a conflict party. But yeah, I mean, in Switzerland, there's also a lot of criticism of the support of the Ukraine because people are saying, well, we should end this conflict by a peace agreement, which I think is very easily set and very difficult to be done. Thanks for that. Stephanie, let's move finally to an article in the times which summed up a rather explosive and contradictory session in the British House of Commons yesterday the Home Secretary braverman under an enormous amount of pressure in terms of not only accusations that she was, well, I think her nickname is leaky Sue in terms of her ability to keep state secrets under wraps. But also the fact that she yesterday said that the British migration system was broken, given the fact that despite the fact that the Tories have been in power for a good 12 years now. Yes. I mean, if you really want an example of perma crisis, it's what's going on in Britain currently and we only have a new government in Hartley a week. And then the next crisis because of the criticism of swell up brother man, who is the Home Secretary, and there's a special criticism of her yesterday in the House of Commons saying that the migrant crisis is an invasion. I mean, I watched it, and I thought this kind of rhetoric, this is not a lapse. This is nothing that she says accidentally and would be sorry about. She used this word invasion very deliberately. And I think and there's also an echo echoed in the British price. This is appealing to the right wing of the Tories. This is putting pressure on the prime minister, Rishi sunak, because swell a brave man had to go while mistrust was still prime minister because she sent mistakenly a classified email to someone who wasn't actually who was the wrong recipient. So there are also other reports that she has used a private phone several times. So she is really not, she has not dealt with her

Ukraine Germany German government Benjamin Netanyahu Israel Stephanie Bolton Swiss government Ben gear Ukrainian government hola Scholes deval Stephanie Switzerland defense committee Emma Britain Ireland Kyiv Syria
"swiss government" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:45 min | Last month

"swiss government" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"I think I can't see them at that point of time so that really come out stabilized completely. And as we are anyway now, again, we are not in a blackout period anymore. So we might access the overall market. We have a lot of clients that told us that they will come back. It seems like you're exiting out of businesses where maybe more profits were coming from. What's the logic in cutting cutting cutting? When the other side of that equation is the ability that you can't generate those profits anymore. Going forward credit is really a wealth management centric franchise centered around entrepreneurs wealthy clients and we don't need that type of businesses that are quite isolated from the rest of the group. So that's why SP and we are, as you know, we are in exclusive discussions with Apollo and with pimco so I'm highly confident that over the next week we will come to agreement. What about for the asset management side Is it a sale or parts of it? These were all rumors, you know, we are the belts manager and asset management goes very well alongside we need to have and we are a multi specialist asset management. So we don't need to be the biggest globally, but we need to have those capabilities that we need also from a product and product provider perspective for our wealth mansion clients and for institutional clients. This restructuring is being funded by a new investor, the Saudis. There are some questions being raised around the Swiss government and allowing this sort of stake just given the Saudis human rights record. How do you address the sort of geopolitical conflicts? No, look, first of all, we are very happy that we have an investor like the Saudi national

pimco Swiss government
"swiss government" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:18 min | 2 months ago

"swiss government" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"On Bloomberg radio, I'm John Tucker, and that is your Bloomberg business flash. Matt and Paul. All right, John Tucker, thank you so much. We appreciate it. Well, the most read story has met Miller pointed out to me is from our good friends in Zürich. Credit Swiss group, other than third, not Geneva, right? That's where the base serve. Yeah, they're both in Zürich. Okay. All right, credit Swiss group offered to buy back up to $3 billion of its own debt in a move aimed at coming investor jitters ahead of the unveiling of a crucial strategy revamped later this month. Let's bring in Alison Williams. She's our senior banks analyst at Bloomberg intelligence. She's been covering the banking industry on a global basis for decades. So Alison, what does this mean to you? What does this mean for, I guess, equity investors for creditors here for Credit Suisse. I think like a lot of things that have happened over the past week. It's sort of more symbolic than anything else. It is a way for them to come out and say that we have ample liquidity in a way that people will believe, if you will. So as we know, over many years, when banks come out and say they don't need capital, they have liquidity. It ends up sometimes having the opposite effect, which is actually what we saw earlier this week in an effort to calm things. It didn't. And by coming out today and doing this offer, they're showing that they do have, you know, they do have ample liquidity. That's not the issue. And you are seeing the intended effect, which is some studying in the stock and bonds. In fact, on a very red screen today, the stock is up, it was doing better earlier in the day. Is there an actual playbook? Did John cryan have a leather bound book that he handed over to the leadership at Credit Suisse? Because Deutsche Bank did that exact same thing right when right when. There was a concern about liquidity of the German bank. Well, and I think it is, I think it is a tactical move to study things. I do think that the situations are a little bit different in the sense that Credit Suisse perhaps is a little bit more to build on if you look at their some of their higher returning businesses. Whereas Deutsche Bank, I think their portfolio is under was under a lot more pressure and after three years of restructuring, I think they're finally coming out of it, which is a positive. But both banks, the similarity is when you come out and we've been talking about this this week. When you come out and say, we're going to come out with a plan. It's going to be in several weeks and without saying it investors knowing that that might include a capital raise. It's uncertainty and it's sort of obviously can wreak havoc in a tough market. And so I think also having this news coming out on Friday will make for a much less stressful and less uncertain weekend hopefully that what we saw last weekend when there were a lot of stories and a lot of posts going around. Can they come out in two weeks and say we need to raise $5 billion after they just blew $3 billion on their own debt? Well, again, I think that to the extent the issue with Credit Suisse right now is the bargaining position that they're in in terms of the price that they're going to pay if you will to issue that capital, right? So as the stock goes lower, it gets less attractive. And also negotiations that they might be having with potential buyers or investors, the investment bank, the securitized product group is something that they would like to get external capital. It seems like that makes the most sense if they can get a good price. The markets are obviously putting them in a bad position, I think, if they can study things and sort of improve their negotiating position. And give themselves the couple of weeks that they need to really put together a solid plan because if they're going to come out and raise capital, they're going to want to credible plan to offer to investors who are going to give them that capital. Allison, is there any appetite at all within the Swiss government to maybe permit UBS and Credit Suisse to ever merge? I believe that's unlikely, we've always said not impossible, but very unlikely. If you think about UBS and Credit Suisse and the size of those banks in particular related to the Swiss economy, it's really outsized versus some of the bigger banks we have here. So we have much bigger banks, but we also have a much bigger economy. And for that reason, the Swiss regulators have sort of bigger capital requirements for these banks. Because the two each on their own are so significant to the economy. So I think it would be tougher to think about the pair together to the extent though that Credit Suisse is going to reduce its balance sheet, reduce some of these investment activities, perhaps that does clear something clear the way for something down the road. But again, I guess we'll have to see what the new Credit Suisse is going to look like. Where's the where's the office downtown? Where's the New York office? 24th of Madison, 11 Madison Avenue, fantastic building. Is it a big and restaurant right there? Yeah, there's a good restaurant right there. With Michelin stars. We used to go there. When it just opened, it wasn't anything. So we'd go down there and just grab dinner after work. And now again, when a top restaurant's around, period. So I don't know, they have a great New York City office. Credit Suisse first Boston has a great place to work for me. I have good memories, but I have to admit, and I've spoken to Allison a lot about this. It just seems like every two or three or four years they blow themselves up and that goes back 30 years as far as I can recall Allison Williams, thanks so much for joining us. Allison covers all the big banks for Bloomberg intelligence she's based in our Princeton office and she's been doing that for decades. Before she was at Bloomberg and talent, she was

Credit Suisse Zürich John Tucker Bloomberg Credit Swiss group credit Swiss group Alison Williams John cryan Deutsche Bank Geneva Alison Miller Matt Swiss government UBS Paul Allison Michelin
"swiss government" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:45 min | 2 months ago

"swiss government" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Morning to you all. Your equity market is slightly negative on the S&P 500, kicking off Thursday's trading negative on the S&P with the ultimate doing much on a ten year up a couple of basis points, three 77, 92. Equities down a half of 1%. Bit of news, corporate news, one from peloton, another piece of news from Credit Suisse. Just want to cover peloton quickly. Peloton cutting its workforce by roughly 500 globally or about 12%, the CEO saying the bulk of our restructuring work is complete. But saying to Dow Jones, this headline came from Dow Jones about 15 minutes or so ago. Lisa, this is the one that jumped out to me. If the turnaround fails, the company likely not viable on its own. What a turnaround in the last two years. I mean, considering how much the share has got absolutely blown up during the pandemic. Ridiculous. Positive way. And then absolutely deflated. But this is the fourth round of layoffs. This year, just to give you a sense, leaving with about half the number of employees globally, and this is the Hail Mary to get to a point where they actually are viable in the new era where people are going back to gyms. Okay, we're making jokes about this. I'm the worst offender. Forget about the jokes. Is the fed over? Is it just that simple? I think to some extent. I mean, I think people still love the bike because Tom, it's not about the best way of saying this. You can have a product you love. It doesn't make a good business. I think a lot of this is still love the product. They still love peloton. There's also a point at which a lot of these companies were able to raise money. And every which way, during the pandemic, when a lot of people's expectations were reset, and now we are having a reassessment of how much money costs and where those investments go. And some of these companies are finding that the investors just are not there. Perfectly put like triple C unsecured debt from a social media company. Correct. Which you'd like to go for a 11, 12%, which might have to go for 15. We can talk about that another time 16 now. Depends on which companies you're looking at. The latest news from Credit Suisse Tom. Trying to bring in an outside investor to inject money into a spin off of its advisory and investment banking business. They do not want to go and do an equity race anytime soon. There's no way under CHF 5 per share. Off our London and Zürich deaths with Marianne Houghton Meyer in Zürich joining us now their leader Michael Moore, who has terrific perspective on what banks do when challenged. Michael Moore, I'm going to cut Back to the Future that you and I lived. And I'm going to drive it forward. There was the government, there was a company called bear Stearns and as mister diamond to his immense regret says, JPMorgan came to the rescue. Where's the Swiss government and where's the JPMorgan in this discussion of Credit Suisse? Well, you have to think that the competitors are looking at the share

Credit Suisse Dow Jones Zürich Hail Mary Lisa Tom S fed Marianne Houghton Meyer Michael Moore London JPMorgan Swiss government bear Stearns
"swiss government" Discussed on Brain Inspired

Brain Inspired

05:26 min | 3 months ago

"swiss government" Discussed on Brain Inspired

"And a lot of these people are humble, scientists who came up through the project and wanted to just do their work and move on with their careers and they shouldn't have to respond to answer to this stuff directly. So that's fair. But okay, back to back to changing as a scientist. So one thing that has changed that I've noticed is that there is no really mention of the human brain anymore. They've scrubbed it from their website. When this started, you know, Henry gave the TED Talk and it was human brain in ten years that those were the headlines. That was the press they were ginning up. And there was a road map that they were going to do, you know, mouse brain, cat brain, primate brain, and then human brain. And I saw PowerPoints with that road map laid out. That kind of got scrubbed and has disappeared, and now I think they've Henry has realized that being more realistic and targeted with the milestones helps dissuade people from being so vocally critic, critical towards probably. If he just talks about simulating the mouse brain, it's a little more feasible, still a pretty big pipe dream, but a little more feasible than throwing out the human brain ten years timeline. That's been one change. I don't think that his core beliefs changed. And in the work, I didn't see him waver one inch, and I was looking for that in the last couple of years of making this film. And, you know, in the last interviewer to I'm asking him, you know, do you still believe in this in this project the same and in this attempt to simulate at this level of detail the same way you did when you began? And yet the answer is always, yes. And I assume continues to be and I think in order to run a project like this and to continue to get the funding that they do from the Swiss government, you have to believe and you have to have

Henry Swiss government
"swiss government" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

08:01 min | 3 months ago

"swiss government" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"To Russia's current relations with the world. It doesn't have many allies, but the ones it does have China and India in particular. How strained are those bombs at the moment in life of that illegal war in Ukraine? Well, the bones are not particular strained between China and Russia. I think both countries understand that a close relationship between them is in the two countries interest. And this is defined by history more than anything else. Of course, China and the Soviet Union were in a state of bitter confrontation for 30 years before, by the way, Gorbachev brought normalization about. He was the one who wanted Beijing in 1989 and closed the page on better rivalry with Beijing. I think now both countries understand that it's in their interest to maintain a kind of a united front Vis-à-vis the west. However, what we have seen in recent months is by pursuing his strategic blunder with regard to Ukraine by pursuing this brutal criminal war, Putin has closed off his options in the west and turned Russia into semi vassal of China, which I think is not in Russia's long-term interest. As far as India obviously Russian Russian India have also long history of relations going back to the Soviet era and India has been quite careful really tiptoeing around Putin during this aggression. However, we also see India gradually drifting in the western direction, but I think that is in part simply consequence of the emerging confrontation strategic competition between China and the west and India feels that it is probably closer here to the west than it is to China. And finally, just briefly, as we've mentioned in the headlines, Russians are waking up to the fact that it will be much more difficult for them to get into Europe and more costly as well. How will that go down? I don't think this will necessarily change much in the Russian public perception of the war in Ukraine, if anything, this will probably strengthen the putinist narrative to the effect that well, you know, Europe hates Russia not for what it does in Ukraine, say, but for what it is, they just hate Russia that's why they want to borrow all Russians, including Russian liberals and opposition activists and so on. You know, this is the kind of Russian propaganda narrative that I think will stick with a lot of people. So I do not see that the public attitude will change much here. And we have to remember also that the vast majority of Russians don't even have a passport to travel anywhere to begin with. So radchenko, thank you for joining us here on the globalist. It's 7 37 here in London and 8 37 in Zürich. Let's continue now with today's newspapers. Joining me from our studio in Zürich is Florian egley senior associate at four hours, the Swiss foreign policy think tank. Florian, thanks very much for joining us. Firstly, you've got a climate story for us. Good morning, Vincent. Yes, so I've gone through newspapers, so the first story is the title story of the German D site, a weekly newspaper that appears conveniently on Thursday. So it's about how big I would say the de facto Chancellor almost is the leader of the Green Party in Germany and really kind of in the spotlight because he promised a bit a big climate transition and now he's facing headwinds because of course he has to react to the energy crisis possible gas shortages skyrocketing gasoline prices and all of the measures that this requires are not necessarily aligned with the climate. So now the newspaper has conducted a big experiment giving Germans a €198. No idea why exactly a 198, but let's say roughly €200 and asked them how much of that money they would basically donate to climate policy to measures to lower emissions, et cetera. And the results are quite surprising because the average is that the Germans would donate about half of that money and that's not theoretical, so they really got the money and then could choose how much they could keep and how much they could give to the climate and then there is all further analysis what kind of policies they would support, et cetera, et cetera and who were they going to donate the money too. So that was not specified. It was specified basically four climate efforts, but what's interesting is if you look at it, even the far right wing party that RFD, even on those people, adherents to this party donated 30% of the money and was also interesting another takeaway from this experiment is that people are generally too negative about their peers. So they would basically think that their peers would give less than they actually do, and that was identified as actually a key hurdle to implementing further policy because people are actually too negative when they think what their peers would do. And that's kind of reflects on them and they do less. So it's kind of, it seems to be a general misconception also among politicians about what people really want and politicians and the population itself seems to be too negative about what people's opinions are really in terms of how much we should do. And is this similar to what the Swiss government announced yesterday? We've got sort of similarity being drawn with the early days of COVID because they don't seem to have as much of a plan for the winter. So it's quite different indeed because you see Germany trying to act quite decisively implementing policies also restrictions and this experiment is kind of encouraged to actually the government to do more because people want to see more action. People are even quite happy with having restrictions. And not just taxes, but actually stuff being prohibited in Switzerland, the contrast is quite stark. So yesterday, the entire government went before it pressed to announce how we're going to get through winter. With the idea of having voluntary measures as guiding principles, they recommended heating apartments to 19°, but nobody really knows how much that will actually save because Swiss households have no smart meters, basically everything is still analog once every year somebody comes looks at your meter. So the government is basically kind of searing into the void nobody. Nobody knows exactly how much such a measure will or can contribute to going through that winter with some safe gas and electricity supplies. And crossing the Atlantic now, Joe Biden had some pretty dire polling numbers earlier in the year, but he seems to be onto a winning streak, but part of this is the PR battle of that as well. Is that right? Indeed, so that was tigers and Tiger with a story that I found particularly interesting because you don't really hear about this usually. So we've heard about Biden's policy successes and passing the inflation reduction act, which is a huge basically stimulus package, and also for the first time I think in more than a decade, actually implementing stricter gun laws. So there have been some successes, but yet he failed to communicate those and the support seems to be waning really. Now, you know, part of a shift into communication strategy might turn this around. So Megan Coyne, she's 25 years old. She has a bachelor in political science and worked 5 years as an intern for the state of New Jersey. Now, her title is the deputy director of platforms. Now let's put cryptic, but she's basically running Twitter for Joe Biden. And the result of this is that Twitter is much

Russia China India Ukraine Zürich Putin Beijing radchenko Florian egley Gorbachev Europe Soviet Union Florian Swiss government Green Party Germany RFD
"swiss government" Discussed on The Trish Regan Show

The Trish Regan Show

03:27 min | 6 months ago

"swiss government" Discussed on The Trish Regan Show

"That I think is worth considering. You know, there's a lot of European countries that do allow guns, for example, Switzerland. And they don't have this kind of problem. Nothing close to it. So what are they doing differently? They've got more guns, actually. In fact, in a population of about 8.3 million people, there's an estimated 2 million privately held guns. Think about that. And yet going back in some statistics I looked at all the way back to 2016, actually, this is data from 2016, there were 46 homicide attempts with guns, none of them were actually successful. So that's good news, but again, 2 million guns. And yet they don't have these mass shootings. So what's going on? Maybe it's more respect for the weapons. Maybe it's a culture of having that respect for the weapons that's passed along. Fascinating to me, every man. Every male in Switzerland is actually required to have a gun. They're given a gun. By the government, and they have that between the ages of 18 and 33, the government trains them extensively in the use of that gun, but it's expected that they would have a gun in their home. The Swiss model being that they should be armed, but nonetheless, not engage in that combat. But they want to make sure that everybody knows how to at least the men there are a team to 34 33. Now how to use a gun. And then after 33 at 34, you are offered the opportunity to purchase that gun from the Swiss government and you can keep it in your home and you have to have a permit and all that stuff. So lots of guns in Switzerland and yet none of the horrific things like we've seen here. They even have a shooting contest for kids, ages 13 to 18. Every year, big national shooting contest or a rifle contest. In other words, there's a culture of appreciation, but respect for weapons. We seem to be missing some of that somehow some way. The gun issue has been so politicized the abortion issue has also been so politicized again. I look to Europe, where this isn't a hot button political issue. Each country makes its own decisions there, and you know, if in Poland, you can't get access to an abortion in another country, you may be able to. And they have, you know, they have a system for dealing with this. It doesn't become so raw, it doesn't become so political. And I would like to see us as a nation get to that. Because we need real solutions, we can't be constantly pointing the finger at the other side and thinking that you wave a magic wand and you either get rid of guns or you bring more in and that's going to solve it on. It's far more complex than that. And so I'm disappointed in our country. I'm disappointed in our leadership, and I'm so sorry for those poor families. That are going through total hell. Hell on earth right now, and all those kids in Texas..

Switzerland Swiss government Poland Europe Texas
Switzerland Has a Stunningly High Rate of Gun Ownership...

The Trish Regan Show

01:59 min | 6 months ago

Switzerland Has a Stunningly High Rate of Gun Ownership...

"You know, there's a lot of European countries that do allow guns, for example, Switzerland. And they don't have this kind of problem. Nothing close to it. So what are they doing differently? They've got more guns, actually. In fact, in a population of about 8.3 million people, there's an estimated 2 million privately held guns. Think about that. And yet going back in some statistics I looked at all the way back to 2016, actually, this is data from 2016, there were 46 homicide attempts with guns, none of them were actually successful. So that's good news, but again, 2 million guns. And yet they don't have these mass shootings. So what's going on? Maybe it's more respect for the weapons. Maybe it's a culture of having that respect for the weapons that's passed along. Fascinating to me, every man. Every male in Switzerland is actually required to have a gun. They're given a gun. By the government, and they have that between the ages of 18 and 33, the government trains them extensively in the use of that gun, but it's expected that they would have a gun in their home. The Swiss model being that they should be armed, but nonetheless, not engage in that combat. But they want to make sure that everybody knows how to at least the men there are a team to 34 33. Now how to use a gun. And then after 33 at 34, you are offered the opportunity to purchase that gun from the Swiss government and you can keep it in your home and you have to have a permit and all that stuff. So lots of guns in Switzerland and yet none of the horrific things like we've seen here.

Switzerland Swiss Government
"swiss government" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

06:48 min | 9 months ago

"swiss government" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"It is 1536 in Singapore and 8 36 in Zürich and let's continue now with today's newspapers. We'll joining me from our studio in Zürich is Alexandra tells you who's a senior fellow at the Atlantic council and contributing editor to the New York sun. Alexander, thanks very much for coming on the show. Let's start with Nike Asia and the story that Japan is to accept refugees from Ukraine. Yes, good morning. It's a very interesting development. And I think speaks to how far this the war in Ukraine is reverberating. So the Japanese government announced that it will start accepting limited numbers of refugees. Those who have family and friends in Japan with the aid of Poland. So those two governments are in collaboration at the moment. And it's interesting to see this being played out in Japan of all places, the former prime minister, Shinzo Abe, he also alluded to Japan potentially having to rethink its nuclear posture in light of recent geopolitics. And there's also the interesting story of Japanese servicemen, some 70 Japanese servicemen who are who have signed up to join the international legion for the defense of Ukraine, which was announced by president zelensky just on Sunday and those Japanese servicemen will be joining other servicemen here in Europe from Denmark, the UK, Netherlands, Latvia, also the U.S. and Canada who are joining this international legion. And in the history of modern warfare, this is itself rather unprecedented. I think we would have to look at the international brigades in the 1930s during the Spanish Civil War for comparison. So it's fascinating to see how far this is reverberating. And how it's really reaching the people also also in Japan. Let's turn now to The Wall Street Journal. Well, what's the paper say? And The Wall Street Journal there has an op-ed. Raising questions about the United Nations as an institution. And the war in Ukraine has really brought the UN back to light, of course, also in light of Russia's continued permanent voting seat on the UN Security Council, which is getting quite a bit of attention. Russia, of course, gained that seat in 1991. After the fall of the Soviet Union and the debate now has become whether or not it actually is entitled to that seat, there was never a vote at the time and it was sort of passed on, so to speak. And there was an interesting debate emerging now if you really start to get into the weeds the last country to leave the Soviet Union in 1991 was actually Kazakhstan. So there are some interesting voices as to whether or not that seat should actually be passed on and whether there is a precedent for removing a permanent member. And there are some people are pointing to 1971 when the UN General Assembly passed a resolution that acknowledged the People's Republic of China as the rightful representation of China at the UN at the time removing that representatives of Chiang Kai-shek so removing the effectively the Taiwanese government. So a lot of interesting debates around the UN, which has come into the limelight and The Wall Street Journal sort of bringing that to the four once again in light of yesterday's vote in particular. And looking at yesterday's vote, it's very interesting to see who abstained and who voted against. Yes, exactly. So voting against was, of course, Belarus, North Korea, Eritrea, and Syria, perhaps not such a surprising collection of countries and 35 countries abstained, including China, of course, which we heard about earlier this morning. But I was surprised to see South Africa on the list of people that abstained of countries that abstained. Yes, I think the African countries in particular are towing an interesting line, of course, they still have some interests and have had some economic or quite a bit of economic engagements with Russia, trade the Russian government, of course, has over the years made quite an economic and political effort to engage South Africa among other African nations. So South Africa and many other African governments are in an interesting position rather towing the line. So the abstention, I suppose, in that regard is perhaps not so surprising. It's interesting to see trending on Twitter, a lot of African support for the hashtag I stand with Putin, which actually chimes with exactly what you're saying. Indeed, indeed, let's move on now to the Switzerland itself, which is of course where you are speaking from. The Swiss government argues it's still neutral. Now there is a big article about this, which it looks into the difference between neutrality law and neutrality policy. Yes, and that's the distinction that the Swiss government is also making so a lot of the foreign press has taken to saying that with this decision with Switzerland adopting the EU sanctions on Russia. It has effectively forfeited its neutrality and the Swiss government over the last few days has been trying to backpedal a little bit saying that actually it still very much is neutral. And it's hanging a little bit, precisely on this distinction between neutrality law and neutrality policy, neutrality law, which points to is rooted in The Hague conventions of 1907. And those conventions at the time really laid out what it means for a state to be neutral in times of war. So speaking to issues and forbidding, for instance, the movement of troops or war supplies across neutral territory or speaking to how a neutral country should behave if warring factions find itself on its territory. Also extending that logic to naval warfare. And so the Swiss government and president cassis is saying, you know, we are still operating very much within the bounds of neutrality law and rather their decision falls under the umbrella of neutrality policy which they argue allows them to adopt measures and give them a bit of wiggle room to take policy decisions that help them to effectively protect and maintain their neutrality. So the argument that the Swiss government.

Zürich Japan Ukraine Japanese government The Wall Street Journal president zelensky Swiss government Russia UN Atlantic council Shinzo Abe New York sun Soviet Union international brigades Chiang Kai Taiwanese government China Alexandra South Africa Latvia
"swiss government" Discussed on VUX World

VUX World

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"swiss government" Discussed on VUX World

"Link to the newsletter. Basically, what I'm going to do is we've had the VX world newsletter for quite some time. And every single week we share whatever we've published on VOX world, whatever podcast we've published, whatever events we've got coming up and whatever kind of like noteworthy stories we find online and on the Internet et cetera. And that's what we're going to do with this LinkedIn newsletter. It's going to be very specific. It's going to be hungry at the best top stories in the conversational AI and NLP space. Anything that will help you make better strategic decisions, we're going to cover in this newsletter. It's going to be every single Tuesday. So please do subscribe. There's over 1100 people subscribed to it already in the space of not even 6 hours, which is pretty impressive. So thank you very much if you have subscribed. And yeah, we're going to roll on with it. Been a lot happening over the last week. Yesterday was a fantastic event put together by the Swiss cognitive team, cognitive virtual, and it was all about how AI is leading to autonomy. And the team are Swiss virtual. Sorry, Swiss cognitive. I must say incredibly well organized. The event run for about three hours was added to closing keynote. And it was just so well put together that was polished. It was professional, a lot of excellent speakers covering a lot of great topics. There was content. There was a deep dive inside there was research being presented. There was a whole bunch of really interesting topics being discussed. And so I won't give away too much. I would strongly suggest that you find Swiss cognitive either on LinkedIn or YouTube or wherever you decide to spend your time on the proverbial social networks. Definitely search for Swiss government. And definitely check out the event. It was a really, really good maquina. It was probably around about two hours and 45 minutes. That wasn't the length of it, although the material that was in there could have probably gone for that long. But I was 45 minutes is where machino is and essentially I'm talking about one of the biggest misconceptions when it comes to AI and how you can overcome that in a matter of 5 years. The upshot essentially, and I'll clip up the whole video and share it more broadly. The upshot basically is that most organizational cultures will very risk averse and they all operate mostly in this waterfall of environment waterfall culture where all of your requirements have to be gathered up front. Everything has to be planned in severe detail. And then you go through a big design fear as a big execution fairs and then you learn at the very end of the project when you finally live. And that's where the most organizations work. The challenge of that with AI is that there are two things that are incredibly uncertain. One is your requirements because a lot of organizations don't really know what kind of use cases on which kind of channels they should be starting off with. And also, there's uncertainty around the technology, a lot of organizations don't understand much about AI technologies, how to utilize them and how to organize their selves to be able to benefit from them. And so when you're in an environment where you do not understand your requirements and you do not understand your technology, you have no choice really but to use them or agile approach. And so this 5 their sprinter, I was sharing yesterday is essentially a way of defining an AI strategy in 5 days and validating an AI strategy in 5 days. So do check out the Swiss cognitive cognitive virtual event if you want to learn.

LinkedIn Swiss government machino YouTube
"swiss government" Discussed on Firewalls Don't Stop Dragons Podcast

Firewalls Don't Stop Dragons Podcast

04:36 min | 1 year ago

"swiss government" Discussed on Firewalls Don't Stop Dragons Podcast

"Be legally compelled to provide any of those fields to swiss law enforcement and by then by those fields i mean email sender recipient timestamps in addition email subject lines could be encrypted without breaking the smtp protocol but in practice proton mail service does not which means the relevant courts may compel the service to provide that data. Also all right so. Let me sum that again. E mail was not built to be private. It just wasn't the protocols like smtp. Or i think that stands for simple mail transfer protocol. Smtp is one of the three protocols involved with sending receiving emails pop. Three and i'm app are the other two. You may have heard of those but email's been around a long long time. I was sending emails. When i was in college back in the late eighties and early nineties. And it was fused before well before that it just. It just wasn't built with privacy minds. So companies pro allen tutu nota and seventies others have come along with services that encrypt the contents and any attachments of your emails by default which is great but for email to work in inter operate with other email service providers. It needs to comply with these protocols that have been around forever. And so some parts of your email just can't be encrypted and still be delivered so that's one thing to take away from this article but the other maybe more important one here is that proton l. is dedicated to privacy. They have done everything within their power to protect privacy but they are still subject to the laws of the countries. They are in and even switzerland. Who's got a lot of great privacy. Laws do have exceptions in law enforcement cases and so circle did mention which was even worse as i believe inserts switzerland if you are stirred with a court order to start tracking somebody. And that's what happened here The swiss government came to proton mail and said. Hey i know you don't log. Ip addresses by default..

allen tutu switzerland swiss government
"swiss government" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"swiss government" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

"Thank you so much for being here. L. delight to talk with you. I can't wait to dive into it. So let's jump right in. I wanna start with something that our podcast audience is a little bit familiar with because we did an entire newsletter in episode series on. Em apps. But i want you to expand on it. So in two thousand and eleven the world health organization and The i a r c they classified. Ems as a group to be possible carcinogen now that was in two thousand eleven now. What a lot of people don't know is that since that time period there has been a lot of additional research. That has come out. And i'd love free to expand on it specifically the links between ems cell phone radiation non ionizing radiation and the link to cancer slash carcinogens. So can you start us off from there. I certainly can try. I think most people don't realize that a cell phone is a two way microwave radiating device it sends and receives messages in order to function and it has multiple antennas on it which are emitting and receiving microwave radiation now. This radiation is too weak to directly break the dna bonds that are in every cell of every living thing but it does break. The dna bonds a through indirect means. So it doesn't do it like ionizing. Radiation like x rays. Which were all familiar with is damaging but it does damage the dna indirectly and caused a condemning dna. This can lead cells to proliferate out of control which results in cancer normally we get damage to our dna all the time from sunlight from just being alive and because we have healthy cells with healthy dna. That damage gets repaired but what we know now from studies that have been done since twenty eleven is that this kind of radiation could be damaging cells. Let's talk about the kind of evidence that we have. We've really got studies. Done in cell cultures experiments done in petri dishes with cell cultures taken from humans and animals. We have studies done whole animals where we follow them. Over a period of time using controlled studies with designs that they've been standardized over many decades. And then we have studies in human beings where we look at people who for example have brain cancer or thyroid cancer and we compare them with those who do not have the disease but are the same age same experiences and we find out whether the cell phone history differs. and that's where we had the most problems because the data are difficult to get people don't live in cages. We don't control them like we can with animals but those studies also shown effect. So if we look at the experimental studies in cell cultures. Those studies were around in twenty. Eleven are now much more robust. There are many more of them most recently. An expert group advise the swiss government that looking at all of the in vitro evidence. And in vivo evidence there was clear evidence it cell phone. Radiation can increase what we call reactive oxygen species now. These are free radicals that can be like the coors of the cells they roam around and wherever they see a free electron they grab it and they cause damage and the right you act of oxygen species proliferate with cell phone radiation which is also emitted by your laptops your baby monitors and other devices which is why we at environmental healthtrust recommend wiring your devices for use in your home and limiting your.

cancer thyroid cancer brain cancer swiss government
"swiss government" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

07:07 min | 1 year ago

"swiss government" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"The temperatures keep people safe keep people cooler but more importantly how to keep net zero and not And keep that infrastructure green. She no thank you very much indeed. That's sheena rossiter with globalist on monocle. Twenty four and finally on today's show. We're bouncing buck. Two zero to ninety strasser where our senior producer and presented. Marcus hippie is standing by marcus. Possibly marcus are you there dude. Good mornings georgina. I'm here indeed. how are you. I thought you might have wanted out of the studio to the cafe area. Because of course you can do that. Exactly you know actually actually has changed since you were being in zurich quite some time either. Phobias reason we we have for over a year. Now and it's it's amazing as usual you loving being back i am loving being back is being you know. I was in london for about forty. Nine months did manage to go anywhere because it was so difficult. Now it'd be it in my home. Country of finland's been italian for more love feels good now not so good though for people who are regretting buying the wrong kind of fighter. Jets that the story. This is an interesting story. From switzerland to which extend it reflects the swiss mind and thinking but this country took years and years and years to decide which type of fighter jets so it cylinder would buy and he was just in the end of last month when the swiss government's announced that they would go for the american f. Thirty five fighter jets. They would purchase thirty. Six from there. Does my colleague desi for example mention. Just a second ago now. No one is happy about that decision. And i'm reading. Today's edition of targets insider newspaper. They they have been conducting some some research on on on which models would have. Benefited this economy. the most. I'm actually sadly it's not the f. Defy from america as would have been as a matter of fact the the the european fighter jets. That's would have been made by airbus. So airbus was saying that they would have been ready to go quite far so thirty. Two of the total thirty six jets would have been built and tested from the beginning to the end in switzerland. And what lockheed martin is saying said they would only assemble four out of those thirty six fighter jets in switzerland so this reflects how complicated the decision has been. Obviously when a country is trying to decide what kind of fighter just by you know you have to take so many things into account and what the government was saying what they made. This decision announced it. Was that the offer from rookie. Martin was was cheapest and easiest so it sounds like the relations in the us work on like a focal point over there as well. Obviously the decision. For switzerland to buy european fighter jets. Doesn't it's not exactly great news. Winning look at the relations that are not bat. Amazing at the moments between switzerland and the european union. No absolutely as we as we reflected on earlier in the program. I love the fact that story. Oh comes up under the wonderful headline fighter jet regrets let to zurich's population apparently. It's not growing. Well it's not growing now so it's been growing quite fast all the way up until the end of two thousand and nine never seen the increases being marginal only five hundred more people in this city. Now i what i've been reading about. The situation sounds like we're talking about a situation that's happening in many many other big cities. I think it's being the corona affect so when when people realize that they would be working from home more they began to appreciate space more and thought about the option of maybe leaving. The city center may moving somewhere a bit further away to get some more space and and enjoy their gardens and and so forth. and i'm i'm wondering if this might be changing though because i i was reading the newspapers from the uk for example over the weekend and there's already science hotel in central london for example. I saying that they're finding new residents nowadays all of a sudden these people who used to live in london and work in london Taking hotel rooms in the middle of the week. 'cause they realized they can't stand. Those two hour commutes to the office when their companies after all are asking them to come to fieri now event to work and of course people will be able to commute much more easily particularly if there's a hyperloop so this is something we've been talking about that's more monocle every now and then so this is the project. That's that's good work as a great alternative to flying would be fostered on taking the train. So it'll be this this kind of how to describe it kind of vacuum tube that would transport people from one place to another very fast. It's been said that you could ever from los angeles to san francisco for example in about twenty minutes and now switzerland is the place that hus europe first hyperloop test. It's it's not huge. It's about forty meters in diomede surroundings about one hundred and twenty meters long but nevertheless it's it's a great beginning and it's great to have it here in switzerland for testing reasons so who knows give it ten years so maybe give you twenty s. Maybe this is going to be a reality one day one day and putz all zip around the world really fast well Fastness was not something that you particularly well at the olympics. I must say that no minded midland hasn't won anything since two thousand eight funeral two medals two bronzes from from tokyo which was great and now i'm a country that has enjoyed the best olympic games for about what seventy years thurdsay medals for switzerland. But then again. What makes me feel a bit better is that they were doing sports. Really well in sports where finland would not really stood with a chance anyway so mountain biking is not a massive thing in finland but obviously a big thing here in switzerland and other big sports sports for this country will guess what tennis yes of. Course well mr federa- yeah that's it a marcus. I hope that you're having lovely swims there and perhaps almost reaching olympic standard. Many thanks to marcus hippie. Our senior producer and presented in the studio. And that's what we have time for on today's program. Thanks to our producers. Done you'll beach. And charlie film court a researcher. Seventy one hundred. Coons studio manager steph toungoo. After the headlines there's more music on the way and the briefing is live at midday in london. The globalist returns at the same time. Tomorrow i'm not golden. I'll be back with you on wednesday. Thank you phyllis me monocle. Devious a proud to present a nobel calls. A book that celebrates more than half a century of the nobel memorial prize in economic science as a nobel.

switzerland sheena rossiter Marcus hippie marcus swiss government airbus zurich london strasser georgina finland Jets jets america european union martin Martin putz
"swiss government" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

06:52 min | 1 year ago

"swiss government" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"The swiss federal institute of technology known as e. t. h. Zurich has released a report following the termination of negotiations for framework agreement between switzerland and the eu. The researchers looked at how switzerland can continue negotiations and potentially create a constructive partnership with the block. Well joining me from monaco. Zurich studio is isabel noble co-head of europe program at the swiss foreign policy. Think-tank for us is well. Thanks for coming into the studio there. Can you recap what led to this report. Good morning yes. of course. I can try so The european union and switzerland had negotiated the this institutional framework agreement for years and This agreement was actually intended to safeguard switzerland's access to the european single market and provide a basis for expanding access. And you has made very clear that this level playing field is required for all countries. Also those that are not of the us so switzerland as well and in may then switzerland decided to not agree or do not sign this agreement with the european union. So the question centers ben. What is next us. It's not clear how these relations will proceed in a future so this report then outlines three stages Of what is next. What are those stages so the first stage would be That there are unilateral confidence building measures so to create goodwill to say so. Switzerland could offer cooperation in additional areas like health or climate And paid the cohesion funds for example and then on the second level on second-stage switzerland whitney to create political preconditions or to declare what they actually want to do in european policies so to create a vision and to make really clear to the european union. What what they intend to do. Because after like this termination of the agreement is not been very clear anymore and in a third step then the authors propose to negotiate a new package to the bilateral sri and is it likely then to be perceived by the swiss government. I would say no I think it's clearly a political Suggestion it it's more actually a wishful thinking than than really a feasible proposition. that also. What experts criticized because a lot of suggestions are if you look at them in detail are rod the illusionary i would say. How would you characterize swiss e you relations at present. Well i would say we're in kind of a little ice age currently The relations are on very shaky ground right now because it's not clear how how Switzerland thinks to proceed to relations. And that's that's worrisome. And it already has a lot of negative consequences for switzerland when you look for example at the You horizon program that funding program for research and cooperation. But it you were. Switzerland is only a third country now. And it's not like researchers in switzerland are not eligible for for funding anymore. So yeah i think. Switzerland is very much Or need a function in cooperation with the european union. And that's not given at the moment and it's not clear what waste we'll go. I mean this is clearly a really major issue. And you have this report coming out from zurich but what what about other recommendations instance you your own organization. Your you'll think tank for us. What are you predicting in terms of e relations. Do you have recommendations. We're always thinking about recommendations so we're clearly also making up our minds on what we could suggest to decision makers in terms of making these relations better but this has been a deadlock for quite a while. So it's not as easy there. There's a lot of very technical legal issues and they cannot be resolved from one day to the other so for also trying to contribute bits and pieces. I mean this feels horribly familiar sitting here in the uk. How much do you think. Switzerland has in common with post brexit britain. It's hard for me to compare it to be honest. i think Switzerland has been very successful with the bilateral cooperation with its special way or special treatment so far with the european union. But right now. They're a little bit on the way of threatening that various successful corporation. And i can see some similarities there With with the uk as well. What do you think the uk then can learn from switzerland because as you say there have been some successes. Yes of course i think. One of the assets of switzerland is is The persistence also wanting to find a west the best compromise. And i'm not saying that the uk is not doing this. But now i think Every country has to define domestically what is best for them in. Switzerland has to do this as well as to uk. I'm about urgency in the timeline on this as you say it's something that's been going on for a while. Can switzerland and the eu continue in this type of lumber. This might go on for for a while. But i think the or the. Us also made clear that it's losing losing its patience They are not willing to wait for switzerland for much longer. Because this Framework agreement has been on the table since two thousand eighteen and Their switzerland like three years to decide that they don't want us. So i think when we come back to the paper that we're talking about especially the idea to be proactive and to tell you that we want to have successful relations. Also in the future is is a very good approach as well. Thank you very much. Indeed and that was isabel. Noble talking to us from zurich studio. Here's what else we're keeping an eye on today..

switzerland eu swiss federal institute of tec Zurich studio isabel noble swiss foreign policy swiss government Zurich monaco uk europe ben sri zurich Us britain isabel Noble
"swiss government" Discussed on The Highwire with Del Bigtree

The Highwire with Del Bigtree

07:25 min | 1 year ago

"swiss government" Discussed on The Highwire with Del Bigtree

"So what's really going on. What's covey's connection. Who well first. Let me say that you're right. He's not a doctor is not a medical doctor and you can see this by his reasoning. So ted ross. And he has The psychology. The profiling if i could say of computer scientists and more than that at technology Free because picture Yep and so two to come we can come back to this bet. I had to make the historical chronology of his involvement to w to understand. So i went through this I think your auditors can really dig into this much more. Because is so much easier. I get into this file. I find new a new new papers. So i have shared with you many and i hope that they can use it for the chronology The global vaccine alliance has actually created a foundation in geneva under swiss law. And there are many ngos in geneva. You can create an joe. I can do one for you in england. Our this headline the federal council concludes a host country remain with the gobbly alliance global lions having taken into account that the task of the lines are of a state nature together with the preeminence of the public sector in its representation and financing the federal council invoking. The host state act decided to conclude host country agreement with the garvey alliance thereby conferring on the same privileges and immunities as those normally granted to an inter governmental organization. Delay terms. Does that sounds to me like basically when we say. We can't touch a diplomat in america because they're diplomat from another nation. They made garvey untouchable in switzerland that they are basically like a diplomatic group. That can't be touched. And yes absolutely i actually. That's the document that triggered my search because some undercover with a lower. Give me documents a look at this as They have total in unity. And i was finding more and more documents On the website of the swiss federal concentration of the swiss government would signatures and agreements between gabby swiss medic which is the idea of the us and So government gabby government gabby. Who made agreements. And i thought this is wrong. That's not right. And so. I read this paper and they have not only totally unique. They have not only total. Immunity have more immunity than member states. And the you can find a document on the the federal government Website that it's infringe on german and italian. It's our three national languages so you have to translate them but i can just tell you the points. They don't pay tax at all They can They have total immunity and more than member states because they don't need to declare anything whatever they do whatever. They spend whatever they have in their suitcases. Whatever when you know geneva an international city we have more meetings in the united in geneva than york yet to see how many agencies we have we have The world trade organization the international telecommunication union by the way or the ministers of telecommunication assemble the wto with ministers of health the iowa with ministers of labour the refugee with a mistress. Taking care of your life sheets so you can go on and on and they have everything here. They have the and it's very easy to access in geneva as an ngo once. You have your accreditation. So i have no doubt the had a facility of accreditation to the united nation. I'm represent Actually an american ngo academic since twenty years. So i know very well how operating and how you can do statements and how you can lobby and they can do this all the time so not. Only they had this very quickly but they had access to all the agencies all the ministers very easily and they became from an ngo that they created in two thousand six that created a found an ngo then a foundation from the foundation it became an international organization. That has more power almost than the united nations organization. Actually might my hypothesis is that they are higher as a melting national over. The government's there is a hidden governance behind the united nations. Clearly today Because they don't obey to the way member states can give a voice. Have you heard any minister of health having contradictory voice to what. Who does no. It hasn't been a huge sweden sweden. I think yeah sweden but they catch them up later with vaccine campaign. Because i was in sweden were nice. stuck on peace summit covet. It's now translated in english. So i can also give you that sits available. It was in december and we chose that because there was facility. It was easy to come there so when we came no mosque december. Everybody was locked down and that The professor techno which are invited to to open That day said to me a very strange message. He said i cannot common attend because there is a pandemic but he was had voice to say. There is no pandemic in sweden. So i could see. There was a change in the room. We occupied The day before we went to visit it and there were organizing the campaign of vaccination in sweden in december. So i think they thought okay. We lost that battle but we have no problem with the next battle and the king of sweden of two. We left his. You know they're using everybody they can that they can krupp. So the king of sweden said we have to get vaccinated so you get it there But i'm picturing in geneva then is do they have a complex. I mean is there. I mean there must be a large established base than because one of the questions we've been having on the high wire and i've said it i don't feel like my government is necessarily decisions are being made from inside my borders anymore especially with the size of what this pandemic has become. It's overridden all of our policies. It's taking away our freedoms it's kept us from being able to work. It's you know it's taking a right to make a living to walk down the street to breathe the air and we're all thinking. Where is this coming from the nfl. We hear about the builder burgers.

geneva federal council ted ross global vaccine alliance gobbly alliance global lions garvey alliance sweden swiss government covey united nation garvey international telecommunicatio switzerland america joe england federal government iowa united government
"swiss government" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"swiss government" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"7 24 now at Wdbo Take you back live to Geneva, Switzerland. The Swiss president. Addressing the media there along side is President Biden and also President Vladimir Putin of Russia. Let's listen in via ABC News. Well. Best wishes. Goodbye. All my best wishes people just remember. Nachama president. This is good for the president's distinguished president. The Russian Federation distinguished president of United States on behalf of the government of Switzerland. Allow me to welcome you to the city of peace. Geneva Creation of the possibility to host you to this high level meeting is a great honor for Switzerland. Thus, in accordance with our tradition of good offices. We are pleased to be able to promote dialogue and mutual understanding Your president's wish you fruitful work, fruitful dialogue for the benefit of your countries in the entire world. I wish you every success goodbye. Mr President of the Russian Federation, Mr. President of the United States of America on behalf of the Swiss government. I would like to welcome you to Geneva, the city of peace. It is an honor and a pleasure for Switzerland to host you here for this summit. And in accordance with tradition of good offices, promote dialogue and mutual understanding. I wish you both presidents, a fruitful dialogue in the interest of your two countries and the world. Best wishes and good bye. Right now. The two presidents Biden, man, Putin shaking hands. As they waved to the media and walk into Bill.

Putin two countries Bill Geneva two presidents Nachama President Vladimir Putin Russian Federation both presidents Biden Geneva, Switzerland ABC News Russia President Biden Swiss government President United States president Wdbo United States of America
"swiss government" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

06:39 min | 1 year ago

"swiss government" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Could do replicate at least a good amount of what the south koreans did again. There's institutional capacity concerns about whether that could be done well. But i think mostly the concerns are political and cultural but the thing. I do want to just emphasize here. Is that although a lot of. These debates are often framed in a kind of privacy versus liberty or liberty versus safety. Kind of trade off i. I don't think that's really true. I mean in either situation. You are giving up substantial liberty in south korea. You're giving up a lot of liberty of information a lot of privacy information right but in the united states. You're giving up enormous liberty of employment liberty of motion liberty of movement liberty of being able to see your friends and family you know about is bad in part because it restricts our choice at the question for society is how it wants to distribute those costs and by not adopting the aggressive measures that a country like south korea singapore took. We didn't avoid the costs. We just took them a different way then also to susan's point but equity. She's absolutely right. That the equity concerns. Are i think really important here. But but they're on both sides because on the one hand not only are whether it's racial minorities or or poor people not only are. They often on the receiving end of excessive government intervention and surveillance which is absolutely true. They're also tend to be more vulnerable to the effects of disease itself. So although i i take susan's point very seriously. That equity considerations have to be really high on the list. I i'm actually not convinced that they cut I'm not convinced that they cut against aggressive action including aggressive digital surveillance. When comes to dealing with a disease season. i'd be curious from you. Is there a country when you have done all this work to look back on the ways in which these programs have or had worked. Is there a particular country whether it's career. Otherwise that stands out to you and is is what happened there juicy it as replicable elsewhere or sort of a product of idiosyncratic in country factors so when i wrote the book i ended it with two examples one was south korea and the other one was harvard which is not exactly a country. Will sometimes it feels like one and with south korea. A decision that the people of the country made a decision in twenty fifteen that they were willing to do without certain privacy protections during a pandemic and given their location physical location in the world. They expected to be subjected to one sooner than later and so they made the change in the privacy law they also made a change in the healthcare law and allowed rapid testing of of tests and other equipment during a pandemic. And that's significant because digital contact. Tracing of any sort is only going to work if there is also healthcare support underneath so for example with swiss vid which used exposure notification apps if. Somebody was warned that they've been exposed. They could call. Swiss health ministry discussed the information they had and discuss whether or not they should quarantine if they should quarantine an isolate than whether or not they could do so and work from home because if not then. The swiss government would pay part of their salary to enable him to stay at home. We don't have that kind of holistic healthcare solution here. In south korea there were privacy invasions the databases that the government put up about where infected people had travelled originally provided enough information including age gender to identify who those people had been. Which made it very unpleasant for them in the fact that it was publicized where neighborhoods are. Were that that. There have been outbreaks when people then fell sick after one particular outbreak in a neighborhood of gay bars that outed some people. So there were privacy invasions that were unexpected. And in some of those cases the south korean than changed how much information published but the big thing about south korea is. The people were willing to wear masks. They were willing to wear masks early. Allen has said that even parts of the country were masks weren't necessarily mandated. People wore masks. But what we saw in the united states was much less willingness to take action at fairly low invasive. Technologies like masks. I wanted to get to harvard so harvard also tried digital contact tracing small experiment last summer in which they used wifi signal from different classrooms. They wired up. The rooms but harvard was also testing people three times a week. Anybody who came onto campus was tested three times a week. What they discovered after a couple of months of the experiment of using the wifi apps is that it wasn't particularly a fictitious. Harvard however was in a position to devote lots of funding towards the testing. And so what you've got is on the one hand south korea deciding in twenty fifteen. Hey protecting against this kind of pandemic with to make these changes harvard. Having done some things with email meta data five six years earlier that it had the campus on edge put in tough privacy protections and when this issue came up said no we can afford to do. The testing and the testing tap fact turns out to be the random testing of people on campus. That is everybody's tested three times a week. Regardless of whether there's any indication of exposure that was their answer and they stop the wifi experiment. I just wanted to make a follow a point about korea. Because i i think that the lesson of korea sometimes misunderstood in in the media and as i've been involved in this issue in reading about it over the last year you do sometimes see these reports about you know south created really well. Singapore did really well. I wanted really well. You know why. Why can't we do it that well and one argument that sometimes it made is that what works in those countries won't work here because of cultural differences right and the nature of these cultural differences not usually explained or defended particularly. Well you know it seems to be some sort of kind of a lazy stereotype about the more often quote unquote confucian cultures of these countries. And how they're much more supposedly rule following and collectivist and to the extent that there are cross country sociological differences that is not what is motivating.

Harvard susan south korea Allen last year Swiss health ministry two examples united states twenty fifteen last summer three times a week both sides one argument south korean harvard swiss government singapore five six years earlier one particular outbreak one
Job market recovery likely to be halted as increased cases lead to new lockdowns

Bloomberg Surveillance

00:44 sec | 2 years ago

Job market recovery likely to be halted as increased cases lead to new lockdowns

"Is the unemployment rate really, just under 8%. I don't buy it for a minute will neither does she. I mean, she said, This is a very narrow measure. And the concern is that the improvement that we have been seeing and we're expecting to see in about a half hour time is going to diminish. As covert continues to spread. I will just say John made mention that next week. How quickly will it be that the pandemic is front and center? The answer is very. We're seeing record numbers of cases in the likes of Illinois, Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, and the question is at what point do we hit peak capacity for some of the I C u beds that leads to new lockdowns Tom that will have a crippling effect. A lot of aspects of the job market recovery is just a complete aside out on Twitter Last night from the Swiss government, I saw a beautiful

John Illinois Indiana Ohio Michigan TOM Swiss Government Twitter
Locked Down in Switzerland and Belgium

Travel with Rick Steves

05:29 min | 2 years ago

Locked Down in Switzerland and Belgium

"Start with Stephen mcfeely he operates being be on Ireland's dingle peninsula in just before the pandemic head Stephen an interest in the hotel Oberland in October and Switzerland that's where he's had to ride out the first few months of the global lockdown good and. My goodness. My Irish friend is learning Spitzer dykes. Good here in the Alps where I've been for four months. Now in splendid isolation, my plan originally was just to come for February and March, but I've I'm still here right well, what does the vibe in Switzerland right now there's a positive vibe. The society is reopening. Tourism travel has started again just no we're on the same level as it was before we had two weekends where there was crazy crowds here huge big crowds from all over Switzerland everybody who was here was from Switzerland or had to be from Switzerland. They weren't necessarily all Swiss because there's lots of international people living in Geneva and Derek and whatnot but everybody from within the barger of Switzerland over with crowds, and then it just died and Monday to. Friday went back to being really really quiet. Okay. Well, this is sort of the very beginnings of the rekindling of tourism I would imagine it'll be people traveling with within their own countries first, and then traveling within Europe, and then finally international travel and transatlantic travel. Yes. That's exactly what we're seeing. The borders here have just reopened. So we're expecting Germans and some Austrians and maybe some French to come now also, I don't anticipate huge numbers like that would have been heretofore. One. Very noticeable thing in the Valley of course, there's no American visitors. As you know, the valley also is very popular with. Chinese travelers Indians many people from Dubai and Saudi Arabia would come here and they're not here this year. So there's a noticeable difference there. So the people getting the real cultural change would be the French speaking. Swiss. German speaking part of his Switzerland and not even leaving their own country exactly. Fifty percent of our guests. Last week were French speaking Swiss and it was the first time I've ever actually met those people and I would say to them. Are you French Swiss would say no, no, we are. All MOM and so I I learned something new immediately the K. The identify as swirl. They were saying exactly what you just said they said it's like we are in a different country it's very dramatic here it's different toossion either those on the do shut down it was really cool. They were very excited to see a different part of their own country. So that was wonderful. Now Stephen you own a hotel in Ireland in Dingle Peninsula and now you own a hotel in Switzerland in Loudoun valley two of my favorite places as a businessman working in both these countries how do you compare the support getting from the government and how the two governments are dealing with this crisis? Well, the difference is. Very. Big. I'm still on team. Ireland. So I want to be positive about my own country, but there's not a lot of support coming. Heretofore in Switzerland for example, within two weeks of the crisis occurring. The. Swiss Federal Council which is the Swiss government offered ten percent of the previous year's turnover and So that's quite a considerable amount of money and they offered that as a loan which was repayable over seven years. Zero percent interest. So they're not looking to profit from it and in Ireland we really struggled to get some assistance. And we got ten thousand euros of overdraft line of credit and but repayable at seven and a half percent interest in Switzerland. We got three hundred thousand. So it's quite a big difference there no-interest at all. No interest at all. Of course, Switzerland may have much stronger and deeper reservists than Ireland, but they were able to immediately come up with assistance very little bureaucracy paperwork, and they immediately got to help us in Ireland. The experience was just simply much different to the government really weren't as proactive for as immediate as were here in Switzerland. The roots here what's around her a lot less strict as well There is a two meter rule here, but I haven't seen anybody wearing masks very much, which is kinda shocking for me because I know in Ireland the whole north of is people should be wearing masks. People definitely are observing social distance. One of my friends said to me that the two meter rule has actually brought Swiss people closer together so. That is so insightful to the Swiss society. It's more difficult thing. It's more difficult thing for Irish people or Italian people are Spanish. Two meters distance than it would be for this people or maybe the. Scandinavians. I can see by home people are wondering. Is the Irish pub culture ever going to come back the way it was with social distancing whereas in. Switzerland. Here for me like I'm I'm in the Alps I'm surrounded by fresh air and. Of of lovely space and it's been a wonderful place to be stranded, I don't even want to complain about it because although I I was stranded here for four months. It was the perfect place I felt very safe. I might have felt different if I was in the middle of Zurich or something or Geneva but I felt very safe. I'd in the Alps and it is lovely and peaceful and quiet, and of course, that's what people are coming here for anyway

Switzerland Ireland Alps Stephen Mcfeely French Swiss Dingle Peninsula Swiss Society Swiss Federal Council Spitzer Europe Geneva Swiss Government Dubai Zurich Saudi Arabia Derek Loudoun Valley
U.S. Navy vet freed from Iran after nearly 2 years in custody

Larry O'Connor

00:22 sec | 2 years ago

U.S. Navy vet freed from Iran after nearly 2 years in custody

"New this hour U. S. officials say a navy veteran who's been detained in Iran for nearly two years has been released and is making his way home with the first leg on a Swiss government aircraft Michael white's release is part of an agreement involving Iranian American doctor prosecuted by the justice department it follows months of quiet negotiations over prisoners between the two

Iran Michael White Justice Department Navy Swiss Government
Detained US Navy veteran freed by Iran, en route home

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 2 years ago

Detained US Navy veteran freed by Iran, en route home

"A navy veteran held in Iran has been freed after nearly two years Michael white's mother says the nightmare is over U. S. officials say white left Iran on a Swiss government aircraft and will head home from Zurich he was detained in twenty eighteen while visiting a woman he met online white was sentenced to ten years in prison last year after Iran convicted him of insulting its supreme leader and posting private information online his release as part of a deal involving a Ronnie an American doctor the justice department prosecuted Sager make ani Washington

Iran Michael White Zurich Sager Ani Washington U. S. Justice Department
Detained US Navy veteran freed by Iran, en route home

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 2 years ago

Detained US Navy veteran freed by Iran, en route home

"A navy veteran held in Iran has been freed after nearly two years Michael white's mother says the nightmare is over U. S. officials say white left Iran on a Swiss government aircraft and will head home from Zurich he was detained in twenty eighteen while visiting a woman he met online white was sentenced to ten years in prison last year after Iran convicted him of insulting its supreme leader and posting private information online his release as part of a deal involving a Ronnie an American doctor the justice department prosecuted Sager make ani Washington

Iran Michael White Zurich Sager Ani Washington U. S. Justice Department
Detained US Navy veteran freed by Iran, en route home

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 2 years ago

Detained US Navy veteran freed by Iran, en route home

"A navy veteran held in Iran has been freed after nearly two years Michael white's mother says the nightmare is over U. S. officials say white left Iran on a Swiss government aircraft and will head home from Zurich he was detained in twenty eighteen while visiting a woman he met online white was sentenced to ten years in prison last year after Iran convicted him of insulting its supreme leader and posting private information online his release as part of a deal involving a Ronnie an American doctor the justice department prosecuted Sager make ani Washington

Iran Michael White Zurich Sager Ani Washington U. S. Justice Department
German government to bail Lufthansa out of bankruptcy

Monocle 24: The Briefing

03:17 min | 2 years ago

German government to bail Lufthansa out of bankruptcy

"Air France a bit of a conditional type of of bailout happening there And then a lot of discussions and of course. This has been going on for for a while. Would we see Berlin looking at some type of loan scheme investment in Lufthansa? A LOT OF PEOPLE. Also saying yeah. Governments have no part of this But of course it seems like something is going to go ahead. what What do we know yet could often intimate afternoon indeed? Yeah Lifthansa. They've they've got there. They've got their annual shareholder meeting today. And of course I mean it's it's an AGM in a shareholder meeting without shareholders. Because you know everyone has to watch it removes Anyway Long Story. Short like other airlines. Lufthansa is also fighting for its survival. government bailout looks. Uh looks likely well. It looks absolutely necessary to be honest. the figure we've hurt is around ten billion euros and of course the The controversial story is that how big will the government influence be once they've provided the ten billion and you know if Lift chief executive officer. Cast boy has any say. I mean he doesn't want an easy to government people on his supervisory board and tell him how to run an airline and I think history's poorly shown that Governments aren't good owners of many assets airlines in particular. So so he. As far as we know he doesn't want the government in there but of course he needs the money so this is kind of this kind of the the question. That's that's being discussed in Berlin as we speak. How much government influence You know will will lift and up with overall. I mean the The the shares have had a pretty disastrous year. Obviously they've Haft lift has has said it will cut the number of aircraft operates permanently They've they've closed a few weeks ago. They've closed their discount Germanwings As a as a first step to to cut back on expenses so at the moment the company is burning through eight hundred million euros a month I think got fourbillion liquidity. Right now You do the math. It's it's it's not a unique situation but maybe just before we get to unique situations. Do we have any indication as to how much going to be Loans and then securities in? Are we looking at? The German state would actually go in and end up with fifteen percent right away or does that come as a second stage potentially I think I think it's really still still up in the. I mean as an example. You look at Suisse the Swiss army of of Lufthansa. They fully They got their money and the Swiss government Hey decided rather than to take a direct stake in the company which is giving medicine hundred percent owned by. Lufthansa would be difficult to pull off. Anyway Dave basically provided credit guarantees so Swiss will receive money from the banks from UBS in Credit Suisse and the government will provide guarantees to the tune of one point three billion francs

Lufthansa Berlin Swiss Army Haft Lift France Chief Executive Officer Credit Suisse Germanwings UBS Dave
Switzerland Rules Transphobia and Homophobia Illegal

Phil's Gang

00:49 sec | 3 years ago

Switzerland Rules Transphobia and Homophobia Illegal

"Coming out of Switzerland should have our attention we're sixty three percent of voters decided to criminalize public homophobia know what we're looking at is a species of hate speech legislation along criminalizing certain speech in an intellectually dishonest move the Swiss government authorities assured voters that even though this is a curtailment of the freedom of speech it is not actually a curtailment of free speech yes it's a contradictory argument but also points to the very heart of the problem with hate speech legislation in fact on the other side of this vast of sexual and moral revolution a traditional defense a biblical Christianity could well now be defined as a criminal act in Switzerland any exemptions we see will not last long because of the logic of this legislation and that is to declare that anything short of the total public comprehensive embrace of the LGBTQ movement is a form of

Switzerland Swiss Government
Roger Federer’s face to be minted on Swiss coin

Atlanta's Morning News

00:16 sec | 3 years ago

Roger Federer’s face to be minted on Swiss coin

"Switzerland is minting money in Roger Federer's image twenty Frank silver coins and a fifty franc gold coin will feature the tennis star it's the first time the Swiss government is dedicated a commemorative coin to a living person it declares Federer Switzerland's most successful individual

Switzerland Roger Federer Swiss Government Federer Switzerland Frank Tennis
News in Brief 15 August 2019

UN News

03:05 min | 3 years ago

News in Brief 15 August 2019

"This is the news in brief from the united nations. The fate of one hundred thirty children on board to rescue ships in the mediterranean sea should not be put put at risk by political point scoring the u._n. Said on thursday amid ongoing uncertainty about whether the vessels will be allowed to dock in italy the appeal by u._n. Children's prince fund unicef to european governments to prevent e. u. Banned migrants and refugees from being stranded at sea follows the signing of a second italian decree banning humanitarian vessels else from entering the country on sunday. More than four hundred people were rescued off the libyan coast by two boats at the center of unisex appeal. One of the boats open arms is reported. The more close to the italian island of lampedusa unicef said that only eleven of one hundred and three children aboard the second vessel viking ocean had a parent or guardian indian with them in a statement unicef special coordinator for the refugee and migrant response in europe afghan khan said that many of the youngsters had fled poverty conflict and unthinkable atrocities and had the right to be safe amid reports that these spanish authorities had agreed to shelter more than a dozen of those rescued at the weekend many of whom m._r. from sudan mr khan welcomed what she called recent progress towards a plan for increased solidarity and responsibility sharing among european governments to to yemen now where the world health organization or w joe has stepped up measures to control the spread of dengue fever a severe flu like illness in a tweet on thursday the the u._n. Agency said that staff had concluded a second round of donkey prevention measures in ties yemen's third city. The aim is to help more than four hundred and thirty thousand people in four the district of the embattled city to avoid the mosquito borne viral infection which is endemic in yemen. The development comes after more than four years of conflict between government and opposition vision hootie forces that are shouted health and other public services in yemen killed thousands of civilians and brought millions close to famine and finally the swiss government's government's decision to decline a sponsorship deal with a major tobacco firm is a welcome move which other countries should follow the world health organization has said responding to reports reports that switzerland has reconsidered supporter of philip morris international at the world expo two thousand twenty w._h._o. Said that featuring a producer of tobacco products what's on cigarettes the only product that is known to kill half of its consumers goes against the theme of next year's fair in united arab emirates namely connecting minds creating the future future in a statement w._h._o. Insisted that tobacco addiction linked to industries aggressive marketing of its products causes suffering and millions of deaths each this year. It's warning comes amid reports that tobacco companies are aiming to establish new partnerships with governments to sponsor events pavilions around the world w._h._o. Explained all governments should proactively aspire to reduce the number of people who smoke the u._n. Agency stressed in line with the w._h._o. Framework convention on tobacco control whereas.

Yemen Unicef Mr Khan United Nations Mediterranean Italy Swiss Government United Arab Emirates Italian Island Sudan Europe FLU Switzerland Coordinator Producer Philip Morris Two Thousand Twenty W
Swiss army launches fitness app for future recruits

Monocle 24: Midori House

04:26 min | 4 years ago

Swiss army launches fitness app for future recruits

"It is a common wistful lament of people just past draftable age that much of what ails their particular country could be fixed by the introduction of national service to promote general moral and physical, fitness if Switzerland which very much has national service is. Any guide. However that may not be enough apparently concerned that recruits arriving not quite prepared for the rigors of military life. These Swiss government has launched a new app called ready team army intended to enable new boots to hit the ground running Mark in Zurich doing what this actually does. Does. It just tell you to go outside and run around the lottery that a bit more structured than that. Well, I mean firstly as you mentioned we we still do have mandatory service. I mean, it's actually quite compulsory service, Swiss man, it's actually quite easy together way, if you want to but this app, you know, it it it's a bit of a silly thing. Really? But what you can do is you can enter let's say you're a sixteen year old or young Swiss you can enter the kind of of army function that you want to prepare for, you know, if you want to be a a parrot a parachute commando or. You know, something like that the app will actually create a special work out program for you that that you can follow over the next couple of years to prepare you for for your service. It it. It's a funny little thing. I was I was quite surprised. They I read that the army's hoping for two hundred thousand downloads of the app in the first year. So there will be they will need to be many, many, many people in Switzerland who will download the app, and, you know, not because they want to get into the army, but maybe they just want to exercise a bit more. Marion general you are you a big fan of state programs to encourage healthier lifestyles among the population. Well, on the one hand, I'm not on the other hand you look Finland and the way that they increased life expectancy in reduced heart disease in Finnish population through a national campaign. A new thing fantastic, you can actually do this. But I think there was the there was a suggestion that maybe we could think of apps that you might use it in other places and the certainly a problem with army recruits in the UK. From with a professional army, and in the police where the levels of fitness aren't wonderful, and I sort of thought when we considering this that actually best apt to have would be to give you a sort of scenario that you actually lived in the inner London suburbs because I came back from Washington and was astonished the fitness level of Londoners racing up and down stairs ground racing up. Escalators marching down corridors it is spectacular. Just final thoughts on the idea of national service. Mark you mentioned that it is fairly easy to get out over. I know Minnie's people who have done that through one means or another. But is is the the idea of national service still holding up among the Swiss to people still think it's a good thing for country to have. All in. All. Yes. That's there's a very interesting thing that came up just in the last couple of years really when you hear and read about inequality in our populations. In most countries in in in developed nations. And and really worldwide inequality has risen now. The the the compulsory Swiss military service, actually, does does a very good thing in in in in fighting inequality because you get to spend a lot of time with people from all corners of the of the country. You get to spend a lot of time with people. You would. I mean, I live in Surrey. Eric. When I was in the army, I spent a lot of time with Swiss compatriots that lived in the mountains, they'd lived in villages that did other Jobson me people that I hardly ever met in my own urban bubble here in Zurich. So which actually actually is quite a good thing. Gaming care of creating a national

Army Switzerland Zurich Surrey Finland Jobson UK London Marion Eric Minnie Mark Washington Sixteen Year One Hand