6 Burst results for "Suzanne George"

"suzanne george" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

07:29 min | 2 weeks ago

"suzanne george" Discussed on Here & Now

"From npr in wb. You are. i'm tanya moseley. I'm robin young. It's here and now. The taliban say they've defeated the last resistance to their rule in afghanistan and photos posted today do appear to show taliban fighters in control of the northern province of pansjhir although resistance leaders there claim the fight is far from over. there are also grounded evacuation planes and a women's march that protesters say was beaten back. So let's check in with suzanne george. She's the washington. Post bureau chief in afghanistan in kabul and susanna pan. Cheer was home to fierce resistance to the taliban twenty years ago it was the only province the taliban didn't take last month. What's your sense of what's going on there now. Well it's really difficult to know what's going on. Their communications are really shoddy. But what we do know is that it's a pretty brutal fight at this point. Even though there were calls from resistance leaders as recently as sunday for talks to resume and for the fighting to end it does seem like the fighting has become very brutal. And what's your sense of These resistance fighters in this region being able to sort of live you know autonomously or alongside a taliban rule. I mean what's your sense of end game here. It seems pretty clear that this is going to end militarily at this point you know. This was one of the areas of the country in the one thousand nine hundred. The taliban was never able to take over if the taliban is able to completely retake this Province it really shows how much more of fierce fighting force. The taliban is now. Compared to twenty years ago you know the group has had twenty years of experience fighting one of the most powerful militaries in the world and now they're incredibly well armed. A lot of that is American arms that were Taken by the taliban during this series of surrender deals in the lead up to the fall of kabul. So interesting just underscored you said. The taliban have more control now than they did. Twenty years ago will further north the airport in mazari sharif evacuating planes have been sort of stuck on the ground there for days hundreds of people waiting for evacuation many might be american What's going on here. Is the taliban holding up. The plane's is there some other issue. Is this a hostage taking which is being called by. You know the fox network here. What's going on what we're hearing from people who are involved in this evacuation effort and what i'm hearing from people who are waiting to be evacuated In this effort these are people who traveled from kabul optima czar in hopes of getting on one of these planes. They are saying that. The taliban are not giving the planes permission to take off The taliban have not confirmed that if that is true it means that the taliban are going back on one of the pledges that the group made to the us which is that afghans will have freedom of movement after the us airlift ends and wants. The group is in control It's unclear exactly why the planes are not leaving but it's very clear that it has been days and it's hundreds of people desperate to leave the country who are being prevented from doing so for some reason. So we'll wait to hear what happened there. But meantime Women cobbler saying that. The taliban have gone back on their word to be a different kind of Ruling force that they beat and gassed these women who were protesting for greater inclusion in the new government What is your sense of what happened then over the weekend at these protests. And what will happen now yeah. I spoke to one of the women who is at these protests that turned incredibly violent over the weekend she herself was beaten and after that experience. She said that she's decided that it's too dangerous to continue protesting. And she now is in her home and says that she fears knock at the door or from the taliban any moment she said it's the same for most of the other women who are involved in the protest when i asked a taliban spokesperson about the violence in particular from this protest he condemned it but he also impart kind of blamed the protesters he said. This is not a time for protesting. He said the security situation. Kabul is not stable enough for protests. And so he asked everyone men and women not protest in the city. Susannah george afghanistan bureau chief for the washington post in kabul herself susannah. Thank you so much thank you. And let's hear another voice inside afghanistan right now as streets laden is country director in kabul for the norwegian refugee council one of the western non-governmental organizations choosing to remain in afghanistan. She is back in kabul. She joins us on skype and asked street. Why did you decide to go back to kabul. The situation has been so dangerous there over the past two weeks while to put it this way. I feel safer now than before. The reason for that is i know. I'm not a target taliban. Know me i have been here. For many years. They have specifically told me and the international humanitarian community that they need us and they want us to stay and deliver. And what are you seeing there. Are you seeing people in fear and in hiding from the taliban that you know. Do you have to distinguish between your main goal. Which is to help the afghans. Who are there and you know not do anything to jeopardize that. Are you going to try to help. People get out. I mean wh what are you seeing. On what your role. Yeah while to put it this way the last two weeks. I have received more than a thousand emails. What step messages. Skype messages from people. Some asked me to help them to norway others say used to work for the us government or the nato forces. Can you get me to to the states. Unfortunately i am not in a position to do anything about it. But i am in the position to pass it onto those who do. What else are you seeing and talk more about the food shortage. What's missing is there water. What about cove it. What what what are you seeing. While according to the world bank seventy percent of the population are living under the poverty. Line that's staggering. That is seventy percent of close to forty million People and there is a serious drought in the north and the northwest where people have lost their Harvest their livestock is dying and they have nothing to live from. These people are fleeing to the bigger cities and they are surviving on picking garbage and begging and they're living under tarpaulin in two months the winter will come and in many places in afghanistan. there are many minus degrees at night and slush and snow during the day so these people need urgent assistance so they can survive vinter..

taliban kabul afghanistan tanya moseley robin young pansjhir suzanne george susanna pan mazari sharif fox network kabul optima npr Susannah george norwegian refugee council washington us susannah Kabul the washington post
"suzanne george" Discussed on Post Reports

Post Reports

07:44 min | 1 year ago

"suzanne george" Discussed on Post Reports

"Afghanistan is really entering this potential milestone moment. Where there's a new peace deal? Let's negotiate between the United States and the Taliban and now they're supposed to be peace talks for the first time in more than eighteen years of war between the Afghan Parties Missy Ryan is a national security reporter for the Post. She's been covering the peace deal that was struck between the US and the Taliban last month after more than a year of negotiations and she says at least for a little while it had looked like the US had achieved a real success but things have quickly become a lot more complicated. There's a lot going on at this moment and it seems like there's a lot of opportunity but there's also a huge challenge and a reason for being cautious about what can be achieved so let's first go back to this peace deal that was struck between the US and the Taliban that did not involve the Afghan government. What was decided on during the peace deals? So this was an agreement that the US negotiators all my Khalilzad negotiated with the Taliban and it was a huge deal for the US government. It was the first direct agreement that the United States has struck with the Taliban the United States if you recall entered Afghanistan in two thousand one militarily after the nine eleven attacks a on their spin this long inconclusive very costly conflict. That's ensued where neither side is one. The trump administration decided that it wanted to reach a deal with the Taliban that would number one allow for the withdrawal of American forces and number two set the stage for the Taliban reaching some sort of political settlement with the Afghan government. And so that was the first part of this the. Us government signed a deal with the Taliban to remove American forces over fourteen months in exchange for a series of promises from the Taliban including the promise to sit down and begin actual substantive peace talks with the Afghan government. So if in this peacedale the US basically promise that they'll be withdrawing from Afghanistan. Imminently what did they get in return from the Taliban? And how has that panned out so far? So the what the United States get some return for offering this withdrawal of American forces is a promise from the Taliban to break with al Qaeda and to sit down with the Afghan government side and begin peace negotiations. And what it doesn't do is set up a national ceasefire any sort of lasting cease fire. The hope is that from the. Us government side. The hope is that there will be some reduction in violence. There was a seven-day reduction in violence period. Not really a that preceded the signing of this deal. So now really. This is one element of the uncertainty. That everyone is entering an after the signing of the deal there was a signing ceremony in Doha February. Twenty ninth. Today. We've taken a decisive step toward peace real peace in Afghanistan and a lot of talk about this unprecedented opportunity for Afghans Secretary of state. Mike Pompeo was there as were the senior Taliban negotiators and it was very strange. Moment in some ways to see the senior cabinet official from the United States sitting down with the members of a militant group that the United States has been fighting for twenty years again. We've achieved great things we've insured. Afghanistan is a haven for terrorists who can attack us and we've better the lives of Afghan people but now we're entering this period of uncertainty. Not only are you seeing the limits of this deal because it doesn't spell out a ceasefire a dozen really seem to have full agreement from the Taliban and the Afghan government side about what was actually agreed to and then you have this big political crisis in Kabul which further compounds the complexity associated with moving forward so this is a stage where the Taliban is supposed to be sitting down with the Afghan government. What is the Afghan government trying to get out of this? What is what is the Taliban seeking to do well. The Afghan government acknowledges that there has to be some role for the Taliban politically in Afghanistan. Afghan government security forces have not been able to defeat the Taliban But they are. Don't want that to be the Taliban imposing again. This kind of hard line. Very repressive rule taking over again as they did in the nineteen nineties and the fear is that this from the fear from the critics of the deal including many within the Afghan government is at this deal actually as much favorable to the Taliban in the Taliban themselves you know they want to be allowed to take part in the political process. They want international legitimacy. They're smaller things. They WANNA be taken off. Un sanctions list. They want to travel freely. There is an expectation that this next stage. This piece talks phase would allow them to you have a more open role in the public life and Afghanistan but the question is will they do that as one actor in a Multi Party society in a multi-party political system. Or they're going to try to make it be the nine hundred ninety s again where they're the only actor in town essentially and I can imagine that if the Afghan government is at this point where there are two different presidents who are both claiming to be in charge the same time that makes it more complicated for them to present a strong force at the negotiating table with the Taliban absolutely I mean the political talks are supposed to start tomorrow and there has not been Any announcement on where they're going to occur. There hasn't been announcement on who the mediator is going to be It's is a virtual impossibility that that will happen. But just as an illustration of why it's so important to have a clear identification of. Who is the party that the Taliban will be sitting across from representing the Afghan government? It's it's a huge complicating factor and You know it would be one of the reasons that there would be a delay Or or postponing of the political talks. If they are ever to actually be dead and it seems like the. Us is deal with the Taliban was already pretty fragile. So I would imagine that if this part of it. These negotiations between the Afghan government and the Taliban fall apart that could have effects on the the. The deal is a whole. Yeah I mean it definitely raises questions about whether or not the United States will follow through with its end of the of the bargain and the major the major leverage that the United States had making that deal and that it will retain as the troop presence so they have the ability to halt that troop exit. If the Taliban doesn't follow through with its side of the deal so you know the the Pentagon could say okay. Taliban you haven't sat down with Afghan government or you've conducted too many attacks or or you haven't actually broken with al Qaeda. We're actually not going to take out troops in fourteen months. They could say that. But there's a lot of speculation that the trump administration might actually choose to go forward with the troop reduction anyway or the troop withdrawal for reasons. Mostly linked to president trump's desire to withdraw from Afghanistan. And that's something that really was hanging over this whole process and so the critics will say this agreement actually sort of a fig-leaf for his desire to leave under any terms and so the United States military might end up having to leave our withdraw troops. Even if the political process doesn't come together between the Afghans as hoped Missy Ryan covers national security Suzanne George Afghanistan.

Taliban Afghan government United States Afghanistan Missy Ryan Suzanne George Afghanistan Mike Pompeo reporter Kabul trump Un president official Pentagon Multi Party society
Polls close in Iraq's first elections since victory declared over ISIS

Team Lally Radio Show

01:00 min | 3 years ago

Polls close in Iraq's first elections since victory declared over ISIS

"The trying to figure out how to make certain insurance claims for a lot of the people i've spoken with say that they have tried to venture back to gather their most important belongings some are less fortunate some tell me they've lost everything correspondent sophia yan reports volcanoes national parchman off limits to visitors fear the volcano could erupt and send you ge boulders and debris into the air authorities say the danger zone all falls within the park voter turnout was low in iraq's first national election since the country declared victory over the islamic state group and correspondent suzanne george says there were good reasons there is a strict security curfew that was put in place across iraq especially in baghdad nearly note civilian cars were allowed to be on the streets in the morning hours for the first hour voting that made it very hard for people to get polling stations to cast their ballot we talked to some people who walked more than four kilometers to try to get to a polling station in total there were three hundred one.

Iraq Sophia Yan Suzanne George Baghdad Four Kilometers
Low turnout as Iraqis vote for first time since ISIL defeat

WSB

01:16 min | 3 years ago

Low turnout as Iraqis vote for first time since ISIL defeat

"In the wsb twenty four hour news center with our top stories this half hour polls close across iraq in the first national election there since the country declared victory over isis voter turnout low here's correspondent suzanne george strict security curfew that was put in place across iraq especially in baghdad nearly notes civilian cars were allowed to be on the streets in the morning hours for the first hours of voting that made it very hard for people to get polling stations to cast their ballot we talked to some people who walked more than four kilometers to try to get to a polling station locally about a thousand georgia state university students signing a petition asking the school to redo their graduation after rain thursday night cuts they're outdoor ceremony short sports the hawks getting a new head coach here's wbz's sports director jay black pierces the man tapped replace mike boot and holes while the former nba coach of the year was not interested in waiting around for the hawks to get good again pierce is very familiar with the rebuilding ballclub he spent the last five years assistant in philadelphia where the seventy sixers went from the league's worst team to the conference semifinals gm travis linked says in a statement that peers checks every box this is the first time the forty two year old has been a head coach in the nba jay black wsb baseball the braves.

Hawks WBZ Jay Black Mike Boot Pierce Philadelphia Sixers Travis Braves Iraq Suzanne George Baghdad Georgia State University Director NBA GM Twenty Four Hour Four Kilometers Forty Two Year Five Years
"suzanne george" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"suzanne george" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"Serious of course the first one but there is almost like irina to it at the end the last part where it's almost like lauren at the end says i don't understand these lacks it's almost like they can think and then so we almost have like in a pissing at the end of the cell you know the final does become a little more serious suspenseful almost a little bit more thought provoking than the first part of the film will yeah he even talks about how drum because he is malato that he's half human which is just really striking that they consider the somebody that has white blood to be human and at this period of time some people considered black people to be less than human they thought that they were somewhere on the pollution ladder between animals and people in so it was okay to you couldn't say dehumanize people because they weren't people and they weren't humans to some of these pro slavery people in just amazing to think to even try to get your head around that and that's why it was so taboo the whole idea of of having sex between a white person and a black person because it was just this like you're dipping into it was a kin to be cialis and it that's one of the things that i like about drum that is almost there even more than mending go and there's even a speech it's very similar that rainbow smith gifts that is almost forbade him from what suzanne george said in the first movie where it's this whole power trip of you know if you don't have sexists me outcry rape and the no end up castrating you and there's a line about like perhaps he'll kill blaze or even worse castrate him and it's like castration is worse than death to these people which can kind of understandable but it's this whole again it's a great place to talk about this idea of the threat that black male sexuality has a word living in a world right now where one of the.

irina lauren suzanne george rape
"suzanne george" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"suzanne george" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"Mandingo until a half an hour it is an interesting choice but also that we get introduced him and then immediately get introduced to blanche the suzanne george character right afterwards is an interesting choice to do because until then this is a story of the maxwell family whose warren maxwell played by james mason and hammond maxwell played by perry king and their interactions on the plantation in that you know hammond is getting ready to take over the plantation from warren because warren is older and feebler and then it at that end of the first act we get introduced to meet and blanche one two punch and then the store really kinda starts to take off from there for me and that's the amazing thing for me about mending film and just just in terms of the structure of the scraped in the way fleischer handles everything i love that i act just taking its time time giving us a sense of what it was like to live on one of these plantations and the way does focus upon warren in hammond maxwell and their lives there and the fact that the plantation itself if hertie much a breeding plantation and the film actually again you know that that that that sense of you know fleischer sort of documentary in i you know i mean we really get a sense of how things work in this plantation and that for me is one of the fascinating things about the actual drama of the film that your shows again how they took the novel which was really rambling and norman wexler worked closer richard fleischer they actually hold up in a hotel for a couple of weeks to develop the structure of the novel to turn that big novel into a tight screen.

maxwell family warren maxwell perry king hammond norman wexler suzanne george james mason hammond maxwell blanche richard fleischer