18 Burst results for "Suzanne Vega"

New Google App Feature Lets You Hum a Song to Search for It

Techmeme Ride Home

00:47 sec | 7 months ago

New Google App Feature Lets You Hum a Song to Search for It

"Google's got a new hum to search feature that it says could let you identify that song that's been stuck in your head for days simply by humming or whistling or singing it into Google search you can be like dude dude dude dude dude dude dude dude and Google be all like, yeah. That's Tom's diner by Suzanne Vega quoting the verge the new feature is available today and the Google App on both IOS and android or in the Google assistant just ask Google. What's the song or tap the newly added search Asong Button and then um your earworm Google then show you results based on. How likely a match it thinks it is after which you'll be able to tap results to listen to it just like you would any other song that you looked up in Google search

Google Suzanne Vega TOM
"suzanne vega" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

08:37 min | 9 months ago

"suzanne vega" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"We couldn't continue on that trajectory that we had been on everything changed again, but that's not bad either I mean I don't know. So it's been kind of interesting process the whole thing. Well, but then when. When you say you had a sense that this was like either inflammation or like that crush thing that would dissipate. It almost sounds like you half ruining to dissipate. Well. I tend to spite of the fact that I did so much so in my life was. Thought of as kind of a wonder can in some ways but I was I am very slow actually to process things So yeah, I felt that this was. Something that was gonNA take a little time to adjust to us. the other part of it was that Luca. It wasn't just a song. You know it wasn't just like, pop? Song. news. Of I. People who wrote to me to tell me about the pain that they had suffered personally. So that was the other side of it you know we on the one hand, we had celebrations because we were very successful. And those were deserved and everyone had worked really hard and and so that was welcome. But on the other hand, there was a tremendous responsibility and of of. Sort of a an outpouring of pain that that sort of came my way because I had invoked this by writing this song by having a go. Go Go viral you know all around the world. So so there was that. So there's a sense of having to he'll. Just like as an information or concussion as you say, you need time to kind of and that was part of like of. Of. Processing like. the fact that this was such A. Universal problem. Kind of shocked me. I thought of it as a secret thing. Is An individual thing But it it was a social problem and still is a social problem and that was an eye opener for me. That was an awakening of sorts. That's amazing. That you perceive that. As you were the one pointing it out it turned out you were also pointing out to yourself that it was a big problem. Vercel problem. That was surprising to me that was. Yeah. That was that was a surprise. So. How did you send to yourself afterwards or did you just let it happen? Was it a conscious effort on your part to say, okay, I have to kind of grab on. To the reins of flick who I am as an artist as a creator, I can't try to compete because you changed up the production team right you. You didn't make the third record or the same people in the fourth records like. What was that all about? Well I. Guess. I. Felt that I wanted to. We're GONNA make the third album with Lenny. and but suddenly the dynamics seemed different and. Ron I guess felt that I could make some how he had faith in me that I could. Do the album myself with Anton and. With ambitious and we thought, yeah, let's do that and was very we also a couple at that time. So we were there was a lot of pressure to be under. of course. So I, remember at that moment in time feeling like Lenny didn't seem to be. Doing that much, i. mean he was sort of. Coming to the studio and sitting on the floor reading a book. So we were like Maybe, maybe we should not have lenny here. So. So I had to break to a minute was like a up. That's really heartbreaking but then Anton and I kind of went through and made the album that we made in retrospect I. I think I don't think I I was. I thought I knew a lot about production and in retrospect I don't think I knew as much as I thought I did that makes us. But the other question is like about like did you did you do anything particular to try to find your own artistic voice again? After the second album or did you just keep going and assume you'd figure it out because you knew suddenly you were the focus of a different kind of attention, right? Well Yeah I knew that but. On on the other hand, I was very cognizant of a lot of women who came after me and Tracy Chapman being one of them are meat I. She's a terrific solid songwriter amid that was only a matter of time before she would get a record deal and there were other women Michelle shocked and it'll connor and all different kinds of women making music. I know very well that whatever statement I made might have been. Lost a little more lost in the field of women making music. which I think was just life that was just the way it was going to be I read I, read an interview with you where you said that used to get very competitive about that stuff and I. I remember when Short Shock Show Michelle is I brought this up on the podcast recently actually talking to this great songwriter. Brandy Clark from Nashville but. Michelle's politics became. Michelle sits and things that are you nuts but boy short shocked up was just incredible I thought. Yeah. So there are a lot of women making music and I felt that that was good. That was healthy. That's the way it should have been all along in a sense that I think the out the album that I made was very diffused. You know there was all this kind of A. Sleeping a lot. I was dreaming Lotto's processing a lot of stuff and so it's an album has kind of open ended nece about it. which, of course, then changed completely by ninety nine point nine so. Right well, that was entirely different thing and that's The woman named best actor who runs my writer's room on billion of great writer she that album she's ten years younger than I haven't that albums like the beacon for her she that's her favorite album and yeah. She's the head have to tell you. It's my favourite album of of the ones that I've made myself I mean I love that even. That one I felt we surpassed any parameters I thought I was going for I was like, wow, this is really This is This is more than I had expected at in in the best of ways. that. So that's I feel about ninety nine point nine and the new album has some songs from that album too. Doesn't it? Oh I think. So I mean I chose the songs based on whether how close they were to New York or not? Know about did it take place in? New, York does their New York story behind it. Right, how does it connect with that whole with that? Kind of the theme. Yeah. Well we are We're basically at a time, but I just want to say, thanks thanks for this. I, want to tell people to go listen to an evening in New, York songs and stories, and if you're someone younger and you don't know these first two albums that we spent all this time talking about You should go back and. Listen listen to them and get the new album when it comes out. September eleventh. Thank right. Is that nine eleven? Yeah. and Are you do you go on twitter? I. Know There's a twitter account but are you on there like if people follow you are you ever tweeting or is it always just? So you're like under team. Here's how I do I. Go on Instagram and whatever post on Instagram I also feed to twitter. and. Then maybe every month or every other month I sort of twitter binge and I I read all the tweets I put my name in an I read what everybody says and I. I like and I retreat but I don't I. Don't keep up with it all the time. It's like at once a month I read everything but it's me doing it. That's a great way to approach it I. Wish I had that discipline. So everybody you can follow Suzanne Vega on Instagram. You. Can Find Me on twitter mostly Upright Koppelman Go Listeners Zack. Thanks so much for doing the podcast. Thank you. Thank you so much for for the invitation. Yes. Great. All right, everybody we will see you. Next time on the moment..

twitter Michelle Lenny. Anton York New York writer Suzanne Vega Tracy Chapman Ron Brandy Clark connor Nashville twitter.
"suzanne vega" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

06:02 min | 9 months ago

"suzanne vega" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"I duNno sounds. Sounds like something that could go to radio or mean that's about as high as I had imagined that that's that's as far as my imagination. Took me. And then when I heard it on the radio, I was like, wow, that sounds great and it and it hit immediately the minute it went to radio just like went like wildfire all over the world. Remember it completely I. Mean I remember completely buying that album I know where I bought it I remember what it was like when I put it on and And what it felt like to everybody. You know when it felt like to walk down, you know college you would just hear coming out of like windows all over the place. It was one of those songs that just kind of takes over the period of time dead it's in you know yeah, it was I was amazed. It was a springtime springtime album and the song has this even though it's such a sad song it obviously has this this bell like crisp. It's like bell like sort of melodic clarity that that brings you in and so you did have a sense like Oh, this could matter this. Could you believed them in a way that that it could matter in some way will allow them to do. It wouldn't say that that constituted belief. Just, as I said, knock yourself out but I I didn't have all my eggs in that basket. I wasn't if it flopped I would not I would not have been in surprised. You've been happy to have just would you've been happy to just have like it be the second album have been? Kind of a logical progression from the first commercially you know what? I mean if if you were just had sort of sold half a million records and and and sort of. Just, slightly built your audience with would you have been satisfied with that? You know I think I'd be proud either way. I. Really do I I was sort of expecting a long slow career more like Leonard Cohen like just to kind of their on what we used to call underground and now. For well, it was underground and then it was alternative and now I don't know what it is anymore, but it's I. Have Been Okay without I will but it would have been proud I didn't you know I didn't get into it didn't get into it so I could have top forty hits That wasn't what I was thinking I as I said, I wanted to be a great artist and I wanted to make my living so. The top forty hits. Thing was sort of like the to cherries on top. Shirl. Proud of those, those to him to proud of Luke on proud of Tom's diner. But it's not as though I feel that you know I need to. Go back there. You know it's I would been proud either way when it hit in the way it did. How did you sort of process but coming Like I guess if the thing is that the first album, there were these two, hundred, thousand, two, hundred, fifty, thousand people who felt that they deeply understood you. You know you understood them even more right the second album became this cultural phenomenon. What did that and you became like a brand in a way right the MTV all of it you you became a pop star for a period of time and how did you process that as it happened? I don't know how did I at the moment it really dawned on me was I was flown to some party somewhere. became a bit of a blur. but I had to attend some. Party. Some. Radio. Convention Party. Probably jet lagged and I was like, what am I doing here and then I Debbie Harry came up to me. And said in her. Funny Voice with her beautiful face. She said, you know I just want to congratulate you on your success. And I was just stunned. I was like God it's Blondie. US. Graduating all my success. Faint. Yes. So that was a moment when I was just I can't believe this is happening There's another photograph that has surfaced from somewhere of me and Suzie sue. Yeah like deepen congregation we'll talking to each other I don't remember that moment but there she is in full regalia with all of her makeup and her her hairdo and the whole thing and there's me looking like myself kind of a just like a a girl like. You know I, Don I didn't have any like costume or outfit. Eighties. All about your outfit and your image even though you're frozen in people's I mean actually I can remember the outfits you were. You know what I mean it's not an outfit, but you look like, Suzanne Vega. Thank goodness for that. At least had my blackjack at NYC. Jacket. Is what I was picturing. Yeah, 'cause. Deep affection for jacket. So. But yeah so this happens though do you. Like. I always, I always wonder some of these people like did it feel like you were can cost in a certain way and you had to wait for the swelling to go down as make the third record good analogy and in fact, I, thought about it as an inflammation. Like a you know it's this is like everyone's very excited right now, but it's all GonNa. It's all GONNA calmed down. Yeah. The swelling will go down or it's a bit like when you're on a, we work in an office and somebody has a crush on you. But they don't really know you are thought of it that way too. It's sort of like all these people. Think that they really know me and like me but you know they they don't really know me that that well, and eventually everybody will get on with their lives and we'll all go back to. Some other way of living and and it was true. I mean it did it did happen happened a little more quickly than I had imagined that it would..

Don I Leonard Cohen Convention Party Debbie Harry Suzanne Vega US NYC Suzie sue MTV Luke Tom
"suzanne vega" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

06:38 min | 9 months ago

"suzanne vega" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"And by then run fierstein really got into the picture and he was So he he was pushing things along he was like we really have to have another album. We have to have an album out by in Nineteen eighty-seven, which was two years after the first one the first one came out eighty five he wanted the second one in eighty seven. So he was prodding and pushing and prodding and pushing and everybody was prodding and pushing, and that's when I really started arguing with Lennie because fourth lenny. Lenny would be sent to harass me We were sort of. What we call would shedding so that meant I had the band we were all in this little house in Cape Cod. That I owned and I just can't. I I'm very. I have my own method and pity pacing and timing of things. So even though everybody wanted this album to be done, done done I. Didn't have the last song I had to finish was ironbound. And we were up at Bears Ville in taught Todd Rundgren. Right up in Woodstock and so everyone we were trying to mix the album we were trying to. We needed the vocals on ironbound and I didn't have the lyrics done. So you can't have the vocals without the lyrics. So, Lenny came to my room one day and he said I've I've written some versus for you. And I was like what? and. It had this and he's scissors sitting there in my bedroom singing She fingers the ring at least it something and I started hooting laughter going. That's horrible. That's so bad. That is the worst like the note can No. I'm not singing lyrics that you wrote and so Did it prompt you then to go and? So I sat down and I think I got the whole thing done. But I think before that, my attitude was something like I refuse to slap some stupid words on a stupid page two. So we have a stupid song finished I think that was. My motto for. Do you think you were kind of protecting yourself from the. Pressures of a second album release. Yeah I could feel that there were very high expectations and I. Myself felt like I was hanging from a cliff by my fingernails like Oh, my God I can't tell if these songs or any good I haven't sung them out. I haven't usually had my slow method of finishing song and then bringing them out one at a time and seeing getting an audience response and then tinkering with it and I all of that sort of went out the window because Ron could feel that there was there was an expectation and So we you know we had to get it all done. So there's some of this stuff on solid standing that I'm not sure. You know song like in the I I think was kind of the moment that I'm not sure. I don't think it very. That's real. Yeah. I love that song. I listened to it today actually and I was like Clo- because I remember that I'm coming out also right because now by then I'd started working with Tracy and and. You're like the one hope like the one thing we could point to you know and. In the world was like, well there Suzanne Vega when I would try to tell people to believe possible and And and and that song was like my second favorite song on the album and went back it today to see. So you don't. That's how I. Love It. It's so dark. fucking dark. It is dark. It's dark and it's very it's sincere certainly, and it's meaningful but it's it's not one that I just like without to to sing unless I'm doing like a celebration of solid standing which I've done a bunch of recently. do it down but you know I'm just saying if it if it had been a few years later, maybe it would have been a different song. So the whole. The whole premise when I started this podcast was like. To find moments in people's lives like these inflection points, I always use the example of Ram. I played together to those four guys look at each other and go we're going to be we matter in America like we're going to be one of the most important bands to ever live so. When you recorded Luca you heard it mixed. Yeah. Did you know that you could you know you'd like change your life in a way that it would never ever be approximately the same even Know but that's not to say that I mean Ron really heard the potential of that song. he heard it when I wrote it. which just cousteau you just feel cousteau. Guitar Yeah I was singing that Song I had written it I started to play it out in one, thousand, nine, hundred, four. We had just gotten the record deal night to be honest I was not feeling any love from the audience for that Song when I did it a Cappella when I did it acoustically. it. It seemed to first of all I wasn't sure people understood what I meant and what I was talking about, and then you could see it in their faces when they did understand what I was talking about and you can see them feeling embarrassed and kind of sad. So. Yeah. They seem to just wish that I would get it all over with and that we could go on like Gypsy or something. So that's the way I was feeling. So when Ron came to me and said, you know it is that a song about child abuse and I'm like, yeah, and he says you know I think that could be a big hit and I'm like are you crazy and he says it's a song about an issue and this eighties and we need songs about issues. I mean he was a strong believer. He in the redeeming power of music he felt like you had ended the Vietnam War so. Again I argued with him. I was like I don't think so and and he he he said, no I really think that that could be. So in a sense I, I think I said something like we'll knock yourself out With action which they did I mean they spent really did. They spent two years on the production and they made it radio friendly and. On, all different kinds of sound systems in their car and various types of speakers and we we. Arranged it and then we rearranged it and we had different drummers play the part and we had different guitar players play the part and we ended up with John Gordon to play the Solo. On it. So by the time, we were done with it.

Ron Lenny Lennie Cape Cod Todd Rundgren Bears Ville Suzanne Vega Woodstock Clo John Gordon America Luca Tracy
"suzanne vega" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

06:18 min | 9 months ago

"suzanne vega" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"Hey. This is the moment Brian Compliment. Thanks for listening. I'm a little freaked out because my guest today is Suzanne Vega. Whose work has meant. Just an extraordinary amount to me over the course of my life. And the nineteen year old version of me would would be losing his mind over this. So Suzanne thanks for being here. Oh. You're welcome. Thank you. Know. This is where I I wanNA start, which is. Last night I put on your first album for the first time probably in. Maybe, fifteen years where I put it on. Just, to listen to it again in a focused way and. I was. Destroyed me and it brought me it just brought me back to my. I was. Finishing. My Freshman Year of college when it came out and I knew every grew I mean literally literally the old usage of literally war groups out on the album and You know I tweeted about it last night Suzanne and I tweeted that I went back to this record and that under like when I heard undertow and it, it just reminded me of being this kid who was much more innocent than you were you were six years older than me or something but I was Long Island kid you were a city person and I was a college and it it was. I remember just staring at the lyrics and trying to understand everything that you meant, and it gave me a window into like a world that one Dan might be able to live and I tweeted it and then all these fucking people. My Age and between my engineers years basically all started saying the same thing about what that album and and you know I looked and that album sold quarter million copies over all this time and obviously the next album was this huge worldwide smash. And I know the first album was pugin England and stuff but. It occurred to me that for the people who bought that album. You became this this figure in our lives and your music became sort of North Star in a certain way and I'm wondering what it felt like for you to make that kind of. Immediate bond with this group of people. What did it feel like? it was awesome I I remember. the week it came out. I knew that the record company had pretty low expectations. Slide their standards they thought that we would sell thirty, thousand I guess you out. And so it came out in the first week it sold seventeen thousand, which was like more than half of what they had expected. So I was surprised and I remember thinking seventeen thousand people bought the album men I couldn't even fit all of those people in my mind's eye you know it wasn't as though I, knew them personally some power like I kept trying to think who are these people How do they know how do they know about me because I hadn't done a lot of was just sort of around New York and maybe from time to time venturing out. Until the parts of the northeast So it was kind of a lovely feeling to go on tour for that first album woman and play packed folk clubs and and feel that people responded to the music and cared about the lyrics and was very gratifying. And did you get the sense? Of what it meant to those people were kind of allow yourself to think about. The. The impact because you know your music was not like anything else that was really happening at that time in in a way you were there are other acts that might have been associated with folk music, but your thing wasn't really folk music even though it got. That way a mixture. Today I think about it I felt it more than I didn't think about it more than I. Kind of felt it around me and and it was exciting and it was but it was still manageable. It wasn't It wasn't like what happened later with solid standing which kind of blew up And and that was a different situation for a number of reasons. But no for that first album I remember feeling like I was being discovered by all these people and the same time I was discovering other people I remember being in I on that first tour and discovering Rem which was like very American You know as an American rock band of of of that time and just like laying there as we were traveling sometimes overnight and and listening to this music and sort of feeling myself being discovered and discovering other people at the same time it was it was a very. Exciting and hopeful time. That resonate so heavy with me because they were my favorite band right then like they became my favorite band that. Armor album. Yeah Right. But Murmur was a couple was like a little bit old by the time you know what I mean but. Then to know, but I found it then to and. Fables that just like come out or was just coming out or something like that and so yeah, your album led me into. It was one of the things that led me into searching out for other like young American artists who who's music might. Might Resonate in that way, what were your ambitions at that time and the reason I'm look you have this new album coming out that I've been able to listen to a bunch lately. Vega and evening of New, York songs and stories, and you play a bunch of these songs and yeah and notches these songs. But you sort of it's a retrospective of your of your career and you do some covers. But What were your own ambitions at at at that time as you were gathering the material to make this record and then as you made the record with Lenny and Steve? Well I mean my. My ambitions word I wanted to be an artist I wanted.

Suzanne Vega Brian Compliment Long Island New York England Dan Lenny York Steve
"suzanne vega" Discussed on Never Not Funny

Never Not Funny

03:01 min | 11 months ago

"suzanne vega" Discussed on Never Not Funny

"Ease up on how horrible! Point on the panel. Perhaps pathetically guessing something on those lines are. Good Point. Yes, we should see what the Jimmy! What's Your Guess Cabinet sitting here rethinking. I was GONNA say okay, so it's got to be Acapella so that that that eliminates. Guests right up the back so? I'm thinking Acapella I'm thinking. A that might have been redone in the nineties so I'm don't worry. Be Happy. That was what I guess good. Good answer. To Cross it out. Because I changed my mind. deluca I was so excited. I thought of Luca, but don't worry. Be Happy with my. That was my first gut. Ask question what what was it about Luca? That made you come to the conclusion that it was in fact an Capelle soft. It's not so horrible. Just I think also in your head you. You knew that it was Suzanne Vega like or if we're right. Maybe we're not right, but if you were thinking of Tom's diner, but you couldn't pull it one hundred percents. I did the same thing I was like I knew it was vague and I was like what's the song? It's not, but it's not Luca because that's not acapella, but I couldn't think of the name. All right well. Let's find out here we go. Are we ready me? Forty do a remix of. Forty, two red red wine wrote I crossed that up to it might be could. Here we go. I will tell you this. We got winter. Oh, we gotTA WINTER A boy. And the the band DNA took Suzanne Vega's voice. And added their beats originally without permission, however Vega much letter much later said she loves it her voice track. Boy, again my son's head or any the voice track. Castle that can't be right very very. First Song covered to MP three, which is how the band did it, and the answer is Tom's diner. That isn't that I'm all right, so you guys each get to fifty. Isn't that exciting? Point value, but that's the point value polity. My. points, what are we all bear? And what would you go with I with fifteen? Nice I went to that it matters. Seventeen. It doesn't matter Kevin. What'd you go with? I bet the phone I. saw like Oh you now you now another twenty thousand dollars she. That was off the air. Matt. What did you bet? It hurts to say it, but I said twenty. Garin, it doesn't hurt you at all. I you know what you're doing. The switch it up I wanted a full. You guys and I'm thinking I low. That means Matt Win that.

Suzanne Vega Luca Tom Matt Win Jimmy DNA Garin Kevin
"suzanne vega" Discussed on Never Not Funny

Never Not Funny

03:01 min | 11 months ago

"suzanne vega" Discussed on Never Not Funny

"Ease up on how horrible! Point on the panel. Perhaps pathetically guessing something on those lines are. Good Point. Yes, we should see what the Jimmy! What's Your Guess Cabinet sitting here rethinking. I was GONNA say okay, so it's got to be Acapella so that that that eliminates. Guests right up the back so? I'm thinking Acapella I'm thinking. A that might have been redone in the nineties so I'm don't worry. Be Happy. That was what I guess good. Good answer. To Cross it out. Because I changed my mind. deluca I was so excited. I thought of Luca, but don't worry. Be Happy with my. That was my first gut. Ask question what what was it about Luca? That made you come to the conclusion that it was in fact an Capelle soft. It's not so horrible. Just I think also in your head you. You knew that it was Suzanne Vega like or if we're right. Maybe we're not right, but if you were thinking of Tom's diner, but you couldn't pull it one hundred percents. I did the same thing I was like I knew it was vague and I was like what's the song? It's not, but it's not Luca because that's not acapella, but I couldn't think of the name. All right well. Let's find out here we go. Are we ready me? Forty do a remix of. Forty, two red red wine wrote I crossed that up to it might be could. Here we go. I will tell you this. We got winter. Oh, we gotTA WINTER A boy. And the the band DNA took Suzanne Vega's voice. And added their beats originally without permission, however Vega much letter much later said she loves it her voice track. Boy, again my son's head or any the voice track. Castle that can't be right very very. First Song covered to MP three, which is how the band did it, and the answer is Tom's diner. That isn't that I'm all right, so you guys each get to fifty. Isn't that exciting? Point value, but that's the point value polity. My. points, what are we all bear? And what would you go with I with fifteen? Nice I went to that it matters. Seventeen. It doesn't matter Kevin. What'd you go with? I bet the phone I. saw like Oh you now you now another twenty thousand dollars she. That was off the air. Matt. What did you bet? It hurts to say it, but I said twenty. Garin, it doesn't hurt you at all. I you know what you're doing. The switch it up I wanted a full. You guys and I'm thinking I low. That means Matt Win that.

Suzanne Vega Luca Tom Matt Win Jimmy DNA Garin Kevin
"suzanne vega" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"suzanne vega" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Get along and diverse region in fact the most diverse region in the country. Now they weren't racially diverse but unlike earlier settlement on the East Coast where people clumped by national origin or religion Midwestern communities brought together other people from lots of different places they came from the South the Northeast as well as Ireland Germany Scandinavia. So you had all these different languages cultures religions in the same place and at the time those differences really mattered so to get along it helps to be nice and friendly but not too inquisitive or critical. If there there was a disagreement a mid Westerner. Wouldn't say you're wrong instead. They might say something. Indirect like Bash but over time those differences says became less important and today most of the descendants of those early settlers are just considered white Americans and this brings us back to question asker shining experience in Ohio. She was a first generation Chinese immigrant and predominantly white suburb. And she said people seemed welcoming but she can never tell it was genuine. was that partly due to racism. Dr Suzanne Vega says yes. She studied the experience of Latin x immigrants and Lafayette Indiana for her book. Latino heartland the white families in the neighborhood by the mid Western families wooden out right be negative towards some and some would even wave and say hi you know how you doing Or welcome them but but there was almost like a superficial to that Vegas that some of these people simply didn't know how to behave around people from different cultures but they had the sense of. I'm I'm uncomfortable by your presence. I'm afraid of what might say I I'm uncomfortable with your presence because you're different and I think that plays into the mid Western after Nice Because people want to be nice but there's also a lot of awkwardness when it has to do with race politics and that squares with what Jason Renfro found in his research on the Mid West agreeable but not open minded and instead of acknowledging their awkwardness. Midwesterners are just well polite and that can provide a kind of cloak for discomfort comfort and in some cases even racism but Vega doesn't think the Midwest has to stay this way. We want to embrace differences embrace the fact that we're not all comfortable with each other and then move forward in that conversation by then keep avoiding it because it's not comfortable of course to do that would require confronting discomfort.

Mid West Dr Suzanne Vega Ireland Germany Scandinavia East Coast Jason Renfro Northeast Ohio Lafayette Indiana
"suzanne vega" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:23 min | 1 year ago

"suzanne vega" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Sincerely T. A. most on the collection called tower of song the songs of Leonard Cohen whole mix of people from Willie Nelson to Suzanne Vega Bondo to Billy Joel all try Leonard Cohen's famous blue raincoat and others on for size. Paul Cavalcanti with you the song book on W. NYC and here is Sarah Vaughan the intimate them cheery take on a great fats Waller to. no one to tell. no one. be on the show in this day and all. well you. I'm through with. and misbehavior. you know because. don't go No Way. we don't stay out. can a goal. and miss may. yeah. yeah. you. and miss. thank you. and his name. Hey. that. things. of planning. as one of my support team all. Schemel. you'll. have been. and the. the whole thing show. Gee I'd love to see. Lil swear. right outside the door yeah we look at. right. what are. is that low key they. don way. and the thing. come and. I can dish out and then. but. the only thing I. I am very. junk might remain on why game. your short term. all those final Arabian things your little heart and small. yeah. I'm the same way. well one man got no business. you can go to go well allow wow well. you know. I. not give up on. fats Waller..

Leonard Cohen Waller Paul Cavalcanti Sarah Vaughan Suzanne Vega Willie Nelson Billy Joel W. NYC miss. T. A.
"suzanne vega" Discussed on Is It Transphobic Podcast

Is It Transphobic Podcast

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"suzanne vega" Discussed on Is It Transphobic Podcast

"Implication being like it's only fair like you're the prettiest woman i've ever writer. It's not fair that you like. They managed to be prettier than us. Link again like in the think they're being complementary because they haven't actually thought about like the phobias that they're hovering in there for expressing in this thing this idea of there is this implicit real woman and not real women and why are the not real women minnaso- gorgeous gorgeous so it's a comp and i feel that here too with the added sort of iffy -ness of like the objectification yeah i'm thinking about my sexuality in the sort of way and i'm using you as a tool for that are pretty i mean it's not natural but you're so pretty yeah and it's really really uncomfortable. It is and man it gets worse in the in the in the the bridge. Let's chronicle dark. Side of life of the life mid the trans life. Did you ever keep the date with the steel side of the knife. He doesn't doesn't matter to me which side of the line you happen to be at any given time so we've now encountered the first time one of these songs has asked about quote unquote. The surgery young which as we know is not a thing. There's not just l. surgery for anybody but you know it's just again. We're getting back into this idea of like. What are your genitals yup. This is important to my song that i talk about what your genitals look like or what i wonder they look like and it's bad and i'm very disappointed. Can you suzanne vega. I really big so harsh as though like the guys weren't as bad or worse but he's like you like. I expected better from view. I knew that you know i love tom's diner. Don't do this to me yeah. I love blood makes noise like i know aerosmith is gonna be a bunch of assholes but what's your excuse yeah but we do have to move on because we have so many songs we we we we this is like are edited sunless to. We could talk about this for being very complete us. <hes> not really complete as we're just. We can't stop ourselves. That's the real yeah but you all like it right. This is fun for you okay so we're gonna talk about girls and boys by blur nine thousand nine hundred ninety four yeah a blur simpler alert. I mean if you don't know much by blur. The song that you're pretty much guaranteed to know is who so <hes> <hes> that's the only one i know yeah earliest i could pag yeah and <hes> i just watch the music video for this song right before we started recording and it's like the most nineties thing you've ever seen every kariuki music video recently where it's just like them singing in front of green screen and behind them has been edited like people at a water park yeah. You're just like here's some footage on the really see either damage clearly now and i don't know what has to do with the song it was an experience. Go youtube it. It's it's it's a thing so i feel like you. You need to say the lyrics of the refrain so that now <hes> in a in a sort of bridges in as one of those. I don't know what the musical term for that is but like it's like the verse and there's the one line that goes in from the verse to the chorus yeah which is looking for girls who are boys who like boy to be girls. Who do boys like. They're girls. Who do girls like. They're boys always should be someone you really love eight which is like such a weird like last blind to that but let's unpack that for a second so girls who are boys voice okay so i mean that could go in really in either direction depending on which way you're being transphobic right leg are you you like oh. I saw girl but it's a boy. Are you saying like this person oh girl but then they're saying that they're boy right who knows. They probably didn't know when they read it. Who like boys to be the girls.

tom suzanne vega writer youtube
"suzanne vega" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"suzanne vega" Discussed on KTOK

"Is finally bumped off the top spot thank Gerry Rafferty city to city and this week in nineteen ninety seven was the first ever at Lilith fair concert organized by Sarah McLachlan the all female tour kicked off with a show at the gorge amphitheatre in Washington state artist combinations very did each stop at Sarah McLachlan Suzanne Vega played every show that year there's a look back at this week's rock I'm Tiffany I have some tips for you on how to quit smoking like ID it first I did some reading about it I found a lot of great advice on how to quit smoking and picked out the ways I thought would work best for me I started by setting a quit date then I throughout my ash trays lighters and matches I did other things to do like exercising more and it worked but I'd still get cravings especially on long car rides to help me with that I put a picture of my mother in my car she died of lung cancer from smoking cigarettes when I was only sixteen now I have a sixteen year old daughter that picture of my mother reminds me that I don't want to miss all the things my daughter is going to do in her life including turning seventeen you can quit for free help call one eight hundred quid now a message from the US department of health and Human Services and CDC you can hear the weekend Saturday seven.

Sarah McLachlan Suzanne Vega CDC Gerry Rafferty Washington US department of health and Hu sixteen year
"suzanne vega" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"suzanne vega" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"London. It's, it's a wonderful combination. And on this edition of new sounds, we will be hearing music that does two things. It tells the story and in no fewer than four of the songs. The story is about a girl named Molly, but will also be listening to some amazing vocal work really distinctive voices. Sometimes on their own, but more often in collaboration, for example, the late American folksinger Bill Morrissey collaborating with Suzanne Vega. The Scottish English group known as the furrow collective, and in American duo calling itself among the oaken dash, who do old Appalachian, murder, ballads, and other good stuff. I'm John Schaffer. Glad you've joined us for this edition of new sounds. Which frankly put together simply to have an excuse to play this two minutes song for you. It's an old folk song called come near my love from an album of the same name by Bruce green and core. Loy mcwhirter the two of them met in the mid seventies and have been singing together ever since. And there is something absolutely bewitching about the way that his voice, and her voice harmonize in this song will, then here's some music from northern England Rachel, and Becky unthank-. They are sisters, and they record as the unthanked s-, and their harmonies are also capable of raising the little hairs on the back of your neck will hear their version of the song magpie. But I here is Bruce green and core law mcwhirter just the two voices unaccompanied, unadorned, and these spine tingling harmonies that they get on the song, come near. My love..

Bruce green Loy mcwhirter Bill Morrissey Suzanne Vega John Schaffer Becky unthank Molly murder Rachel two minutes
"suzanne vega" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"suzanne vega" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Three on ninety three point nine FM. This is WNYC ninety three point nine FM and AM eight twenty NPR news and the New York conversation. Today on fresh air, Terry gross talks with composer, Nicolas Patel. His score for if Beale street could talk nominated for an Oscar. He also composed the score for vice which is nominated for best picture. That's today at two on ninety three point nine FM. This is all of it on WNYC. I'm Alison Stewart Lucy Lansky first appeared on the music scene as a teenager riding around songs playing around Greenwich Village collaborating with Suzanne Vega, Shawn Colvin. And then there was two she decided to pursue a PHD in clinical psychology at yeshiva university, Lucy became doctor Kaplinsky landscape working with chronically mentally ill patients around New York City even opening her own private practice. She did of course, return to music in nineteen Ninety-four Lucy released her first solo album tied. She has a new release out. It's called everyday street. It's a stripped down to friendships family and the streets of New York that she calls home. Let's take a listen. Years ago. Nanos begging you sleep. Sitting up in bed wouldn't still. Every.

Lucy Lansky New York Nicolas Patel Shawn Colvin New York City Terry gross NPR Greenwich Village Alison Stewart Suzanne Vega Oscar yeshiva university private practice Kaplinsky
"suzanne vega" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"suzanne vega" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Right track though. This would have been a good question for the millennial X games tomorrow. This is called Tom's diner. And it is by Suzanne Vega. She's the one who did that LUKA song. Give you that one before. So that made me go today also the fax machine. Are you familiar familiar with fast machinery, we still use them? Those were they are they are still around. They they remain the most difficult piece of technology to operate in any office setting. Title. I have successfully sent a fax with all of my pertinent information. I made us got my social you've got my income. You got it. All right there. And I never know. And then shoots out of paper. I can't find if it was successful or deny if it does get to the other end the person who it's intended for is probably not going to see it's a free for all you just hang out. You know, if you notice like Hank is hanging around the fax machine bit much. He's not faxing just looking at. He's snooping. This was like a kind of a huge deal in radio at one point. And it wasn't even in the beginning of my radio career was like in the middle. And we used to do facts to win contests though, a lot while you'd start run contest on Monday and declare a winner Friday. We would take like people who are listening in the office. They would send us a fax. And then we would read the faxes on the air. Crazy. I remember on the Valentine's sweethearts they came out with fax me back in the mid nineties. And it seemed so hip. Yeah. Totally. I remember corresponding with somebody in the music industry who said. Why don't you fax that over to me, and I go fax machine in my house, and he's like come on get with the time. We've gotta go to kinko's taxes. There's well. Listen to this TV, the fax machine was invented about thirty years before the telly phone fax machine was invented thirty years before the telephone scam scams gab. Scam. Paranormal activity is the most profitable movie. Our moving on percentage wise. Yeah. Already moved on it costs four hundred and fifty thousand dollars to make and it made eighty nine point three million scary movie. I can't can't do it can't do it. And we gotta talk about scary coming up here after the break. But the reason it's the most profitable is. Because that return on the investment is nineteen thousand seven hundred and fifty one percent making it the most profitable movie every I thought that. Blair, which would have been because it costs like what fifteen bucks a may been more than that. Your meals. Exactly. Hey, we've gotten some suggestions on what to watch you. And.

Suzanne Vega Hank Tom Blair thirty years fifty thousand dollars fifty one percent
"suzanne vega" Discussed on X96

X96

02:33 min | 3 years ago

"suzanne vega" Discussed on X96

"I addition i have that right here from the big lebowski soundtrack on here that's on there oh that's right the only other reason i could think of that you might have made i didn't know that terrible suzanne vega som made marginally better by by that rematch thing their dna is maybe you played too because you know they right at the beginning she says the waiter pours my coffee and i'm having my mill creek coffee right now so maybe carry knows that usually on wednesdays i say something about milk coffee and so on this day bills as limping about milk green because i love my this is mexican blend by the way the mets so kerry would you say moore's birth two things that in that whole past minute and a half not it's like you were on cocaine it is you accomplished so much in that minute and a half so maybe the cocaine is work i love it it's the coffee yeah well the first thing i said to gene good morning the first thing you said to me was not good morning we're not playing any richie sambora songs this morning god carey jackson think about it and even once i bless you tab hundred lived a few more days he would have been eightyseven right eighty seventh birthday suzanne vega singer her birthday she is fifty nine today still out in about performing all that is she i'll bet and i and i wanted left or center but we didn't have it we don't have it i don't know why it's on if you if you heard it you the one that you do know suzanne vega because hi my name is can four number my my halloween costume l concert dirt pals my halloween costume was i had realistic bruises all over my face i'm luca parable is an awful song let's see now here's left of center once you hear it you'll remember you'll remember much better so i don't see we got this we gotta wait we gotta wait for sam jackson to pitches talk tom's diner is a pretty good so i like it i like that version you say it is an interestingly doesn't rhyme jong.

mets moore cocaine carey jackson sam jackson tom suzanne vega kerry richie sambora milk mill
"suzanne vega" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:33 min | 3 years ago

"suzanne vega" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And it sounds beautiful and ambient and strange and echoey and ghostly i believe it was called the ghost in the mp three we're all becoming archivists i've got more mp threes on my hard drive than i will ever be able to listen to in the next ten lifetimes and yet i keep acquiring more so in a sense the acquisition of these artifacts has overwhelmed the use of those artifacts and we've all sort of become librarians which has led the ought librarian rick pre linger to say that archiving is the new full art i am thinking of your voice suzanne vega with her nineteen eightyseven song tom's diner kenneth goldsmith is a conceptual poet and author of wasting time on the internet we've been talking about the things people miss about the old analog world vinyl records cassette tapes anything made of cardboard and paper well writer virginia heffernan has her own personal catalog of analog items she misses she just might be the only person in america static for landline telephones but virginia was also an early convert to digital she started messing around with computers when she was only nine years old they were magic to her them and they still are in her new book magic and loss she calls the internet the great masterpiece of civilization yeah a radio ready version of this this sort of back row history the that sentence the internet is the great masterpiece of civilization is that civilization moves from more material to more abstract so you take the history of say finance beginning with just mind gold two gold in gets to you know minted golden gets with inscription on them to paper with inscription on it very like a book then you know it's the letters and the symbols on the dollars that make it meaningful and then to electronic pulses all the way to bitcoin in one of the most abstract things there is so are you suggesting that historically we're in this continual battle to transcend the physical because that seems problematic we are fundamentally bodies yes and.

suzanne vega kenneth goldsmith writer virginia rick pre virginia heffernan america nine years
"suzanne vega" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:33 min | 3 years ago

"suzanne vega" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And it sounds beautiful and ambient and strange and echo we and ghostly i believe it was called the ghost in the mp frei we're all becoming arca fasts i've got more mp threes on my harddrive than i will ever be able to listen to in the next ten lifetimes and yet i keep acquiring more so in a sense the acquisition of these artifacts has overwhelmed the use of those artifacts and we've also sort become librarians which has led the oft librarian rick pre linger to say that archiving is the new fall car i am thinking of view avoid the suzanne vega with her 1987 song tom's diner kenneth goldsmith is a conceptual poet and author of wasting time on the internet we've been talking about the things people miss about the old analog world vinyl records cassette tapes anything made of cardboard and paper or writer virginia heffernan has her own personal catalogue of analog items she messes she just might be the only person in america nostalgic for an mom and line telephones but virginia was also an early convert to digital she started messing around with computers which it was only nine years old they were magic to her then and they still are in her new book magic and loss she calls the internet the great masterpiece at civilization yeah a radio ready version of this this sort of back row history that that sentence the internet as the great masterpiece of civilization is that civilization moves from more material to more abstract see you take the history of safe finance beginning with just mind gold two gold in gets to you know minted gold ingots with inscription on them to paper with inscription on a very like a book then you know it's the letters them as symbols on the dollar's that make it meaningful and then to electric pulses all the way to bitcoin in one of the most abstract thinks there s thirty suggesting that a historic klay where in this continual battle to transcend the physical 'cause he was prevalent mad at we are fundamentally bodies yes and.

frei suzanne vega kenneth goldsmith virginia oft rick pre writer virginia heffernan america nine years
"suzanne vega" Discussed on Throwing Shade

Throwing Shade

02:05 min | 4 years ago

"suzanne vega" Discussed on Throwing Shade

"She was fired for sudden menstrual flow just something that happens to you when your premenopausal your dislike doodoodoo doing your aaron's limeland bega i was sitting in this pathway way this link my periods and i didn't have a tap on so i blood all over counters and i looked at those waitress as she prime prime me more coffee and i said can i have napkins 'cause i bleeding everywhere it did it dude soga so good so let's talk we can say now tom's diner was the first draft right like she she was quoted fillon actual lyrics later she goes by the way what you just did it hasn't hoyda and thoughtful is what she day what happened is no one knows a story suzanne vega was in her writing studio issues schuster right with quill and pay she had a first draft on a papyrus sandwiches also her favorite fought and so she was writing and then she went to the bathroom she had had burritos and coffee them either way so fazzani she tells the story all of its bid on fears turn by definitely be h although it's totally all the all the move we did her with whenever she is that the oscars presenting or accepts anxious cells the story where she's g and which anytime you she's getting your blood cut bank who she is she went to the bathroom global rossiya barito's this that's awful you know what's funny is even be was sensitive system sometimes ignore it if they're really hungry like i'm like i have flour but sometimes they'll have ice cream chief so she's in the bathroom and there.

aaron suzanne vega tom