18 Episode results for "Sustainable Urban"

How to build a sustainable city: lessons from Singapore, with Estelle Forget

Sustainability Explored

35:37 min | 1 year ago

How to build a sustainable city: lessons from Singapore, with Estelle Forget

"Hi and welcome to sustainability explored about Gaston Sustainability of innovation in business and economics at blaze where we explore all the sides angles and shapes of Sustainability Mighty. Ms Nina and. I'm the podcast of the show. You're listening to the episode thirty one season three and today we have a super interesting discussion coming up on the concept and key components of sustainable and smart cd with the examples of Singapore. I invited aesthetic. Fauchet known and established professional in the fields of urban planning and Smart Tedium Climate Change and sustainable development for this episode. Estelle is the founder of Couples Institute Laboratory of Multidisciplinary Innovation of the sustainable city and regional. Planning Erica police come next. Architects engineers city planners sociologists economists and other actors to create a collective intelligence for the benefit of the innovative vision of sustainable development of the territory or the seats. Their collective ideas make it possible to said the specifications of the public order to which the companies respond during tenders style is also an associate of the economic social and environmental console and as well and Knight of the Order of Arts and letters for her innovative work in the context of police and in particular train all future architects into southern twelve. She founded stuff planet. Muhak which specific specialized this in sustainable development business support and we will touch a little bit the topic today the topic of Malkin CD development and the differences between Casablanca niece for example Into southern and fifteen. She helped to organize the climate change. Conference Cop Twenty. One of the United Nations for the French government French climate teen she mobilized both private companies and public institutions to work together and create a good outcome for the global climate agreement. I can't wait to get this interview. Started feeling very lucky privileged and super excited to talk to US tell today I wholeheartedly inviting you to join our discussion and sailed through it together with us. My guess. Today's budget Today we are talking about sustainable. Smart sieges a Stanley's originally from France. I had the lot enjoyment while doing background research on her and beaten the articles and videos which videos infringe now established based in Singapore which the best place to learn about Sustainable models of sieges women sustainability and. I'm hoping for a very fruitful and interesting discussion and it's always interesting for me to learn how my guest guilt got into Sustainability Studies. I know that you have started from lawyers practice. You did something in finance. And then what moved you what? How was your transition towards sustainable? Cd's thank you And not to invite me in this task for us. In fact I was interesting. Buy Low when I was young. I was also curious Sir by economy and the finally because I was born in nineteen seventy four. I always knew the crisis. And the at this time might chose was pragmatic avenue. Secure job and after seven years on the bone can finance sector. I would like to give Mo- meaning of my life and the decided to go back to university and to do what I love to do learning because I have a would going personality I seen. I love care about hotels. Michael League Advice me to today's development and at this time. I didn't know anything about sustainable developments who I resume lies with master degrees in sustainable development at the University. Pavlou she know and what I learned during this master changed my life totally I wanted to change the world and contribute at my level to build the bitter world and the during the study trip in Nederlander I discover Yuban planning. I realized that I found my coyly wire. Finally the reason is clear. If sustainable development impact every single every scene is the in the city I e means People Food Transportation Energy Economy social community. Everything is in the city and We need to find a balance to help people to be balance if the Design people cannot feel whaler and the city can be prosperous environment as a direct impact on our behavior and the mindset and it is very useful for me to have a background in low and finance to address the issue of the sustainability especially for city and territory were governance and the economy of very Santa's as well political issue in your definition. What is a sustainable city as sustainable city or follow my point of view as Houston about teaching? Need to integrate busy seeking. But it's very important to reminded. I mean a sustainable city I need to have a good design and unintelligent your run planning and intelligence. You're planning with an integrate integrated vision. What will be for example my country on my city in two thousand fifteen the firstborn tease whoever long vision long-term vision and for example in Singapore. We know that in two thousand fifty on the right now. It's a ongoing disease. The country of the smart city. And the you know. Maybe the Sheila's author cynic Count Essay Down New Federal Window for one. Who doesn't know where it's going? Whatever the country of the city the preservation of the natural and biodiversity is a censure and Yuban planning or Dorado A to define a fair place for human as part of the biodiversity which doesn't mean that the earth is only the the UN home trust. It's a long vision. Saddam is to integrate the preservation of natural and the bio biodiversity. That was a decision. Should be translated into into a messed up. Land set included infrastructure and services provide from a population of rice. Show around three thousand people. What it doesn't mean that at the local level you cannot be creative. I explain new data Quite technical because I eat. Your vision is not translating the master plumber with long-term vision and the infrastructure antiquated inside. And you care about the population ratio about three thousand people on the local level. You cooled of Ubon Development Very Very Archaic and the and the bad but the a c t for me sustainable. Ct must meet the principal. Need of the people as defined in domes- slow he a need says Theresa Chaz needs Social needs stimulates self actualization needs. Only for my punch. You wants to have some D- Master planned you may consider using new technology over technology is only on the AD. Owner technology cannot heal the city. That have been badly designed. It means that long vision integrated biodiversity and the and the preservation of land to be at the service of the population and to find a solution for the need to translate the vision in the masterplans with the infrastructure at the level of a smaller ratio of population. And I think it's very important for me to explain the bags Dabezies also European planning before to talk about smart city and new technology because Yuban designer like her medicine for the city and the technology. It's like a vitamin and the as you know. The timing can play a big role to manage the city to promote new services to the possibility to have more efficiency. Seventy bets You cannot put determine with body didn't Yeah I know that. You're the head of for Young Company consultancy at a couple of days Given that would you just mentioned the design is very important. Technology comes afterwards if we start with the design who is in charge of taking these decisions. Who is the driving force of seeking transformation? Which kind of body organs government government's? Where where does it start? Where does your company enter isolate? Think that I When I talk about the vision. It's not necessary envision confront professional division for me to come from Gouvernement. Why because our elected usually by the population and the need to know and to explain what they want. The country for example told the future yours and your question is very interesting because it's a way for me to try to explain the the responsibility between each people in the supply chain of the smart city of the fabric of the city because sometimes it's not clarify and the when it's not clarify. This is terrible on the on the local site but I is the government all Mayor Vision. I want to be. I want to to do night. City I want to build my city my country smart all. I want to be of my citric city Ikea Tropicana city. I don't know whether you were and after that this translation. It's a walk between three kind of poppulation. I governments gone professional and so popular action and Danny to work together. I two as the need to population and usually provisional can ask the need to the population in linguist gouvernement to find the best solution. What is the innovation at White Camp? Sign the bit solution for Almir territory ends up after that that created a master planned but the first input it's politics but of course the political decision needs to be adapted to the needs of the population. The program on the city is usually you have. You can have a mayor you want to to create an economic building in the in the city and at the end just to be for him for the population. This is only and the. It's for these reasons that you can preserve this kind of a situation is your vision is clear down and the dissolution is button right. You're just the politicians come and or the mayor is there for four years of supposedly. He doesn't take usually the long term decisions. I want to completely remake the city. So that it's comfortable first of all. Ben Sustainable Than Smart Than Integrated Technology. But they always start with nine one this bridge or one this economic building and that will be. I will be remembered for that. Where does this change from mental change should come from that? It's the question of goods. What is interesting in Singapore? I can give you a concrete example incident gap pool. Singapore's asks you ten years old. It was not contrary at the end. It was a small island with a lot of Slammed I c. h. e. percent of the population lived in the in the today fifty years little eighty one percent of Singaporean. As living in the age you are owner of the house. It's very interesting to seize that Lincoln. You the father of singer who as a real vision for his country but division was not five years six years. You was for one hundred years because he considered a designs that senior post story when he passed away. Singapore steel continue on its case and digging for long-term vision and each ten years. Division changed a little bit. But it's the only solution to sing globally the city and you're right. The electoral calendar for the mayor is a real problem. But it's so decisions when I talk about Vision Divisions Continue and the mayor need to understand. Here elected do population just to edge. The people to be appeared in the city to leave well during vast. You know what I mean but yeah. I think that this is the first problem when you talk about a sustainable city and its decisions at Of Today on the world I never a given I. I don't know a sustainable city because a lot of initiative very interesting and we can talk about it but at the end because the problem is the short term vision. It's complicated to to a real assistant city because the need can change depending of the need of the population because as I explained the need of the population is the mass low needs. Of course this population changed and now we are. We use new technology and human needs the basic needs to the same. It's to hit to to move to you. Know regarding this need is not complicated too long vision to plan New Territory End. Twenty grade or saw the demographic change like a prospective in fact the two factor. I is division. What do you want to do? And signals a factor is the evolution of your demographic and after can plane. You know to be to sing the city and to be In charge of to be Yuban planner. It's the Knicks of the missing in one hundred. Secondly it's a prophecy because you don't know what will be the recent of the decisions at EU thicke right now. The result will be in the future. It's all these reasons. I two of long vision into play to plan for the long term. It's very important because you can just write in your team in a couple days. What kind of professionals come under the same roof to do been played in sustainable urban planning side twee are most talk catalyst to create the city right now? You need to have a lot of competency of skills. And what is complicated? It's to look for a while in the same direction and to manage the the difference. Kill for example. We can bring some architect. Your Ben Planner Economists Ingenieur note of engineer. A Lotta lots of kids and the out job is to be like a cat at least From the social perspective what makes a CT safe? I think that the first point is education and prevention if his a by education and Prevention Yuli meet the risk of insecurity in the city disinclined to we'd be maybe due to protect people and technology. I sink can help to educate and improve a wellness and those who to onto the risk for example regarding the Dorsal sees that as a French company as developed A DASHBOARD FOR EMPTY-HANDED SEVERAL CITIES TO EPA Mayo to manage the CIT in real time for example. In your time you can change the duration of the red lights battles on the traffic. You can monitor utilities by bullying make recommendations to reduce for example water on the energy consumption and the also you can for example a look at the the elderly people who aren't shows Dass Chilean life by shaking the use of utilities all doom. Cg SAFE now three Peter. I think that's really education and prevention low of course and the new technology. You know a- curious that you should mention Three distributors for the safety and specifically mentioned technology Came to my mind that this is how a Singapore combat nineteen because they were able with the use of Technology Cameras. Big Data A to trace every infected citizen or lead. They found one infected and they can trace back everyone who they contacted with him. This is one of the reasons they were able to flat curve. So I so what? What's your take on the technology and I A- pro or against you think it's GonNa do humanity in the city any good or shall we rather start being paranoid. I devote I believe in in progress. Fourth and with these regards. New Technologies are definitely in barrels of progress. If and only if we use it to under good based on the for the good cool technology as I explain can aid to be more virtuous Tool dangerous depending on. What will we critics? Give me you wanted to leave. I don't want to leave in a dystopia in the world as described in the Novella Nineteen eighty-four from Joel and the I'm not fun to monetize. The data is a real business for compagnie right now but for me it's bad business and sustainable we. We need to preserve the snug data as global public. Good for my point of view but I believe in progress and to take your exemplary level Singapore and the coronavirus. It's not just a question of the technology disappoint was the question. I think of the trust with the government population development because development of Singapore are very proficient And That explain very well clearly. In remember in January I give a lot of information and we take care. Each foser and after technology was very good to tracking of course and to help to win you sink about trade king for example so where suit to prevent the other people that you are in Be Seek ended. So it's not too bad at some point on your career. You organize launched an initiative with a miracle miracle You to a group of students from France Being went into Morrocco to Casablanca the group from Moroccan Students K over Moroccan students came to France to exchange ideas. News Eliot Denise unless you're visited Esab Lanka and I was surprised to say the least. How different they somewhat similar. Seated is using their waterfront. In niece uses long prominent people have access to the beaches to the water. They run along the shore and in Casablanca that that is just blocked by concrete fans. No one knows what has happened in behind. There is no view on their ocean. There is no way to see the water. I remember reading a book on Urban Planning on. Sustainable fifty in someone was saying if the city is blessed with water access. It should use it for for common reiter so. I grew up with this ideals the water in Ctbt River Sea and ocean is the big is a great blessing. A what do you think is the reason for such a different approach. In similarly same CDs like Lease Casablanca L. Regarding the cheap penny of Casablanca and the niece for example disease found no seen prevents secons. Ceelo or the keys from mckinney. Who'd yoga planning decision and accept the like a vision competency or technical capacity to integrate global issue? And you're right and it's for this reason that the beginning I explained that division is imposed on the planet occasion. The plan is important. Also because when it's designed in in the concrete it's down you cannot change. It's not like you have a draw on the packer it's done it's finished it's the case in Casablanca but the the for me. It's a lack of vision competency and technical capacity and the it's showtime vision for example as you know in case you are being more better. It's interesting to for the business but it's not the global of vision you but at the same time Casablanca till Casablanca and it's a beautiful Oughta city. I get to see because I didn't feel safe on the sloughed. This is also you know. It's a siege. Like any other pets. I couldn't be there low but it's true that sometimes you have been planning X. Quite a specific to Morocco and the between the same time in France. We have also Nin In cities. I seem that the problem of lack of vision and competencies of technical capacity is not the problem of one country bachelor snowball and regarding the student we do in Casablanca. The project was to find a life of the whole the slaughterhouse at 'twas to promote miracle American heart and the artist one pre last question. They win report. Says like seventy percent of global population will be in the CDs by two thousand fifty. I'm mistaken so basically in thirty years than nothing with the coronavirus crisis I see that more and more people talking about moving to private houses somewhere in the rural areas to have their little plot of land. What do you think that trend will be We go into still be wanting to believing in the CDs or the current trend will reverse it his think about it. In nineteen fifty. The worldwide population was around two billion. Five of people. Today as you know we are saving going to civilian Media Nizing. You're more or less we coronavirus and the we will be almost ten million in two thousand. T- accu explain end. The these data could give us a reasonable idea of depression on under unvarying months east. So we consider that we need to eat to drink. Water beetles red wine to leave on the. If we consider that the capacity of the hearse Take time to regenerate we must preserve land and biodiversity. It's not an option and to reduce the pressure on the environment. Then don't see t's not a an option intact and This is a really crucial to promote the concept of the entity Yuban planning and to sing very well and strongly the design of the city to the rational. A concept yes. I think that this is my own. Swirl density is not an option and the technology cool the notre result the facts that we need to keep land to feed ten billion people. And it's not because you need filed the city's at jewel in the city and You know or the Infrastructure Services on to C. T. and we need to keep the London presented. Biology vestige range will be very dependent on infrastructure to having yes some infrastructure the democratic changes the big deal even though now it really looks appealing to have a little plot at little house to be able to go outside even in your own tiny you tiny garden. It's hard to that. Also don't see a for a lot of opportunity for civility for the population to leave depending Your city I will do to preserve the natural in the city as the case in Singapore in Singapore skins out high density. But never never you feel to Haydn Institute really what I sees at Singapore. We'd surreal success. Story it's a because Yuban planning contribute to the development of syncopal industry of Sangha Pool should be inspire love of country and often often. I heard that yes. But Singapore. We'd smalley loan the Weezer. Six billion of Six million people at the end. It's not a question of size. It's a question of ratio of population. If you are a vision and a good ratio of operation to sink your yoga planning you can imagine like a consumers. Union city a lot of development for your country does each not appropriate. Really feel like I should visit because it's hard to mentioned everyone talks about Singapore eight three one I actually approached with this topic was living in Singapore. I already interviewed my classmate Singapore in class mate. Who gave me a lot of background on the governance on House in Newport works on the history and why and how they arrived to this point today in it feels like let's The lace and It's what when I talk about when I explained Singapore when I'm writing a book about syncopal end the best practice of Singapore to share with France in particular people. Think no it's not possible as such success is not possible but yes it's true it's true and it works and senior worlds very well and I'm not here from syncopal. I'm here to talk about sustainable end the spots. I can say also that. Singapore is not really a sustainable because because a lot of sink but if you compare with a the country with the the fact that Singapore has no resources the only resources that Singapore have is the population Anzac fifty years ago. The population was not educated. Like now and in fifty years syncopal her the worldwide place. It's incredible the school a out in the good around. The worldwide chess is incredible but Yuban planning was a base of Singapore. Tell me it was probably the less question I know. We're running to the end of the interview When will you be out? Maybe in two months in French one less question your own book recommendation for Sustainable Urban. Planning what would you suggest? I'm curious about economy. I read a book from the Ed Lesser. I don't know if she knew had lesser is unequaled AMIS sent he wrote a book titled The trillions of the City and district Our great invention makes us richer. Smarter Greener has shown up here and this book is bursting with the inside on policy presided to the vet and as you know. French love debates and I think it's a good amazing. Thanks so much for your Participation on this show thanks for your time and sharing your wisdom. It was very cool. I'm glad we had this wonderful discussion today. On a sustainable. Cd's thank you very much. Thank you I really hope you enjoyed this episode and learn something new today from our guest Estelle. Maybe you got inspired and motivated. Maybe you have questions. If so please do let me know me or tell you can find both of us on Lincoln variously. I would also like to use this opportunity to invite you to check out the other related episodes. The one I mentioned earlier. Orbin sustainability with golf tear young. My classmate from Singapore who takes a seat is in view on Orbin environmental and social development of his home country. I also now read in a book. Called the the new urban crisis how our cities are increasing inequality deepen aggregation and failing the middle class. And what we can do about it by Richard Florida that I'd like to also recommend on this topic while we are waiting for the book stealth to come out in two months as she said other than that. I would also really suggest episode called green inclusive and open economy. Wise Sustainability is not enough interview with Ralph term to get perspective and broader understanding of Modern Day economy and more recent episode. Also that I want to suggest to look to advice to listen to beds the episode from last week called circular economy challenges and systemic change. Wisc Leona how we deliver your from. It climate gig about how the economy will change during and after the covet. Nineteen pandemic what to expect. How can we go? How can we all make it happen? So the greener and more sustainable future to come. I truly hope this. Three episodes or been sustainability with young green inclusive an open economy with Ralph term and Circle. Konami with CLEON. How WE W will get? You inspired to take some positive action. If you like the episode. Please consider subscribe sharing leaving the review in the rate in us on the blood from. You're listening on. We're now available on slightly more than fifty platforms in previous episodes. I asked the listeners to leave this podcast review on chaser in order to raise some funds for meals on wheels of Nineteen Response Fund. Today would like to take a moment to think Andrew Julia Mattie and Victoria for taking their and leave us. A review together retraced two bucks which is still better than nothing. Thank you all again for listening for being with us today and until next time take care. Stay tuned stay healthy and most importantly stay home until next week goodbye.

Singapore Casablanca Singapore Yuban France United Nations Ct Cd Estelle US Infrastructure Services Ms Nina Erica Yuban Sustainable Urban Couples Institute Laboratory o Knicks
Tobias Peggs - Doing Well by Doing Good, Innovation Through Square Roots Urban Farms

Dan Churchill's The Epic Table

49:32 min | 1 year ago

Tobias Peggs - Doing Well by Doing Good, Innovation Through Square Roots Urban Farms

"Hey tame, I'm Dan show. Chew and welcome to another episode of epi table podcast where we bring together thought ladies expert in that field. And entrepreneurs and we bridge the gap between performance, and cooking into is ever. So we have a good friend of mine to boss peg the CEO and founder of square. It's run. This is a company that is building a community through innovative technology. And as a farm, we're not talking us. You know, fifty to one hundred callers outside New York City with talking just over the road in Brooklyn, and not in a Vaas, major landmass as we're talking inside shipping containers. What square into doing a finding innovative ways to grow ingredients, the optimal Thais, and therefore nutrients, I use them at Charlie straight? So on first hand, just as they are along without the hell with business development in young farmers, and all that they finding ways for our plan to be more sustainable in growing, these Osman ingredients. They also help young farmers. The Knicks generation who are going to be supplying us with these Tyson. Ingredients come through. There's plenty more fee, Gosselin, most importantly, as you know, as chef I'm passionate about this industry, and I'm so excited to hear about what to boss has to say. Welcome to the podcast to blast peixe. On today's episode of the podcast. All I have a very close friend, but also someone who's definitely expert nephew. We have Tomasz Pegues found out and say square. It's my man, welcome to the shot and Q. I'm so excited about today. And I it's awesome. I love the fact gets connect with people who are locked wanted but doing phenomenal things then be, but yeah. Hey, we're I wouldn't. To have to sell your somewhat of a father and a way. I like I like to think of it, and what I do in life. Why selfish, he's really really point to make because it's knowing where we comes from his super important, and that's exactly what a big part of the future of what swears grow is doing. So I'm just going to give him a lot usually strike to you own to tell at least the square, it's as familiar like revolutionizing farming, just not show. So they sought out in Brooklyn, you, you have traded opportunity, the young. Really, really casualty PayPal. Try their own businesses in shipping containers. And you're doing it a why that, you know, then support Sunni areas of life whether vase stability, optimizing, most point mate flav off. And I think it's really cool when I two one visits a squarer, and it was opened on this shipping. You tied an inside was his arrived grain breads beautiful college leafy greens. And the toughest of these, these grades was phenomenal summit sorry that we've now looking here at some beautiful basil and cement, which we're gonna work with today. But I just love the fact that squares does too many things. It's, it's showcasing white to match farming over farming real thing, and supporting detraction businesses for young neighbor, went really following them through their watch channels. We're going to hear more about skirts from your perspective, but I want to start off the east Pacific tomorrow. So you may all you've had a very inspiring lot. Going through different areas in the low tech you obviously you part of the colonial British ninety Boston my your English taking it again. Yeah. So we're very born. How did you come today? Who is to boss pace. Sure. So I was boom, in rural England, sank west of England grew up on beaches and surrounded by farmland. We thought we were million miles away from the big city of London. I'm new to the US probably my late twenties and sort of got a different sense of scale, I grew up three hours from London. That is like as far away, as you can get in. Here you to work for three hours, right? Crazy. So, yeah, listen. I grew up. You know, as a child of the eighteenth and nineteenth, I started my career as the internet was becoming a thing. I always joke I went to university with an Email address, because they essentially didn't exist, the noble people when I left university. The first thing I did was set up an internet company. My car was right there in the middle of all that craziness. And pretty soon came to the US, chase the Silicon Valley dream Bill internet companies in California and on the east coast in New York, and a couple of hops in steps along the way and now to your point, I'm now Fowler. Yeah. It's, it's that's a, that's a massive not show the story for what they've actually done. So some of these some of these company, I think, when I look at what you've done. I wanna very sat down with you. You are the of what a business is all batting solving problem, ultimately square it's I said to you squares is, what is the problem? You're solving. What is the problem? Yeah. I mean basically we have to change the food system for the whole planet. Right. The way that we. Saw few today, industrial food system is a disaster, the food shipped in from the other side of the globe. We've got no idea where it comes from. There's no connection with that pharma as the few travels across the globe that takes time, all of the nutrients in those foods, just breaking down into sugars basically, what we eat is high cowry, but low nutrient is making us fat it is making a sick is also destroying the planet, right? Industrial agriculture is responsible for thirty percent of greenhouse gases. It's crazy, so systems, go change. And so what we're trying to do is change that and get the world onto a local, healthy sustainable food system. But of course, we have to do that at a global scale. And so involves a lot of scalable technology, which is what some of my background is. Now, joining with re fantastically talented, pharma's, bringing those two things together. And basically reinventing, the food system. That's on get definitely wanted to daytime action how to now with the business and the systems at technology doing and the partners, of course. But let's talk about devices, you know, behavior so made it takes a very unique person too. I jumped shifted countries and follow something and be super entrepreneurial. So in your is growing up. Did you did you have something, a terrain that you want to change your place sport? Did you? Yeah. It's a great question. I mean so my mother and my father both rains, we'll businesses. So I was always a rain so that general spirit. If you like kind of you see them ocean roller coaster, that you go through only running small business for me going up the big sports guy, I mean, you cut me bleed soccer. I just played football and I wanted to be a professional soccer player, right? And probably still did until I was thirty five. Thanks you gonna make that happen? Play soccer later in life. Got into China flown. University. I was pretty competitive athlete. The saying I'd always been kind of sporty, right? And I think through sport, I had a basic understanding, therefore of nutrition, right? If you're gonna go out and do a triathlon and you're going to bust your chops five hours on a hot day in a race like you got to make sure that the fuel that you're taking in is kind of nice balance that is going to be good field. Body segments was a crazy that nutrition nut. But I knew enough about high to source high quality foods and get the right fuel for my body to to go through those big spokesman endeavors on room on yet. It's interesting how the connection between reality of actually what would doing comes back from a personal motivation. So if you ever see we interested in looking after yourself, and so you found the best way to do that through, you know, the right forms of nutrition. Yeah. And then, so what took that from you saying that aspect. And then, you know. Obviously, the entrepreneurial aspect of you from your being around parents. But then wanting to do it from a I guess, impact global sky with with square roots short-lived. Yeah. I mean, I think you know, this is my full startup company in full. One of the one of the companies that I had previously was completely different university was very early social media. Analytics company. Right. You're watching, what people are saying on the social web, and providing sort of interesting targeted content to then very high tech thing that quiet by wool, Mons. People Wayne, these tech positions happen. You often go work for the acquiring company for twelve months. So I worked in wool for twelve months. A wall, I was in that very long story short ended up studying global grocery by the hate is. And what I saw at wool mart scale. Right. They got three hundred million customers over in planet buying food, and it blew my mind. I could see people wanting food from all over the world right people in the UK adding bananas to that shopping list right now. I grew up in the UK. I know they don't grow bananas in the UK, right way. Did that food come from where it was it shipped from and I could see this map? Athena, just flying all over the world. This is insane because into the little, I know about nutrition says if that food is being traveling for weeks to get the nutrients Birkin dang, right? So what was the quality of the food like it into that chain? And then you start to think about the impact on the planet. Right. Well, how much does it cost like transport the speed? What is that doing in terms of just the environmental impact of all that transport? And so, I started thinking, you know, listen people won't food from all over the world. We can't change that. But what if we could replicate the growing climates late in the world, but do that in your backyard and could you then grow food from all over the world, but do it in the same zip code is that an consumer, actually, you can give these people food from everywhere which they want, but it's name grow. Known in say mile right as the supermarket they go by and then you can get food from farm to shelf within twenty four hours of office. The feed is fresh is very little impact on the planet because literally, you could just jump on a bike and cycled on road and take it to the retail soil, and there's no impact on the planet. The quality of that food is so much better. So that was kind of a hub for me. And I knew at that point that the next company, I want him Bill had to go and make that country morality. That's I love the fact that you're y'all motivated purely because you see something that ki- generally hasn't the impact on. And you want to be a part of that. And you were the forefront of that, like, I, I remember the first time I heard of what essentially was introduced to you. What square roots is doing? And I think that is ultimately product, but it's not because you, you actually creating realization about up on it. And that's unlike message, I think a lot of people forget when a company is doing something there is the maybe the, the impact on small scouts fought does bottle, biggest guy. It's like saying, well, hang on. This is what we need to wing now, young night and show that we actually go through planet. Unfortunately, with as you spoke on early modern agriculture industrialize -ation all these things that have taken place to really. We'd us of flavor. First and foremost, the ultimate nutritionists. Well, the, the way the future need is working with companies lot yourself, who will make sure that, you know, I you Tricia his ultimately at its Paik and creding wise, the is still motivating us to one endorses long-term. That's exactly what you guys do. I think that the term that we use internally is doing well by doing good, right? We are here to build a big billion dollar business. There's no by that Kohl's as we do that. There's a responsibility or an obligation, I think, to do that in a way that is better for people better for the planet. Right. And those things should be better for profits. And I think the, you know, especially like the generation Z conceiver coming in, they just don't want to buy product anymore. They wanna buy product with a purpose, right? And they won on the send. Hey, this is positively impacting the world. And I think the big companies that are being built right now with all Gulf that, you know, double bottom line view of the world, right? Do good. But do well. And combine those two things together. Yeah. One hundred percent. I think I, I not everyday when are safe able when Charlie street is an example of that we want to support the Fonzie web, with the raise painful need to know where that comes from the same reason generate more wins for you guys doing. Ultimately giving back the to the environment as, as any company grows underlying message to what they actually do grows. So if you if you are in just New York Grammy back to New York if you are in different states, renting America US starting to have a national impact eventually being gloating. It's like, yeah, you have a valuation of know billion dollars. The ultimate, you have a major scale impacting education, which is really awesome. With what's Stein's? So I've I love rating. And a lot people I rate from a fluky you know, over time things like one of my favorite books. Some rain right now is some blue ocean. And then third plight by Dan bobbins. Well, these are really good books to talk about like the next the next fifty or so years. Looks locking. Hajjah Pollock's become a very common debate without a low table. I'm on over for the idea of creating optimized ingredient through different spectrum actually let's let's for second. So a love it back to the. These beautiful. She doesn't leafy greens also nurse as a specific cows. Must talk about that technology. Okay. Okay. So the what what we've done is, we've built funds inside these refurbish ship teams. Right. So it's a forty foot long container. That was screened in what get useful. What? Well, I mean, we saw how it's a beautiful story at she shipping tain is built to transport food from China to America has yet, so like less repurpose that for much, much better thing. Right. So we literally built the phones inside the shipping tain is to your point inside these funds, and we basically recreate climates from around the world, right? So if you're your chef you want some basil, right? We will come and say, to where is the best basil in the world? Right. You probably going to say no visiting twice right? Nova lease where it's at. So what we do is study the climate in the north of Italy. And we'll learn what is the temperature in the north of Italy. Well, it's the humidity wind is the sun come up. When does the sun go Dane? What's the CO two level? What are the nutrients? They were net. Grain will basically re. Recreate that climate inside a ball in Berkeley, and then grow the exact tasting basil for you or year round. Right. And the oil rang bit is really, really exciting because you're in doors, and you'll control in that climate. Even if there's to Dole's it. Still the perfect conditions. The basil to be wearing indoors. Right. So you get consistent quality product that's literally two miles away from your restaurant. And we're giving that to twelve months. Yeah. That consistency is huge. Like, obviously I, I work seasonally. But that doesn't mean that the idea behind having Abaza way rather, as optimized nutritionally doesn't mean a conscience game throughout raisins talk. More about that simply get back from one of our breaks. Hi tame. Today's podcast is brought to you by city harvest. I am proudly on their food council. And this she, I'll be running the mouth on as a coach captain with Maputo chair now. Mean rising out lofty, go bidding two hundred fifty thousand New York is I love city office, because I stand for two important things that I both preventing Weiss with food and feeding those in need. So if you want to help get behind us, you can visit my website, you'd have city harvest website. And of course, every dollar you rise is going to the white and should be moving forward. Thanks team. Vass. We're just talking about the technology behind what screens does and allowing optimizing nutrients and ultimately flyable all year round. What are some of the other things that look be pitch up when it comes to swear words in terms of sustainability capturing different leafy drains, given stage what other things skirts doing the really are above beyond anything, you'd say. Yeah, I think you mentioned earlier, right? You have a business in New York, and that can make an impact here in the local market. Right. So the next thing that we do is take this national. So we just made a big Amazon. Actually, we're working very large distribution company, golden food service headquartered in Michigan. They operate, two hundred distribution centers and retail stole the will across North America name building square roots fons on every single one of those. Right. So the idea now is that we can bring locally grown food to people in the city, but do that at a national scale. Right. So that, that, that's excellent huge. So all you all essentially a farmer across the nation. Yeah. I mean, the whole idea was can we build a local farm, but do that at a global scale and Saturn's like impossible to do? But when you've got this technology this modular, technology, the means we can literally drop Afam into a new like Michigan. We will into the Vom press the basil button. Right. The farm configures itself to the optimum climate to basil. And you can guarantee that consistent quality in any of the market, one show that you can, then put these. Femms literally anywhere cross the pine. Yeah. It's, it's absolutely brilliant. I love it for a number reasons as well. Because as a young chef y I relate to, like some new innovative technology, rod, not that will actually in the post doing it through my stanwyck hell ya. Like, unfortunately, fallen isn't executives appealing. I guess, familiar is the genetic public farming's not that appealing to being out somewhere Ramona work. Yeah. Gelo, hot work. You're gonna be you're going to buy land doing what you're doing is you're actually taken if you make it you bring you back following new age, for the farmers as well. So you have these young farmers came to build a business, and then also knowing that crowding up achieved education, so they actually impact on people, and then learning as well, so square, it's his Greg, because not only you actually doing the thought of having impact on the community and the planet, ultimately onslaught project. You actually helping an individual grow their business. Yes. So let let's talk about that. So. You know, when people think about hype. Bad industrial food system is they'll look at pollution and pesticides and run off. And you know, Fant nutrition all of this. There is another problem that doesn't get as much time as it shoot, which is the average age of a US farmer is fifty seven years old. And so there is a demographic time bomb. That's about to go off. Like who the hell is going to grow the food when those people retire in five years? A massive problem. So we gotta get more young people into the industry until point, I don't necessarily wanna work, you know, in a big industrial farm in the middle of the country. Right. They want to be in Brooklyn and Serena by technology and it's got to be cool. And, and so what, what we've done at square to set up, what we call the next Jane training program, so it's a twelve month program. Young people can come to work with us at square roots. They don't have to have any experiencing growing. They just need to have the same belief that we do that. We've got to change the food system, and they want to be part of that mission. So we, then basically, give them a phone Sarang them with technology training tools insights, and get them from having zero exp. -perience to being a really really, really good foam in about four weeks, like almost no time at all right? That person in stays with the company for twelve months. They grow a ton of food. We sell a ton of food. That's how we make money and pay for the training program. In addition, during those twelve months, we also provide are structured training for them on entrepreneurship frameworks on community building skills on marketing and positioning index of everything that you would need to learn such a when you graduate from square ritual, narrow in a position to go set up, your own company will have an awesome career or even join up, obviously as waste scaling. So, yeah, you're, you're right with a growing food, but we're also unleashing the next generation of leaders in the food industry as we do it this. Why like my personal brand and why Charlie straight is something up proudly want to be associated with swear. It's not that natural. Just doing the thing is this pow naturally as well. But there's so many things you guys are doing that has such a positive impact in all areas of law. And I'm you know, I love Tolkien out the pay off feels like what something I'm going to do all you hear about square? I mean, you are why y trust me. You're gonna anyway anyways, it's like it's, it's almost it should be. Awesome for square as minds to being come like an education center, even aside from what you has already too. Yeah. I mean, this a small startup company, right? Whole companies twenty you're going to be very focused as you do that. But even today, we open the doors once a month. We have open high swamp tolls a couple of hundred people show up, and we'll have the educational component. Right. We'll explain what's going on with the technology, people can talk to the farmers of what it's like to be a pharma for year. And I think, honestly the thing I get most out of those events is the fact that when you come you also get to me two or three hundred other people in the city that I really jazzed about the idea of growing food in the same zip code is where they lived and you can see this is a movement, right? This isn't a little Hickson niche thing. This is a accident negative movement. And that so exciting. And that's it. And you feel your forefront of. Well, I mean, I think maybe the hub I would say, right. I think I've ever if we're at the forefront like there are a lot of brilliant people thinking of this, I connected, right square. Roots does is a connect those people, right? And if we can bring people with different thoughts in different expertise in different angles on how to solve the system of we can help to bring them together. Then we've done job. Absolutely. I British Australian. We know that we done took off. I think what you're doing is absolutely phenomenal. I think it's really cool. I think a lot of people complied from Assad from doing thinking about what they're doing. It's should give him back in some way like. I don't it continues each street, my soap, ultimately, we will pay me educatable him. What the eight? And so if every ball that goes out every play food. We know that the looking for Subic, call known as fresh off, now, maybe start the second second about where we comes from exactly. And so that's something that I think, you know, what scares Dodson. It's Bryce bond of the cetera. Yeah. He was selling lot. But that's not the unlike over lachey thing he needs, so participant as business if you do that knowing pay packet, and now no. Everything's growing what time of day. Where is the line? I think that's incredible. Which actually touching a now isn't it? Yeah. Also from Johnny street, people can listen to jump on the subway and beat there. John, the sacree. But yes, in terms of transparency, right, how do we tell the story of where that comes from, so on every package at square roots product that you can buy you go to supermarket you pick up packages as a QR code on the package name. Did you scan with your phone and that will show you the complete story of way you'll food come from wherever the seed sourced? What farmer, Dan? What did this looked like yesterday when it was still on the farm who package day? How did it get to the retail store is total transparency of total time line from seed to shelf, and ultimately during trust, if you're entrust with the consumer not for the purpose yourself to people to realize that they can trust you to nor the when you educate him on something else, they can believe yes. I think that's right. I mean you see, you do see a lot of companies say, trust us. I think trust is an instruction to Justice be Bill so job is this, we'll give you the information. And you're smart enough to figure out whether you trust us on right versus a competitor. It's all about just being transparent. Definitely just transparent about trust on now Conley making a beautiful little mint oil. And this is. This really showcase. Just how simple ingredients half for five off, or you name when it comes to cohesion ditches, I have extrovert and oval. Holy extroversion end means that is the and this is from square and I've only just plucked a life of from datura stem. And as you do that burst from the natural oils and aroma is just the kind of thing that I would put on my neck and be happy with him. I go from we come down. Annoy. The you say that you don't have happy that. The amount of effort we put into getting the climate right to promote the oils in that leap. It was wild and today, someone like you. So it is oh, beautiful. He's done his work that has sometimes people, the subtle things that people don't realize. No. What is missing and really simple oil he to start out of love the hottest dish. So just go extra-virgin olive oil, the low eight and just added into it. And that's all it is. So obviously using a very high quality impacting oval made it's growing so quickly that I know the nutrients and the flavor is epic. All you need to do to sit that a soft thirty minutes, and it just of change the way you can drizzle oil of any full of salad bowl on your eggs in the morning. And I'm like that sieve Assad. We'll see the crate, a lovely, I think of told you this device, Mark favorite or I'm gonna say herb with US, British the beginnings, actually. Is definitely basil and basil Beijing. You'll you'll get his. Yeah. So, I think you're basil particularly from like, Genova pasta. Genovise at pop star is the most natural another. This is so sweet is enticing. Yet news, call this beautiful aroma. And when was this pit when did I get this today? You picked it last night. They got lost night, fifteen minutes on the train, and it just heat again. That's what you're looking towards the rest of the nation in the glory. Correct Jerry you build, the response inside every city and then you can do that, hyper local distribution. That's awesome. Even if you if you visit New York, first on, or even anytime actually get out to the square, it's for sure, let's talk about this the business man. So when you came up with the idea like was a ushwyn, I listened to know being involvement take sides understanding sky obese and Cisco did you say, drowned if you a series I just off pretty? Classical path. So I think I'm lucky enough to have a little bit of a track record a couple of tech companies that have exited so that, that puts him in a slight advantage. You know, I was able to put a PowerPoint presentation together and Neil away my hands around until we'll also is going to be and raised the what's known as a c- drain that seed rand ally, to build the first farm train the first set of pharma's build some technology arraignment to make that easy. Basically prove the concept and the months, you've proven the concept. We raise the second funding and that got us to the point where we were able to prove the technology platform, could scale nationally and that Snyder, the path that world. So how long that process type is a couple of years. So I probably came up with the first sort of idea, the square roots with my co fame Kimball maybe three years ago from today, I guess so we probably kicked it arraigned for six. Months before we had like a pitch deck whereas this is how it's gonna work. Typically a fundraising process is gonna take three months. You talked to one hundred people ninetieth antennae. No, you're crazy. You know, in town of high believe let's make this happen. You have I'll take three months and then the idea is you raise enough money to give yourself eighteen months of runway as they say to like just get your head dendritic. Right. So that was what we did. And then eighteen months ago race at saccharine and it always takes about three months, and then you get your head down run again at saw a really interesting experience, anyone listening there. So raising money is, it's quite a it's quite a circus, because you have your eyes if he does. And you're right. Not every day on business. So, you know, one my menu get. Yes. And then I'll southern commit and then they sell the command and then they're like change their mind, or so it's, it's quite a thing, you know, ultimately, it's it takes perseverance to do to do that. And. You got it about thick skin. Right. Because it's your baby and you're selling vision, and you believe it so much. And then you get someone you know, punching in some numbers on a spreadsheet, and it doesn't match their mother, and they get told and it's like, come on. You don't trying to change the world. Like why did he believe? Komo man. So you touched on your part, and before then what's it lot work? We've kimball. Man. He's awesome. So I've never Kimball for probably fifteen years at this point, you know, we worked on tech companies together. He's always been into food, right? He has an amazing nonprofit could big green puts like space age vegetable gardens into schools, all across the country and gets young kids like, really understanding how to grow food had connected with food that tastes like is an amazing program, and then he runs a restaurant company, that's kind of in hot land of the country, kitchen, a next all of sourcing food from local farmers, but making that very assessable. We hear about table restaurants, and that's kind of fancy high-concept this is, you know, very young Sandoval menu too. Great price point. And it's all about getting real food to as many people's positive. I love a love. You say it's fun because obviously video Kimball cable mosque. So he video of cable on a backup visited a tractor or something or not everyone of our bites. You go around Manhattan Brooklyn. I it's, it's funny because you just say riding around the parking lot in Brooklyn. Use looks like the very happy person. And I think it's really important to take this time to think about it, as when, when you own a business, the people you work with constantly your friends going to be able, you can genuinely that you bring out the strengths that you have witnesses in. And so, you know, obviously, he has strengths that I'm sure that you love him to deal with in, as you know, yourself with him. Do you have any advice for people in the coming to terms with building business? And I always say you should know visas Potter for six months lace like you should really not him for six mean. You're kinda getting married. Right. And probably you're spending more time in the day with your business. Personal partner. I mean, I think I think you're right, right. Complementary skills, good. You've got to be able to motivate each other. Right. You go to understand how each other ticks. And. You go to like hanging out with each other right? Because flex in the early days, especially when it's just you trying to take business from nothing to something yet, but you could be in a room with flat. Eighteen hours a day this person. Right. And so, you know if you don't click and, you know, almost like a tough Pathak relationship, right way. You'll just able to know how to work together. The Fraser is us is. How do you make one plus one in three right? Hi. Can you get much more out of the partnership than just the sum of its pieces? And if you've got one, plus one three you can tackle any business tackle any problem and do it a hundred dollars an hour. That's awesome. It's great. I love a love analogy because ultimately, you are getting married. Really? Sorry, just make sure that when you are doing business wherever you start off with doing that. The person you're doing with willing to get into bed with that stats, and you all, unfortunately you save more than some of the closest part. We've girlfriend husband would raise the my own only he some move out your routines habits really Kook and put together beautiful square. It's plights of in all this really, if more Mewa seal that when we come back. Okay. This this. We were back and win. He'll actually print together. This beautiful dish bronze you swear scientists did not pay me is love it so much. I actually pay them. So in the blend all we have some beautiful extroversion oil again, from the timing we have the salty land, soldiers beautiful natural sell that basil from square. It's and it's fantastic. You're gonna have some gross. Golly, almonds, three nine and some macer price. So this is a really simple pest, a plant base of eight install one John Regianna, if you want to you can always sell shoot, the Mesa pice the poem, the traditional wide of Mike, Testa. And I can tell you right now, this is this is quality ingredients righty. So you go, I know exactly where all these come from, I'm serious on put together. It's actually we have a straight or Sabi Charleston. So Amish giving blending. My man who actually he wore bat, some your morning retains. Can love taste. Kojak is bang. That's super took, oh, the smell as it. That's why I love ship. Some of them. So other she told me you really about mom on your first thing that uppity, grains since my. What gets the boss often volley? Well, i'm. Yeah. Listen running. These news types, a lot of hours and you got to maximize your time. Right. And, you know, dishing, the triathletes or go to try and figure training in married. I got to try and figure out time with. But I must make the first thing that I do every morning and all my sounds like a bit of a cliche at this point, I am a big big fan of meditation. We'll sit just for twenty minutes. How little guy token is to follow the breath and it just like orders the head and gets me focused and like gives me energy used to get up and running. What is what is the detection us? No, I went to a course a couple of years ago, the Penn school medicine Philadelphia. Right. And they taught us a whole bunch of mindfulness techniques. And with that then came some audio files, I still listen to on, on a daily basis, a nice little twenty minute twenty minute guided meditation that is just all about focusing on the breath. It's really kind of mindfulness right? And just focuses the mind. Let's a think Marfa me mafia, some hours of tell people to start to right themselves towards because being able to relax that one St. they so part if you'd have cloudy decision making all these things for you. Guy because we always darn often lacks enough right, hauntingly bother. We've all been there we can't sleep. We should put a notepad next on time. Addressing title and just be ready to run every dance. We can clear onto the morning. That's why that's why we'll see what you're talking about. Now is really important. So often meditating happened said I work at. No. I the pain the roads or in your could go to the gym, and you hit a spin by all take a room bike to central park, and zip rain, gem nil. Do like an hour hour and a half work in the morning. Then I'll come back at that point, I had to look to any Email. I got my head in older. My body in order, it's probably now are end thirty. And at that point, you know, see what the world is saying. Right. And so, you know, we'll start work at eight thirty generally, I like to get like an hour's worth of work done before I had to the phone, and then, you know, once a the fall, and then there's it team thirty people. Right. And I think it's that kind of morning routine that gets me in the right shape, so that I can be present. And as helpful as possible to that team as the COO, and is the founder of a company like that she'll job. Right. You'll there to create an environment where other people can be very productive very successful. And I think if you don't look at yourself on show up, you know, the best version of yourself every day, then you're kind of selling your teammate show. And so, you know, people will often aspirin, the hell do you find time to meditate work? Hey, you're running a startup company in my institute and is if I didn't do that. I would probably be ready. Terrible running my son up. So this is the way to get more out of me to I can give more to, to my teammates, the perfect example of what success morning. Retain does essentially paying respect yourself and, and doing you Utah. The things that allow you to be feeling structured in the day. That is going to be unstructured. You have that you have that one thing that allows you to do correct bulls. Unreal my, my question is if to boss was food, and ingredients. Anything? Would you be why am I I definitely know the kind of area of locker gonna go to once? Yeah, I feel they Sunday. Well, it's funny. Right. So. The firm you to the US lived in India for year Mumbai so like, like, give me a nice spicy. Her old. I. Oh, I probably be vegetable berry, actually. This. It. Because you have to use that law or there's just some tense. The author racing. The other thing would be a big big fan of Japan, like my wife and I slow borders. We tried to go to Kaido every year and go snowboarding in Japan. So ramen sushi noodles. I any of that stuff. I love to precision and beauty on the plight and the whole culture of being respectful of the ingredient and the farmer eating everything. That's on that plate. That's a beautiful experience. But I to pick one. I probably go full a concoction, pastor Chikan pesto broccoli and cheese. Now as, as an athlete, like I love, thou gives me everything I'm sure it's the cops v protein at someone who's not particularly Dextrous in the kitchen is also super easy to do. And I'm sure I should probably talk with you and figure out how to elevate that experience somewhat. You're frozen broccoli. How you doing, man? I'm I'm embarrassed to even talk to you about it. Right. Going go into it already has. It's about is make he's chicken festive Boston. Oh my God. All right. So the chicken I'm doing grilled, and then I'll chop that up. Maybe if I'm feeding really flamboyant, all kind of get out there on the grill, we'll give you a little bit of sick. Pastor is probably drive past there on the right that I'm just boiling. And then I'll be honest with you, like broccoli heads go into that bowl in the last minute. Right. So it's still nice and crunchy. Maybe if I got Tom on my steam that guy, and then I'll mixed the whole thing with beautiful pesto sprinkle way. Too much teams. Some matches. Nancy? Right. Exactly. And then gorge. Right. And it sounds gross. But like if you're doing that, you know the night before a big race. Oh my God. I'm getting hungry. I do actually a few things you can do to just throwing Oregon Cowboys, I love you and your supergroup Chiquita pasta. I love the you could also slow thought like just poach it in chicken stock, and then ends pulls upon kinda goes well yet but leads to do is just get by without the skin. Chuck in a pot of low Seraing water flak forty five an hour, and you could do that, by any guy like time rosary, if you really wanted to give then you can also Roche abruptly because he gets a little crispy Mench. Chuck on the amount of time texting twenty minutes, all salt pepper. And then he gives some pasta together, the end and only cool Jeff to statement or anything, and ultimately, I would change DASA stark hell Iago man ever story. John, I love here. Now, you never know what makes you put that together. He. My wife left so much for my light terrible dish. Because it like the Toby dish. She's like she didn't want to do so to hair a chef sound might do something with that menu would be. Why is dotted dishes? Spaghetti bowl. Nice. It's what allow me to all my honestly, like it is more precision is a specific. One told me about we're talking that over years. My family would be critiques. And so that's what I love about cooking and bromine together. And so from approach is the most amazing I'll have the rest of my life throws. All sorts of sentimental value. What's wrong with having a beautiful nostalgic pasta? I'm writing math on this year under this game that pasta and yo- pasta. Alright on my way clear. That's right. So one of these Fluffy's is about controlling the controllable sorry occupied controllable, number different ways when I travel, I make sure I have I'm aware where going as I play site at eight four darn thing. The place is going to be what I want I make sure prepacked culpa cheese for myself. I take my runners when I travel in the morning, if I get, you know, have a busy day or get all the things I know Don in the morning because there's been acting how does to bias control the control every single day while. So I'm a massive scheduler. Right. You know, you can open open to count on my iphone and you'll see everything from six AM until ten thirty pm. Right. So I'll schedule twenty minutes meditation. Right. And schedule of forty five minute workout or whatever it is. Because with the best intentions, you, they all meditate. Oh, work. And if you're running your own small business, that's going hundred miles an hour. Let those are the things that tend to get deep twice to that. Just in Mike and Mike candidate. Right. No one else can schedule a meeting on top of that. It's already in that, you know, I just hold myself honest to that schedule. You join some into not scheduling you watch Tom there that. That's a big notice this, how many people are watching? So what you what one of the things that we do, do some wife. Is a lawyer by day and evenings a weekend, she's building a children's clothing company. Right. So she's got the whole entrepreneurial thing going. So both of us are kind of tanked. We have a dog, and we take that dog on a nice big walk on Saturday morning. Right. And so, whatever. Or the crazy stuff is happening Saturday morning. We know fight. We got a couple of hours, we might talk right business strategy or anxieties that are going on your whatever it is. But it's just awesome. The dog right for that wolf can that's kind of sacrosanct time. That's brilliant. That's that's I love that. I having knowing that you'll have time I think some off annuities Montagne one hundred percent. But yet I always try told me it's smart from it. Your schedule Tommy to see like your she couldn't account. But hey, hanging out this between these hours if he comes on with this, I mean, if people have to do it survey, but becomes almost like this magic anyways, but knowing that you have on your team with her own Saturdays force, Letsie Raton, Switzerland. What's a brand what? Yeah. So it's an amazing story. And she. So she's Bill, a children's clothing company called the circle collective wasn't serious on Instagram, the circle collective, and the whole idea is to build a sustainable clothing company, that also deliver, they're really chic product, right until what she's done is Bill, a supply chain of autism in India and Jaipur India, so she's working with no prophets and autism ends. That do handbook printing on organic culture and then she's manufacturing children's clothing from that. So they closed the beautiful. But when you're buying, the closure, also supporting these artisans in these families who have got skills that have been there for generations. Right. But a dying because of industrialization. So she's kind of protecting those autism as well. It's an amazing amazing amazing business that she still I reckon isn't number payable this going kosh for a couple of humanitarian goals right at by doing something that's having a massive impact on the. The globe. In some why is truly inspiring? That's, that's on the will wanna get get the segment a lot require to close. No wait about. I know what a buy them I'd have to give you a deal. It's obviously pleasure having eat tonight in front of me. I have my scary. It's place play. Yes. Must be said it's beautiful Abaza situation. Pesto remarried on the bottom in a separate ball. I just combine that lovely oil from the mid some extroversion on altogether. And then overlaid, that with some Rosen vegetables, Houston numbers abrasive, vegetables, combine that Masumi rocket or rubella. And then you just put that on that planet the pesto, and it's really simple nourishing thing it's elevated. But using simple ingredients. So that's out for Tobias Peggs and size. Because you're going to get stuck into that own actual people know that you find out, more about us, so they could full, you specifically on Instagram Tobias Peggs. Yup. That's right. And then square at square its growth for the company fantastic. And also, you can go to square dot com, and we'll they stole of the foam till date. Right. So if you're in New York, and you wanna come to the farm, just go to the website, sign up for one of the toilets and I'll see yet, that's you guys really have to think about this. It's not as if you plying all driving, getting boss out the opposite, which isn't even follow. And so we're talking in or Brooklyn. So you have fifty minutes on the try might want to three stops from Manhattan. And if you already in Brooklyn, I really have no excuse. So make sure you get out to the farm. You never say doing some pooping. On the my it's been obsolete pledge you how to use it. I really spots, it, it'd be potus various, Jerry, of course, yours. What child streets doing person the his we support him dude? It's exactly what that means. So much said, thank you for the friendship and the ship, and it's awesome. Of course, of course, and we'll see soon. At the. There you have it. Same to boss pegs of square, grow, and make sure you definitely hit up this socials and follow along doing at square roots grow. It is one of the things I always say, you must do when he comes in New York City. It's so my hidden list of things to do visit square. It's grove. Go to a farm to absolutely amazing. Open your eyes to what the future can hold. Of course, if you love what we're doing with the everytime podcast, labor review and combing their takes about two minutes. If you locked actually viewed this episode you can want us to check us out and meet you head to my channel Dan, Churchill. And of course, if you wanna share with a friend, take a screen shows episode and post to Instagram stories, a lot of share. That's thanksgiving. My friends, and I'll be seeing you every Wednesday as allies for another episode of the EPA, title checkup.

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6. TreePeople & Climate Justice: Prescriptions to Heal Communities | with Cindy Montanez

Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

44:22 min | 5 months ago

6. TreePeople & Climate Justice: Prescriptions to Heal Communities | with Cindy Montanez

"Welcome back to another episode of raising the bar. We are super excited to have. Cindy montana's the ceo of tree people on the show today while she's amazing. We really enjoyed the conversation. It was super lightning to learn. Not only about panting trees but how they affect urban communities and how it can really help all of us and how we can really get involved. I mean when things. I loved about her. Why we wanted to play this episode for you guys right now in this time is because as you know government can get. Re polarized people can stop listening can only be screaming now. She has been a political powerhouse her whole life. She was a mayor at a very young age. Jenner twenty s choose. The youngest woman ever elected to california state assembly and then she left all that to go run. La dwp pursuing her passion huge and make it a clean energy source which is one of the biggest h- utilities in the country. And now she's out running organizations. You're gonna love her. You're gonna love her mission lever story so listen up cinema. She's amazing we'll catch guys at the end everybody. Welcome back to the raising the bar. Podcast adrian alley here excited to take To build a display or have a conversation today with another one of our impressive impact leader. Today we have cindy montana's on who's the ceo of tree. People and i'm excited to be in this conversation with you. I know even for myself. I have lots of education. There's a big education gap for me around the environment around conservation really around climate justice as you talked about right before we started so i can't wait to be in the conversation i got connected to cindy be a mutual friend who is a part of leadership of genetics. Who's a very forward thinking organization. So when i asked her. Hey who do you know that other people need to know and her first person. The list was cindy monson. As saying you're the one most influential people Win in california politics so excited to get to know you and excited for audience to get to know us. Cindy's with thanks for being on my pleasure. Thank you both for doing this. I think I mean as as the person who's in trying to make a difference in the world. It's always wonderful to listen to your podcast. Mike listen to what other entrepreneurs and like impact leaders are doing is we. We all just have a lot to learn and when when we connect our movements just bigger so yeah looking forward to the opposition at our listeners. And you know really really connecting with each other as much as possible. I feel like if you live in. La you know would treat. People is for the most part. But why don't we start there like explain. 'cause i know i you know we lived in laurel canyon before where we are now and i would always pass tree people and everyone knows it but i i know there's more to it than meets the is gonna give us kind of an overview of what it is so i have the best job in the world being you re people. I mean it is such an amazing organization movement because we are really a movement of people that care about nature and we are tree people one word. There is no separation between the tree and jibaro always want to separate are. It's one word one word of. Because i mean that's the feeling of of organization and the movement is that we are connected and should be connected to the earth into into nature We are planting trees all over from the national forest. Us like forest areas to the beautiful santa monica mountains which are located in los angeles and and have some of the most biodiverse ecosystems in the world odd urban areas in the heart of los angeles. That have very low tree canopy coverage and we do this with volunteers. We have a year after year over ten thousand people that come out and just give us their time to help plant trees either in their own neighborhood or go and they'll help another neighborhood out and in addition to that Food before there was kovin. We had aeko tours. So we had these beautiful award winning eco-tours people come up to four hundred plus acre park right in the heart of los angeles. And we have these eco-tours were kids are learning about trees and water in soil Our characters dr dirt for example who has funding. And it's out there kids about dirt and And i have to say like those eco-tours are really beautiful Because sometimes it's the first time that a child from the urban area gets exposed to nature miss the week kids go up to them to you again on the heart of los angeles beautiful park coldwater canyon park and the kids will ask you know. Are there going to be bears. That are gonna come out because like we're in the forest so it's just it's a wonderful organization movement of people. We have people from all over. Not just los angeles but all over the world tree people done were a work. In other parts of the world so we have airlifted of fruit trees to areas in africa that have experienced famines. We have partnered with cities across the country. There are tree. People just snot official treat people affiliated groups but they were trained by people and the people have started their own tree people groups all over the world. We just had a beautiful at the day with three people. London and we have done work in australia. We just had the mexican war ministry of forestry reach out to us because they love deprogramming doing in spanish so tree people what we believe is everyone is three people because we all connect to a tree right if we all knew about it. We have those beautiful connections to a tree and And do we just want to you. Know use our movement to unify more communities he'll communities And bring people together to green the earth especially as we experienced the stress from a change. There's no better time that we could actually come together as communities to make a difference and we can make a difference. That's that's what's that's what's amazing about the work that we do is that everyone whether you're little can or someone who's older everyone can plant a seed and be part of making a difference through that simple act of nineteen etry. Yeah they'll plant attorneys. Barring a couple of things popped up for me first off as a dad of young kids. I hope we get to open the door tours again soon. 'cause i'm i and we were just talking right before we got on about. How much of a nerd i am. We talk about that a lot. Anybody who follows us online knows about many things and we were talking about. I'm not a technical nerve buddy. I'm honored like this at the table last night. I was talking about why we eat the skin on vegetables because of the nutrient burden. That's where the nutrients are. They weren't as interested as i wasn't trying to get into all the whole. You know full explanation of what. I learned bio two and high school but most aren't but i i to meet mr durr man. I wanna go on that tour but the so anyway. The first one of the first things you've talked about that really connected with me. I love the educational side of it. But for those that don't care or don't you naturally connect with in your passion is so innate for you rights of but for those that don't kind of get what's it all about like three people we ought to be connected to trees give kind of your view on why it's a good thing for all those even the even the folks had maybe too busy. I've twenty five things to care about the canopy. Isn't that interesting to me. Why is finding a way to care even a little bit. Good idea for the everyday Citizen that 'cause i didn't i was like just everybody just know what i mean. I know like at a very like surface level. Why it's good to have trees. But like i think it. I just felt kind of stupid asking that question. No it's actually a great question. And i hope this day. What do we need trees increase. We treating if you go to people's website right you could get like the twenty two benefits planted tree and he'd go through all these benefits from from air pollution right. Treasonable capture the carbon and other talks the air. The roots stem serves like a sponge so when flooding happens. A trees help prevent flooding because the tree goods hampshire waters shimmeran. Yes though that have instead of having all this. Urban water runoff alluded water on streets. If you'd have trees especially big trees they'll capture water. Civil prevent all that water from contaminated rivers or streams ultimately in the ocean trees obviously considerably contributed biodiversity. A city like los angeles is one of the burden. Cities in the world is birds in in los angeles and most most areas. People don't know that but it's because we have all these trees and some he's for trees on and on. But i have to tell you that our work like it even moves beyond the environmental benefits of trees. The human benefits writing like adrian. You're talking about you to get your kids out I have been advanced. Where i've come up. I've gone to our volunteers and ask me. Hey good morning. Glad you're out here volunteering. Which looks like you're having a great time and people have turned around and said he notes. I am so happy to be out here. Because i had nowhere else to go and i was feeling really bad today. I remember one. Day was like valentine's day around valentine's day and this young woman was just like yeah. All my friends have these dates. And like i don't have anywhere to go and she's like this is so much fun. I'm glad that i'm here with three people. She's like. I'm texting them. Come over because this is and some people were like. Yeah this is the place to be coming out here planting trees for whatever reasons i mean it. Sometimes we have people that are just on our part and they're just sitting there under a tree and they're just you know they're there because they want to heal and so we've also seen the incredible benefits of just human health mental health right the beyond the environmental health so whatever. The person's perspective is on the environment. But we have seen that everybody cares about the environment you know. Our donors are you know. Liberal donors tune very conservative donors are volunteers very conservative. Very liberal in their political perspectives and trees are optical in a trees are everyone and and that's why we say it's like what If you wanna come out and you wanna make a difference. Not just for times today. But that's the plant is gonna have a benefit for generations to come because he's beautiful oak trees that i'm like you know around right now. They live four hundred years old. The sequoia are two thousand years old. Funny i'm working with like a nutrition coach and literally just yesterday. We were having a conversation. She's like can you get to like a park and like walk around barefoot. I'm like what why. And she was like. Because it's like issues like i know it. Sounds kinda hokey. But it's really good for your mental and there is like some like healing and grounding that you know she was like really talking so much about yesterday we have to go to pan pacific. And i did take me shoes off. They feet in the ground made a difference right now. It's strengthening yeah. That's that's that's actually where i was headed on a couple fronts. One is we were just. We just walked. My parents are in town. We walked them to breakfast. Walking back in one of the planes stopped and looked at. Was this huge beautiful tree at another species of it but it really breathtaking tree. And i was thinking about how much wonder there wasn't that and we stopped and looked and wondered about this and that and and even beyond that i was thinking i don't know i don't. I've never met a person that when you ask them how they center themselves or how they had their own connection to any kind of type thing. That nature isn't a part of that conversation. Solitude and appreciating the natural world is a healthy rounding point to use your word about grant my fifteen year. Old son did a program. That's it was called wilderness where he literally lived off the land for about sixty days. I mean they brought in certain things but like when we went to him. I mean he was like i could live out here forever. Mom like he. He made rings out of you know at of what is it juniper. I think he did like an like spoons. And emmy he's and he could. I mean he just like he could live off the land and it was an issue would imagine it was a really healing experience for both of are right and we have seen that now with the pandemic that the world is is facing right that the more that we were told to be inside in the state for home orders went in and the more we were just connected from other as humans. The the next thing that we people wanted to do was like. I want to be a nature right outside again around my friends. I'm going to go. And i'm gonna look for that park where there's that beautiful tree or i'm going to walk spree trees the next best thing fact that great things after he he gave me nutty shown and we actually have three people are now leading is going to be like cutting edge research on the direct mental health benefits of trees especially in urban areas to until house onto their studies in japan is leaders is You'd have forest bathing so alliens what you're talking about with or spayed you'd go out and you put your you connect to the soils you connect to trees and it is very much considered a therapeutic to help. People heal both from visible illnesses and also to have mental strength so we are now at tree people Beginning that research with its top universities and researchers so that in urban areas we begin to make a case for why more trees should be planted. Not just for again that the environmental benefits but also the human in the mental health benefits pretty close staff. I mean the scan this phone. What we're what we're doing at people is all about healing communities and healing the earth. And i think by healing communities in to earth we bring people together and we heal each other and we work with each other and we strengthen each other you know and we connect in a way. That's very profound very meaningful and it's very long lasting We have seen people. I mean we've been around now for about fifty fifty years are almost fifty years. Our founders started three people when he was just a teenager. You know he goes up on a camp you know or or through up into the san bernardino mountains is camp. Counselor tells them you know andy. These trees because so much pollution in los angeles. This is in the seventies These trees are going to be dead. You know before you guys. Are you know adults. And it scared the heck out of them so teenagers started planting trees in that area and later on he. Here's a story that the Forestry division in the state of california was gonna kill about twenty thousand seaplanes so he writes them a letter and he's like those seedlings we wanna plant them and the forest service was the like or is like well. You need to pay some outrageous amount of money so what happens. He comes back to los angeles. The la times writes this story. And it's like andy versus deadwood. Eurocracy started sending money to his house. Major his parents call him. He's like andy you won't because there's all these like envelopes to the house really hundreds and then thousands of envelops this house of people from los angeles and all over the world standing over a dollar twenty five cents. You know ten dollars. Whatever to help him save the trees. That's how treat people was born by. Is there today here. we are. You know we're probably over fifteen million dollars now year of just investments that we're making communities throughout but our basis definitely the people in communities that continue just to give us what they can because I think everybody in everybody like in this world idea believes i'm how has that special connecting connection back to a tree or or to nature and and again all believe back that have have a have an ability to really make a difference now and for the future by again giving trees myfm one of my favorite books that you must know that book yes to give tree. It's so it is great. And and as i said i mean you. This isn't this is something that's uniting. It isn't about You know any political perspective. It's really a in business together. Foundations individuals schools kids adults. We people from all over the world. I've been at tree-planting events where somebody is or several people are around a tree in someone. Speaking farsi some into golic. Somebody's speaking spanish. They're not. Nobody's speaking english yet. Everybody's understanding each other. Sure that simple acts of planting a truly. Yeah that's beautiful even as we've been i've been i've been reminding myself memories of coming back about. I was even up me. being up. Walking into the forest and the upper peninsula of michigan was eighteen years old and Just having quite a personal on a breakthrough type experience in there just being amidst you know you don't something that felt really untouched. Even a little bit different than an urban urban setting but it is quite. It is quite healing. Tell us about you know. I'd love to hear some about your own story i is. I'm in this conversation already sad. Because i wanna talk to you for four hours. So i've got lots of things going through my head even about the political stephen globally politically shoes in rainforests. And all that. I'm sure you've got you an expert in that field so but let to hear some about your own journey. Just because as our listeners are ambitious smart applied people i love when our impact leaders get to share share about their own journey where they've you know leverage. Their leadership capacity ended up pointing outwards into society at large to hear some of your personal journey. How what landed you here and how you got here. Yeah so I mean my connection to nature goes back As many people to you know memories of child rights Parents you know we grew up very poor. My parents both immigrated to this country and even though we report. My dad always made sure that over the summer as we take a drive along california's beautiful coast and we would go into national forests. We would go out to lakes. We were always around nature. But i grew up in a in an area. That didn't have a lot of trees and lots of pollution. And i also grew up at stories of my parents is talking about you. Know how beautiful there you know where they came from their hometowns or their villages. Were but then. I remember a time when we went to mexico which is where my My parents are from and we went to a silver mine where my grandfather worked and this is the place where there was an explosion and my grandfather was in that mine exploded and it was a devastating accident. My dad tells us these stories. You know here. He was seven year. Old with like A tweezers taking little rocks out of like my grandfather's back. And i remember going to that silver mine and i was a little girl and i just. I took this rock. You know from that silver mine and we went later went to my grandfather's tombstone and i had that rock and i put like that rock. You know on his chin stone. And i told myself as bryson you know. I'm gonna like dedicate my life to fighting against the exploitation of people and the exploitation of the environment and so now being at treat people it's all about helping in a positive way both nature and people and throughout my life. You know i You know we would do beach. Cleanups you know here with heal the bay. Another incredible nonprofit located in los angeles and I i became a member of the california state legislature. When i was twenty eight years old was the youngest woman ever elected california state legislature. Before that i had served on my city council and mayor of my city and in my agenda there was always issue of the environment. I wonder like twenty five. When you're the mayor right over that are just the mayor was you. I go into elected office. And i always had the environment at the core of what i was doing. No i was. I was boop pushing for protecting our oceans protecting our for as to also you know fighting for bringing environment into urban areas like the ones that i had grown up in and fighting pollution and The more that i did this the conversation went from just like you know beautify neighborhoods or fighting pollution to dow addressing climate change right so my work is very much about addressing. What i think is one of the world's most pressing brett's which is a because of the changing climate. We see these days of extreme heat right where we have doubling or tripling of the days that are going to be ninety five degrees hotter our research research that we're conducting with top. Scientists in the world shows that people especially african american and african american women and latinos and the elderly have almost fifty percent higher likelihood of dying after the fifth consecutive day of of whether words ninety five degrees or hotter so people literally die. There is a direct connection between extreme heat and people's like ended up in the hospital or even worse dad and what are some ways wolf communities. You plant trees to help. Cool unity's right and the threats. We see wildfires. California is literally on fire because again of the way we have manager forest better but the changing climate also creates this you know situation where we have increased wildfires and then we're going to have flooding. There's days where it's gonna be years where it's going to be really dry. And we will experience droughts as we have you know in in recent years and then we're going to have very wet years so very erratic climate so we all have to do something about it that impacts everyone. it doesn't matter again in the world you live and it doesn't matter what your you know how much money you have or don't have. We are all being impacted by the changing climate and therefore we have a responsibility to do something about it. So my life. I think from that very dislike rahm moment of a child feeling something like you know painful because of my my family history like that rob feeling still exist with me where it still is about protecting people's protecting the environment and that's ultimately like our work at treat people is about and that's what might fight for for addressing binding solutions on climate. Change comes from protecting people in protecting the environment and and talk more about. I feel like i should know more about like what are the things that you can do. You help climate change me and obviously planting trees and cooling down communities. That makes a lot of sense to me. Can you connect the dots between how planting trees actually does golden communities to great questions right and so the i definitely like there is so much we can all do but not everybody can afford you know to to to do everything solar on their homes and like know electric electric vehicles. And there's a lot of things that we can do right. Sustainable clothing being very conscious of where we buy our clothes and like you know The goes on and on and on what what we eat or what we don't eat but everybody can be art of. That's lucien of planting trees and it's fun. It's a it's a one of the most wonderful like activities you can do in why all this is important again. Goes back to real solutions viable solutions. That have to happen now. So we look at the extreme heat. If we plant trees we just released a study. Recently that shows We basically come up with different. We call him prescriptions right prescription to heal it community if we plant eight forty percent increase tree canopy coverage in a community by forty percent. We literally now shin. Measure have estimates of how much cooler a community can be so we can cool an air entire city like los angeles especially down people. Walk by you know one degrees or we could slow down the impacts of climate change which is amazing. It is truly amazing that we can model that because of all his sophisticated modeling that we can do. We can say by planting by increasing tree canopy coverage by forty percent and then increasing reflectively right. So you want you want turn to reflect like you don't want dark surfaces for example on. Your roofs won't cool roofs right. You don't want the you want it to be cool. You want to increase reflectively you want to like be able to pull communities we now we now have ideas of how much more we can do to literally pool communities and trees being this another. It's a wonderful thing about trees too. I mean when you're walking under a tree if functions like an air conditioner because you have all air coming from the soil right. Evapotranspiration what is called so you have pool air coming from the soil and then you also have the trees and the leaves releasing cooler air so where you are where. We are walking as humans. It's like an air conditioner so if you stand under a tree and you literally walk away from a tree there could be ten or fifteen degrees difference. Oh it's so true. I mean we we go to the park. We go to in hollywood at the holly at hollywood park or something. And it's like there's a couple of big trees that are like a round hits true it does feel like and it will be a super holiday. We always like purchase under the tree. And it's super cool and you're right when you walk out. It feels like ten degrees hotter. Ucla students come out with us. We have thermometers and temperature. We take temperature readings and it like if you are like on in the middle of the street that could be like you know twenty difference from a sidewalk and then you're on a sidewalk the trees so there's so there there is a difference so there these fully abilities do exist and again that's why you treat people and the and our partners. The work that we're doing is so important because we don't have to wait decades and decades we literally could plant trees and we can start seeing these impacts very shortly yes so so when you say cooling communities i hear two things one is is a natural effect. The trees put off air. And there's also the mostly the most of the cooling communities idea is that is that it's cooler on the ground underneath shade. Guess at so what you're doing. You're are literally protecting kids as they walked to school with their parents or like senior citizens may just want take a stroller families. I wanna take a stroll around the neighborhood. We are now protecting peoples from the threats of climate change. So that's why we don't want people to feel overwhelmed. You know 'cause the whole climate change like someone may not be able to stop you know polluting factory or we may not ever be able to get off of fossil fuels right. There are things that Will still continue to exist by three people. Look at it from the perspective of like. Well what can we do neighborhoods. You know what we do to help communities now and dude in a way. That isn't that's the dude that's right and that's why we have such large partnerships from like your company companies like we have partnerships from you know villains philanthropy philanthropist from all over the world i mean we we get resources from people throughout the country because people are seeing like this. This is one of the best things that we can currently do to address like climate change and You don't again are our model is always. It's about people personal responsibility right. And it's in it's about making it fun and it's healthy and we take our process and we share we share as a model for the world. So this is it's it's all scalable right which is really important as you're building movements as you building business. It's like how do you scale and the things that we do. We heard asli design it so it can be scaled and so it can be very easily implemented or ever. A person may be anywhere in the world. Yeah but i'm thinking. So i wanna i wanna get back to that. The the thing that comes to mind is the idea of climate. Change is such a political punching bag now and it's back and forth and it's kind of this even the recent debates get into that but the It can be so big and then controlled by such huge powers that the everyday person. It's not. It's not accessible what i hear. A part of the gift of tree people to the conversation is that you allow an accessibility because anybody can come. Sounds like come and be a part of an income and then ignited the next levels advocate for which i love to hear fat like as you as you think about. You've built your model that scalable globally. What is the talk about the advocacy piece and what people can do Either in their neighborhood. Or if i'm going to go on a live here that a lot of the people that live at listen getting out on a limb here at announced that judges come with being a dad but most of our listeners are probably in well canopied neighborhoods. So if you want to advocate for a poorly canopied neighborhood how does one go about that. And how do you get involved in something like that and tell us about how you. You know advocate inside Bureaucracies and push push people to open up new programs and that kind of thing. Yeah exactly so and the thing is about on the barman is that impacts. All of us right. What the other side of the world or what's happening in the arctic it's like it impacts all of us right so what we do in our neighborhoods is really important and you know if we are lucky to have beautiful trees on our property. We have to do everything we can to to make sure that that we're taking care of them and that's like one of the things we can do but helping others it. It's it is part of being human human that we bring a good one. Yeah human itis out. And we have so many opportunities across areas like los angeles and cities throughout the world where we can go in and go out for example like here in los angeles A tree people's working with about thirty partners in community called watts watts in nineteen sixty five went through a major the watts riots as their calls right to look at look at the history there was fires there was you know a lot of Damage that was caused to that to that neighborhood People fighting against any of the issues be here now right racial injustice and a wanted wanting to have more economic prosperity so at that time there was about thirty five million dollars worth of damage. Two years ago people worked with about thirty partners Community partners to bring in thirty five million on one shot and another thirty five million from the federal government Under this administration to be able to reinvest in a community like watts African american community and we are now doing from building affordable housing to Putting solar on on rooftops to do an electric vehicles electric charging stations greening schools planting trees. Weather is in homs. I mean it is just amazing. All these different solutions as a community. And so what's about it is that we have brilliant you know forward-thinking business people working with the community working with public agencies to transform a community and when you go out there and as we're out there we're organizing the community. It's this it feels incredible right. Because you feel like you're doing justice to where there was injustice in history and and people are welcoming all of us you know with elwyn with open arms and the communities really engaged and and that's the kind of those are the kinds of things that we can do Especially know people who are fortunate able to give a little bit back to the community knows are the types of projects that that at exist. I mean we give out fruit trees. Even during this. Kobe situation in in southeast los angeles. Which again is High poverty and a lot of environmental just challenges in communities like that We organized a co bid safe route tree distribution where we were giving out fruit trees to people that otherwise would not. Have you know food right. In the long term for teaching people how to grow their own fruit their their food and the community welcomed us with open arms and we had people from all over the region in and help us. So i encourage you. Everyone especially entrepreneurs who know how to run businesses how to make a difference how to sail impact. You know. I really encourage you to join. Abc part of organizations and movements like tree people. Because you know you you're able to incorporate yourself into the fabric of a community. And i think all of us together truly can make communities better places and we we can make the world a better place. There's no question about it but we have to do it together. Regardless of what industry or in everyone can really come together around the environment inside courage we have. We have programs called for example teams or trees and our teams for trees. All about businesses bringing their Their employees together. Yeah and since teamster trees and so businesses come together. A greener employs together and we are from forests to the mountains to urban areas. First and we let the business decide a lot of businesses. Say you know we want to go into the for neighborhoods. That don't have a lot of trees because we just want to feel like more connected in these communities some will say we wind to the national forests and we want to take our teams out there so this team's retreat incredibly successful and we have all kinds of businesses that are part of tree people in helping us make a difference. Can i ask a silly question. How long does it take. I'm sure it varies like a tree to grow. That's a great question so depends on the trees right what we have we. We always say we're gonna plant but right at the right time in the right place right so they are different Micro climates within even los angeles right so depending on the region that we're in will decide. What tree is the right tree We are also taken into account the changing climate so what may have been in a certain area. That tree may no longer be the right tree or may not be the tree for the long run but we find that on average you know we within the three three to five years. Mysteries are trees began to to capture. Obviously the carbon immediately when you want them to begin to catch our band to begin to store water in there in the roots but after three to five years is when we usually know whether a tree is going to be healthy and survive so we plant the tree and then we do treat care and we go back and we take care of the tree so we spend time giving a lot of love and care to the tree of the three to five years. Went to gets established in the tree uses able to to to survive On its on its own orla so interesting in school during the cool thing why go with three people events We have Kind of our own tradition. Where every tree that gets rented. It's named gas. You grease that we do that together. allegri and You know we get around in a circle and when we bring that you know. Basically at tree is planted. That has life we get around in a circle and we save trees and grease that. I'll at whatever. The name of the tree is so there were millions of trees that are and believe intrigue is well you. You could neck. What happened people. Talk about like how they talked to their plants and then their plans survive in our health log. F i really am because now your little your kids right. We'll say like dad or mom like let's go by you know. Let's go by our ally you know this tree. And we use the people with their buckets or water. They'll go by the water. The tree right so you tree dogs. If you've heard if you've heard any snoring on this podcast audience. Not there's a dog gets room as we record that's great why wanted to I thank you for your impact. Thank you for your stand for the future matters. Thank you. I've played with that you You got into some of this Because we want people to listen and do something about it. I mean i don't. I'm concerned about where cultures going from multiple reasons but the despair is the thing that concerns me. the most is the isolation that's happening and kind of the if we don't make positive choices it will stay around right and then just the world gets less hopeful in that context so as a as a human as a leader as a dad you know. I want to got capitalized as many opportunities as possible with getting out and doing something that's both connected to a broader world beyond covid is world connected broader world but also positive and generous and building and connects us to a not. All of humanity is going to make it through this in a healthy way. I mean that psychologically some will decide you Is it just not safe world now now live in a very small world from here on out and be scared forever but then you know we'll need people like yourself and like so many others that are leading the charge to what's possible and what's worth pursuing so thank you for standing for that and you gave a couple options like if you run a business you look up teams for trees at three people other other final like if people want to get involved. Obviously they can send money under you guys. That's an easy way three. Click away to do that on the website. If they want to their family wants to get involved just tell them what to do and mobilized right away. I think we said it really wonderfully adrian. You know we have to decide what were you know. What's the world that we wanna live in the world that we're going to leave for our kids and our grandkids and this is this is the time more than ever where the world has to be united What we're going through going through it as as as globes and the thing is as a we can make a difference you know we. We have a saying in spanish that just as c. support and my parents tell us about since you're little kids you said whether that means yes you can. Everything is yes you can and and this is one thing. We're yes we can create that world that we want to create a world where people respect each other a world where we are united world where we help each other out and that we still do well where we have economic prosperity right where we have people's protect protections of the you know their human dignity and And that's what we try to do at tree people. We try to bring people together from different backgrounds. Different ideas together in a way that healing. That's uniting right and that's leaving the world a better place than what we found and there are many ways to do it. We as people provide one opportunity to do that And that is out. I mean these are just incredible opportunities to connect one with yourself. As i told you stories before it moves sometimes tom for their own personal keeling and desires to make a difference but then families i mean so what we're doing now because of ovid is that we are now doing safe volunteer activities. Where it's just your family because you know your family is saved. You're only interacting with your family. So we'll have emigrants to treat so now family pods is like in trees so reach out to us because we will get you to come in and help like walkers with with With us a treat people and then the teams trees corporate entities We are working with Corporate entities to make very we are for example paramount ranch which is in malibu calabasas area earnt during the wolsey fire in two thousand eighteen massive fire that destroyed almost one hundred thousand acres beautiful historic like place burnt down. We are now in fall going to be planting over three thousand trees at this paramount paramount ranch and so we're going to be bringing corporate entities to come out volunteer and then we have a program called citizen forestry and so we train people to become i as in own neighborhood so we could go. Hat's cool tree. People t shirts nerd and then we go out and we help provide tools though. It's okay if you don't have the shovels. You don't have picks in like buckets like we bring in reducing them out and we work with you to plant threes trees which is something. That's perfect training now for that for kobe. In the pen. The pandemic where you don't have to go anywhere you literally in front of your home or you could go to a neighborhood. That doesn't have trees and we could plant trees in a very safe by so there's definitely a lot of things that we can do as we're dying to be outside and we're like desiring to be around nature Treat people provide opportunities to come out and do it in a very say if way and i said what's what's meaningful about this is that it's long term work that we're doing is having a long term positive. It's raining plus so far all your parents that listening this that are grumbling that you kids aren't getting great educational experiences tree. People here to solve that problem for you and give you something to do on a saturday so go to treat people Thank you sandy. Your amazing appreciate so much. Thanks for joining talk to you. Know i feel like. I found people in both of you. We're gonna we're gonna go that plants and trees we to be involved. We're always inspired. Our calendar fills up as we do these interviews. Make an impact. That's that's what this is about. And here's the way where people can truly make an the long run. So thank you mazing persuaded great. Well that was an amazing inspiring episode. We wanna go plants and trees and do more for the world. Hope you guys enjoyed it and learn something to and as always please subscribe to raise the bar when you have a second rate us sheriffs review us all that good stuff and if you wanna to get involved. Please go check out their website. Take your family down there. We all need time outside. We all need time to bond. During the season of you know the new reality of cova that settling. It's not going anywhere we might as well make the best of it to go out and make a difference. Have fun and please let us know about a chair. Tell us your story if you go out. Please post about on instagram tag us. We'd love to share what you and your family are up to his. We keep inspiring each other's to make the most of this moment ren thanks a lot toxin.

los angeles california ninety five degrees Cindy montana adrian alley cindy montana cindy monson beautiful santa monica mountai los angeles beautiful park coldwater canyon park forty percent mr durr fifteen year fifty fifty years andy versus fifteen million dollars golic valentine laurel canyon dwp
PODCAST: Fighting climate change, one building at a time

UN News

11:26 min | 2 months ago

PODCAST: Fighting climate change, one building at a time

"You really can't make the climate math work without decarbonising where we live and where we do business foods. It's key consideration to make sure that these new housing stock can contribute to reduce their greenhouse gas emission. You're listening to the zone with me conlon. Even though the covid nineteen pandemic has put a dent in commuting and other forms of travel. New york is still a busy city teeming with traffic but petrol and diesel. Far from being the main sources of greenhouse gas emissions hit that dubious honor goes to buildings more than two thirds of the city's carbon footprint comes from the energy that goes into heating cooling. All lighting buildings. New york state has an ambitious plans significantly reduce its carbon emissions by eighty five percent by mid century but here in the city a dense metropolis full of buildings from different eras. The scale of this task is playing jimmy. Joseph from the new york state energy research development authority accepts that the challenge is significant. But it needs to be tackled building. Decarbonization is one of the more significant challenges in our a climate agenda. But you know you really can't make the climate math work without decarbonising where we live and where we do business. So that means bringing to scale many different solutions and overcoming barriers in the millions of buildings that we have a across new york state and we have over four million buildings in new york. State and seventy percent of these buildings were constructed before the emergence of the energy code. So these buildings were not designed to be energy efficient. And if you look out your window you could probably glean as as much so many. And i would say the majority of these buildings will need to be retrofitted or upgraded in some way shape or form over the next few decades to reduce carbon pollution and to achieve our greenhouse. Gas reduction goals. So that's what we're very focused on. And we have many different strategies to try to drive progress on that front. I was joseph senior vice president strategy at the new york state energy research and development authority explaining why the state needs to get to grips with the energy leaking out of inefficient buildings. I'm one of the strategies. For cutting the state's carbon footprint involves finding ways to ensure that new buildings us just a small fraction of energy needed by buildings for heating and cooling on a snowy windy day in february. I headed to the bushwick neighborhood of brooklyn new york to meet chris. Benedict's an architect base in manhattan. Who's had her own practice since one thousand nine hundred five and has always been interested in designing buildings that are environmentally. Sound as possible. She wanted to show me to her projects commissioned by the riseborough community partnership which develops low-budget housing for low income families senior citizens and other populations with special needs with an emphasis on energy efficiency. Both projects demonstrate that it is possible to dramatically slash energy needs without costs rising through the roof. The first is a reasonably built construction for senior citizens which means strict ultra-low energy or passive house standards this building a special because it was either the first or one of the first new construction buildings and definitely the first affordable housing building in new york city where we sought to meet the passive house. Standard was an empty lot. Grass growing in here and a lot of the construction was very typical. The exterior of this building is now clad with installation which was an unusual thing to do in two thousand five and we like putting insulation on the outside of buildings because it keeps all the thermal mass of the building inside of the installation and keeps the temperature inside very steady. We also like installation on the outside of the building because it keeps condensation from happening inside of the building because of the walls are warm. And there's no condensing surface. It improves the health of the people in the building by insulating on the outside. There's a lot of things going on in buildings right now with regard to their mechanical systems. That could be improved. That could bring us a big jump forward. Why is this important for it to be tights. There's normally in all buildings here in new york a lot of building leakage. So in the winter buildings experience something called the stack effect which is a physical effect. Where air at the bottom of the building that is warmed up rises up through the building and then pulls more cold air in at the bottom so often in new york. People are very uncomfortable on the first floor. They live there and their overheated at the top and they open their window and this is a cycle can control by creating an air barrier to reduce the staff effect in the building they might have steam boiler systems so steam is on and off. Steam has to heat all the radiators up in the entire building water condenses and comes back down to the boiler again but people on the get heat when the steam gets up there condenses and the heat comes out into the room then the heat goes away and so you have to keep doing that. It's hard to maintain temperature in a steam heated building. And so a lot of energy is used for that often the radiators are oversized for the rooms and then the buildings don't have insulation so you're losing the heat that you put in a very quick rate you know. That's kind of the poetic and beautiful thing about a passive houses. You're cutting down the rate of heat loss out of the building enclosure. And you're making up for that heat with the people and the lights and everything else that goes on inside of the building. So you're matching the rate of the occupants and what they do with the rate of the heat going through the enclosure. so it's it's kind of a poetic beautiful thing. Buddha's benedict is not only concerned with designing new buildings to the highest environmental standards. She's also helping to transform those extremely leaky buildings. She mentioned. we are in grove street in brooklyn and these are four buildings that are part of a nine ding project called casa pacifica and the project is to take existing buildings and bring them to the passive house standard. The passive house is based mostly on creating an airtight enclosure. That is insulated with continuous installation. Ventilation that is done with heat recovery. So that when we're taking heated air or air condition air out of an apartment. Were taking energy that we put into that conditioning and putting it back into the incoming airstream you've really put a new brand new skin on outer layer on the existing building. A how complicated is that to do. Well you know it kind of looks simple when you look at it now but it was It was a puzzle to figure it out. Most projects such as cassava are encouraging examples of innovation. Climate action. agenda. It's clear that they contact place in isolation as giant. Joseph explains joined up thinking is needed if the city and state to achieve their goals. We need high-efficiency electricity to heat and cool our buildings so that means moving off of the fossil fuel based sources of heating that. We have today for buildings. We need to make our buildings. Energy-efficient contain the costs associated with expanding the electric grid because we are going to need to build out the electric grid if we are to electrify the four million buildings and in new york state. And then the third thing we need to do is Incorporate more load flexibility into buildings so that buildings can communicate with the electric grid and buildings can ramp down and ramp up their loads to balance the overall systems and whilst established cities such as new york are grappling with the legacy of their past other parts of the world or urbanizing at breakneck speed. Potentially storing up problems for the future. Christofle is the head of the housing unit at un habitat the un agency that promotes safe and sustainable urban environments a supporter of retrofitting products like cazar perceive which improve existing housing stock. He's confident that the developing economies of the global south can benefit from the kind of innovation seen in new york from the best figure. I'll work on housing with his very large share of the emissions to come about of like the new housing stock that is required to be built in your future. So when we work as you touching on the future of cities your forensic for it's really key consideration to make sure that decision and this new housing stock can mitigate the impact undo on the climate but also contract to reduce greenhouse gas emission. some companies are pretty printing houses in africa sub saharan africa. And some years ago this would have not been really maybe like the most attractive approach to reducing greenhouse gas emission. And especially from the lakers. Joel point of view. But it's a very. It's a very interesting solution to be able to produce housing at scale at cost but also By streamlining the way that you are building house in the also like sourcing sourcing materials. You can really have a positive impact on the environment by reducing emissions christofle alone head of housing at un habitat back in new york. No one is underestimating. The scale of task ahead but there is a sense that the political technical and logistical stars are running and that we have a fighting chance of achieving the goal of bringing down global temperatures one building at a time. It's not rocket science. The challenges that we need to achieve. There's just a a lot of issues. We need to work out on the ground. We gotta get the costs down. Are we going to get care. I've traveled to some european countries where they set these goals. And they say they're gonna try and that's what we're gonna do. We're going try. I'm katelyn and you've been listening to the latest on the flagship podcast from news for daily texts audio and video stories. Go to a website. News dot u. n. dot org.

new york new york state energy research riseborough community partners conlon new york state energy research New york brooklyn Joseph casa pacifica jimmy Benedict manhattan joseph new york city chris Christofle un africa
How we can build sustainable, equitable cities after the pandemic | Vishaan Chakrabarti

TED Talks Daily

19:08 min | 10 months ago

How we can build sustainable, equitable cities after the pandemic | Vishaan Chakrabarti

"Hi I'm Elise Hugh. You're listening to Ted talks daily. The world's cities are engines, culture, knowledge, and community these days there at the center of public, health and racial inequity crises at the same time. How could they be built back from these upheavals, but in a better way? How should they be engines for inclusion? Architect with Sean Chakrabarti has some ideas, and it's all about putting people at the center when we design solutions for our cities. He's in conversation at Ted Twenty twenty with Ted Curator Chee Pearlman. Russia Walla host of a new podcast from Ted called pin-drop. Every week you'll travel to a different location around the world. Get lost in a new vibe and tap into a surprising idea. Next to Mexico City a real life superhero who dresses up as a loser door to protect citizens from traffic. That's pin-drop from Ted. Checkout pin-drop Apple podcasts spotify or wherever you listen. So when we launched the build back better interview series, we knew we wanted to take a hard look at how we might build back our cities after the pandemic. Now. We're still in the midst of a health crisis, but our streets are no longer empty canyons. Instead they're filled with protests and the urgency of healing are urban fabric has only been magnified. I'm pretty passionate about cities. I tend to prefer to run I. See them as our engines of. Culture Commerce knowledge. Community, but I also asked. How can they also be our engines of of equality and inclusion, so we have someone here today? WHO's thought about these questions his whole career. v Sean Chakrabarti is an architect, his urbanism. He's an actor and he was the director of Planning in Manhattan in the aftermath of eleven, so he has seen crisis before he's the founder of his own architecture firm, and in just a few weeks he'll be taking the reins as Dean of Berkeley's College of environmental design. So hello welcome the Sean. itchy. Are you good to see you? So happy to see you welcome I imagine you're in deep. Thought about so many things right now, but. Campus, your sense of what we're thinking about. Cities in terms of how they are struggling, and how they might recover from both a health and an equity crisis, said they find ourselves in. Sure. After nine eleven. There are a lot of forecast made about what would happen with cities. People's had cities would be over. Skyscrapers would be over. A lot of those forecasts age very well and so I think rather than forecasting about what cities might be I think we should talk about what cities should be coming out of. These dual challenges of damage on one hand and Standing structural racism on the other hand that the black lives matter movement has really made made so clear to the world. And and if you think about those two challenges, they're interrelated because the impacts of the pandemic have not been equitable and communities of color in particular have suffered disproportionately, and so I think coming out of this in our cities, and I think our cities are everything. You described as these engines. Of Culture Commerce, but I think we need a new narrative a new social contract for the way we think about our cities. And I think you know right now. People are going to naturally tend towards this austerity model. They're gonNA say well. We're going to go broke from all of this. And so we have to pullback in investing in our people and I think that's exactly the wrong thing to do. We need a new narrative of generosity. Not Austerity and I think we need to focus on on the equitable, the sustainable and the attainable. Prior, to this crisis, and these crises that are in right now you know people that we now call essential workers. Communities of color were not having equal outcomes in our cities. Are Cities were? Working very well for the prosperous and not working in all four people in other parts of the economy and really critical parts of our world in our culture. So if we wanted to craft a new urban equity agenda, what would that look like? What would it entail? and I think about three components one is the idea of having equitable health and Housing and we can talk about how those things are interrelated. Sustainable urban mobility, and really changing the way in which we move around our cities, particularly as it relates to climate change, seventy percent of carbon emissions come from buildings and cars often rooted in our cities, and so we can have an extraordinary impacted scale in terms of the environment and climate justice. And then finally the idea of attainable, social and cultural resources, and I think if we focused on those three things, equitable housing and health, sustainable, urban mobility and able social and cultural resources as ideas for policy coming out of these crises that we could craft. Newark, inequity, agenda. That, that's really it's. It sounds like you're thinking on all cylinders all about this, but let's just start with housing because you know cities before the pandemic. Most people could not afford to live. In a decent housing in many of our major urban centers. Housing costs were skyrocketing, and that actually meant that the essential workers that we now recognize we need to have it mixed in with the entire city fabric are living further and further away and the further from their jobs, and I just wonder from your point of view. How do we start reset that balance? Sure it's a critical question. Obviously everyone prior this dual crisis you know spoke about gentrification, and that became a concern across cities globally as cities kind of recovered from the industrial era of the nineteen seventies became more attractive places to live, but then in turn became unaffordable. And I think we're presented with a false choice in terms of this narrative that we are either the impoverished cities of the nineteen seventy s where we have no tax base, and there's horrible crime or so forth or the cities that we just experienced which are kind of bourgeois banality. Where cities would become so prosperous that the very things that made them attractive. Became monocultures and we were not only losing the housing or essential workers and communities of color as you mentioned, but also losing the spirit of what we all love a bit cities in the first place, which is the diversity inclusivity that makes cities interesting, and how positive social friction I think first of all we need to think about. A how could? Housing, policy change in the future now. If remote working becomes something that is much more prevalent, we may, in fact in many of our cities drop in demand for office space, and is that occurs. It very well be has been done in other places like in Lower Manhattan where we can convert older buildings into affordable housing supportive home formerly how? Almost people because we need to break out of is the fact that essential workers you're talking about with leads to homelessness is the fact that most people in cities are redbird, which means they're spending more than a third of their income on housing costs, and so we need an activist government intervene in that. And to be able to say well, maybe some of that older office stock could become housing, and also most cities have brownfield sites real yards other places where we could bill mixed income, affordable, attainable housing, and that will lead to better public health outcomes. Because housing is health, you cannot have a healthy society if people are under housing, stress or have homelessness going on. One of the things that I've been thinking about is we're all talking about how retail is transforming and we're. Maybe we'll see fewer chain stores in cities like New York, and and maybe instead of those chain stores we could use those empty storefronts for educational or social purposes pop up libraries, pop-up, universal, pre-k or classrooms. You know things that still give our streetlife vibrancy and activation, but not without relying on chain stores, and instead relying on social infrastructure and education infrastructure that. That rather than as your question talks about school zoning that we bring them out into Muhammad that we actually distribute a more diffuse way around our cities, the educational infrastructure that people need in their communities, which includes by the way things like vocational training and senior education, so we create a kind of cradle to grave educational system. That's a a kind of street infrastructure across our cities I. think that's possible in a world in which we're GONNA see fewer chain stores. Fish on I mean I think you were talking about something that. We are all very key to. Figure out in our in our world, but if you're speaking about a new urban equity agenda. Are you also speaking about a different kind of budget allocation? Has that get done in how the afford that? Well I think we have to talk you know. financiers talk about equity and debt and I think we need to talk about social equity and social debt. You. We've seen what happens when there is an economic crisis that leads toss Taraji and austerity often just leads to more cycles of hardship, more economic ruination, and that is not the path we should take your, so we probably will need to borrow some more money and actually put deck to good use to billy a infrastructure of opportunity that I'm talking about, but we also need to. acknowledged that our cities are wealthy places when I was. Was Manhattan Planning Director New York City's budget was about forty three billion dollars. The budget passed last year in New York. City was almost double that and that's been pretty much of a global phenomena, and so if you look at whether, it's London, breed in San Francisco or and Hidalgo in Paris, the mayor's around the world are understanding. You have to invest in your people. You cannot have a massive retraction at a time of social need. And so we're going to have to find a way to pay for it both through. Some deficit spending as well as looking at the industries that are thriving and saying whether we can pay higher taxes for some people I know. I could be higher taxes in order to have a more equitable world than I'd gladly do so okay. I wanted to actually switch to the topic of. because that is so much. A part of our infrastructure is also obviously such part of what our cities are. Driven by whether it's the amount of payment have now on our streets the accessibility. To public transportation. I wonder though in the context of all of that. Are we going to see the rise in use of a private car? Because of people going to be fearful about being in that public space well this is a great question. It's a big concern. Many people are concerned that as certain cities recover arena C., wide widespread sheets, widespread use of private automobiles and you know mass transit was not the problem here and I think both. Both, density and mass transit and been painted with a rather negative brushwood comes to the covid up situation because there are places that are quite dense that have survived the covid crisis much better than a lot of the cities in the West have, despite the use of mass transit, and so mass transit can be made to be safe, but I. Think what we really need to do is step back and look at what happened which is? Most of our cities have about thirty percent of full one third of their land committed to roads right, it's a it's a staggering figure of a third of Tokyo or third of New York being committed to roads, and then the majority of that road space is used by private vehicles today and I think we need to completely rethink equation and again in the spirit of equity and ecology. Reap us that public space in terms of XPRESS buses. That could be space so that you had more social distancing on buses while you needed them. Because, you have many more of them. Walking and biking proved to be very effective means of transport in the Cova Environment as long as people are keeping their distance, and I think you know in terms of both the ecology in terms of human connectedness. All of that is so much more possible if we stop using roads solely for cars and especially private cars, because the problem here is not a technological problem, it's a spatial problem if you look at how much. Much space personal heartaches up versus a bicycle reputation I don't care whether the car is autonomous or electric or whatever it is, it just takes up too much space per person, and that's what we need. We have the space in our cities to move around in a much more efficient, ecological timely manner, and in a way that's much more pleasant for people in terms of quality of life, if we simply give more of our streets over to people as opposed to cars. Ishai tell me. What. What are you thinking now? In terms of how dramatically? Will Change. Do you feel like? Things will ever be back to some version of what we used to know or are we really setting course for something near? Well. People are obviously concerned about this. I know that as an architect and you know in my studio. We're itching to get back to the office. We know that there's an opportunity costs to working this way, but at the same time know there may be people who have really difficult commutes. They and their CEO's might have kind of aligned Dole of saying the employer says I don't really want to pay for that cubicle. The employee says I. Don't Really Want Commute. Commute to that cubicle every day, and so I do imagine that over the long term. This is going to reduce some of the commutation, and so I think it will be a mic situation, but I do believe that a lot of industries we still need that face to face serendipitous contact that sparks innovation and sparks creativity, and so I still fully believe in that and fully believe that that will be part of why cities recover from all of this, but. You Know I. Think the other thing to say about that is that I'm in the middle of writing my next book and there's so much interesting history associated with how cities changed in the course of pandemics. Sewer and water infrastructure, light and air standards from between. Cholera to the bubonic plague Spanish flu. It all changed the form of our cities, and this will to, but hopefully for the better, but also in a way that you know. Builds upon our desire for human connectedness. I have just one more question for you, which is you are embarking on now? Your new role as dean of architecture school and I wonder. What is the pedagogy going to look like? How is it changing? It's on my mind constantly obviously as an incoming dean. Berkeley as a big public university, in my undergraduate body, forty one percent of my students are first generation. We have a lot of inclusion. We're going to get a lot more diversity and inclusion I hope in the coming years, and those students will go out and become our future leaders, and it's in those foods I mean. They asked me really tough questions about how we're going to diversify our faculty and diversify our pedagogy, and I think one of the questions that a of students have is. Once their instrumentality all of this. How do they take what they learn? and become planners, landscape architects, architects who really change the narrative and change how we implement policy on the ground you know Berkeley's obviously right next to Oakland and there's just so much to do. In terms of listening to that community and working with that community are our good friend Walter Hood has been doing that for decades and I. Just think that Berkeley is one of these places as a big public. Public University that really gives me hope because of the students and the faculty, and what what impassioned them and I I do think pedagogy will change the consequence of all of this because we have to look at everything through this frame of what is equitable. What is sustainable in what is the table? But I think we do know that unless there is a a different sense of representation in terms of. What. Our government is how our government can. can be reformed in everything from criminal justice reform in terms of how we police our streets. That that none of this can come to pass that we need. Diversity and representation, and also again I think we need to rethink our narratives and not. Constantly fall in the trap of of. What we've been living in the last fifty years and instead think about. How do we get a much broader sense of representation and have the the self-governance that you know that our democracies promised us and I. Think unless you have that. You can't institute the kind of urban. Equity Agenda that we've been talking about. That's that's a lot of new thinking for the architecture fields, but We welcome that Sean. I think you are absolutely in the business of building back better. I think that your ideas. And your initiatives. More needed now than ever thank you. Thank you.

Sean Chakrabarti New York Berkeley Ted Manhattan Ted Twenty twenty Mexico City Ted Curator Chee Pearlman Elise Hugh Russia Walla Public University spotify Apple director of Planning Cholera Muhammad
HOTM: Making Cities Greener

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

29:22 min | 1 year ago

HOTM: Making Cities Greener

"Hey first-person listeners. This is Rob Sachs. I'm the director of F. Studios here at foreign policy and I wanNA tell you a little bit about heat of the moment. It's a show. You're most likely already familiar with as we inserted the debut episode into this feed a few weeks back. Well we feel that. Climate change is such an important issue. We wanted to offer you a few more episodes so for the next several weeks. We'll be dropping heat of the moment into this feed in addition to our first person interviews. We'll be labeling. These episodes H. t. m. before the title. Here's heat of the moment host John with the latest episode Efi Studios in the climate investment funds. This is heat of the moment. I'm John Sutter. Here's an inescapable fact. If you WANNA talk about the climate crisis you've got to talk about cities by two thousand fifty. Two thirds of humanity is expected to live in urban areas and importantly for those of us who care about global warming cities consume two-thirds of the world's energy and they're responsible for seventy percent of global co two emissions later on in the program. We're going to take to Oslo. Which is one of the greenest cities on the planet. We're going to see what they've done and how it might be replicated elsewhere in the world but first we turn to Peter Kaldor. He's a pioneer of sustainable. Urban Design way back in nineteen eighty three. He founded his own design consulting firm in San Francisco in over the years. He's worked on projects all around the world from the US to China in Mexico. He's concerned not just with individual buildings but with the very fabric of urban life and how that contributes to our own well-being in to the climate crisis he also is a founding member of the Congress on new which promotes more sustainable urban areas. So I read that the Charter for the Congress of the new urbanism that it hangs on the wall in your office area and I'm wondering for people who aren't familiar with and new urbanism as an idea. What does that charter say? Essence and what does it mean to be an urban EST in the year? Twenty twenty what the Charter says is that since World War Two. We him Headed off on an experiment of brave. New World centered around Automobiles Freeways single use zoning a paradigm of the suburbs I e the American dream that has become increasingly dysfunctional both in terms of environmental impacts and in terms of social and economic opportunity. It's an environment as of two thousand and eight with the financial crisis which was really embedded in the fact that a lot of middle class. America couldn't afford that American dream and didn't want to drive that far to get to it that there's been an increasing mismatch between what we really want what we can really sustain environmentally and economically. And what we've been in the habit of building. So sprawl is the vice. It's the problem and it's a global problem. We have sprawl in China by huge super blocks. That have ten story buildings you'd think the density was urban but there's no walkability there's no excuse. There's no urban vitality none of the synergy that makes a great urban environment. The Truth Matters. You can have great urbanism at any Density Small Town where kids can freely walk from ELM street to Main Street if you WANNA call it. That and parents can get on a old-fashioned streetcar or Light Rail Line instead of getting in a car and ending up in a parking lot. These are all the big differences and they have to do with real choices. We make in terms of infrastructure in terms of the vision of how we WANNA live new. Urbanism tried to articulate it and basically right down some very simple prescriptions for how to get to a better man made environment. What are the ways that cities in this conversation about how we live in metropolitan areas like? How does that contribute to the problem of climate change? In how could also be used to leverage solutions so spreading out is destructive in three big ways one by displacing nature second by increasing the amount of our mobile travel. We ended up with and third by kind of mandating buildings that are inherently less efficient in terms of energy and water consumption. But beyond all that I'm always most interested in what I call co benefits if you saw for one dimension of the equation even something as important as climate change. You are kind of missing the opportunity to solve many problems simultaneously so take for example affordability here in California. We have a housing crisis. We don't have enough housing for our workforce used to be that people would just drive farther and farther into the Central Valley to get cheap single family homes and the penalty of course was time away from family time away from community time away from oneself effectively as well as the environmental impact so a better urban environment. That bills on infill sites and adds more transit solves a social need and an economic need for effectively a better lifestyle and so when you can solve multiple crises at the same time if you can solve affordable housing transportation and climate change with one strategy. That strategy has a lot more potent. I mean it seems like we have these cities in the US. In Asia in parts of Latin America that are sprawling are concrete in are in place. And so how do you? How do you get to make those shifts in who who decides US? Yeah and most developers now know from their surveys. That people would choose a smaller house. That's closer to the important things in their lives than a bigger house. A large lot. That's more distant. So that's the jury's in on that the promise courses we have legacy planning and land use policies that stand in the way I think this one giant opportunity at least in the United States for how to solve switches we as we built suburbs built a grid of arterials the five and six lane roads that nobody wants to live on. That are in many cases lined by strip commercial big old shopping centers with parking lots and single storey buildings. That's the land that we can now rian habit and redevelop into mix use projects. Turn those arterials into transit boulevards because they got plenty of space for everything could sidewalks could bike lanes new transit ways mostly bus. Rapid Transit is the most cost effective trees. And of course you can still have the cars even so you get these ribbons of urbanism carving through all of Suburbia providing yet another kind of lifestyle opportunity even in those areas that you'd think of is kind of categorically sprawl and you've worked on projects in the US and China like in various parts of the world. A quarter of the success stories like are there cities that have have. Reinvented themselves in that way. And become more climate-friendly as a result it's interesting. We spent ten years working in China. They're national land. Use Policy Now. Calls for transit development makes us human scale city blocks walkable streets all sorts of things. They didn't have in there. I kind of explosion of urban growth. I'm glad you brought up the size of city blocks because it's sort of surprising to me that this idea of how big your block is would influence. You know your energy footprint. We'll just think about it. The average block in China's was super bloch used to be around four hundred to five hundred meters per side. The hold over five thousand units of housing and because the streets were space so far apart every street had to be huge and was therefore inhospitable to pedestrians and bikes. The death of the bicycle in China's well known now for that period so giant streets and giant blocks led to complete demise of human scale and to certain degree of community. People didn't know each other in these super blocks. They could recognize who is supposed to be. They're not so they started getting them. Making the situation even worse. We had gated subdivisions subdivisions. They had gated blocks. Same end result. Which is that people tended to use cars coming and going? Now there's a mandate for around one hundred meters city block average. That's that's an average hold historic town centre scale in the United States around three hundred and twenty feet square blocks and all of a sudden you get more streets and therefore each street can be smaller and more human scale and more hospitable to all the things that really should happen on the streets such as walking and biking and sitting in cafes as opposed to what can happen on eight lanes at the edge of a gated super block. We now work with standards there to call for green streets remember. They're they're now pushing towards maybe thirty percent of households owning a car. Unlike US where every household owns a car and so there's still a great need for streets that are just there with for without cards period. They're just there for the seventy percent of the population. That doesn't own a car. So they're walking or on a bus or on a bike. Historically in China the old wet and dry markets the places where people met and had local commerce. They're coming back in the form of these green streets so you have a pretty popular Ted talk and right at the top you cite this statistic that we need to build cities that will house billion additional people so this massive expansion of the cities that already exist. How do you think about that future? In which they're going to be many more people in a lot of them living in urban environments you know it's a classic saying which has never let a crisis go unused sustainable cities and regions are the solution to so many of our problems. And so you know the fact that we are going to be building that much means that we can reshape existing suburbs we can revitalize urban centers that we can get it right effectively and in many places that is happening. It's and don't forget running in tandem with all. This is the decline in global poverty. I mean I think it was back in the fifties forty percent of the global population was In extreme poverty and now it's well under ten percent And a lot of that happened in China because they move people to cities when people move to cities they have economic opportunities for rates drop and so our population comes back into balance. Women have opportunities. They don't have in the countryside. Education flourishes public services. All these things start to happen so on a social level the city really can be great medicine for the kind of poverty that that mankind has lived with most of its history. What about some of the some of the most rapidly growing cities in the world are in Africa and other parts of the developing world in place? Where there isn't money being spent on those other programs that you mentioned that could be diverted into two smarter cities like what do you think the plan should be there? You know we did a big regional plan for Mexico City which is kind of at the high end of the developing economies But still has massive poverty. I call it. Low income sprawl In in the United States the higher income population moved to the suburbs away from the city in much of the developing world. The wealthy stay at the city center near the historic cultural assets and and job centers and Poor pushed more and more. To the periphery So I think the same Urban Paradigm or Metropolitan Paradigm works there as it does just about anywhere. Which is you need more transit especially for those low income populations that don't own cars. You need to decentralize jobs in ways that make them accessible to everybody without a huge burden. Some of the average commutes one way in Mexico or three hours. You need to solve the housing crisis for the low income population through things called sites and services let people build their own place but give them land security and give them a rights of ways with utilities so that the sewers not running open in the street and water is accessible and powers accessible. It's not that expensive to do. World Bank has experimented with it many cases it's been quite successful but it does once again take investment. We just have to invest in the right things. There are plenty of solutions out there. Plenty on every level we just have to decide to allocate money and energy to them entrenched and forces that were up against and we just have to be very clear. This is going to be a long battle. Not An easy win. Peter Kaldor is a San Francisco based architect in a leading global voice on designing climate smart cities a changing climate presents humanity. Really with only one option adapt join host. Doug Parsons for America. Adapts A PODCAST. In which Doug Interview. Scientists activists posting makers journalists including myself to discuss how society is going to adapt to the perils of a warmer future from rising seas to droughts and storms. You can find America adopts on your favorite PODCAST APP or visit America Adopts Dot Org. So what is the best case scenario for what a Green City might look like? Well you could do worse than to look towards Oslo the capital of Norway in Autumn. Two thousand nine thousand nine. The European Commission launched an ambitious target of zero emissions by twenty fifty. Well this Scandinavian capital is ahead of the curve already. Oslo is only ten years from that goal. Our reporter preteen. Alu Traveled to Europe's twenty nineteen green capital to see firsthand. What Oslo is getting right in what it can teach the rest of us these sounds of digging tailing and fourteen. Come from an unlikely. Venue this herb garden where we have some herbs. Some some flowers also have a bigger rooftop garden on the fourteenth. I'm on the rooftop of the Clarion Hotel in the heart of Oslo. The capital of Norway Watching Ana Carlsson Rake in soil despite the persistent drizzle of rain behind the main train station is buzzing with commuters. Anna has been a full-time urban farmer. Over the past year a far cry from an old office job is an environmental lobbyist. Soudan office in front of their computer for many years. Yeah so Gordon. More physical flung by the looming Nordic clouds and dressed in a windbreak in gumboots. She looks ready for a force type work. But it's just another workday for on as she tends to the micro. Greens that supply three sizable restaurants. Spas of the hotel that is wedged between corporate offices and commercial streets down below in the hotel. Lobby Theresa lugging suitcases through the revolving doors. This call Lead Andrea. Scapin sits down for a conversation. A comfortable misfit in the flashy reception area hanging over worn jeans. His sweatshirt proudly displays the word farmer in Norwegian indeed Andrei's inherited farming as an ancestral depiction. But over the past years it's transformed into education genuinely believe that our wasting food is connected with our distance from the soil era because when my grandmother her generation ninety five percent of the Norwegian population had their own personal experiences in growing food. How it's two percent two generations later and during the same period of time. We've started throwing away food that is connected and started small with a city garden the produces vegetables and host community. Dinners with the help of its members. It became cradle of urban farming in the slow food movement in Osler as an urban farmer employed in which farmers union that was my job to inspire as many as possible to to grow our city screen and Annabella depending this culture embedded in a larger green economy has itself been a slow moving process like the garden. The hotel project has been success in terms of production. What we have done here at the hotel is to see whether we on a very small plot of land two hundred and fifty square meters can grow enough and sell it to market prices and live from it and the answer to that question is yes we can. We can pay our gardener this so that's an area of just under twenty seven hundred square feet about three or four times. The size of basketball court and raise an Anna have been growing micro Greens in the small space stacking them until each other and harvesting four to six times a year and when standing on the fourteenth floor of the hotel reface one point five billion square feet of unused rooftops for Andrey is helping transform the densest parts of the city rooftops backyards and even basements are empty plots of land. That ought to be used and wouldn't that be beautiful. Such Franz Nation. He points out requires a shift of attitude in fact shift. Of course I work with city-dwellers throughout many years. Yeah and you can see a change in them. I mean just that realize sation of how long it takes from your put your tomato seed in March inside. What you need to do is bringing in and out. Planning watering during summer also experienced a change of the people who are interested in this case. The success is as much. The result of social political movement as individual efforts here in Oslo people like nine hundred as a spearheading. The lodger fight abate climate change through a combination of lobbying and literally getting their hands dirty as the innovate for the future. Their experiments provide important insights. Eight hundred million people around the world engaged in urban agriculture to meet daily needs architecture and design play a crucial role. In the city's efforts to together the lived in natural environments according to Marina Satra. A senior architect is also based on so a lot of the projects is working with dealing with architecture in relation to Cape and they -ture and we find landscapes everywhere even the density. It's one example is the opera exiting. The central station is students threw away the Opera House and on the Banks Osma fueled amid some of the most diverse florin four-man the country. The building itself is a leading example of architecture. Sublime music drifts. Out and travels to the communal Bart's along the waterfront with the winter the sloping sides of the building. Pile-up with snow subbing as rants for snowboarders. It's a special emotional experience that makes you feel that you belong somewhere and we think that's sustainable in itself. But then of course you have all other kinds of aspects like reducing carbon footprint using Solid durable materials and then of course we have positive energy positive. Projects Akin Trondheim. We just opened up One of our first buildings. That are on the producing. It's just one step on your way to be carbon negative given this holistic approach. It's not surprising to mean Mariana. At a gathering of anthropologists and urban planners come to the world central politics sustaining cities by the European Association of Social Anthropologists and the University of false low. The conference is among the hundreds of local and e you wide efforts initiated by the Municipality. The different specialist spend they days exploring new approaches to designing cities. It's an honor to be here and I'm really amazed by this big crowds following the conference. I meet Marianna in her element at her office. That is a refurbish warehouse in the city's main harbour. We like to have this big open space where we collaborate with each other with. Dole's large enough for trucks to pass. The office is vast yet intimate with a vibrant color scheme an open floor plan wall size windows line-up to face the port with large ferries arriving and departing you. I'm looking at the most environmentally friendly votes way in Europe. While clear consistent policies have steered such developments gathering. The political will is much more complicated. Says Marina so right now. There are a lot of interest trying to understand the existing regulations to force sustainable solutions. Maybe this is a place where entrepreneurs could help out to see. How can we create great environment for collaboration because this really maybe sometimes the challenge that you have? Developers policymakers politicians and engineers architects coming together up. Front Oslo is an optimal laboratory for experimentation. Because of its small population wealth and ample space but Norway's hardly representative of the wide world. The big question is whether these initiatives can be scaled to size applied in major cities elsewhere especially in the global south to find out how I visited. Thomas Hilland Ericsson an anthropologist at the University of four slow in Norway there are few of us It's a fairly cohesive society with very little by way of social conflict people to pay the taxes very high level of trust in you know the educational system in the health services so it's not directly comparable at all to sit say in global south or even in the UK indeed the city of Oslo has especial climate budgeted with forty two separate measures across different sectors. This would be difficult crisis. Ridden European capitals like Athens. An unfathomable for huge stratified cities like Mumbai or Cairo. Given these disparities thinking globally and acting locally seems to be the only practical approach. It's important to cut this down to scale which is manageable which is human. I probably can't save the world but maybe I can save you now. This clump of tree or this little river and if everybody does it in the same way communities worldwide will make collective contribution to making the world a better place for others unders with such you global contribution in mind no way invested public bonds in distant parts of the world through information sharing between researchers and new way and those from countries in the Global South One area where there is a direct kind of a transfer of knowledge between Oslo and many parts of the world would be in public transportation in fossil free mobility. Dan Dainik originally from India who works at the center of Development and environment of the University of four. Slow has been a bridge between these worlds speaking from Malawi where he works. Part of the Dan has noticed. Increased curiosity in exchanges between the so-called developed parts of the world and those that are still developing particularly in the area of sustainability. I see a fantastic new development particularly in Africa. Certain cities like Nairobi. Likely US like He. Golly they are adopting some of these solutions. Coming from the global north like Electric bike like introducing cough. Frey motorcycle free zones. Dan Points out that while remedies such as alternative means of transport can catch on quickly. A larger behavioral change is much more challenging in countries with economic disparities. The trouble so far has been that. There really isn't a proper well-functioning public transportation system. You can't talk about electric cars because only ten percent of the population is connected to the grid and even that ten percent gets electricity for three or four hours. A day On the other hand there are many citizens actually wanting much more of an emphasis and investment in solar and more renewable energy sources but shifting to these sources is the main means will again required that shift in attitude towards the environment especially in urban centers. Where consumption is the highest. What has been particularly interesting in Norway and Oslo is that this green culture has been extremely participatory so citizens have been actively involved. There is greater ownership in promoting the idea that this is good you. The green lifestyle is the way to go. Also success stems from essential prerequisite conditions continuing to create jobs that feed into green growth investing in sustainable development and e culturally ingrained love for the outdoors. But the city's reign as the European Green capital is coming to a close in now falls to its successor. Portugal's capital Lisbon to set an example. The world can begin to follow this. Pretty Fox now lou in Oslo next week on heat of the moment we traveled to Morocco and get an up close look at a solar energy project. That's a game changer. For North Africa and beyond because there was no precedence to nor was is that was difficult to get investors to get projects financed easily at now with this demonstration. It makes it possible for everyone that they see that solar power can be part of the future of energy production. That's next week on heat of the moment. That's it for this episode of heat of the moment. Which is a CO production of F. Studios in the climate investment funds? The opinions expressed in this series. Do not necessarily represent the stance of foreign policy the climate investment funds or their partners. Our podcast is produced by myself. An Emily Johnson with help from Scott. Andrew and Dan Haggerty special thanks to Ku Yar in kcrw in Salt Lake City and WABC in Atlanta for their assistance. The Director of studios is Rob Sachs. I'm John Sutter. Thank you for listening

Oslo US China Norway John Sutter Peter Kaldor America Mexico Rob Sachs F. Studios Africa director founding member Congress Europe San Francisco

Thursday, February 25, 2021 - The Christian Science Monitor Daily

The Christian Science Monitor Daily

13:44 min | Last month

Thursday, February 25, 2021 - The Christian Science Monitor Daily

"Welcome to monitor daily podcasts. It's thursday february twenty fifth. Thanks for joining us. I'm noah robertson. Reading four stephen humphreys and i'm samantha laney 'perfect last year north carolina native. Michelle fishburne packed her belongings into an rv for ten thousand mile cross country trip. Her mission research a book about how the pandemic changed ordinary americans. If i had to sum up what. I've seen in the two hundred fifty to three hundred interviews i've done. It's pluck says miss fishburn who's met homeless people medical workers teachers judges hairdressers and even a performing clown. Pluck is defined as spirited and determined courage. That is what. I've been seeing in person after person. She says during a stop in columbia missouri. Miss fishburne a twenty one year old. Student who exemplifies quality. India gregory recounted how she decided to do something impactful during lockdown so she launched an e commerce retailing business the motto for her company. The repertoire is embraced the uncomfortable and walk with purpose. The majority of misfits burns new acquaintances. Feel more connected to other people than before the pandemic gifted their heads up from their previously busy lives and they are thinking about and seeing and caring about other people says the self employed storyteller that extends beyond family and friends. Americans are concerned about the well being of others. They've never met including those across party lines. I have heard those five little words. I think about those people over and over again. She says today's stories our first story. When can we drop our masks and swap smiles with strangers in public again as cases and deaths plummet some see signs for cautious. Optimism amid continuing vigilance nearly one year. After much of the nation abruptly shut down due to a little understood virus. Something new emerging in america a sense of cautious optimism. Not everyone is sure. The country has reached a covid nineteen inflection. Point case counts have died before only to rise again. New variants are a possible danger. The us recently passed the grim milestone of over five hundred thousand deaths but health experts. Say a number of factors are combining to dampen the spread from widespread social distancing to increasing immunity from vaccines or past exposure to the turn of seasons for sprain. The us is much closer to control of the pandemic than it was even a few months ago. They say control is not the same thing as elimination. However many experts warn that vigilance will still be necessary. As the virus recedes from acute threat to chronic concern. Kenneth bernard an epidemiologist who ran the office on global health threats. In the clinton and second bush white house's says i think we are at the beginning of the end but not the end that everybody's hoping for this story was reported by peter greer francine keefer patrick johnson noah robertson and nick role for the monitor like many americans. Steven hasn't used the subway in almost a year. The anticipated post pandemic rise of public transportation is encouraging new thinking about how to invest in sustainable urban commuting precipitous drops in ridership during the covid nineteen pandemic have ushered in a famine year for american public transit withered funding and reduce services have experts fearing diminished capacity for years to come even a potential car pockets of congested roads. Looming ahead john gabe. Our staff researcher at the university of california los angeles institute of transportation studies says the global transit ridership trend. Last year was bad across the globe but in the us it was a free fall. According to mr gabe hours research average ridership decreased by fifty eight percent nationally between march and august of twenty twani. The road or perhaps rail to recovery will require federal investment and getting the pandemic under control though infrastructure. Spending isn't cheap. Experts say and may be prudent long-term robust public transit can make cities more equitable and sustainable. The more options residents have when travelling the more resilient and efficient american transportation will be so far industry experts voiced hope based on biden administration proposals that include an additional thirty billion dollars for transportation earmarked in its pandemic relief. Bill secretary of transportation pete. Buddha judge had high marks on his transit report card while mayor of south bend indiana with corona virus cases. Now well below this winter surge. America's trains and buses may be on track to keep running on time. The story was reported by noah robertson for the monitor alexa. Turn the lights back on and restore power. Hello alexa as the internet of things controls more household devices. Some say it's time to shift away from centralized hubs. Joe brown's moment of clarity came in the dark a father and a tech enthusiasts he figured that linking his wifi enabled lightbulbs to his google home speaker but allow him to adjust the lights with his voice all his hands were busy and it did most of the time until last december when google outage rendered the lights useless a month earlier an outage at amazon disabled doorbells vacuums and thermostats up and down the east coast that also crash. Newspapers and ecommerce sites disrupted ride hailing and food delivery apps and blocked people from accessing. Their bank accounts primavera. Day phillipi a faculty associate at the harvard. University's berkman klein center for internet and society. Says some services have become the central hub of most of the internet traffic. Can these single points of failure be avoided. A number of efforts are underway to help restore the decentralized network. Envisioned in nineteen eighty. Nine by tim burners lee when he created the world wide web these include using mesh networking having multiple services to us as backups. And an idea. Promoted by mr burners lee himself creating pods were users can store their personal data and control who sees it. The story was reported by neck role for the monitor. No-one can handedly solve. The nation's environmental challenges listening to citizens are commentator. Argues will be critical to success. Michael regan president joe. Biden's nominee for the environmental protection agency administrator has leadership model. That suggests he wants to hear from the people in his current capacity is secretary of the north carolina department of environmental quality. He founded the environmental justice and equity advisory board to elevate the voices of the underserved and underrepresented as we work to protect the public's health and natural resources yet while his concern for community has been applauded. His response to business interests has been criticized including his recent decision to issue a five year permit for swine operations without requiring significant adjustments to their management of hogwash. If selected mr regan would be the first black man to head. The epa that distinction combined with his degree from a historically black university means he will be looked upon to lead with a conscience. That is mindful of the history of environmental racism yet. Even with mr. Biden's backing mr regan won't be able to succeed alone. Communities have a role to play as well in steering the country toward more just environmental policies and practices that kind of unified approach might change more than the environmental condition of our country. It might signal a change in political climate as well. This commentary was written by ken making for the monitor and this story stephen and his co author talked with americans who've embarked upon new activities and occupations in their golden years for example ninety one year old sylvia anthony runs a homeless shelter their shrugging off societal limitations and finding joyful purpose a handful of years ago victoria and david marshall started third act magazine to chronicle how older americans are blooming it was born out of the marshalls own experience after retiring early. Ms marshall especially found. She needed a sense of purpose. She says i've learned so much by getting to meet and work with people who really get aging right. They don't live lives of leisure. They're really focused on lifelong learning growing expanding retirement and even the years preceding. It are often considered fallow a winding down the twilight but older adults are seeing an opportunity. For what more are calling as the marshals. Do a third act. Well that can mean embracing a new pastime. Some are embarking upon more ambitious undertakings starting new businesses entering new occupations or devoting themselves to philanthropic endeavors and the process. They're becoming exemplars for the more than fifty four million americans. It's sixty five. And above larry samuel founder of age friendly consulting says if the first act of life is mostly about education and youthful exuberance and the second act mostly about career and family. The third act of life is about the pursuit of wisdom self actualization and leaving some kind of legacy. The story was reported by stephen humphreys and ryan baloney for the monitor. Now commentary from the monitor's editorial board. On india and pakistan and the digital universe the young netizens in india and pakistan have no problem sharing across a tense border between the two rival states. The latest example is an instagram video of pakistani teenager. Suggesting people need to party. It went viral in india. Sparking joyous. spinoffs this neighborly. Culture is just one of many backdrops that help explain why india and pakistan have restored two thousand three truce in disputed kashmir more importantly the agreed to address each other's core issues perhaps the biggest backdrop to the agreement is that the two countries can no longer afford military conflict. They fought three wars since they each gained independence from britain in one thousand nine hundred eighty seven pakistan's economy is now on the ropes requiring massive foreign loans. Well india has its hands full with a dangerous dispute with china over. Himalayan territory and a domestic revolt by farmers a peace dialogue makes the show quickly that diplomacy can produce results faster than continued violence around kashmir many young people on both sides or already digitally linked. They see more. What's in common than what is not. That would be worth celebrating. That's a wrap for the news. You can find the full length versions of these stories in today's issue or azzi s monitor dot com slash daily. Thanks for spending time with our stories de tomorrow's package includes a look at what's motivating calls for the us to boycott the two thousand twenty two winter olympics china. Today's christian science spiritual perspective columnists thinks that no matter what the world throws people god's unlimited goodness and love are here quell anxiety and inspire healing and solutions. You can find the column. Today's issue or at cs monitor dot com slash daily. We wanna give a quick things for staff concluding today's audio production team ebrahim on echo shing fung and jeff turton. This podcast is produced by the christian. Science monitor copyright. Twenty twenty one.

noah robertson stephen humphreys samantha laney Michelle fishburne miss fishburn Miss fishburne Kenneth bernard office on global health mr regan peter greer francine keefer nick role us john gabe university of california los a mr gabe biden administration
Climate Gentrification

Future of the American City

38:33 min | 2 years ago

Climate Gentrification

"This is a game of musical chairs and there will always be people who were wanting to move from one chair to the next. But you just don't want to be the person that that is standing when the music stops from the Harvard Graduate School of design this is future of the American the city conversations on how we live where we live on Charles Hunt. And we're here today with Jesse Keenan just as a social scientist. His work examines the relationship between climate change and the built Environment Jesse joins and just today to discuss his concept of climate gentrification. Welcome thank you for having me. You've been published in a variety of contexts. Both popular they're professional technical press over the past months around this concept of climate change. Mitigation can use begin for audience to unpack defined that term fourth sure climate gentrification as a theory which now have some empirical validity that explains the extent to which instability in economic terms leads to instability in social terms particularly as it relates to the affordability of housing in response to climate change impacts and so is clemency certification a term that that you've formulated. Yeah I a number of years ago. Almost six years ago I was doing work overseas and I recognize is there were some unintended consequences to some of the investments that we were making in the built environment and cities Under the name of resilience and fact we had created raided kind of Amenity we had created a level performance on that was actually increasing investment but operating indirectly with the unintended consequence of driving out many of the people that the policies were seeking to protect years later or some months later with hurricane. Sandy in New York. I recognize that there. There were certain geographies in Queens and in Brooklyn as well as in Staten Island or certain communities that had a relative advantage in terms of low exposure We're seeing increased rents In fact people were moving from one district to another Somewhat out of necessity because maybe their homes are. The neighborhood's were destroyed good but very often as a as a function of perception of thinking about hey in the long term this may actually represent a superior investment so there's several well different pathways by which climate gentrification may manifest the first pathways superior investment. This is people make an investment moving from one area of high risk geography to lowest geography of market. If you will and this can operate across multiple scales from district district region to region Displacement in in in south Florida may actually lead to climate gentrification in Atlanta or Charlotte for instance. Jesse would you say your concept of climate. GENTRIFICATION COMES OUT OF THE EMPIRICAL OBSERVATION OF SEA Level Rise and storm events yes I I would include other impacts associated or attributed more formerly to climate change including forest fires the availability of potable water LA soil stability any number of biophysical hazards and Physical exposure that as an impact on property so it isn't just limited to sea level rise and climate gentrification in that conception while I think we can agree. Three most rational actors can agree that the climate is changing anthropogenic climate. Change Sea level rise increased storm events will impact the way that we live in the American city widens recreation as a focus well classic model of Gentrification is really about the supply side of the equation it's it's about more or less opportunistic developers A real estate investment Actors that come in and see value in a particular area district or community and they take that risk and they develop and they create a market and that leads to degrees of social instability but also oh positive externalities a negative extra was good and bad that comes. gentrification climate distribution is different from the classic model in the sense that it's actually really represents a shift in demand and that actually takes the idea of gentrification and and moves it to a different scale altogether because now it isn't about a localize has neighborhood is actually about a broader shift in wide swaths of coastal regions or regions their more susceptible to forest fires in the Mike. And so we start to see. gentrification caught up in demography in climate migration as it starts to connect both demography and the economy at a much broader broader range of scales so the negative connotation the impacted your justification on various populations. You're suggesting is actually going to increase in scale scale and scope. There's no doubt and we're already seeing that both empirically and anecdotally so this suggests that in the context of sea level rise increase storm events events not only coastal cities affected but ultimately a whole variety of populations or affected. That's right and there's a number of cities across the states that actually see. See this displacement as a competitive advantage for attracting What will be a mobile or immobile depending on how you look at it and think about populations and economic base he's so what may be the plight of certain coastal areas in the southeast? United States may be an opportunity to attract new population for instance in the Mid West. It's a complex array. That's very much caught up in. The history of economic mobility in the United States and the implications are particularly for low to moderate income households and historically arkley marginalized communities as not. Everybody will have the capacity to be mobile to pay for the cost to adapt. I think one of the greatest challenges their implications of this work. Because how do we think about those who are trapped who may be trapped in the future on certainly there will be some communities that will have an upside to climate gentrification their houses will. We'll be worth a whole lot more now than they ever have been in the past but there will be many people particularly a renting tenure class. That will be significantly. Challenged to relocate kate and create new lives livelihoods places and communities your work is compelling to the extent that it touches on both The winners and losers. Let's save climate change if we could use those terms. Are Those terms fair in this context. No I think that's absolutely fair. And much of what we describe and evaluate is about trade offs offs and so in many ways the scholarly disciplined that we bring in multiple areas of social science and Applied Science and as well as design. Research is to understand both resilience and adaptation not as absolute goods but nethon logical and analytical domains from which we can understand trade-offs and so we have to understand that resilience at one scale to one set of people may be maladaptive to another and that it's the degree of self interest Degree to inequality of resourcing All of that plays into the trade offs that society has set for itself and making decisions. That's primarily what I'm concerned with decisions about investment in decisions about investment in the bill environment as well as how we design the built environment the history of American city In terms of economic change terms of environmental change suggests mobility is not always guaranteed to all populations and in fact your work points very directly to the vulnerability of fixity in space over time. How do we think about resilience or planning adaptation in the context of an economy economy? That is so unevenly distributed. I think we saw the extent to which our history of economic mobility which has been tremendous. This shrank through many generations across many economic cycles. greatly impaired in the foreclosure crisis in the last housing cycle. The extent to which people were trapped and the extent to which job growth and economic growth was actually happening in cities. In places people couldn't afford we started to give recognition to the idea. The economic mobility was a much more complex set of characteristics deterministic or not that were driven by mobility in terms of class lass in terms of education even access to transportation and healthcare all our social drivers of how we think about economic mobility climate. Change as we understand. It is in many ways a threshold issue in the sense that it very often as both not just the shocks of hurricanes and flooding flooding but the ongoing incremental stress that pushes us across thresholds of social issues that challenge abroad ray of social policies from affordable housing to health. Care that are all now challenged by that ongoing and additional stress of climate change in my own work on Detroit and Economic Restructuring Shrink we see the result of populations that didn't have access to that level of mobility and given that that mobility falls differentially along questions of race and class. This image this future for the American city that you're describing seems quite challenging. I also think it's an opportunity and I think climate gentrification points to an opportunity community at least in terms of land use planning because what it reflects is an opportunity to think about density and to think about sustainable urban density that avails itself of the Amenities of transportation of cross subsidized affordable housing. And the like it's an opportunity to think about. How do we create the value? And how do we redistribute that valued help stabilize not just low to moderate income populations but also addressing much broader spectrum of society. Economy me and I think in that we have a collective opportunity for collective action that rethinks the notion of density Rethinks wchs the notion of organization and rethinks what it means in terms of a broad scale of accessibility. Is it possible that the resilience planning tools and techniques. We have available today or sufficient that challenge. There's different degrees of maturity in adaptation. Planning which is inclusive of not just resilience planning but also Hazard Mitigation Planning Flood Plain management design events for civil engineering. It's it's a wide spectrum of activities but really time will tell The extent to which are resilience is adaptive or maladaptive in this is one of the elements that we have to give consideration to with resilience as it. They're six or seven major categorical variants of resilience but primarily. What we mean is engineering and disaster resilience which is about a reversion to the the status quo is about a reversion to the pre event stimulus and in that sense? It's fairly conservative yet. Were challenged all around us to to think about transformative adaptation the way we consume produce manage designed the built environment so we have this conflict between station heirachy and transformation. Listen so I think as we get more and more analytical clarity about the implications both intended and unintended with a variety of activities and both adaptation in resilience planning. We will start to understand the clarity of the trade offs and thereafter. It's really a function of the democratic processes of society of due process to give consideration to what we want to protect what we want to preserve and what it is that we wanna let go and it's that's the transformation in that will happen both as a function of demography demographics economics and more fundamentally due process as a matter of electoral politics and presumably mm ably the function of the marketplace. As well absolutely and we can't discount that And I think that that's part of our fundamental mythological. Ambitions ambitions is to understand the extent to which economy is shaping everything for material design and selection to space and location to life cycle analysis to a wide variety of technical but also social implications and bearings on how we design and build and manage the built environment so acknowledging as you have the resilience is in in some ways fundamentally conservative framework and that. It's only one element within adaptation. How might we think about enabling civil discourse or conversation about these choices? It strikes me in reading your work. That much of it is coming from. Literatures occurs in certain technical disciplines. You're publishing an in a range of fields and at the same moment as individual actors in digital communities individual homeowners are making choices. How does that populous become a literate on this range of subjects? I'd say one of the more powerful academies that has translated its work in to the public discourse is climate communications which has begun to understand these trade offs and conflicts and begin to translate them I to an heuristic terms which is simplified terms that people can understand and relate to now for many years. There's been a lot of research that has translated. Its way into behavioral economics comics into a public policy as it relates to risk and it's all about risk and risk assumption risk transfer so that world of risk is well understood stood but adaptation is only about managing risks. It's about managing the opportunities and I think the extent to which we can elucidate what those trade offs are over. The short term to the long term are critical for advancing public discourse. Because much of what we talk about now is about infrastructure. It's about material cheerio responses that have long term life cycles but really all that infrastructure does for the most part is by US time and by the time for more difficult decisions that we have to think about whether it's managed retreat or fundamental land use decisions or whether we're over consuming space in an unsustainable on sustainable way given the origins of the concept in your work looking at European examples and what you've seen in North America. Are you suggesting that there are perverse. Incentives built it's into large-scale infrastructure responses to adaptation. There's no doubt that disaster capitalism has driven the discourse of resilience in a uniquely American aircon phenomenon. They're certainly a severely organized. Industrial and organizational response if not political response that capitalizes this is on disasters. Part of that is a response that you can't pass judgment on. which is that? We haven't fully funded our infrastructure and the operation and maintenance and the Cap Paxson wchs and affects of infrastructure so we used disasters as a means to recapitalize and make new investments and infrastructure. But part of it is a deeply entrenched American American phenomenon of disaster and recovery. And there's no doubt whether it's tax provision or building codes or any number Moore of institutional mechanisms that drive the built environment and the production of the built environment we are deeply entrenched with the notion of the status quo. We do it the way we've always done it. I mean if you look at productivity in the construction industry it's it's by far the biggest laggard in the United States is very little innovation. That happens in the built environment comment and here. We are now confronted with the idea of transformative adaptation so we have a lot of incentives that are deeply institutionalize that were not fully fully pain For what we could or should be paying in in the production and consumption of housing particular on because it's been deeply subsidizing subsidize in probably the pinnacle example of this is the National Flood Insurance Program where the federal government absorbs a fair amount of risk That the the taxpayers absorbed that consumers don't absorb we have here in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts the example of the underwriting of flood insurance on the Cape Secondary homes a whole series series of questions about the distribution of risk at the site level. Your work has focused recently on south Florida as you mention Miami Dade County. Why is Miami Dade County? So seminal in describing this new condition well. Miami is a city that was created by real estate for real estate. It was a marketing conviction. But the interesting thing about Miami is that it's reached a certain crescendo and level of maturity. Where the extra analyses of a lack of fundamental fundamental transportation planning a lack of fundamental Water and wastewater planning infrastructure has caught up with itself. It's reached a certain critical mass. Ask a certain intensity That is now leading into the vein of dysfunction. In in that moment I can. Now see the fissures there's in the exposure of these various dysfunctions and how they're reacting and market preferences and particularly consumer preferences and so in my mind and yes there's a narrative and there's a story line with sea level rise and actually rain inundation events actually represent much more immediate hazard but in my mind wind it's a combination of its own settlement patterns in history and maturity in combination with the confluence of climate change that opens ends up a lot and there's much to be explored there. Some would argue. It's perhaps to cloud. It is driven by rhetoric the deep deep inequality economic inequality inequality that real estate has impart produced in Miami on May actually cloud some of the more precise analytical Outcomes but what I think in many ways it represents The challenges that many Cenis have which is how do we protect the tax base. Where do we shift tax base? How do we think think about protecting a broad spectrum of our population And what's IT GONNA cost us. And how do we respond in a way that thinks about equity that thinks about out Fiscal Stewardship Were at that moment. Where Miami has the opportunity to get it right or get it wrong? We have ten fifteen twenty years. Get right or get it wrong. Your work as focused on the role of elevation in this context of climate change vacation. Why elevations important surrogate here? There's several different pathways. I mentioned in the first pathway. which is a superior investment? There's a second pathway of climate gentrification which is a type of inverse gentrification where essentially only the wealthy can afford the cost of increased insurance and the like and finally there's the resilience pathway by which resilience creates an amenity that drives in speculation Li if one of more more of these pathways was developing as a as a function of behavior consumption. In Miami. It would most likely be happening associated with elevation because in theory the higher elevation you are the less susceptible you are either as a function of observation of nuisance flooding or your perception that elevation allegation actually represents a superior investment does really combination of observation and perception so we tested two hypotheses. The first policies Aussies what was that there was a correlation or relationship between rate of appreciation. And how high a property was. We found very strong correlations nations throughout the entire sample but particularly strong and it was a big surprise to us along the coast because there's a fairly heterogeneous distribution of flood risk across the county. There's certainly a high areas of a Coral Ridge North and south of downtown that is fairly uniformly distributed in terms of risk because it can flood on the fringe of the county can flood in a great number of places But why was it that we were getting the strongest correlations on the coast and and our theory which has been validated by other economists. Since is that nuisance. Flooding was driving it in part but also perception was driving it so we now understand that the perception of what it's going to be worth in the future is likely the reason we found such high correlations on the coast I The other thing that we tested was called the Nueces I- prothesis was that we looked at properties and we broke them up into one meter cohorts and we hypothesize around the year. Two thousand plus or minus four or five years which is when the observational studies. Really kick in to suggest that a climate change and sea level rises was really actually beginning to have an impact in terms of observational studies. And sure enough a right around that time around two thousand the lowest elevation cohort completely dropped off in its rate of performance relative to the rest of the elevations which worked as a pack. Elevation was not that much of a strong effect until essentially sea level rise kicks in And that represents the first peer reviewed published evidence of climate change signal and a real estate market on the implications nations for property taxes the implications for the public bond market implications for wide variety of investment and public investment Stem from from these findings and in addition to this. Are you finding anecdotal evidence amongst the people that you speak with of individual actors making choices voices based on this. There's some evidence of an individual's I in terms of survey and interview evidence and data But there's no singular lurked large scale development that we can say this is about climate change. We really just don't see that evidence where we see. The strongest evidence is really an individuals who are buying up individual houses. They're buying up small properties and again. That's a reflection of a change in demand is not necessarily a reflection of big bad evil real estate developers. Now that that isn't to say that the people who are advancing these very large projects that are that are extensively feel like climate. gentrification aren't thinking about climate change as Impacting like this is a real value. Add now where you are on high vision. It is say they aren't giving consideration to that but we don't see any evidence that that's a primary consideration fedaration. Is it ironic in your view that the history of elevation and class that we see so many other American cities where the lower bottom land was associated with lower class and along certain race lines is is it. Is it ironic in your mind that that's inverted in Miami beach or it's not ironic ironic as much as it is deeply perverse as a convention of American history and it is important that we give consideration to the uneven impacts of that but we also have to represent and understand that there's other communities throughout South Florida that represent different modes of settlement and marginalization and opportunity. Climate change isn't just about the opportunity to correct historical wrongs which in many ways it can and should be about particularly as it relates to sustainable urban development but what we really need to understand is this impacts everybody rich and poor. There's an article in the Miami Herald this summer in North Miami where a woman was in a multi million dollar house and she was facing a couple hundred hundred thousand dollars in fines because her seawall corroded and now her street was flooding. The people who lived around her were ultra-wealthy. They had built defenses. They built all the bells and whistles necessary to keep seawater out of their yard out of the street that is climate. Gentrification that woman owns a multimillion dollar asset that she's elderly but she's GonNa have to move because she can't afford a couple hundred thousand dollars to be able to fix a problem which is more or less an infrastructural. Problem problem in the city wasn't going to do it for her. So there's a wide spectrum of impact and we have to think about yes marginalized communities but we also have to you think about middle income communities workforce housing. We have to think about a broad spectrum of actors who are going to be impacted by climate change. What I'm afraid of is we have have a singular focus on history as a guiding point for the future we will lose sight of the full range of opportunities and we will just fall into into predictable polemics about who benefits and who bears the burden when I think in reality we all bear both collective responsibility but but we all bear collective opportunity? This story the woman her seawall her neighbors this points out. I think one of the challenges that you do your work points do which has to do with individual actors making their own choices. We have a widely widely distributed environmental threat. Each landowner individually responding. Is that really the way forward Arthur opportunities for more collective action. I mean this is one of the challenges that you've seen in the humanities discourse in both the sort of cognitive perception and meaning and in in many people have argued in reality from a critical studies point of view resilience pushes the burden on the individual and it becomes a characteristic of into. Are you resilient or are you not right. It's it's a kind of binary election. Do you have the capacity for Zillions. And instead we should be thinking about collective adaptation and collective responses and in fact there's many examples sort of the perfect example of of elements of resilience that can be maladaptive a series of individual homeowners who put flood barriers that promote the resilience of their home home but when the flood comes it steers water to other properties. That would not have otherwise been flooded and that's collectively maladaptive because it's collectively flooding infrastructure and it may actually be maladaptive to the those individual property owners because it may be cutting off services. Electricity potable water to those properties individually so I think in the humanities discourse behind resilience in what it means as an individual state and an individualized capacity on I think in many ways challenges challenges us. In fact there's great work by Helen Asmundsson in Norway Looking at the extent to which resilience created kind of lethargic a kind of apathy among among those that were engaged and when they started utilizing the nomenclature and the framing of adaptation people started understand that this was a collective issue that it wasn't about the individual capacity but it was actually about collective action. And there's no individual property owner. Who can survive is an island in advance of anthropogenic agenda climate change? We've seen that. The combination of housing costs plus commute. Times makes Miami Metro area one of the most challenging environments armaments. Especially for the working class. How do you imagine the effects of climate change will accelerate those conditions of inequity or? Are you more optimistic. Dick than no I think certainly wasn't perfect. Example of this is One of the primary impact for seeing is greater convection events. In since that when it rains it really pours and those downpours are leading to surface flooding That is actually having a measurable impact in Traffic Circulation. Those trip times cost gas and the cost time. And when you think about the a Labor economy of Miami Many people have more than one job. There's a wide swath Roughly roughly. Let's see forty to fifty percent of Miami is by most conventions economically Stressed if you're losing an hour or two in traffic because of a rain event on that's hourly wages that you could be making so you know the implications or a economic productivity but also people's livelihoods On our our immediate in their measurable and they're happening today and so We really need to utilize that as a means to think about. How do we advance the Metro Rail? How do we think about more cohesive planning as it relates to a bus rapid transit? On how do we think about interoperability. I bind between transportation systems. How do we think about fundamentally where people live where people work where people go to school? And how do we give some resolution to that So that we can Not just optimize system but build robustness there in certain robust capacity to accommodate a wide range of events so from resilience robustness snus. I mean these questions seemed particularly apt given the percentage of the working class. And the working. Poor that you point to that are involved in the service and the tourism economies. I think for many They think of south Florida as among the most vulnerable and exposed geographies in the United States. That talk about the future of American city In in many estimations domations Miami Dade County is really really at the tipping point with respect to rain event sea level rise and these massive storms. Yes it is but we can substitute those impacts for many other cities. The availability of Potable Water and storm events in Los Angeles. Njoya are of equal import. An impact. So you know these are not unique. basically anywhere in the United States as we highlighted added more recently in the national climate assessment and the built environment chapter There's a wide spectrum. There's there's really no place in the United States that doesn't have some some immediate challenge to climate change. Miami just is the poster child in many ways but is by no means unique in many of these challenges in your your research. Have you found evidence of a slowing or a redirection of development To other areas away from south Florida anecdotally in my own experience. My my perception is that they can't build it fast enough. And maybe this is in part why you think of Miami. As the poster child for climate change it seems A kind of cultural dissonance dissonance. That on the one hand we clearly have evidence of a future of living with water and yet we can't seem to build them fast enough. Well we have to think about those vertical bank vaults right they're not really functionally Real estate in the sense that people live there and there they engender engender part of a community or and built environment they're they're more or less Assets and singularly so perhaps different way to frame it is. This is a game of musical chairs chairs and there will always be people who are wanting to move from one shared at the next. But you just don't want to be the person that is standing when the music basic stops. How should we reconcile cultural heritage community values of collective memory and individual experience on the one hand versus the enormous power of these forces that you're describing that might cause us to migrate? I think we need to become more familiar. With the language of Justice and Justice comes John who forms it comes in procedural justice and it comes an absolute moral justice and I think that we need to come to terms with the fact that we have processes of design and planning and public policy that will guide us to have due process that will give voice to the people who are voiceless. That will give voice to the public. Whether in electoral terms or participatory planning but it may lead to an inequitable outcome and when I say equitable I mean equitable. In terms of distributive justice that is the notion of distribution of resources equitably across society in terms of access and we may have a perfectly perfectly just outcome but it may ultimately be inequitable. And we have to come to resolution with that we can challenge that for what it is but we have to understand that there. There are two mechanisms of how we relate and analyse the notion of equity and justice in our role in that and our role that we play as educators caters as design leaders as Albuque- policy advisers. How do we help people understand again coming back to? What are the Trade Offs Your era social scientists? Do you imagine that designers planners those responsible for imagining the built environment have a particular ethical responsibility to advocate for more collective outcomes. Yeah I you know it is a it is an interesting thing because the question is is it a personal ethic or is it a professional ethic and and professional ethics are geared towards the preservation. The Self Service of the profession which is geared towards an agency of a client as to a product. Is there an adaptive capacity within this this building within this infrastructure to be able to adapt to a range of potential parameters is there passive survivability in these buildings so that we can have potable water water when the electricity goes out or the elderly can evacuate when there's lack of a service in the elevators. You know the question is are we really going to. To internal is the monopoly of the professions in service of the public. Good or are we going. To perpetuate an ethical convention that is geared towards agency of clientelism. And I think that the ethical standards at least to the A and what I teach In architecture are geared towards agency inclined to listen and but I think that the ethical rules are beginning to mature in. They're beginning to create a friction because there isn't necessarily Israeli conflict between environment and economy that we are starting to see that there are quite synergistic and that we are creating new values through stewardship of the environment that will actually advance the interest of our client whether they know it or wanted or not and to what extent does this suggest or imply a different education for the architect. I I think what. It implies. Not only for architects landscape architects planners and others is that we need a basic fundamental understanding of the applied science of climate change. We need to understand the physics. We need to understand. What radiant forcing is? We need to understand basic elements of fluid dynamics. We need that literacy across the realm. We need to understand what climate change is how it applies water first and second order impacts of climate. Change the bill apartment that should play into our total understanding and design and selection of buildings while your research is focused most recently on Miami. He did county You've looked also obviously New York New Jersey Po Sandy. You've suggested that these impacts will be felt across every American American city are there cities or their communities across states. That could imagine to have an advantage. Coming out of clemency cert. Yeah there are definitely cities that have some beneficial attributes and those attributes sir not just environmental. They're often function of governance. There's leadership there. There's people that think about climate change and think about renewable energy friends so a a perfect example of this is the extent to which certain local markets have been a law in with local governance to reinforce a renewable energy production and that is feeding into micro grids that is feeding into cheaper more reliable more resilient energy infrastructure. You see this primarily in the mid West right now and you see see what follows behind that data centre development tech jobs is is actually driving an economic base in many ways because it's cheaper more reliable liable energy the perfect example of where we are shifting based on a combination of climate mitigation reducing greenhouse gases and climate adaptation And and that's well On. That could not have happened without leadership and governance you touch on the importance of governance and the importance of leadership You of course have been active. You've advising government on advisory panels and boards at the federal level at the state At the municipal and county level. Can you say something about the SCHOLA- clarity of the scales of US governance. And at which scales do you find the efficacy of governance. The regional strength of regional regional bodies I think is increasingly being understood as a real politic. There's greater collective will mobilization of political. Will there's greater sophistication education and what the cell is and what the by is one of the strengths of the states. Right now is regional engagement. We have the southeast Florida regional climate. Change Compact we we now have one In Tampa Bay Tampa Bay actually doesn't get a lot of Recognition but they are actually equally if not more vulnerable than southeast Florida. Now there's a multi multi county compact there. I think it's ten counties and In Tampa Bay. That are modelled. On that we see multipple the bay area regional collaborative in San Francisco. Oh you see it in L. A. There are regional engagement that I think is critically important wise it critically important because they can start to address housing transportation listen Many of the other attributes Apollo policy and urban policy. They can start to see it as a system an interconnected system and they see the shortcomings in delimitations of of any given local government in isolation and they recognize that their capacity to work together as much greater than some of their individual capacities patties. Jesse thanks very much. Thank you for having me. You've been listening to future of the American city. curated by the Office for urbanization at the Harvard Graduate School of design. This conversation was supported by the knightfoundation. And Agendas diller stood the American city spot producers. Barbara Charlie Gilliardi Emerson Ladies Peralta Kevin Graham and Jeffrey Ladies Recording engineer to learn more visit ever. TAC DOT GST dot Harvard. That Aditi you.

Miami United States south Florida Jesse Keenan Harvard Graduate School of des Mid West New York Miami Herald Queens Sandy Miami Dade County south Florida Miami Dade County Charles Hunt scientist Florida
Garden trends with Katie Dubow-A Way To Garden With Margaret Roach October 28, 2019

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

26:00 min | 1 year ago

Garden trends with Katie Dubow-A Way To Garden With Margaret Roach October 28, 2019

"From awaited Gordon Dot Com and Robin Hood Radio Dot Com. This is a way to garden with Margaret Roach. Your weekly invitation to dig in and grow I have to confess that I have weeded out and discarded a lot of press releases and pennsylvania-based Garden Media Group A women owned and run public relations firm specializing in the home and Garden Industry and celebrating its thirtieth year in business so trends so even the casual garden chopper will have noticed trends you know like one year you go into the garden centers and there's a million orange flowered things that everyone just go out and change everything they're doing just like you said it just I we want people to think maybe make a few changes but just you know what do you think about it yep coming full circle but she worked here in Kennett Square with the mushroom industry because can it is the mushroom capital of the world and from that work she met the CONARD pyle company I look forward to it because it makes me think this report each year kind of makes me thinking and you know we should probably say right away it's not like this is the you know eighteen years it's been issued its from the Specialty Public Relations Agency called Garden Media Group and it's their annual garden trends report more on what field or a reader interested in the wonders of the natural world their books are there to help you grow timber press dot Com Katie do bow is creative director of the Kennett Square elves and everybody who and we also look at outside of our industry to we look at the fashion industry but look at the home industry because you know I love gardeners we've never said that were a group of trendsetters I think so we look outside of our industry to see what are some of the changes happening out there that may affect us right two leaders in the industry to figure out what's trending and you know I think like you a lot of people look for it but it's just fun you know we have a lot of fun doing it and we don't expect read the knockout rose also here in our backyard and they saw the work that she didn't they said you know we're launching this little rose it doesn't have a name and we think it could be a game show an editor for four or five hundred years so but you've done the garden trends report for what nineteen years I think it is report yeah ranger but we'd like your help with it she worked on that for the next ten years so for mushrooms to the knockout row success so and an all this time really I've been and so that's from garden center owners to product manufacturers and even the public yes to think public yep growers and media such as yourself she put me on the bus to kindergarten which is especially important for me I put my daughter on the bus at kindergarten this year also though it's really yeah it's really you know the year before there wasn't so much orange or whatever and there's that or or like caliber coa you know the like little miniature looking Petunia things well maybe ten years forecast for twenty twenty in a moment but first this message underwriting support from timber press your go to resource for books and gardening nature whether you're new gardner a professional at the top of your he's also author of the agency's annual guard trends report which is our subject today so welcome Katie thank you so much Margaret so that had to be here yeah I really I'm not kidding when I say Goer so there were one or two and then suddenly it takes up a whole giant area of the garden center you know what I mean there's those types of things that even us who are not doing it analysis could say oh I don't remember that having that much real estate before sue sue but you know you're you're looking at as you said some scientific based enormous research report from some governmental agency or something like a wreck right where a group of people in Kennett Square who put our heads together and we talked before kind of input from a lot of different places and what are some of the things you know over the years I mean I think in your I reports let's backtrack for a second of sort of a quick what's carden media group question because I feel like if I recall correctly stories begins with your mother Susan in two thousand and one you really correctly forecast like a growth in so-called outdoor living do you remember that yes why wasn't working here then but I do remember I mean all in literally outdoor living rooms their kitchen outdoors where we're magnificent I think luckily we have shifted a little bit and we still have outdoor living rooms but it's because are spaces inside or maybe a little smaller and so we can expand our life outside by having rooms but yeah that was that was the new living room right and read all the reports and the fascinating thing was at that time it was the era of the mcmansions people had vs outside or inside boy and in early client of hers. I was like the American mushroom growers or something you got it yet she tells the story Sudi McCoy's my mom she started this business when the whole thing but with the transcript of the show I mean but a lot of the topics had an environmental bent to them you know even seems like they've gone from trend to like a permanent fixture right do you think through when Cheerios is talking about them but you think they're mainstream right right right so kind of give everyone a little sense of what your forecasting rate yeah the way that we do our trends and the reason that they're listed this way because you know it's not that that wasn't on purpose it's just that that's the way you know that's the trend that's the way the world is going so that's kind of go through the table of contents a little bit you know let's and so the trends along the way sort of headline trends you know the by local that was one that you talked about I think two thousand eight and we start more on what's happening on a global scale and then it kind of goes down to how it affects your backyard some people might not be seeing our first training which is called cities of the future thought in them yes they do absolutely and you know that's not something that we even were quite aware of until someone brought that so this year you know in twenty twenty the table of contents to your report and we'll give the lane for people can browse through and whatever hmm more than half of our world lives in cities but that's expected to change by twenty fifty to seventy percent and so with the number of people that are moving into our city spaces that are accessible not just one park in the outreaches but yet more integrated and I'm glad you brought up trees because there's such an important you know I think that often cities will have to have that include greenery you know with parks historic places and Dare I say it instagram mobile places that will attract this younger younger these things are going to have to change about our city's not just to accommodate those numbers of people but to be a city that attracts the kind of who wants to move to a city how were you changing your suit have you heard of that term before it was funny I had not yeah that lasted me researching it you know it's it's as our cities grow we need it person to move into this area and to live in the city it's going to be an element that a city must have to attract people to it and so urban trees kind of have to be reinvented in a way to eighty to be more green facing and that really is the big change here and how it affects our industry is the rise of this thing we call the central recreational district Ooh the old sort of St Tree system may not work as well we have to have some good sustainable urban trees for future and a changing climate and and and you say these green obviously the native plant interest kind of coming around you know and the related one about pollinators I mean some hang like pollinators natives now it's not again it's this is not a you know a report from you know the Department of of whatever on climate tried or something but a lot of them had an environmental up attention and they said that's been out of eight of them and they miss that even the color trend has a little bit of sustainability and vision our cities as as a place that it's things do not leave it as trash it keeps moving around and around and so a circular economy the definition of that Sidy Margaret did you ever darn your socks I'm now I'm not that old Katie but but no and you know and right we get a hole in your sock urban environment what will work right and then after the sort of cities of the future the report talks about a circular economy now it might not be something that's so close to home as we get deeper into the trends of really really close to home so our cities of the future one is just that you know right now intense yeah you know and I love that term green collar jobs because it's not looking down upon the segment of the workers that maybe don't need a PhD in our interest times we have tree blindness we think they'll always be there so it's important to plant the right tree and the right plant there's not a lot of research done about what trees and plants work in this kind of ages are created right right right and that you know so with just nine percent of cereals globally that we consume being reused and acting in the report it says five trillion dollars in new output by twenty thirty so it's not that we are just going to be re we still are going to want to eat peanut butter we're still going to use toothpaste is just about how those packing added that basically you're you're taking your trash instead of throwing it in a landfill you're being able to reuse it and the reason that we need to do that is because you know an average of fifty five thousand dollars per year and don't require a bachelor's degree and a lot of them are in our green industry so it's really just about kind of shifting that that model on it some might think that according to you know because we're we're using things that it would be a detriment to companies but according to one study actually says we could generate trillion four point five is it like global consumption overall has tripled since nineteen seventy I mean something's gotTa give so you're talking about that in the report and then you're moving on to away and you know and this is our mentality right yeah nine percent of our materials now globally are reused so that is our mentality it's terrible head about looking at education and versa fine the way that we look at education and really fulfilling the need because in our industry the the number of jobs outnumber the number of candidates two to one I'm sure you've heard of the CBD the central a different kind of CBD that maybe his trendy right now but the central business district it's the general downtown well this is a new area that can just quickly mention you know there's going to be in this economy also a a need for or more green collar jobs as you call them in the table of an endangered soil and there was some pretty shocking thoughts in that in that about really where we're at with is to to garden and they you know that age group are so interested in pollinators they're so interested in growing their own food but when you ask them what's horticulture they look at you nine percent yeah terrible so we need to make a change and that change starts it starts with us but it also starts with our big companies and so give our dollars we can support and shop from players who support soil health as the onic farming and good proponents in the industry who who manage their soil better Putting your dollars there and I I mean I think of that is from cystic is that it's wiped away one third of our world's topsoil and that if we continue with these trends that are soil this topsoil that we need my favorite but it is when I like to talk about the most because it's something that you can make a change in your own backyard today you know we really can't do something that starting with where I get my seed to whereby food all the way along the line so not just my own backyard but that to you know can help we just our our country has put our our you know this generation and millions of dollars of debt of college debt right for what for what right you have thirty million jobs in our country out this and and the statistics as you said so as we know prior to the twentieth I you know the twentieth century our farming was different we did we didn't develop as much there wasn't as much table of contents tons were the ones that appealed to me the most as a gardener you know 'cause they're a little well a little closer to home maybe the next one in health and and as you say we can make changes in our own backyard and we can also I think and I think is important is we can make changes with our pocketbook we can with how we treat soil and where the soil situation is add in on the on the planet right now the endangered soil one is probably with if I can say it street or any industry for that matter in fact I just read a study that really hit home with a lot of people I shared it on my facebook page from PBS that said that right now gardening it's like you said organic it's building on organic gardening it's doing all of the elements of organic gardening but just having the idea of putting the neutral but this helps people understand that your your farmer that you're choosing is not just practicing organic but they're also dedicated to rejuvenating the soil so we go from there to in the report we go to sort of beyond it's almost like a new form of the seed to moving to the farm that you're choosing to buy from two growing in your own backyard you really can make a difference and we're the the real trend that I'm seeing here is called regenerative I apparently in the United States only ten counties in the US grow more than ten crop varieties so we've really it's all like you said it's about that starting at back in the soil it's adding an extra layer regenerating your soil because that will also help sequester carbon right and there are I mean there is evidence that there are companies now who are onto this even large corporations that we've heard of who are realizing and who are making a contribution in this direction that are that are alert to it on just the plain organic standards at the idea and you know this is a little controversial because do you farmers and other you know supporters and growers need another certification right they are sometimes I look at some of those and I think it's just lip service but it does seem like there are some that are actually I mean even general mills has committed to generate a million host to conventional farming products created unconventional over. So you know I mean I think in a way it supports it supports supporting or get half of US consumers would buy a brand committed to the environment so we as consumers as you said vote with our wallets right right I Ryan Fun farmer trainings and that's really what we need is we know how stressed our farmers are so to be able to give them the resources to make the right choices right one at one point every year it's how do I get rid of the slugs eating the holes in my hostile leaves or whatever plant and I'm like you know get a snake get a frog like you have two heads I don't know right so you know it's just a little bit about education probably the next you know group of things we're non GMO and we're Ganic Omri and so it's it's a little controversial but I think it's important because it's consumers they say according to Nielsen I'll also fair trade and animal welfare practices so it adds a couple things to that organic label which is Great but again do we need for this climate you know these climate catastrophes that were causing erosion and deforestation and I could probably go on and on and on just the systems gone by twenty twenty two thousand fifty according to the UN right and and literally all the whole entire food chain is based on the soil life indicator species don't have them you need to plan for them and provide habitat for them and stopped and stop using store but you know native to see the change in and I don't know if you've been to a house plant swap one of these new meet ups no nobody in my remote town of three hundred people on yes people aren't there's a great organization you know seed your future yes a great organization that encourages younger people elementary and middle school students center owners and one of them asked me how do I attract frogs how do I get for hugs where do I get them. Well it's just you know it's just like pollinators frogs as you said liked the frogs the animals closer to the base of the food chain you were a big trend setter on that frog friend with basically you can call in some fungi and those in quickly just sort of quickly explaining you know talking about these sort of helper creatures that we also have to help and support you know and I don't mean get one I mean make support of place where they're welcome and that to regenerative gardening right yeah I was I was presenting this trends talk to a group of gardens until and that's why this is another trend this year you know house plants are trendy but the real trend here is the way that they are creating and cultivating a sense of community and so if you also that gardening you know is not being handed down to the next generations now you're young mom yes you're much younger than I am you're young mom you love it I think full of the the next things in the in the report I loved because some of them in one case it wasn't so much environmental sort of things you're judging Philadelphia flower show is that right so you obviously have the bug has bitten you but had I wonder how are we doing in which of these trends certification your mentors kind of talking about our that came up at a guess at a the natural products expo elsewhere this year people have been talking about sort of going be Graham fraudster grand for you you know right I'm a Frog Lady Yeah Yeah I've appreciated them you know people have asked me for decades you know every year I get same questions country and you talk about this to people even beyond that you you talk about what you see the pulse that you see and so forth but I wondered do you feel there's still majority women but not only are they young but they're extremely diverse and that really excites me about this future generation is that who are like minded and we were able to talk about things that we all loved and it just created that sense of community and you're right we have moved far far away from that chemicals and and other things too yeah so so and fungi one was in there and I love that and we can talk about that if we have time but I wanna get onto one thing that kept making me think about what I love about that is that it's interesting to me. These are unique varieties of plants they want to know the family they WANNA know the species they wanna know all the things they want what trends I mean they used to say what Herb Window Sill Herb gardening was the gateway to guarding something. I mean what's really the case do you think what's Ah African Violets Society the society now things are they're starting to wane but it was the concept of these tribes we got together with people people as as you know we've studied millennials right now they're they're living in smaller spaces they don't have a ton of money and they are a little bit stress which is one reason they've turned to these indoor plants being equal that thinking outside the House and kind of about houseplants and beyond we could talk about that in a minute but there were two more that were kind of environmental when you called the frog whisper and one not just attractive very diverse group of people and so it is a diverse young group of people who are attending these how swaps plant swap yes and folks in some cases big-box proportions numbers

Garden Media Group Gordon Dot Com Margaret Roach Robin Hood US Sudi McCoy Ah African Violets Society Cheerios Ganic Omri Philadelphia Nielsen UN twenty twenty Graham nine percent ten years fifty five thousand dollars five trillion dollars
Ep. 014: Nurturing A Tribe - Urban Futures, The Global Movement

Invisible City

24:46 min | 3 years ago

Ep. 014: Nurturing A Tribe - Urban Futures, The Global Movement

"Welcome back to invisible city. We've missed you but so many of you have reached out on twitter and email that you have never felt too far away. We knew we would be back but we didn't know when the good news is the time is now and we have more episodes in the hopper. Then ever we will be ramping up over the next weeks and months and we're brimming with ideas stories and content that we can't wait to share so many people continue to cross our paths. And we want you to be a part of our learning we continue to seek to untangle the complexities of of what makes cities tick to make the visible invisible in our cities. All we've been away. The reprieve is over a few cool. Things have happened that would like to update you on the first is our Webby Award. That's right you heard that rate we won a Webby Award for best sound design into original music in a podcast Bryden Ryan from Las Vegas creative made the trek to New York City to walk the red carpet and Bask in the glory and damned. They look good if I do say so myself. We also have a refreshed website. WWW dot invisible zabol city podcast DOT COM. Take a look. We've tried to make it really easy to navigate so check it out. I've also successfully transitioned from my five year stint as chief planner at the city of Toronto into another life. I loved every minute of it and no for those of you who are asking. I do not miss it is it. I am relishing getting to know my family again but more importantly I've taken on a whole new adventure as the CEO of creative housing. It's true I've become a developer and I'm having the time of my life collaborating with great people and pushing new approaches to ensuring that everyone in our are cities has access to beautiful housing incomplete communities. We have a whole series upcoming on affordable housing and this the question of how to house everyone in the twenty first century so stay posted for that in February of two thousand eighteen. The invisible city team Set up an impromptu shop in Vienna in partnership with the Urban Future Global Conference as Europe's largest event for sustainable cities. It's the place place to meet the most passionate and inspiring city changers from all over the world. We've pulled together a series of five episodes that will be released released over the upcoming weeks. That came out of that conference and the conversations we had there it pretty much features some of the most interesting people from across across the globe. Who are truly driving change? I'm Jennifer keys Mac and this is invisible city Have you ever had a different vision of the future than the people around you. It can be tough seeing something that others don't yet see in the seventies. My Dad had this crazy idea that we should keep all all of our food scraps in a bucket under the sink later to be thrown into a small heap in the backyard with grass clippings and later turned into our modest suburban garden. My friends thought he was a little nuts off his rocker. who held onto stinky food scraps and turn them back into the cycle cycle of life? My Dad was convinced that everyone should be doing this. That it just didn't make sense to through food. Waste into a plastic bag again to carted away in a truck to a land fill site miles and miles and miles away but alas he was ahead of his time it would be many years before municipalities on mass would embrace composting and recycling programs hanging around the halls of an urban futures. This conference is a bit like hanging. Out With my composting dad. Seventies people with ideas people thinking about how to do things Zan's differently how to live better more lately more sustainably in our cities according to Josephine lay. Oh it's like a place where all the Freaks reeks of Urbanism Gather. Of course. I felt right at home. This is the first part of our five part Vienna series. Listen in so here. I am in Vienna with Josephine at the Urban Futures Conference and have to say that a little bit Giddy. Because it's so exciting for me to be here at this conference conference I have wanted to be here in the past and circumstances have made it very complicated and here. I find myself at this conference with global leaders from around the world. Who who all really care about the same thing which is changing cities making cities better seeing cities as a space for adaptation? You are a CO founder of this conference. Let's start right at the very beginning. Where did this idea come from? And why does it matter. Thank you Jennifer for is really great to have you here. Finally we couldn't make it last time and this time you did really great talks and adding Arrow as inspired yeah. I didn't pair to say that that one really completely unsolicited has well. We started Three or four years ago having actually manny started since maybe is trying to think about about how to make life better as architects as just as citizens and in the early nineties and early two thousand. It was not the very popular kind of a topic. People your totally out of your mind the word but luckily regression years because at no if his lag or not but because of all this climate crisis are these resource crisis even political kind of instability. Really made people forced most people do start looking at the problem and realizing that okay we have to solve those problems and so we were kind of writing a a rising wave yes yes. Rising awareness of this problem is and we really want to do it and we really my own to uh-huh create something that could facilitate people to to to to to leverage their impacts in their own cities in their own environmental industry whatsoever but they need some some some Some facilitator some platform to to to to get help in in the sense that we're talk about status city business. There's this very complicated as you know much about any now. I love where you started with this piece. which was that when you first started thinking about this that no one was really very interested interested because I kind of feel that has happened over the course of my career? I used to say to people that I was a city planner and people would look at me and go whatever people I didn't really care. They weren't really interested now when I say city. Pr People say. Oh let's talk about bike lanes let's talk about urban agriculture. And so I feel like I'm kind of in in the center of this thing that happened and it's funny because when I was trying to decide what to do with my life I was I I wanted. I need to do something that mattered. That was sort of my criteria. And I want to do something that really matter. I somewhat apply my passion and feel like I was making the difference in the world and I read Sask assassin and her world city theory and she basically argued the future will be cities absolutely the future will lot be nations. The future will not be state to state. The future will be city to city. And I read this when I was just an Undergrad and I thought that's where I WANNA be. I WANNA be in the future. I want to be in that spot. Where changes happening where decisions are being made? We're transformation can take place and and to your point. I sort of feel like I rode the wave a little bit. I rode the wave to you. Absolutely cities have always been had always been the the structure aww administrations since since hundreds of years and this nation sing well is kind of new invention but is par- is a little bit too complex for human capacity of dealing with complex system. Yes and it's impose more because The efficiency but however go back to the INISIA- initiation of our conference. We know that city is a complex business and you have so many different interests conflict in your Tannin's have investors. You have policymakers and a citizens have on this kind of a conflict of interest but to go forward to make any changes to initiate anything you have to bring them together. Gather make mutual agreement and therefore we started having this This this conference as a platform to bring the design the knowledge the politics and finance together to have common Sushi. So this is what has struck me about being so special about a about being here and having this conversation the first piece is that three thousand people talking about cities talk about building a momentum and yesterday I called it a movement I feel like I'm a part of a movement Being here the other is that you've literally brought people from across the globe this commitment to being global and thinking about city through a Global Noble Lens and what we share as global challenges in trying to be more sustainable in trying to be more innovative and forward thinking that two strikes me as as being very unique it does it does have that movement movement feeling where there's people on a mission to do something transformative and everyone one wants to help everyone else. In that was symbolized. I think today I went to the Canadian. Consulate here in Vienna and The city the Vancouver signed an agreement with the city of Vienna a memorandum of understanding to collaborate and mostly around net zero housing and architecture. And how we can design and really push the envelope around sustainable design and and those conversations are that collaboration in that sharing now in a very detailed way on specific projects in Calgary sorry in Vancouver and Vienna is in outcome of these kinds of conversations of getting people saying wait a minute. Where are you pushing the envelope where we where we pushing the envelope? How can we all contribute to being in transformational? You made the theme this year. A city changes and people who are walking around in T. shirts say I'm a city change and I really love this because I really think Urbanism and the Practice of Urbanism No matter. What the lenses that you come at it from is really about adapting and adaptations in the urban environment What was the driver? Why the language guage around around city changers? While that's a very good question well it might be that it just kind of fit with the ethos of the kind of people that you get to these events. Yes actually. That's that's really true. Because we're kind of nurturing tribe. Sometimes people have innovators. Sometimes people have Early adapters but for us is these people who are passionate really want to make change happen. And that's the that's the mutual kind of a shared passion. That's the trigger. Why people out here that this these people they they could be they could be freaks? They could be You know the loners in their own environment eighteen their own. CD's industry but here the each other. This all this like manage people who want to make change because to make change happen is tremendous tremendous tremendous Difficult will and you know because it's difficult this notion of nurturing a tribe Love that language. I think it's I often talk in the city of Toronto about building. Constituencies that we WANNA build constituencies for progressive ideas that when we come forward with a progressive idea like getting getting the cars off are a key transit corridor and dedicating that quarter transit. You need to have different groups within the city that have different tribes arrives to your point and those tribes need to be able to work together towards that shared interests. And we've seen that a little bit here over the past couple all days In the way information has been has been shared we attended a great session on a rethinking Paris and what was so powerful to me about the session about Paris. Wasn't the amazing things at Paris's doing which they were amazing but was also learning about the struggles realizing leising. It's been hard in Paris and there's been some really bad news out of Paris with respect to the suburban communities really pushing back against a UH of vision of a future. That's much more sustainable for for the core Can you talk about the the way you have seen outcomes beyond this this event to nurture that. Try because I think that's really what this is about. This isn't about this moment. It's actually about the change that's happening in cities is is on one hand as human nature. We really fear for Ano- really fear for uncertainty fear for change. That's deeply in our genes. This we cannot change but we have to be have to be reasonable. We'll have the rationalize have been able to see beyond our emotion Russian beyond our fears so one of the really key objectives of doing this. It wasn't just about getting really passionate people in the room. It was actually about. It was about change. How do we make change happen? So give me a sense of what happens next. What comes out of this? The innovation piece the labs piece right it on one hand. This conference healthy to learn from each other's success and failure to help them in their own domains but on the other hand we really feel feel like we need some more radical kind of acceleration because his they're being billed. Hundreds of cities have been building Asia in in America car and while we're discussing were debating we're talking about policy making this is not. This is not make sense so so we know that we need manny. That's the first thing and the second scenes and giving the understanding of our economy's changing challenging we want to we innovation so you mentioned the word acceleration and of course money's money's a big piece of it. It strikes me that really the debate were constantly having in our cities is about where the money should be spent. There's money in the debate about where that where that money should go. Go if we want. What can what can we do? What can change makers due to accelerate change in our cities in in light of the fact that most of us don't control? The purse strings is incredibly difficult. Cities cannot afford trial and error in terms of innovation. That's a fact and feedback loop is Tula anyways and on the other hand is it's like selling any product as your how they look you cannot tell you have to show. And that's really the crucial part of our. Is this kind of a silently understand that we have to show for it believing something. That's trump tremendously. Different Than Patter. The will have to walk it out and this is these include new business models include new ways of looking at cities in relation waste citizens with business with environment and so that that's so we come to the conclusion that we have to our vision of the future. We have to convince the business. We need to come communes. The partners in technology panners investments. And so that if we can convince those innovative thinking kind of forward looking people depot and having a A group or a partnership and then we can show people how how much could be done and under the they would follow because as a much better way to make money to leave and two for basically for Arazi so you know our city building does end up in this. It's kind of Catch twenty two. Because on the one hand We want to innovate. We need to do things in different ways on the other hand. We want to see the change before will commit to it before we'll spend the money and it can take a long time to make that happen. There's been a lot of talk over the past several days as about the power of pilot projects about the power of just going out and trying things. There's even a session this evening on fuck ups. The things that have been tried. That have gone wrong that that you can bleep that out if you want. But that's really what the sessions called. It's actually about trying stuff that that failed. What's the risk on the one hand? We sort of can't move quickly enough on the other hand. We need to try staff in inevitably. We're going to get some stuff wrong. What's what's the risk that we face right now in kind of grasping at new tools for city building the the risk one of the biggest risk as you already talked about is the kind of one dimensional perspective looking at technology she like the good example of cars and the risk of forgetting what is essential waitress human is human humanism out harassing surrounding humor and the risk of Feo to look long term but in instead short-term and for example Lantern Development is that were really reaching that that tipping point already that Material kind of abandoned is making us to who who is much more valuable particularly young generations to meaning to social interaction to offending purpose in life. And that means our future. The lifestyle would be changed dramatically and that would require state is to have totally. Different are imitations and urban settings to fulfill that new knees and which seating could could could be a step ahead in this term this type of changes. These cities would success while. I'm so quite you've raised that because it always makes me nervous when people are talking about smart cities and it it. Sounds like it's about gadgets As opposed to being about about people and I do think that our cities did go a little a little bit sideways really over the past five years it was a ton of talk about technology. -nology in not enough talk about people and how we design how we designed for people. How do you keep that conversation really focused? How does that conversation? You should not get away from us when let's face it tech companies whether it's Google or Amazon or Cisco have a real real vested interest in cities that's the population is. That's where they can collect data. How do we kind of hang onto that conversation and not lose the vision? The cities are actually about people. And as you say that human interaction well I have to say I have no answer to that question. The Big One is a big one you have to. I think I'm not sure if it's a regulation or policy issues. I'm sure there are things that you will have to have to because this this this this this is raising of the power of technologies energies. Something new but we have a lot of news in our history that we had to then later anti-violence some kind of system to regulate that that that power at I personally think that could happen and that should should happen. I think this is the power of this. New Power is is is much much much much much bigger well. There's a lot of talk about this right now. In particular in relation to social media like twitter and facebook folk and the way that these entities have been able to operate in a completely unregulated way and there has been implications Some pretty significant ones with respect to democracy democracy and who gets elected where and who's doing the elected and that lack of regulation regulation has always existed to protect human interest. And I would suggest that this is the risk we face in our cities as well. That new technologies big new shiny thing. If we're not quick enough an an agile enough to ensure we have regulations in place to protect us. Shula's in no there's Gore is going to be challenges on the other hand. I was also there might be solutions. Using technology. For Example Status Security privacy issue might be quite easily software blockchain technology and for example. And also that so I sink may hopefully with the help of the technology that the the knees demands for human regulation would be Declined yeah hopefully. I'm I'm I'm kind of skeptical on that only because I think that one of the challenges we faces powerful powerful interests trysts that are not in the public interest and We're seeing this in our cities right now with respect to global capital and housing and the impact that's happening at ETA very tangible level on people's everyday lives and unless there's regulation and more regulation people won't have access to housing is pretty strays straightforward so. There's an opportunity to kind of capitalize on a growing interest in figuring this question out around. What are sustainable? Urban Urban Future looks like Josephine. This has been a fascinating conversation. Thank you for having us year in in Vienna and watching closely Every every every step as you move forward thank you so much Hughes my pleasure. I hope you enjoyed this podcast as as much as we enjoyed creating it. Thanks to Daniel. FUCA for being my Sherpa and lugging all of our equipment to Vienna and producing these episodes alongside me. Thank thank you to the team at Urban Futures Global Conference for their leadership and facilitating a global dialogue about change in our cities and for sponsoring this Vienna Vienna series. And also just the you know you can subscribe to invisible city podcast so that you don't miss out. All of our episodes are also on our website late in visible city. PODCAST DOT COM. If you like our work give us a rating on I tunes we would really appreciate. Invisible city is a product Arctic. Lhasa's creative a creative agency based in my beautiful city Toronto. Each episode of visible city features and original score by Loftus. Creative read

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Density and distance

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

25:37 min | 6 months ago

Density and distance

"And Welcome to monocle twenty four is the urban est the show all about the cities we live in I'm Andrew Talk Coming up on today's program. Only Christian. Austin is also has to do with approximately governance and capacity of cities too often invade enlisted in thirty years from Al. Two. Third of the population worldwide reliving cities that means that in the next thirty years, we have to build citizens for exactly the amount of people who right now living in cities designing an up and call accommodates. Everyone is the key to a successful city however, the idea of density. Done right has been cast into doubt by global pandemic has managed to disrupt almost every facet of city life. Today we ask if density is the real issue here, and if the very idea of the city is a threat or should we be taking a step back and reassessing what the real cause for concern is urban areas I guess explore all that today right here on the West with me. Andrew Tuck. Experiencing an historic reversal in the global surge of people ditching small towns in the country for the allure of the big city, the pandemic is changing so much back. Americans fleeing big cities in record numbers with many preferring the suburbs during the coronavirus pandemic wants to be locked down. We decided we wanted to be an apartment building and you wanted to have more in for. Family and talking about the fact that people are staying away from towns and cities This is the scene in Trafalgar Square bright. Spring Day, as you can see, it is absolutely deserted. These are some new. Yorkers are now wondering if this is the time to pull up stakes from a high density area like the city and move to the suburbs before the next pandemic hits. As various versions of lockdown swept the globe in early twenty twenty, an exodus was beginning those who could fled the city to the vast open spaces of the countryside for fear that density was the big body when it came to virus transmission. Fast forward six months and city streets may seem a little quieter but it's clear that the majority of citizens have remained. It appears that working out how risky city living is for. The spread of illness is not quite as simple as per square mile calculations. There are other aspects clearly at play. Well discuss this and more I'm joined on the line now by Cecile Mazo nerve chairman of the urban innovation think tank laugh break. Cecile recently wrote an op Ed titled Long Live Urban Density, and she believes that the dreaded D. Word might not be as scary as it sounds too great to have you on the show. Can You I to explain why you don't think density is such a bad thing. There is nothing new under the sun each time there is pandemic we. Density for being men responsible off the united. Answer on. Are with been seen as a place where? Diseases deal but the fact is if you just luke where these pandemics. You will see zapped. Of numbers. He. Acted by virus are affected by the disease itself. You have as many people in dance cities as in rural area, which touch program is not so much entity off living institutes. Question is advancing social interaction, and this is why may be Ronald. The pastor is in France for example, was in a medium size Eugene de. France. But the reason why there was trust to act simply because a religious meeting people at huge, very anti social interaction and these coz that clustered not to heck with leaving in a very. Another example if you take the density off Paris Twenty thousand inhabitants Kirk mature. While, city outside off Carry Slack Sandy Nasty is three or four times weaker. A number of cases. was much more imposed in to once again, we talk about social interaction. About who housing condition? Condition when not talking about Density cafe. So does that mean to you that we shouldn't change the way that we're designing ACETATE PER SE. We should continue to think about more density and Acetate is adding in more apartment buildings but just making sure that people know that if something like this happens, they have to use their personal space, their apartment space to disconnect from other people to meet in smaller groups, for example. We know cats throughout the history of cities are being built against Damian issue tax exempt from London. Accepts Paris they are the result of the long history of relationship between cities disease. So it's not news that we take into account when building cities question of diseases why would say regarding the current situation is the way you view I mean the architectural shape off buildings your way you building in relationship with a mother is as important as density. Diamond SMOOTHIES is up for example, you have to say that. Between central London or high pay. And, speaking, you don't have a meeting experiences the city because architectures. TV's. As two different. So when we talk about drawing lessons from what we are she through, it's more about. Said wiki away signed building. We organized Austin's with the way we organize it comments aces, for example inside the billion outside of building mall. The only action. Density and Tummy uses site in your article. This reference to the work of Baron. Houseman. In Paris building these amazing Palmer buildings have come to define the city for outsiders, the look and feel of it. You say, perhaps we should look to his example actually am reinvent housing the delivers central courtyards, green spaces, a sense of fresh but good density. Why did you think that Barron Houseman was quite good in what he did at the time and and what lessons would you like to bring forward to today? I said Paris is also the And from when we come city Intel substanti- key you have to compare it not with London Belene but with that kind anglerfish office kind of cities and Barrels man did to reach very high density while at the same time, you don't have the feeling. This well. The precaution between the built environment, the buildings themselves on public spaces you very well. So it's a huge question when you build a CD or when you. As summary Maria you. Take into account. Not, just about building on there and here it's about abortion the relationship between spices on open. Second Point, what is important in the city is its immutability, the capacity of transforming it, and there is nothing Intel's occupational transform. Ends. Minimum flats. It can be an office for medicine doctor. It can be private housing. So it is important also to this kind of reversibility of us h when you think about built environment and. Nas epsom pulse the. City is a CT which he designed for walkability. There is this approach off eight year what he the EEL. Las meninas. which enable the building commercial activities to be working distance with. Cyborg at the same time. So this is the way of mandate in the nineteenth century and I can see why today we couldn't apply those principles in in Ireland and actually all that we see throughout the cities all around the world putting into question i. To to. Is Really about rethinking. Relationship between the built environment and the way we move in society and we are from our daily activities and just fine lay defoe reasonably confident than about what lies ahead for cities in France and around the world do you feel that learned some good things at this time in the actually we could come out of this but stronger. Said has been shaped by convenience he's stirring and if we think about it. All cities up some. I think in France. All the. States themselves. Will. To thrive even after his nap. One condition that we say is to draw a lesson from what we are county eating through. This is a question of how resilient cities are. He's not only question off architecture of is also has to do with finance and capacity of cities too. I would say to on debate with this, he didn't do project all set in the future success we walked to leave in anticipation, of Resilience and governance wisdom. Eastern me absolutely key capacity to reshape avenue environment after the. Crisis. Cecile Mazel nerve chairman of laugh at break. DETAILLE. Thank you for your time. Up next on the urban EST, we look further north to Copenhagen, stay with us. Now for north if you're on the discussion, we turn to Denmark. I'm joined now by Yes but new Gore the CEO of the Copenhagen based. Philanthropic Association Real Dania the organization has worked on a number of Copenhagen developments including blocks an enhanced urban space in the city's port and blocks hub the Nordic Hob for sustainable urban is ation. Yes. But thank you for your time today. I. Could you explain a bit of history behind Real Dania and what you're trying to achieve with the Organization Real Daniel, we used to own a mortgage institute and we saw that to a bank twenty years ago, and then we will lift with a rather big GIPP pile of money and for the last twenty years we have been working with philanthropy where our task is to increase the quality of life primarily for the Danes through the built environment. So everything we do is trying to use philanthropy tomato Peter and Create Society. And in these years, we have been able to donate around twenty billion Danish Corno between two point eight and three billion euros. We have the same size almost as Rockefeller both inequity in donation, and our task has been trying to improve the quality of life for the Danes with all kind of way to ward like a modern philanthropies. Trying to engage people trying to work with development knowledge data trying to create a huge effect of what we're doing influential Nasi that you have one, hundred, sixty, five, thousand members was the role then of the members in this world of modern philanthropy. When we saw this more than in year two thousand, we have the choice between being. Foundation or continue to be an association and we continue to be legislation. Denmark is a contra with a lot of. The average is a member of more than Twenty Five Association and the board member in between three and as ation. So our society has for hundreds of years been created on associations so we chose to be. Continuously and today we have hundred, Sixty, seven, thousand members everybody who who owns directly or legally a property can be a member and we want to be the you say the common ship for people with interests in the built environment and you say a lot foundations in Denmark and in Europe who are created by one found of who invented a window appeal or whatever they on their own will legality and legitimacy we're born the galaxy, but we're not own geomancy Mississippi and we thought that sation way. The way of having members would be a way to create that legitimacy of what we're doing. Now, for many years, the redevelopment of Copenhagen especially harbor has been a benchmark for other cities to come see from around the world. You've been instrumental in in helping. In particular with blocks physical space, a space for people to meet a connection of cycle ways explaining what this is a you effectively the owner of large chunk of the harbor. The way we work with philanthropy is that sometimes we take ownership sometimes, we help people changing a mindset. Sometimes, we donate so people can create new knowledge and do something different. Or something donate money. So other persons can develop ver- concrete. And in hoppers Denmark, we have in all twenty years trying to help this transformation from being at Industrial Dockland to be a half of a people that transformation is globally and it's also in Denmark and we have been helping. Ten fifteen places in Denmark in this transition and in coping. Speak landfilled the last in a hopper downfield lift where until nineteen sixty dollars a big brewery burned many years ago, and then there was this piece of land lift which has been very very difficult to figure out how to use and how to engage in the city, and we chose many years ago, two thousand and fall to Inter relationship with the city of Copenhagen. So we could help transforming the inner city to hop for human beings instead of an hopper who used to be an industrial hop and with that reason, we chose to make our. By because investment in creating blocks as a destination as building and a way of transforming at previously cert- pot of coping into live urban space and amusing point for Iran. So we tap into some Britches and this big building and the room where we could create liveability, which is a very important part of the Copenhagen DNA to make a livable city and you proved yourself that be pioneers of sustainable innovation hub for the whole Nordic region but as we should. Jump to this moment where we are now over the last six months or the last five months since the pandemic began many of the things that you've been championing bringing people together events festivals have been challenged, and at the moment Denmark after a very good summer is saying it's numbers of infections rise. Again, how much of you had to think about that space? Its meaning for the city is adaptability as the pandemic has hit Copenhagen Denmark in rest of Europe. I have to wind little back because the ambition creating blocks was both to create a modern house in a city will allow function. You know may the Dutch architect things that big buildings has to have all functions from a city within it? So you have architecture center, you'll have a avenue for creation you have housing, you have a restaurant, you have a space where can do things so them bitches with blocks has been extremely high. We have trying to create fantastic room for the architects On a two, they could illustrate how architecture can make a difference for all of us in our alive design. Architecture is so important to create a Beta live and the blocks ambition has been to convene more than seven hundred people working together from small companies big companies. Companies from startups from researches tried to develop new solution to a sustainable of innovation ride. Now, fifty percent of the population in the world living in cities enlisted in thirty years from now, two two-thirds of the population worldwide will live in cities. That means that in the next thirty years, we have to build citizens for exactly the amount of people who right now are living in CBS's three point seven billion people. and. That could either be the catastrophe for mother earth all it could be the solution if we do it. Right. So the Bishen with blocks was to build a place where sustainability in architecture design could be developed talk about percents both fall professionals and from ordinary people like me and that ambition in appeared will pandemic is extremely difficult all events in the. Area has been canceled for months when we had the lockdown, all the people who have to work together to go home the exhibition. Danes architects to send the heck to shutdown gobbly. Some of it has owned again now again with some restrictions, but we have seen that even in a digital world, we can't do some of the things, but it's very difficult to convene people who don't know each other and to invent new things and to have dialogues of things if you can't be together. So what we have done, we have made a special effort. In trying to create a Kobe nine or corona campaign we have donated. Hundred and seventy five million Danish corner in trying to help our society to be a little more sustainable. Very, very inspired by the UN symptoms build back better. So every time you have a pandemic everytime, you'll have a catastrophe have to do something on this show that that is Beta than society was befall. If. I have to be able to into my children's is all in the futures is is very important for me for real. They knew that five years from now we can look back and say we used this crisis not only to create employment and jobs and growth and wealth in our society, but also do it. More sustainable to do it more aligned with the institutes from you in and more aligned in the climate challenge, and we do that in blocks but we do that in our whole portfolio with this. I think that is extremely important. The projects you're involved with are going to be long term have been in the pipeline many of them for years already, and you have to think years ahead about what the world will look like a need just out of interest. Are you thinking that you say five years and I should we begin to move just six through this pandemic? We know it's going to roll on certainly into spring next year you thinking that the world will come back together on won't be in city spaces dense rubbing shoulders with each other sharing workspaces or you planning now in rethinking your program of projects and The things that you're looking at to think well, actually maybe even Danes will want to work more remotely lead to be out in the countryside that perhaps some of the things you had planned and had ambitions for won't be so relevant in the next five years old man that's a very tough question. That's a lot of things about the pandemic. We simply don't know yet density is extremely important for the climate. So the amount of space used to live is as little as possible but density in the European context density in Asian context and density in an American context of very different and. We don't know about the virus still we don't know if it's more spread in buried in areas, but we know that the city is the spaces are used extremely different, and probably for sure we will have to design our ceases different in the future, and we are very keen on that topic and bureau engaged in it for several have. supported. A big study that. He'll has made where they in falsities in Denmark and in other cases in other places in the world has been making a starting, how will the city used before the pandemic? How was the city used doing the lockdown and how was the city used after the lockdown and there's a lot of knowledge to take from that survey and they have made a lot of snapshots from sample the fuel pedestrians the peak use it's Times has shifted. The dominant activity observed in public spaces has changed crying lots to there's love taking from the Kobe nineteen experiences we have to work with, and we will definitely go the next years trying to see how can we come? In creating Livable Betas is who on the one hand trying to help with the climate process and on the other hand hope with a new takes from pandemic experiences we have had for the last six months. Yes. Banou. Garcia real. Dania thank you for joining us here on the east. For this edition of the EST Today's program was produced by Kaleta Rabelo and David Stevens David also edited the show and play you out of this week's episode. Well, his the Beatles with altogether now thank you for listening city lovers. I. Six seven eight nine, ten, on. Love you. They. See. The I think friend. Yang love you. Fail the. Old. Home. Off. Aw. Latin. Think. Off. Off. Off. Aw. Talk.

Denmark Copenhagen Paris France pandemic Density cafe Europe chairman Andrew Tuck Trafalgar Square Intel Barron Houseman Austin Cecile Mazo Cecile Al London Twenty Five Association Iran
Density and distance

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

25:37 min | 7 months ago

Density and distance

"And Welcome to Monocle Twenty, four, the urbanism, the show, all about the cities we live in Andhra talk coming up on today's program. Only Christian. Austin is also has to do with approximately governance and capacity of cities too often invade enlisted in thirty years from Al Two third of the population worldwide reliving cities. That means that in the next thirty years, we have to build citizens for exactly the amount of people who right now living in cities designing an up and call accommodates. Everyone is the key to a successful city, however, the idea of density. Done right has been cast into doubt by global pandemic has managed to disrupt almost every facet of city life. Today we ask if density is the real issue here, and if the very idea of the city is a threat or should we be taking a step back and reassessing what the real cause for concern is urban areas I guess explore all that today right here on the West with me. Andrew Tuck. Experiencing an historic reversal in the global surge of people ditching small towns in the country for the allure of the big city, the pandemic is changing so much back, Americans fleeing big cities in record numbers with many preferring the suburbs during the coronavirus pandemic wants to be locked down. We decided we wanted to be an apartment building and you wanted to have more in for. Family and talking about the fact that people are staying away from towns and cities This is the scene in Trafalgar Square Bright Spring Day. As you can see, it is absolutely deserted. These are some New Yorkers are now wondering if this is the time to pull up stakes from a high density area like the city and move to the suburbs before the next pandemic hits. As various versions of lockdown swept the globe in early twenty twenty, an exodus was beginning those who could fled the city to the vast open spaces of the countryside for fear that density was the big body when it came to virus transmission. Fast forward six months and city streets may seem a little quieter, but it's clear that the majority of citizens have remained. It appears that working out how risky living is for. The spread of illness is not quite as simple as per square mile calculations. There are other aspects clearly at play. Well discuss this and more I'm joined on the line now by Cecile Mazo nerve chairman of the urban innovation think tank laugh break. Cecile recently wrote an op Ed titled Long Live Urban Density and she believes that the dreaded D. Word might not be as scary as it sounds too great to have you on the show. Can You I to explain why you don't think density is such a bad thing. There is nothing new under the sun each time there is pandemic we. Density for being men responsible off the answer on. Or with been seen as a place where. Diseases deal. But the fact is if you just luke where these pandemics. You will see zapped. Of numbers. He. Acted by virus are affected by the disease itself. You have as many people in dance cities as in rural area, which touch program is not so much entity off living institutes. Question is advancing social interaction, and this is why may be Ronald I pastor is in France, for example, was in a medium size Eugene de. France but the reason why there was trust to act simply because a religious meeting people at huge, very anti social interaction and these codes that clustered not to heck with leaving in a very. Another example if you take the density off Paris Twenty thousand inhabitants occur mature. While City outside off Carry Slack Sandy. Nasty is three or four times weaker. A number of cases. was much more imposed in to once again, we talk about social interaction. Also about who housing condition? Condition when not talking about Density cafe. So does that mean to you that we shouldn't change the way that we're designing ACETATE PER SE. We should continue to think about more density and Acetate is adding in more apartment buildings but just making sure that people know that if something like this happens, they have to use their personal space, their apartment space to disconnect from other people to meet in smaller groups, for example. We know cats throughout the history of cities are being built against Damian issue tax exempt from London Texas apples Paris. They are the result of the long history of relationship between cities disease. So it's not news that we take into account when building cities question of diseases why would say regarding the current situation is the way you view I mean the architectural shape buildings your way you building in relations with a mother is as important as density. Diamond SMOOTHIES is up. For example, you have same Dante between central London or high pay. And speaking, you don't have a meeting experiences the city because architectures. TV's. As two different. So when we talk about drawing lessons from whether, we are currently living through. It's more about as you said, Wiki away signed building. We organized Austin's with the way we organize comments aces, for example, inside the billion outside of building mall. The only action. Density and Tummy uses site in your article this reference to the work of Baron Houseman in Paris building. These amazing. Palmer, buildings have come to define the city for outsiders, the look and feel of it. You say, perhaps we should look to his example actually am reinvent housing the delivers central courtyards, green spaces, a sense of fresh but good density. Why did you think that Barron Houseman was quite good in what he did at the time and and what lessons would you like to bring forward to today? I said Paris is also the in work and from when we come a city. Intel substanti- key. You have to compare it not with London Belene but with that kind Bangladesh artist kind of cities and. Barrels man did to reach very high density while at the same time, you don't have the feeling. This well. The precaution between the built environment, the buildings upsets on public spaces you very well. So it's a huge question when you build a CD or when you revealed as summary Maria you. Take into account. Not, just about building on there and here it's about abortion the relationship between spices on open. Second, point what is important in the city is its immutability kept. For transforming it, and there is nothing Intel's occupational transform. Ends Minimum Flats. It can be an office for medicine doctor it can be private housing. So it is important also to this kind of reversibility of us h when you think about built environment and. NAS compose the. City is a CT which he designed for walkability. There is this approach off eight year what he the EEL boxing in. which enable the building yet tibbets commercial activities to be working distance with. CYBORG, at the same time. So this is the way of mandate in the nineteenth century and I can see why today we couldn't apply those principles in in Ireland and actually all that we see throughout the cities all around the world putting into question. I. To to. Is Really about rethinking this relationship between the built environment and the way we move in society and we are from our daily activities and just fine lay defoe reasonably confident than about what lies ahead for cities in France and around the world do you feel that learned some good things at this time in the actually we could come out of this stronger. Said has been shaped by continues he's stirring and if we think about it. All cities up some. I in France all the. States themselves. Will. To thrive even up to his ending now. One condition that we say is to draw a lesson from what we are county eating through, and this is a question of how resilient cities are. He's not only question off architecture of is also has to do with finance and capacity of cities too I would say to on debate with this, he didn't do project all set in the future success we walked to leave in anticipation of Resilience and Governance Wisdom Eastern me absolutely key capacity to reshape avenue environment after the neutral crisis. Cecile Mazel nerve chairman of laugh at break. DETAILLE. Thank you for your time. Up next on the urban EST, we look further north to Copenhagen stay with us. Now, for North, if you're on the discussion, we turn to Denmark. I'm joined now by Yes but new Gore the CEO of the Copenhagen based Philanthropic Association Real Dania. The organization has worked on a number of Copenhagen developments including blocks an enhanced urban space in the city's port and blocks hub the Nordic hub for sustainable urban is ation. Yes. Thank you for your time today I. Could you explain a bit of history behind real? Dania and what you're trying to achieve with the organization. Real Daniel we used to own a mortgage institute and we saw that to a bank twenty years ago, and then we will lift with a rather big GIPP pile of money, and for the last twenty years, we have been working with philanthropy where our task is to increase the quality of life primarily for the Danes through the built environment. So everything we do is trying to use philanthropy to Peter and create a society. And in these years, we have been able to donate around twenty billion Danish Kornel between two point eight and three billion euros. We have the same size almost as Rockefeller both inequity in donation, and our task has been trying to improve the quality of life for the Danes with all kind of way to ward like a modern philanthropies. Trying to engage people trying to work with development knowledge data trying to create a huge effect of what we're doing influential Nasi that you have one, hundred, sixty, five, thousand members was the role then of the members in this world of modern philanthropy. When we saw this more than in year two thousand, we have the choice between being. Foundation or continue to be an association and we continue to be legislation. Denmark is a contra with a lot of. The average Dane is a member of more than twenty, five association and the board member in between three and as ation. So our society has for hundreds of years been created on associations so we chose to be. Continuously and today we have hundred, Sixty, seven, thousand members everybody who who owns directly or legally a property can be a member and we want to be the you say the common ship for people with interests in the built environment and you say a lot foundations in Denmark and in Europe who are created by one found of who invented a window appeal or Whatever they on their own will legality and legitimacy. We're born the Galaxy, but we're not own geomancy Mississippi and we thought that sation way. The way of having members would be a way to create that legitimacy of what we're doing. Now for many years, the redevelopment of Copenhagen especially harbor has been a benchmark for other cities to come see from around the world. You've been instrumental in in helping. In particular with blocks a physical space, a space for people to meet a connection of cycle ways explaining what this is a you effectively the owner of large chunk of the harbor. The way we work with philanthropy is that sometimes we take ownership sometimes, we help people changing a mindset. Sometimes, we donate so people can create new knowledge and do something different. Or something donate money. So other persons can develop burr concrete. and. In hoppers Denmark we have in all twenty years trying to help this transformation from being at Industrial Dockland to be a half of a people that transformation is globally and it's also in Denmark and we have been helping. Ten fifteen places in Denmark in this transition and in coping. Speak landfilled the last in a hopper downfield lift where until nineteen sixty dollars a big brewery burned many years ago, and then there was this piece of land lift which has been very very difficult to figure out how to use and how to engage in the city, and we chose many years ago, two thousand and fall to Inter relationship with the city of Copenhagen. So we could help transforming the inner city to hop for human beings instead of an hopper who used to be an industrial hop and with that reason, we chose to make our. By far biggest investment in creating blocks as a destination as building and a way of transforming at previously cert- pot of coping into live urban space and amusing point for Iran. So we tap into some Britches and this big building and the room where we could create liveability, which is a very important part of the Copenhagen DNA to make a livable city and you proved yourself that be pioneers of sustainable innovation hub for the whole Nordic region but as we Should jump to this moment where we are now over the last six months or the last five months since the pandemic began many of the things that you've been championing bringing people together events festivals have been challenged, and at the moment Denmark after a very good summer is saying it's numbers of infections rise. Again, how much of you had to think about that space? Its meaning for the city is adaptability as the pandemic has hit Copenhagen Denmark in rest of Europe. I have to wind little back because the ambition creating blocks was both to create a modern house in a city will allow function. You know may the Dutch architect things that buildings has to have all functions from a city within it? So you have architecture center, you'll have a avenue for creation you have housing, you have a restaurant, you have a space where can do things. So them vicious with blocks has been extremely high. We have tried to create fantastic room for the architects. On a two, they could illustrate how architecture can make a difference for all of us in our alive design architecture is so important to create a Beta live and the blocks ambition has been to convene more than seven hundred people working together from small companies big companies. Companies from startups from researches tried to develop new solution to a sustainable of innovation ride. Now, fifty percent of the population in the world living in cities enlisted in thirty years from now, two two-thirds of the population worldwide will live in cities. That means that in the next thirty years, we have to build citizens for exactly the amount of people who right now living in CBS's three point seven billion people. And that could either be the catastrophe for mother earth it could be the solution if we do it. Right. So the Bishen with blocks was to build a place where sustainability in architecture design could be developed talk about percents both fall professionals and from ordinary people like me and that ambition in appeared will pandemic is extremely difficult all events in the. Area has been canceled for months when we had the lockdown, all the people who have to work together to go home the exhibition. Danes architects to send the heck to shutdown gobbly. Some of it has owned again now again with some restrictions but we have seen that even in a digital world, we can't do some of the things, but it's very difficult to convene people who don't know each other and to invent new things and to have dialogues of things if you can't be together. So what we have done, we have made a special effort. In, trying to create a Kobe nine nine or corona campaign we have donated. Hunting seventy five million Danish corner in trying to help our society to be a little more sustainable. Very very inspired by the UN symptoms build back better. So every time you have a pandemic everytime, you'll have a catastrophe have to do something on this show of that. That is Beta than society was befall. If I have to be able to into my children's is all in the futures is is very important for me for real. They knew that five years from now we can look back and say we used this crisis not only to create employment and jobs and growth and wealth in our society, but also do it. More sustainable to do it more aligned with the institutes from you in and more aligned in the climate challenge, and we do that in blocks but we do that in our whole portfolio with this. I. Think that is extremely important. The projects you're involved with are going to be long term have been in the pipeline many of them for years already, and you have to think years ahead about what the world will look like a need just out of interest. Are you thinking that you say five years and I should we begin to move just six through this pandemic? We know it's going to roll on. Certainly into spring next year, you thinking that the world will come back together on won't be in city spaces, dense rubbing shoulders with each other sharing workspaces or you planning now in rethinking your program of projects and the things that you're looking at to think well, actually maybe even Danes will want to work more remotely lead to be out in the countryside that perhaps some of the. Things you had planned and had ambitions for won't be so relevant in the next five years. Old Man that's a very tough question. That's a lot of things about the pandemic. We simply don't know yet density is extremely important for the climate. So the amount of space used to live is as little as possible but density in the European context density in Asian context and density in. An. American context of very different and things. We don't know about the virus still we don't know if it's more spread in buried in areas, but we know that the city is the spaces are used extremely different, and probably for sure we will have to design our ceases different in the future and we are very keen on that topic and bureau engaged in it for several have. Supported a big study that. He'll has made where they in falsities in Denmark and in other cases in other places in the world has been making a starting, how will the city used before the pandemic? How was the city used doing the lockdown and how was the city used after the lockdown and there's a lot of knowledge to take from that survey and they have made a lot of snapshots from sample. The few pedestrians the peak use it's Times has shifted. The dominant activity observed in public spaces has changed crying lots to there's love taking from the Kobe nineteen experiences we have to work with, and we will definitely go the next years trying to see how can we come? In creating Livable Betas is who on the one hand trying to help with the climate process and on the other hand help with a new takes from pandemic experiences we have had for the last six months. Yes. Banou Garcia Real Dania. Thank you for joining us here on the arborist. For this edition of the. Today's program was produced by Kaleta Rabelo and David Stevens David also edited the show and play you out of this week's episode. Well, his the Beatles with altogether now thank you for listening city lovers. I. Six seven, eight, nine. On love you. See the I think. Yang love you. Fail the. Old. Home. Off. Aw. Latin. Think. Off. Off. Oh. Poke. Talk.

Denmark Paris Copenhagen France Diseases Barron Houseman Density cafe pandemic chairman Europe Cecile Mazo Intel Trafalgar Square Andhra Andrew Tuck Austin Cecile Copenhagen based Philanthropic
395: Giles Heap

The SodShow

29:28 min | 2 years ago

395: Giles Heap

"I was about to say it's a Friday afternoon. But won't I'm in the company of a gentleman who I have great respect for a great report. I should say Allah afternoon. Oh, that's me. I'm joyous. Charles heat from CD CD, natural stone. You might best remembered him as one of the first companies have put our hands in their pocket and said we're gonna make your trip to Chelsea to eighty in a little bit later. We get to that into show just press this putting here on the intro jingle will play. Ladies and gentlemen. Log into the sod show guide podcast. For you. Listen at home for Buchan the same car parks. That's not a little bit in college garden design placed me here was actually said, well, the ambiance sounds would be better. Now, I'm fearful that'll be a bit too much. So it's a bit windy, and I hope it's okay for you. Listen home. I'll start with the starts on a leave the intro bit till after but this series of episodes is actually supported by London college gardens. It's not by you. I did say I think it was an episode titled an impromptu Tancu on in dot it was essentially that when you're doing a podcast on a Bush it on things can be little bit. I have to give credit as company between you and Howard on on the what was to cut list on. Sure why. But you did support it. There's lots of reasons I think that the basic reason is I like what you do. I like the fact that it's an informal chats with some of the best people in the industry, and it's it's fun. You know, we need to spend a little bit more time enjoying ourselves and listening to people who've got something decent aside. And quite frankly, you do it in the NAS right now, I've kissed you RC enough next question. I like to your spin on things. But it's one thing to say I enjoy what you do. And that's always appreciated when a listener says. But when somebody says, no we're going to go a step further, which is what you did. And I'm not accepted posterior kissing. I guess I'm I'm paying you a compliment irrespectful was me or a lot of shows out there that are very full move, very plans. Very quite frankly, most of them are boring has held, and I think that something about the socio is it just encourages the that Detroit person to come out, and you as an interview you do that. And you know, we have industry we've got some great characters we really have. But you don't get to see the real Saunders them most. It's on I'll I'm lucky. I do I get to meet them get to work with them. I get to. Occasionally drink with them. And they fantastic people. But to try to understand that through a formal interview. My some big radio company or big ball costing house away and other you just don't get that feel personality and landscaping and garden design should be about personality. That's that's so, you know, it's it's it's real and to see someone like you who's doing it? The because you love it's then that semi is worthwhile. Helping out if you can't and we can look in day wasn't myself expensive. But I think it's are just think it's a great thing. If just as roles reversed extremely embarrassed go, you'd takes two photographs is actually security here has just passed waved at me. So that's destruction. Was I want to take this as I don't really have a plan. But I'd like to have a plan. I'd like to think that this if you were to plant grower plant breeder or a garden designer on the stone on services on finishing for greater has evolved massively from when I first began on people used to make their own concrete, slobs son and then little bit fancy, Dan and true, some aggregate, better known as pebbles into the top or. In some cases, I used to see seashells put into them. Can you explain to the listener at home what that was two years ago that was innovation? I think that was that was the the industry crying out for something more interesting, but it was made from a timber explained that the timber says Blimey going back. Well, I never really had that down here. It was never really a popular Cigna soon ceased, you know, and I cut my seeks down here. Really? I'd certainly been the last few years lost ten years that we've started moving over the rest of the world in a big way for those who in a home what I'm referring to is used to get four pieces of timber it essentially both them together, you'd pour concrete into the four pieces of timber which made up a square on when it set yet a concrete slop on then you decorate it, and that was a little bit domestic pre nineteen eighties or back to the Cliff Richard stuff all over again, if you had hard landscaping, that's what it was. It was may be crazy paving is it fair. Yeah. I think that's probably is fair wrestling. There wasn't a lot of choice right there. And I have to say if using. Hi, it's remember that kind of concrete set stuff, then all the ultimate. I really am. Back in the seventies. And even the early eighties. There wasn't a huge choice. It wasn't really told me that ET's when we started to to look at other other products from other parts of the world, French Cranach's where the first thing to come over, really. And then shortly after that Indian sense downs in Chinese Granitz, and then we had the whole world of to look at and with the more unusual materials that we bring over then the more people ask what have you got this? And can you find that? And what's new so now, the whole industry is driven on something new and amazing, you know, every six months, and and funny enough as you mentioned that the the concrete putting pills that's actually coming back in. Now. You know, I'm working on. I know you raise your eyebrows, I'm working on a couple of games designers landscape, dishonest commercially who wants to create that look. Not quite sure where that's going. But, but it just everything goes around what we're doing here now announced to me fat known to you. Now is that we're going through it translate essentially, an will come up to two thousand eighteen eventually a promise, but I did a garden talk to goes a couple of months ago on essentially tree hundred years of landscape design and how it's volved and when I got to the eighties. I said there was a log roll epidemic that we hit the Cobb lock pandemic. Then we went to everything was sandstone bamboo or it became decking Mbemba, then it went into grow your own which is always invariably tight in what times of recession after world wars in particular. I know we've gone to what is the new thing which has become essentially houseplants in landscaping integrate outdoors to backtrack it when we hit dot sandstone thing lasted a bit before. Started to get nerves on what I do. Remember is star was one that was extremely porous on wound that wasn't so porous and one was two cheaper quote a bit. Like the Buddha grew to forty five foot tall. I'm wasn't a flight a stack assault was a FARC UCLA which grew to maybe eight foot tall. And so I lost some jobs, which I didn't mind on on the other hand. I didn't help democrat pedantic did this and stunting it got bloody ridiculous. It got to the stage where every single garden effectively was was using Indian sense, then, but I think a lot of that was also because it some of it was awful guy called. There was some crap that came in and still is to say, but some of it's actually not too bad. But enabled people to have something a little bit different. It enabled them to have a natural stone at a point that the common God could have fooled. We hadn't had that before we just hadn't. It was your stone all York stone or possibly something from Europe. Maybe some. Stuff. But there was nothing really nationally that came in in a big way. So in the Indian stuff landed being able to buy something for twenty thirty pounds of square meter was unheard of an extra cough, and it took off in massively big way. And it still does. But nowadays, you can pick up some of it for less than ten bounded swimmers. I wouldn't say lost museum. But especially because it's too soon. But it's it's a. Oh gonna boot of it. It's been around a long time. Now. I have to say and it's time for something else. When I look the displays that CD stone hearts. The landscape show when I look at your product, brochures, online when I scroll through your website when I see the amount of gardens, you're involved with Chelsea flower show, two thousand eighteen was it was at six gardens. You an evolvement. Yeah. Those six or seven major major involvements and another half dozen also reasonably Mason involvements. And then there were people who just any speaking stuff from us because they were doing a garden at Chelsea not where we had any involvement in. If you miss a few a lot of few in. But you remember who the ones that Chelsea where Oklahoma? Now, I I get your sage almost where show she goes. And then Hampton Court happens, and you get so involved and then having to do with Hampton Court are completely forgot what happened to Chelsea. So the reality is this is literally sit down and think for ten minutes, I'm going to go. I'm bloody clue who we'd hoped chosen because it's just on. Now. Johnson snow was one. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. I think that dealt with her Molnar did. Oh gold. At signed by. I actually really can't remember them. No cake goals. Joe Thompson, currently former guest to the show. Maybe if they did something others would turn around and say, well, inverted commas, quote unquote, want that Chelsea look and say, well, the stone that I used is x from CD in Johnston snows case, probably at least Nick sample on main avenue. Chelsea do you have or have you seen a rise in requests dot stone? That maybe Johnson used as a result of that suet degree. Yes. You do. I think a lot of it depends on more on general trends, I mean I've worked with a number of times. And I find that some of the. Designs and ideas that comes through if they're not. Completely off the wall. Lots of it's been done already. Now. I'm lucky in the working with people like K enjoyed they do tend to come up with unusual ideas. And for me. That's that's a great challenge. So they they give me a joy in the guy. I want to make that I'm once I've picked myself back off the floor and stop laughing. Then we find a way to make it happen. I mean, they're good. A good example is actually at the garden at tempting courts last year. And we did the walled garden with him. And he came to me, and he said, well, I want to create this garden, and this is what I've sketched down, and it was instantly apparent to me that the ways to deal with this was to create sloshed border. So we base it took a big eight and a half ton border and sliced into paving. And that was perfect for what he wanted and we've been doing sauce boats for a few years quietly. But since then I've seen more and more and more people start to you use this loss boulders. Indeed, I think we had a couple of gardens. I had sliced. But what is in them and more people are starting to realize actually, this is quite nice because it's Cannock sort of shape and your question about trans earlier the trend. I'm now seeing is designs moving more away from very very Tanggula square straight lines back into a little bit more organic movements. Now, what does that song of our times? And maybe we get a little bit fed up with being told what to do all the time. But the trend I'm seeing and actually I mean Kandasamy people moving towards launch. Are they want to say crazy paving, but crise paving for broader year or so on suspect that's something that will come through and so on, but it's not material choice. It's a it's a design choice design chain. Because there isn't really a little new that's coming in unless you wanna talk about porcelain, which it's a big toil there along are you working with CD are how long you into stone in the CD for twenty three years. I worked for a Corey before that for year. I was asked dads come into the company when I was about twenty two and I said, I'm not coming in a list of fines unless I can bring something to the business. I'm previously to that. I'd been publican three pubs in and around London. I'd been a doorman bodyguards diplomatic chauffeur postman by my managed a petrol station. Yeah. Yeah. Standard stuff for a few years a little bit weird. And he said, look, can you can you come and join up with some help. So I said, well, you don't want to doing that. But I don't know anything really about the industry other than the, you know, the fourteen very strange family holidays that we have when I was a kid like, you know, a week in the fjord in Norway. So that we could glossier mostly because you really wanted to see the stone quarry that was next door. He said, okay, that's fine. So be rains for me to spend nine months in London. The half months working in a quarry in Yorkshire, which was fantastic for me. Don't get me wrong. Nearly killed me because that's really hard work. But I did I spent nine months working in the quarry learning from the quarry and who's a true old fashioned quarrymen Kaku Yeltsin, and I learnt more in that nine months about stone most probably ever since. I learned how to look at it. I learned how to understand it to see it to quarry it. How to produce it? How to? Understand. Why does what it does? And and that familiar was was an amazing learning, and I didn't realize how much I learn until I've been in the industry for few years when I started it all started to come together from the finish the fraud evening. Hon back down to Brentwood on the Monday morning. I was up at five drug tonight stung to work on science outside mainstone town homeless happens. And it turns out I was laying the Orquesta paving, the same York stone paving, I'd loaded on a lorry the Friday before and that was kinda cool because I am not watch it come out of the ground and be processed light. She did that. And then I actually helped to lay it. So I learned I spent about three months on sites on the signing a little bit about contracting as well. And I also instant very much. I really hate early mornings. And that's never going away. And they're not doing enough been there with twenty three years. What's the biggest change give you a funny one this conversation, maybe recently about carrots? And so, yeah, I'm trying to give one that's entirely different foot that they went from being on the supermarket shelf, which was just any car. It's grade one two three into a bag songs to wear and totally bruised unblemished to all the same size all the same to all pre washed. And then we came in an organic era where the green parts of the car, it was being left on European laid loose. It was almost like full circle again back to the old grocer shops, except that we were in a supermarket when I look at the stone ranges now that I don't need to go to a garden center to pick up tree slobs on Mike Rifter. Well, chopper that was the one I want. Now, you couldn't put these types on Trump. All simple to those give everybody wanted to be Dennis hopper. This is to stone stuff. When I go back and look at that. Now, still say above all things you can turn around and say, well, we've got a okay he Iraqi answer in choosed anymore. You can say, well, maybe wanted to choices, you know. We've got new variety Halley bore or Heller snores some people call them, but orca Tony Oster, whatever floats your boat. Drawn are probably the classical in that have changed from the old mop pets into the Annabel's on when a look at stone. It's the most understated least amount of interviews. I've ever done ever. This is probably the first one on it on a surface or on a product that we bought you so much of therefore den now up to speed within those twenty three years. How has it changed? Because even how they Mark bonds had marked music had his sell music. Everything has changed massively on in your department. I might earn at about a new stone slob if. Are you subscribed to English garden magazine ordered dot by mail order? I didn't see anything about it. It's one thing that saints now industry. I think it's the same in every industry, and that's digital marketing. And that that has changed the way that companies supplies like house and designers inclines can search for and look at new materials. I it's unfortunate. It seems to be more important to have a good digital brand than it does to have a good service or good knowledge. And I the one thing I've seen the loss of last four hundred ten years. Definitely lost four of us are a lot of online companies and branding themselves in the same way. That apple did, you know everyone. Wow. This is amazing. It's best thing. Actually, it's not exactly the same. It's just in the different packaging and after Tom notice good. I've seen a lot of that. But I think that the Mathu himselves they don't try and stone doesn't really change. You can't grow a new stone. You can't grow any type species. It just doesn't happen. You can want people to find something you. But even that's been around a few million years. The truth is stone doesn't really change much. What does change changes the ability to find materials or stones that we haven't had before? In that case. I think it is a lot easier to do that because of the internet. But also a lot easier to get the wrong stuff because of the internet. So it's one of its outside a little bit of knowledge is a dangerous thing. And I think there's quantum more a lot more sources now than ever used to be. But I don't think they will necessarily very good ones. The biggest change I've seen is not actually to with stone. It's to do with the understand if construction with stone fifty years ago one hundred years ago, everything we used to lay was unbound. We didn't have cement mortars. We didn't use them. Not particularly after the war. We had not. In but concrete, and then everything had to be bound. So we have to submit Malta's nowadays absolutely this quantity Bush towards unbound. In other words, no cement in your motor Lang stuff loose. That's I'm starting to see more of it starting to come around again. So from a general change materials on trains, you can't honk road him. But we're now started to look at maybe we did before and go actually that worked quite well because we got a couple of streets all over the UK. Ada being down for two hundred years is what you're getting up. I'll give you a funny when a saw I don't know. I don't watch a whole lot of TV. I was waiting to speak to a client. I don't know who the guy was a apologize. Sincerely. But he had a crack between paving on a piece of timber, which I got was a her bed, and you grabbed a handful of compost or soil and run it down to crack stomped it in and true, some lettuce seats on you know, that's not for picking comb again to the Stott dot went on a slide show vote tree. Four years ago where the amount of from cartons in London in particular dot were being concreted in which I think was something like eighty football pitches per on them on how it was outing towards the flooding in London on at the time. I remember reading about them designing to go underground on rotted on just going down. So to water wind straight down. The quickest point away are putting a swirl or two are independent too late water hitting where they wanted to go. I remember to this is crazy. It's it's notes however living in London on having lived in London saying I recommend it. But I kind of white people would concrete in everything in order to get an extra car in the next level on the house and don't make London LTd ninety Moore's my dad used to say is what you're suggesting that whole porosity left the waterfall down through that consideration for the environment. Not knowing where to stone has come from. Now, we also sell porous Kabul on porous stones to allow water. At least perforate true is is that what you're getting that. We're being a bit more considerate of what's happening around is or as womb client said to me when my daughter at six years of age say mom, you need to plan to clear, and I'm having a horticultural disagreement with the with the six year old, you know, you're heading towards the right place. Yeah. I think I we would come to the fact that we need to look at what we're doing in the world, you know, ten years ago took all to land in especially into London. Yeah. We have some pretty heavy floods. Ears. But from that all the councils went hang on. We've got to have Saad sustainable, urban drainage systems, whatever the called, and it will become legal. You know, you have to find a way to make sure that any water that landed on your premises site on your premises. If at all possible. From that the industry has been driven to find solutions. You gets restrain, you know, as one of those solutions is it the right one who knows, but it enabled people aren't myself and other landscape designs, go hang on a minute. Why don't we just let water let rain drains for the surface? There are ways of doing it. And I was ways of being develops and understood better. And now says we're not only can we have an unbound surface. That is permeable we also have bound services which opponent. So we can have hard concrete standing or hard paved standing which allows huge amounts of rain to wash through it straight since the ground. So the environmental issues that we had ten years ago. I think actually made a stink. Well, they have made us think. What can we do to make it better on top of that? Yes. There's a much greater awareness of environmental pressures more seven year old. She's the same. She came home from school last week and said to me daddy. Can we stop using plastic lose? No. But we can try to reduce it. We can't physically stop because so much that we do is based around plastic and to be honest. It's okay. I'm going to be a bit controversial. We sell plastic graphs. We sell competent woods because we have to. But the landscape industry stands up and shouts out so much about we've got to be sustainable. We've got to look at environment. And yet we're actually using more and more mastic in screams. That's a little bit hypocritical. Now, I have to stand here sites. You know? I'm also Ambra hypocritical because I do so some do solid official gross. And we do so compass it would and actually they sell very well. And there's a place for is. But when you walk around a lot of exhibitions and a third of the exhibition is based around plastic products. You have to ask yourself are we actually going into direction here, or is it just an addiction to an easy landscape? That's actually a really tricky question on off to be honest, which it we didn't have a script for this. Because I wouldn't have put this in there. No soldiers hidden hall in between us, I probably didn't pick location to Indy cited the city is they picked do give you credit on raise into question. I'm placing yourself slapped buying in the middle of an you could have I guess on the other hand just used this as a bit of an odd for to'real on all you might edited it entirely and just left some nice bits in a I wouldn't do a home. But that's goes back to what you originally say. Which is you know, what the show is? And how it rolls anyway. Yeah. Exactly. I know if I'm going to say something it's going to go out there. So I'm being redeployed on. But I I'm putting myself in the middle of a little bit. There's a lot of questions about the ethics behind stone. As a lot of questions about the ethics behind concrete, gross, plastics. I should say, and we can all come up with a great own son. But really St. win. It comes down to it to me. The most important thing is if you're going to do something make sure you only have to do it once whatever you're gonna use. It'd be natural stone or concrete or plastic gross. All plastic would make sure it's the best one you can get and it's gonna lost. Because it has nothing worse in my mind, then a client spending between five and five hundred thousand pounds on on a designer we're going and it was. That's falling apart and a few years that is unsustainable. So if you got do it do it properly ROY stuff any, you know, artificial grosses stuff in that particular area Joe for it. But make sure it's one that. That's you're gonna lost. I wanted to ask you got two questions ahead. No. It was only going to ask. And what stone have you got your own buck garden? Funny. I've just moved. Absolutely love, and I detest the patio which is Indian paving and the house I had before had Indian paving, which I also didn't put down. So when she gets her stays when I can afford to change it because I can't, and I know how much buddy will costs. I will change it for something else. I would actually probably choose tied importantly, humble opinion, this policy one of the nicest stones in the world, you've got Ross between the suitcase or briefcase and a medical operate and kit us, it's like something though. Making a phone call. He's not getting which looked. Oh, yeah. You suitcase. Yeah. No. I'm going to get one of them and stuff talking what I'm trying to talk to do is five to sound professionals. Do you know who I am do, you know, who I made you? Playing role reversal here. Okay. If you if I'm going, okay? I. I've lost Matola trade noted medical, Casey. Now, I'm going to look I'm going to stop you're doing it. Again. We'd be like a bad Bill actor and say I'm going to look as well to do. I've got a photograph. And I'll stick it out on this art show in scrammed thing. But if you're stuck for on eating you said in between here on you wanna get into CD stone on a no we've played devil's advocate on we've dilly-dallied and we've had a bit a crack. Yeah. I hope that this would be a good inverted commerce industry conversation. And I I think it has I've tried not to be too. I think you've not been too kind to yourself as well. It's yeah. Yeah. Okay. We all what we all. And you know, none of us are God's. But we do have to do the best. We can. And as long as we do the best. We can all we cannot trying to us hills. That's not a was it gets really boring. I really hard work. So if you call a crack, what's the point? Is he from CD stone? It's been a real pleasure. Always good to see an always good to sit in your company, and you have a great team around here on. It's a real pleasure. Thank you so much. It's you have to say something that same is what that my my companies an amazing company, but it's only amazing because of the people that are in it. And I know that sounds really cliche, but we're very lucky. We've got some of the best people. I think working for us. And I wouldn't be where I am. Now if it wasn't for them. So actually, this is this is a shoutout to those guys. I think they've done they do a great job, and I just hope to carry on believing. So you're making this phone call is. We. Reached on the Judy is to okay, we have to get follows the first person to stone company of of bought a coffee for ever Cup. Chino, my policies on the heritage just a genuinely because I'm gonna leave it at that. He's in the middle of making this phone call it takes some folks. I have a great weekend on cheers, pre shut it. Thanks for you.

London Chelsea Bush Johnson London Joe Thompson London college gardens Chelsea Buchan Europe Charles Howard Hampton Court Saunders Detroit Cliff Richard cough Oklahoma mainstone
CoMotion LA 2019

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

31:45 min | 1 year ago

CoMotion LA 2019

"Hello and welcome to Monaco. Twenty four the urbanistic the show all about the cities we live in. I'm Andrew Talk coming up on this week's episode report from the Mobility Conference Commotion While it Might Seem Ironic to hold a conference about mobility in the city of Los Angeles a city infamous for its traffic woes. Civic leaders transit authorities and private mobility companies. were out in full swing at road delay last week. Take for the Third Edition of Commotion. What is the mobile revolution? Well it's the biggest revolution that any of us will see in our lifetime. It's it's not like the gas station model. It's a productive. Transportation is the most interesting thing that is changing and communities right now and we have an opportunity to transform it we can look globally and implement locally. We're comfortable in our own skins and we're excited about future those are just some of the highlights of what's what's coming up over the next thirty minutes right here on the urban est with women on the ground in Los Angeles Recognize that sound. It's estimated the average American commuter loses around forty a two hours each year stuck in traffic. I'm not talking about the time. Their commute takes and how long people drive for. This is an estimate of waste time in snarled up traffic. That's an entire full workweek wasted behind the wheel each year and big cities such as New York. Los Angeles is all Washington. DC seem to have it much worse than anywhere else in the country so when it was announced that Mobility Conference Commotion Was Decamping in downtown Los Angeles to discuss micro mobility solutions public transit innovation and the role cities can play in bringing equity to our streets. I I was curious to find out. Just how real these ideas were and what is actually being done in practice to change it commotion. It's we're in our third year. We are bringing together trying to bring together the leaders of the Global Urban Mobility Revolution and what is the mobility revolution. Well it's probably the biggest revolution that any of us will see in our lifetime. That's Genre Sant. He's the founder of commotion. La Our host for today and he's also the founder founder and chairman of the New Cities Foundation. which is devoted to improving the quality of life in cities? He told me a bit. More about the mobility revolution. That's what's happening in our urban environments for last really over one hundred years since Henry Ford started pumping out model ts. Nothing really earliest changed that much. We all moved around in gas guzzling cars the terminal combustion engines or buses or taxis etc.. Everything is changing now. If you just think of the micro mobility revolution just maybe a little less than three years ago. Bird bursts out of nowhere. A A few miles from here in Santa Monica and now today you go to. Every major city in the world has micro ability e scooter options. I was in Paris last week and I think they're twelve different operators on the streets of Paris and it's an amazing way to get around Paris. So we're only at the beginning of this. So if you think in five years time I can guarantee you that when we're meeting at Elliot Commotion. Twenty twenty five. A lot of people will be coming to the event event in robotic electric air-taxis kind of big drones that have the ability to take passengers prediction. Oh yeah there's no question that's coming in. The technology is right there. At our doorstep there's billions and billions of dollars going into the sector around world and urban air mobility will be just another way of getting around cities so instead of hopping into a cab or into to your car. You'll take your Uber Air APP and coal up an electric vertical takeoff and landing aircraft. which will come in two minutes? You'll get in and it will deposit where you want. Let's use the argument on the other side. What about people? That are skeptical about that future. And that thing even simple as they don't own a smartphone what's the ability then looks like for the future one issue that we can't forget when we're having all of these intensive discussion here here is the whole question of equity and you know unfortunately our cities particularly in the Western world. I mean if you think of Los Angeles or for San Francisco New York or London or Paris have become cities where the rich live in a part of the city. And then everybody else definitely not as rich. You don't have a kind of equality of opportunity in this country become very very severe. It's a real issue here here. In Los Angeles we have just a couple blocks here we have skid row. We gave that name to the world. There sixty thousand homeless people in Los Angeles so yes they don't have fancy smartphones. They're not going to be calling up. Urban Air PTACS however the promise of new mobility also means that mobility mobility is becoming more accessible if you think of shared mobility option to own a car in the United States between depreciation appreciation insurance cost vehicle gas at Tetra. Cost Minimum's six seven thousand dollars a year. Not Everybody has that kind of money so there are a lot lot of shared mobility options. Now that are much more reasonable you know Mubarak pool to go to work something like that. which is really great in a city which doesn't have of extensive local public transportation options such as Los Angeles to exactly understand a bit better? Some of those challenges Los Angeles is is facing. I caught up with the city's mayor. Eric Garcetti Los Angeles is sort of the future. Capital of the world were a developing world mindset in a developed world city place where challenges are steep but our capacity is maybe unmatched between the universities that we have have here the diverse economy the narrative makers the storytellers as well as the actual doers. The challenges we face are the biggest. The worst traffic in America greatly cleaner but still the worst air in America and the position that we have we're kind of Latin America North America and the Pacific Rim intersex really leap provides us as a great testing ground. And that's what today was about to also offer the city to the world to say test your product test your innovation test your brilliance. See the future today in a city that is the third largest metro economy in the world. That is so much about what Los Angeles is in one people think about the city perhaps even in a wrong way. They've never visited. Mobility is not exactly. It doesn't have executive best reputation as I say. I'm so glad we're number one in so many things whether it's the trade capital of North America whether it's the tourism capital of the United States whether it's the manufacturing capital of America or the entertainment capital of the world but one crown. WE WANNA lose number one one traffic. We want to see how transportation will help us solve housing crisis. And you know Los Angeles doesn't sugarcoat. Its problems but we also are kind of city will you will not see barriers to solutions. You don't have to wait decades and pay your dues. You don't have to be from the right family or come from specific culture here. It's a horizontal city typographically and it's a horizontal city. Socially and you know I think when people come to Los Angeles always surprises them. Because it's like thousand cities in one you'll find your dents downtown you'll find on your sprawling suburban area you'll see your particular countries culture you'll find your people your language or religion but you also see things that you've never seen anywhere in the world collide here the trucks that are around us the whole food truck revolution on twitter started in La when a Korean short ribs Taco was invented with two cultures coming together. And that's the kind of thing we do every single day so I think I always offer. La as a place to see the challenge but also more than that to see the solution of the future now. Of course the next decade okay. There's going to be quite defining line in terms of the big events are coming to the cities and that provides an opportunity in terms to kind of trying to solve so many of these issues as we've been talking about in the one thousand nine hundred. When we had the Olympics eighty four? We really came into our own great global city. I think by two thousand twenty eight. We will prove ourselves to be one of the top five most indispensable global cities place where you see the face of the world today a face at the country tomorrow. And everybody's excited I that goal you know when the world comes to you for the Olympic and Paralympic Games. It's like introducing your future spouses parents to your apartment. You want it to be perfect and you clean it up you take care of it you invest in it. But we're really not looking. I'm just a two and a half weeks during the Olympics. We're looking way beyond that. The next two and a half decades at combating climate change looking at poverty figuring out a way to end homelessness leading the way on resilient cities and as a fan of Monaco. I mean that idea that we can look globally and implement locally is to me what makes L. A.'s so brilliant we're comfortable in our own skins and we're excited about that future now for many cities looking ahead to future of transportation means implementing lanting strategy around smart cities. Ringing in new technologies to help mitigate some of the challenges faced one. Such place is the city of Columbus in Ohio in two thousand sixteen it applied to the US. Department of Transportation's. I ever smart city challenge and emerged as the sole winner being being awarded a fifty million dollar grant to invest in Transportation Jordan. Davis is the director of Smart Columbus and she told me more about some some of the issues the city is facing and how they are trying to solve them. Transportation is the most interesting thing that is changing and communities right now and we have an opportunity to transform it in a way that solves the problems in our community and the problems that were suffering from our economic divides that are rather severe and keeping a lot of our residents from accessing opportunity. But also we are growing faster than we ever have where the number one fastest growing in the commit west and the second largest city in the Midwest. Actually right now and so. We're bigger than we ever have been. So we're experiencing new problems with Urbanism and Growth and we think that transportation could be in the heart of solving that so rather than solving it in traditional ways that we've seen we think we can Dan leverage technology and data to do it differently. And maybe faster so we're looking at how transportation's becoming more connected. self-driving shared word electric. And how this can work as a service for our residents but also what's the role of data and keeping it healthy and growing and secure so we have everything from connected vehicle pilot were deploying hundred seventy four intersections of connected vehicle environment type technology will connect about twelve hundred vehicles in our community. To address safety and mitigate congestion we have deployed a self driving shuttle. I we did it in in downtown. And then we're taking it to a low income neighborhood in the first quarter of next year to solve for the first mile last mile challenge from the shared mobility ecosystem. Were doing things to strategically position public transit as the backbone of our ecosystem. So we've done a complete transit system redesign of our bus system Tom we've upgraded to mobile fare payment including Wifi. And then we're adding onto that a integrated seamless multi-modal trip planning and payment application. Are we just released in August. That allows the resident to plan book and pay for a trip across multiple modes from scooters to buses to TNC's and and then we have a whole effort to grow the electric vehicle market and then we built our own operating system to manage data as well. There's only only one system is called the city and there's only one transport system in a city. It's only the separation of the transport systems is artificial if if you put yourself from a citizen perspective. It's one system. It's one road which is used by buses. Buy Cars Bicycles with you. Have streetlights when you have to post signs. It's only one road. It's one track no matter what is operator and we have to think the system as one and bring together or the actors or order regulators or the suppliers to improve its efficiency. Make it better for city support the economy and make it more sustainable. That what's Silvain. How on he's the director of strategy for the International Association of Public Transports? This organization brings together urban and public transport on sports stakeholders from across the world including public transport operators or authorities manufacturers and now new mobility players to that's east scooters for you and I as we caught up in between sessions that commotion. Sylvan told me how he believes. That's the traditional definition of public transit is being redefined and has now gone way beyond busses trains and subways the transport systems. He's about going going from one place to another. It's not about going on one road taking one night. It's going home to work to the school to the Jim. Thirty transport can provide backbone of the transport system in the city to move the bulk of the people around but the last what we call the last night the last five hundred meters may not be possible to be done with the bus. Always the train. Obviously and that's where we think there is a place for on on demand transports heavy seas for shared scooters bike share. I know the mode of transport the first of them being the oldest one's walking working in cycling by the way do you feel like that's one of the issues as well for example looking at Los Angeles. You just mentioned walking and cycling. It is a city that he for example as as much as there are initiatives to try to encourage people. It's not twenty people immediately. Think of when they think about mobility and how to get to a place. How do you change mindsets I would say you have three key elements? The first one is the toughest one. It's the city. The city create the conditions and by city. I mean the physical infrastructure physical urban environment. It creates a condition to make cycling walking possible of Courses City with so much as Sanjay's big highways in the center of the city. It makes it more difficult so you have to work. On the physical infrastructure you have to work on St Design to create the Coalition for people to walk or cycle. The second part is make sure you give Kuraray to cycling working and Public Transport so that you reduce place the physical space given to private cars and can you give more space. More is to move around to the other modes and the particular active transport and its third element is a need to create incentives incentive for for sustainable urban transport solutions and these incentives for the private car. And that's about parking policy. Parking fees charging for the use of the road. Frustrate chair so you need three laments for comprehensive policy to Anchorage Alternative to going around with your own car and being stuck in traffic and and this is an opinion that is also shared by Jordan Davis from Smart Columbus. Here she is again you have to ask can private mobility be solvent solvent like Kansas. Actually make money and in its effort to make money. Does it actually meet the goals of public transit and can they coexist. Oh exists or do they need to merge and I think that's the question that all the city's grappling so if scooters are there to make money because their private business but they also need to be equitable notable. Do those things kind of run in competition with each other and for us we think that the ecosystem needs to be integrated interoperable in order under to give the largest amount of choice for a resident but the relationship of do these things become public services. I think is still yet to be determined. Ironically ironically we are still in pilot mode you know even from a private market perspective like Willis. Scooter stay around. You know. We had cargo in our community are very fortunate to have them before we had really made a commitment to the space for five years given some company decisions they exited the market will really left a a lot of residents without their main mode of transportation. And that's a possible scenario for scooters if they don't become a successful business so I think that yes yes on demand services are absolutely the future and how does it become public service. Is the question for us. We are doing first mile last mile on demand service invest through our actual public transit authorities so their vehicles their drivers and then via is the software provider behind it and so they're providing in low cost rides for residents in a certain neighborhood to get to a transit centre or somewhere in the geofencing area. And so that's changing public transit tremendously. Yeah now how do we bring any other. Private companies is really the question a company that is trying to change the way we literally access public transit. That is the way we pay. Hey for a ticket is Musabe I caught up with its head of partnerships. Nick Cardy leak. You just read platform is built to allow people to you pay for and receive secure dynamic ticketing for their public transport on their mobile phone and this is achieved by single platform for all agencies. He's globally where we can incorporate any products and fair types for that agency and offer them through an APP download an APP store or through third party application which is not wait. Lap such as we do with Uber and Denver or transit APP in many locations through our software developer kit and so are sort. The basic goal is to make accessing and utilizing public transport as seamless and easy as possible for the writer. We all have to get through our day. The more steps. It's in the process. The more difficult it is sometimes the more likely we might be to take another option so simpler and more streamlined. Your journey can be the more likely you are to upside public transport now as someone that used to live in London and that I'm so used to sometimes even just leaving my wallet at home and I can do everything with my phone in terms of traveling and whatnot moving to the. US Dot proved to be a challenge in some places but it makes me question even if for me this seems like the ideal solution deletion. What about people? That might not have access to a smartphone. Are you suggesting it should replace all systems or just streamline it for people that tend to use this no no in fact we refer to ourselves mobile. I not mobile only because we know that all writers need to have access to public transport and some people including the UNE Bankcorp. They just prefer not to use their mobile phone for these types of transactions should have equal rights to access transport so we do currently provide full-fat collection solutions which which are again mobile first but we do install vending machines. We integrate with gate lines. We provide for digitizing cash. We provide for fertilize TAP cards. So that people with any kind of entitlement might be able to tap into a bus or other vehicles. Such as for instance in Fort Collins wins all students at University of Colorado can get onto the bus and validated with their student. Id through the platform to NFC card. All veterans can access public transport for free using their veteran's affairs. ID and so. We don't mind what the token is. We just want to be able to provide through our back end. The most seamless way for persons. What they've got in their pocket to access public transport simpler? You make this system more people you'll convert to actually use public transit and perhaps apps did you know that the first instinct is to call a ridesharing platform whatever instead of that. If this processes made simpler they will eventually revert to using in public transit more. Well what I think is people will always do. What's best for themselves? And that's what we want them to do. But utilizing transport really is. What's best for you if you can access I sit easily and if it's going where you want to tell if it's cost effective and better for the environment and all your other choices in the end of the day it's the best way to move around the city so so this is why we've integrated with Uber who have fully installed our platform in their application through our software developer kit for city? We deployed that solution. And so you can now. Oh by public transport ticketing in the UBER APP is in Denver. We have only been live for maybe six months. But I know that we've sold something along the lines of twenty or thirty two thousand public transport tickets in the UBER APP. And what that means is that somebody opened up that application to get a car and instead they were offered public transport and chosen. This is behavior change and we know from our data that this did not take any chunk out of our regular user base so these were new users. People are making choices for themselves based on. What's best for them? But what if you want to change the way. People travel in cities not three public transit but by convincing car owners to trade their regular car for an electric one. Instead but part of that change in mentality comes with the access to charging stations. Louis Tremblay Eh is the CEO of add energy and also flow the largest charging network in Canada. We started by talking about the fact that for many skeptics optics access to charging stations seems to be the main sticking point. Everybody has the range anxiety. Everybody are wondering before they buy a car right where I'm going to charge but what happened when you start to use your car. It's that you figure out that it's not like the gas station model. It's a paradigm shift so all of the sudden you don't go somewhere to charge everywhere you bark unique to charge every morning you leave your home and your fully church so it's really about a game changer. Like your mobile or your laptop. You don't go somewhere to plug your laptop everywhere you go you blood. There's no range exciting when you start to use the electric vehicle but it is is important for. I would say minicipal these city to understand that reality and make sure that charging is available. People need it. Do you have difficulties these are. Is it a challenge to get cities to understand that I would send no city as are open because they wanna make sure that this happen. So we're there to provide the data because we over it so many chargers. We can l. them to understand to installed busy charger so charger where people will need. You know use them as is there working nearby and they need to charge overnight. People live in multi unit dwelling. That can use it during the night so we can have really busy charger. But if the city wants more than padding busy charger but one win stall charger everywhere across like a CD like elite to make sure that everyone accessed whether dependable charging service people leaving being in Condo apartment which has a lot of people here in La so we need to make sure we put chargers everywhere so people feel comfortable and then they will switch to electric and used. WHO's the leader deployment? which did use the curbside charger charge overnight because they don't have a parking where can recharge it's only on the curb so as it then The concept here that if you make it and make it simple people will use it. As long as it's available it will be easier to convince people to switch the type of vehicle that the US yet again back to the laptop and cell phone example. You know it's about freedom you know if you understand how the electric vehicle work you will appreciate it more silenced. Acceleration is great and it simply to us and there's charging everywhere so why not making the switch but people have to understand you know all the benefits of the electric car before they get confident. But we're there to make it simple for them before wrap-up of the Sears Commotion Ocean La. I also had the chance to speak to Amanda Aurora the Managing Director of Planet M This is mobility initiative of the State of Michigan which helping companies access the mobility ecosystem. She started by telling me more about the city of Detroit and how it's mobility revolution is quietly quietly. Moving along. The city of Detroit footprint is very large much larger than what people realize we only have about maybe eight hundred thousand residents however the footprint print is equivalent to Manhattan Boston in San Francisco. So if you could imagine there's a lot of empty space with a limited number of residents that exists there today so some of the challenges. Oranges are just having areas in the city in which we are trying to provide access to public transit first mile solutions. So we've actually launched a particular pilot to solve of some of that in one particular neighborhood called the Osborne neighborhood on the east side of Detroit. The pilot itself I think is interesting. Starts to help define some of the challenges. But it's called car for you. It's being led by General Motors on there maven platform with that. What we discovered is that many detroiters are une banked and many perhaps maybe they you have a smartphone but don't have a data plan to be able to access the maven platform and so what we did? Was We partner with a community center. We plays two of them even vehicles there at a discounted rate so it includes insurance the other thing to note about Detroit and Michigan currently we have the highest car insurance rate in the United States. City of Detroit is even worse. So there's a very low personal car car ownership so a lot of challenges with mobility in the city of Detroit so with these two vehicles in partnership with a community center at a discounted rate it includes insurance that includes your fuel and you can go into the community beauty center to actually rent out the vehicle without having to have a credit card and without having to have a smartphone so that is gentleman launched a couple of months ago so we're still collecting a lot of data on that. But it's just one way. Hey that we're trying to solve some of the specific challenges that are unique to Detroit. Just like what we heard earlier from Louis. Klay of Adeniji and flow. The the state of Michigan also sees electric vehicles as the way forward for mobility and educating the public is a big part of making it happen. Here's Amanda Manda again. As part of project we have a second pilot that's launch. It's called charged with a couple of defer to trade at the end and essentially. It's Detroit's first fast chargers but it wasn't just just about charging. It's all about eve education outreach in helping to you know hopefully get michiganders' to embrace this idea of electrification in the future. So what we did was. We didn't just put these charges off somewhere off to the side. We actually put them in a very dense area as part of the city. So there's several pocket parks in the downtown and midtown part of Detroit. We selected one of those. We put these four charges adjacent to the park where there's tons of programming and application through group called downtown Detroit Partnership Partnership and so the idea really. There is that somebody would come on down charge very quickly. Maybe within thirty minutes while they're there and it's a two hour parking limit so still still trying to figure out the whole balance of how do you pay for parking and paper charging so. Unfortunately we haven't cracked that nut yet so we haven't been able to streamline that but we're not we haven't given up and then the idea is it will help drive economic development. They'll be programming in the park as well so we partner with a couple organizations that are working on developing some programming so that will be the second case. Study that we're just starting to right now now and then. We will package all of this together as a white paper really to help other cities so can and should cities fully embrace micro mobility solutions. And in the meantime. How do we make our streets safer? Here's John Roseanne of commotion. La Wants more more and more people are biking more and more people are going around by scooter. And so there's much more of a popular pressure. Now which is where democracy and politicians who run the city here the voters. I think there's more of public clamor for this type of thing the same time. One of the problems is people who own cars ars have been extremely entitled we subsidize Massively Car Culture by our tax dollars goes to new in keeping streets and street lights freeways and things like that and they feel very a title so I mean some Angelenos talked to feel the same way about their cars that you know Oklahomans feel about their guns and it's become kind of a second amendment issue away we have a constitutional right guard to our gas guzzling cars. That no one's GonNa take it away from us. A lot of people feel that way. I think it's a generational. Yeah I mean there's clearly you know my kids. They like driving around car. But it's not the be all end. All they have a completely different attitude due to ownership. You know whether it's a car anything else. So they get the sharing economy in a very fundamental way. So things are changing. It's this question for Monaco in Los Angeles. I'm Carl Tarabella. That's all for this edition of the Urban Est.. Today's episode was produced by Colors Rabelo from Los Angeles and edited by David. Stevens from Zurich. What am I bought team they are now? It's pay you out of this week's episode. Who else is that lever with? locomotion thank you for listening. City lovers to give than Obama. Did it it. Why not take a wonder into the wonderful world of Monaco? With an annual print subscription. You'll receive ten issues of the magazine. A year plus are seasonal specials. The forecast Austin the escapist subscribes to one year plus and premium packages also receive our new annual the Monaco drinking and dining directory. And that's not roll. Each of our plans comes with a free tote bag delivered to your door. We invite all fans of the Ernest de-subscribe today and receive a special ten percent discount on any Of Our year long subscriptions simply visit Monaco Dot Com forward slash urban Est.. There's never been a better time to sign up. Monaco keeping an eye and an NIA on the wall.

Los Angeles Public Transport United States Detroit Monaco Olympics Jordan Davis New York Henry Ford DC Michigan urban air Paris founder Elliot Commotion Department of Transportation software developer Midwest
A VerySpatial Podcast - Episode 650

A VerySpatial Podcast

38:37 min | 7 months ago

A VerySpatial Podcast - Episode 650

"You're listening to episodes six hundred and fifty very spatial podcasts. September Twentieth Twenty Twenty Hello Welcome to a very special podcast I'm Jesse I'm sue and this is Frank Ladies and gentlemen is your last chance if you live in the United States to fill in and submit the US. Highly Orage we think no is there. There's a lawsuit even it's despair. It's it's a whole mess. Let's be honest. It is always a mess. Yes. There's like eleventh hour fifty, nine minutes lawsuits that I just got announced yesterday maybe I don't know it won't go anywhere. So it probably your last night. What's the date September thirtieth? There you go. September thirty s get get seriously get it done if you're in the US, get it on if you haven't. They are sending around door to door but they don't I mean it takes a while and they don't necessarily get to everybody. So just fill it out if you haven't. Done a lot of people don't answer the door anymore. Yeah I have two friends that are working as as poll workers for the following softened there there. There's a very low response rate. Now, of course, West Virginia is historically, yes directly have been an issue, but there's a big. There's a huge problem with visiting door to door even have an interesting little interactive map APP that allows census workers to. Bark houses problematic or something like that. So it's kind of neat but you know the time is running out even the lawsuit comes through really going to add a week. So let's get it done. You know our goal of having one hundred percent count is is not Something that happens but the the greater, the count, the better we. A sense of you know what we are as a country. Where we are. Yes and for the next ten years, data will be used for all kinds of things. So, not the least of which will be redistricting. which will have says the first thing it'll be used for. That's what it's for. That's what the constitution says is for all the other things are just gravy as it were but just hey, we could use it for this too but. But yeah, it's worth their next next year we will see how various places realign themselves as it get new seats Of course, I'm curious because, of course, North Carolina where I'm from. has historically. Not had a non-contentious. Redistricting in decades. Latest. Byron been sorted out yet finally no, I'm pretty sure it's still contention. Just, keep going back each time the. Main problem if they would just. Not Do what they're doing. And in theory, North Carolina's picking up another seat next year as well. So, that that'll make it even more interesting with the GERRYMANDERING. Yes listen an issue for like someplace like West Virginia where we're GONNA get so few that it's really matter. Draw the line. Like, you have the minimum number of Reps. that's yeah. What I keep meaning to look what is the minimum number of reps I believe? It's too. If I'm not mistaken, it could be three. I should know that but I think it's too. I guess. I'm not a hundred percent sure I I went to the police I guy and and even he's not sure. So I know leave it to the I. R. I do not know things about the US come on, right? Yeah I. Mean That's just I'm pretty sure to. Wyoming tell you. That's gotTa Tell Your Rhode Island I mean that's going to be the ever made that and I think that's too. So feel free to hit us up on twitter or or wherever to let us know and we'll google it later as well. Yeah. So. Next up in the news, we have a whether he stuff first off it is Noah's fiftieth anniversary as of September fourteenth officially. So it was founded in nineteen seventy and it is now fifty years old, which is you know A little shocking that it's so young if I'm honest. It th right there with that whole group of environmental legislation. Including the EPA and others that came round in you know late sixties, early seventies. So there you go. Yeah. So happy birthday to Noah. Just a word since they are fifty perhaps you know actually. Saying their name. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. That's right. I wanted to say I don't a quiz quiz question. I I don't say it and the reason I don't say it is I have trouble with oceanic to think really hard about how to say that word I don't know why that is true. but it just is I. Don't tend to the partisan where mutes. Oh. No but I mean, we haven't linked to a story map they talk about their history and their founding and all that sort of stuff inch. It's pretty cool. Check it out and you know happy birthday to know. Speaking of Noah. The folks who help us keep track of tropical storms and right now we have reached. The with the most repeatedly I guess is the way of putting it. the Greek letters. So we are already into the Greek letters with Beta. there is no Alpha but. Yeah. So we made all through the. Again keep in mind with the Alphabet we only have what twenty two. We don't have Q. and a couple of others. I don't have. Ex- ex-. Yeah. So yeah and I'm looking real quick to see if anything else has been named now we have two more. In the Atlantic but they haven't. Actually formed into tropical storms, but we're still so. I thought there was an Alpha that was hitting Portugal. which is reared in itself because Portugal doesn't normally get hit by trump storms have gone sub-tropical. Yeah because they were many of them are turning directly North into the Atlantic you. are some Greek letter so just like there are some. Traditional twenty-six character that we skip, there's also some Greek letters that we skipped a camera which ones they are. 'cause this is only the second time in my lifetime. I think that I remember getting to the we may have before, but I remember what was twenty? Two thousand five with Katrina. That year we got to Greek alphabet ask say there's one or two years I can remember. This very late in the year like end of October thought. This is rare that I when I saw this because I saw like is an image on like reddit or something facebook. I've I saw this I was I call why don't we use a Greek alphabets from for all the names of the storms it's a great switch and then I read the headline the sub-headline of Oh yeah. That's bad. It's just so rare. I'd never had heard a Greek alphabet I'd never been really paying attention enough to realize. I think I can't remember when at what let it started. But like every time we will get a store. It'd be like this is the earliest for this Leonard Storm that she are so. It was. It was pretty early maybe K.. J.. K. Yet right along in there but Yeah. So it was early July active. And they said it was going to be an active season but I don't think they. Even I think even the the predictions that we were talking about in the spring were under predicting what we've seen so far and again for us in the southeast. We've been unfortunately of course to get hit in September and October with some of our most. Significant storms over the last four or five years and before that as well. But we've had a run of them for last four or five years. So we're still. Kind of strapping ourselves in. We're just now into mid September and we've got A. Month and a half to go before we even think about clenching if you will. You're now in the danger zone. Copyright aboard. Right into. nevermind mind. On the other side of the country, we be dealing with in the United, states, and actually the there've been wildfires in lots of different places. I was just reading about some in. Siberia and places like that. But for us in the United States, the West Coast and western part of the US has been dealing with terrible fire season, and just you know fires after one after another cumulative effects of of Local weather patterns, climate change. All kinds of things have really been ramping fires up and and This year's fires are so consistent and covering such an area and so deadly that we're actually seeing weather patterns and climate patterns actually pulling smoke all the way to the east coast of the United States, and beyond and a NASA has released some informational imagery As part of you know, kind of the efforts to get the word out about some of this showing how satellites I think. The Images Lincoln show notes from Suomi. But you can check that in the text below but a just illustrating you know how prevailing wind patterns and other. Parts of the atmosphere are actually. Broadening the effects, the indirect effects of the fires as they continue to try to fight those out in the West. Do you guys remember forty seven years ago when Australia was on fire back in that time period, we call January of this year. It's just you know it's just like poly one after another on to it, and it is getting harder to remember. How? Brazil last year or was in the Amazon last summer was. Slower. That feels like forty eight years unless okay does but but I mean it's it's I think pretty much year round now we've had some places had. so very severe fire seasons. And like I say I think I. It was just a passing headline about some of the fires ramping up in Siberia this year but I haven't checked on that to verify. But They I think they concluded the last couple of weeks. There's been a couple of reports to say that the Western wildfires are definitely worse because of climate change not that it was that much in doubt those of us who kind of all that stuff but they have kind of proven. That is true. So there's every indication much like flooding that the the severity is going to get greater. Of these type of events and more frequent too so. More of the worse life people at the weather channel point out. Warm Air can hold more water. Speaking of Australia and potentially the counterpoint which can also which is pretty devastating at a time like this is we're beginning to see the formation anaemia. So were expecting now heavy rains. To be significant over northern portions of Australia. So there's places that were ravaged by fires. Last year are now even more vulnerable because, of course, a lot of education that would have helped. Keep the water from running off helping. Permeate the soil isn't there at burned off so You we're gonNA see potentially significant floods and those being exacerbated by. The loss of that vegetation. So. Yeah. Why Mania is? Ramping up yes, and has other effects as well. Yeah. But since we had talked about Australia was on my mind so. I think the end of the year that's just going to be the word for twenty twenty. Or? Or some just. guttural sound. You know the mental image I have is. Maybe, those of you who aren't nerds art never this phenomena. But when you're a nerd middle school at some point, you end up kind of curled up in a ball. And being hit by dodge balls, her fists or whatever thing that you get picked on for and the twenty seventh one just really is just. That's what I feel. Twenty twenty is. Whatever thirty, thirty, five, sixty, seven, whatever. Sort, three the they they count they matter. Yeah. But after at some point you're just like. What? Yeah, it's just your nerve endings shot. And the US gets it election during that period. But that's a whole other thing. Yes. Okay. So switching gears a little bit but but a good follow on to what we were just talking about because, of course, increasingly remote sensing missions. So satellite missions from different entities around the world are. Continue to be instrumental in helping us understand what is going on with the changing planet including climate change and other issues, and so I was really excited actually to see that the next part of the Sentinel series. So part of Copernicus European Space Agency can purchase program a sentinel six, which will be a pair of satellites. He's actually a partnership with NASA. And some other groups and it's going to be launching in November so they've put out the media invitation and a little bit of information about it, and they're going to launch it from Vandenberg Air Force. Base out in the West Coast. So a sentinel six is GonNa continue some of the work that Nasr's Jason a satellite has done and that is going to. Focus on C. level observations so they can look at sea level change and they planned this mission to last up to a decade, and then there'll be a second sentinel six series launched this. The Sentinel six actually has a name it's Michael Froehlich so the satellite has a name and it's named after the former director of NASA's first sight sufficient. So. I thought that was interesting and the final in really interesting bit of information in this project really bringing a bunch of groups together partnership is that actually spacex Falcon nine is gonNA launch it. So you've got the essay in their expertise in the pernicous mission sort of the Sentinel series you've got NASA and you've got spacex and some others adding onto that as well. So I just wanted to say this genetics reference that not many people get I'm very disappointed. Some of the team members don't go see Mikey. Got It. He gets everything I'm. Always. Reminded wherever we talk about one of these, the fact that the the number is actually telling you basically what the purpose of the satellite is. So they've. It's just an IED. Departure. From you know where? We have so many different named programs. They have one program name. But each number represents a different mission. So Ridge Ason y and the series of Jason Satellites were intended for that purpose to six series of sentinels and that where to is, of course, the the traditional imagery based three is something I didn't see weirdly I'm not even sure where four and five are one is the SAR stuff and I've used that. I've not used the other ones yet. But a SAR what is then I don't remember what three, four and five are. On. That's another thing. One. Yeah. You know it seems kind of bizarre to me. It's not like there's not enough characters in something that you couldn't use. The actual name. I like it. I liked the fact that you know they're all sentinel. So we all understand that remote sensing projects from the USA in the number, and then of course, you have a letter after that but you know which one it is. So I I actually like it. But you do look up the number. Is Why can't you just have sentinel. SARS. H. You know he's like. Probably for next time to on this vein there's got to be an update out there and what's going on land set nine. I have not seen anything new on the land set list. Not less but the the website and probably two months last time just wasn't the optimistic plan twenty, twenty one for the long. Think we've talked about that. Anyway I I try I'll try to get an update on that. It's big done by Microsoft skip ninety. Call Ten. But. Apparently have another satellite. It's some additional Earth Operation News because I love the the space. Satellite News, any startup recently do a startup that was featured at a tech crunch event. Called Satellite View is actually looking to get itself into the commercial remote sensing market but in a way in a different way than what we're used to in that is by launching satellites that are actually going to focus on thermal. And not just third on the thermal bad. But also on higher, much higher resolution thermal than what you can get with satellites that currently capture that particular area of the spectrum. So they were talking about their satellite sensors being able to do resolutions of three to four meters which would be. Very, very, very much higher resolution than what you can get soc trying to think what it what it is for. Lancet, which is pretty course I want to say it's like sixty or ninety meters per pixel something like that. But don't quote me on that I'd have to go look it up and so this actually is an area where the commercial satellites have not really. Delve into too much that I can think of. So Um, it actually is a is a niche there there I think right that that has room and there are a lot of uses. Now for a thermal in terms of you know customers who might be interested in energy savings sustainability and some other stuff on. You can also use it to monitor what's going on with things that emit heat so it can be used in certain types of emergency type of response responses. So I thought that was really interesting but anyway, if you want to know a little bit more about to the their presentation at the event, I think it's techcrunch disrupt. which they have a number of these events but anyway Yeah. So thermal getting into the commercial space. Thermal. So hot right now. Yeah. Okay Sorry folks I. got a good night's sleep last night i. Did you stay at Holiday Inn Express I did not I? Just I have. Mentioned something, commercial. Yeah. I just have been losing sleep for a week and I slept like twelve hours last night. So kinda. Little heady with all the sleeping. Next to the News, the twenty twenty story map it's competition is now live. So if you want to enter, it can head for the Lincoln. The show notes This is a combination work with the. United. Nations on something called a sustained don't want get this. Wrong. The Sustainability Sustainable Development Solutions Network S Tsn. All governmental agencies are so fascinated with acronyms, but they are They are basically asking people to create story maps that have to do is sustainability issues, and there's a whole range of seventeen stability development goals. The United Nations. Put out and they run the gamut of areas from you know climate related to poverty inequality hunger. Name something that requires thoughts about sustainability particularly for a population and the environment they embody. Then they've got a goal around it and they're asking people to come up with story maps that sort of address the things that are on those goals so. It's a great little competition, and if you have some stuff that you'd like to add to the equation than head over Lincoln the show notes and you can see all the people are going to be involved in judging it and know what you can do to get involved. I think I may get involve myself. Whence are due date. did I not I didn't think I saw that when he's out so we don't the bottom. So Twenty. By PM Pacific Time so you know get it on the twenty fourth get yourself some. And winners are being. Twenty, twenty one, there's a list of prizes you know and they're basically certificates and you know. Access to more things. You can look at the prices, but the the it's it's worth doing even without the prize. And of course, the sustainable development goals those build on the Millennium Development, goals from to thousands SDG's came around in two thousand, fifteen course. Both of those have fifteen-year-old lifecycles or fifteen year life cycles. and yeah, it was really A. a flushing out of the MDD's to get to the SDG's, and so there's more of them but one of the great things about the SDG's the Millennium Development Goals were very much focused on. the global south and growing and developing economies whereas the sustainable development goals have a much clearer recognition and statement that you know these are issues not just in developing regions, but everywhere in the world. So issues of hunger of climate change of all these things that are included in the seventeen different focus areas are issues everywhere. So whenever you are looking at these, don't just you know. Think of them as limited to the developing portions of the world. These are issues you know on your doorstep. So. There I should two tracks. One is for students and the other one for professionals So if your students that you can in turn a whole different tracks, you're not competing with professionals and the each thrown surprises. You can only submit an individual or team can only submit to one of the tracks so either students or professionals, but you know. You can submit your story to one of the transit should say. Yes. So kind of as a I think a good companion piece to the participation in these story map competition with the UN as has also signed an MOU with a UN habitat, which is the UN agency that that is involved in sustainable urban development So you know case sharing of software and expertise and training to help that. have been identified as resource strained and wanting to work towards sustainability goals so Just, getting started with a program, there's actually I. Guess already few cities that are are kind of working with Serie on some stuff. So if you're interested in a little bit more info about that, but again, other example of utilizing geospatial technologies for sustainability and to actually you know give a chance to urban areas and places that want to work on these goals, but maybe don't necessarily have. The resources to do it on their own. next up is as read has acquired in frames, which is maker of light are two. Middleware, and by the way middle where's my probably most hated? Business technical term ever but what they do is really cool. So essentially, this is a in frames was apparently a company that what they've created a bunch of algorithms that essentially takes lighter and aero photography and makes really good three d models out of it. That's an oversimplification of a lot of what they do, but that's the heart of it. So the idea is Israel has purchased this company. The terms are not disclosed and what and it's a German company and what they're intending to do is to fold this type of technology into art. Obviously pro is my guess to continue to expand their three capabilities in that software, which will be awesome because an awful lot of imagery and light ours being flown particularly high resolution stuff in small areas. It actually include drone grab as sensors too. So I I think this is going to be really really cool. It can't wait to see what comes out of it that I get to play with. While the the actual screen shot on the the AD is obscene. So you know being able to take this data. You know we're we're we're waiting to see think whether or not. This is going to be something like what you're suggesting a plug in I've never actually used frames. So you know I'm not really sure. If it's a a pro extension or If it's Online and so while I'm saying that him. Well, you know I think it's something that will come like city engine is an example of like, okay. We made a companion product when we bought the Swedish I, think was the company in Switzerland. that that company and then they've sold they sort of folded into a into pro. So it is still in its own program, but a lot of things it city engineers to do it now in pro so. Whether IT'S A. Cloud, or a desktop type of thing bull find that out a point in time and. I assume, of course, Lake with various acquisitions that. Really were most likely a new research office, our office because of course, they've done that with the folks Interruption here in the middle with some hardware news, HP makers of more or less most of our plotters. unless you go up to, what is it Oh c. e. that the other one And there's an epson. COUPLE APPS and users out there all seven of them. So, HP rolled out new designed jet printers and the focus on these is really about sustainability So there staving their carbon net neutral I assume they're doing offset store this they also are being traded with thirty percent. Of them being recycled plastics. More sustainable ink. Not, sure exactly I didn't look at details about the ink but you have that option. I. Assume that'll be a premium over regular inks. But yeah you. It is interesting to see more and more. Companies in the space trying to be more sustainable, and of course, allow that's being pushed by other. Other countries outside of the US where you know the move towards sustainable move towards carbon-neutral move towards things that were put together in the Paris Agreement, which means other countries are members of. are actually being implemented. It Jesse skipped over one important bit here that I want to You know more about is. Actually thought it made sense the market research to decide that they should make a model for, and this is their quote ideal for homeworking professionals I twenty four inch plotter that they think people will have at home that there's enough of a market. That people right now. I know. But I'm just saying I want to work at a company or organization that has enough resources to buy me applauded I'm just going to say that. I would agree but I would say you don't want the large format printer plotter is the own song hero. Of many many industries including ours and I have to say when I first when I first took my teaching job where it was hard to get access to such a thing I think that was one of the things that I miss. Most right not that I- excessively used but it was there when you need it and when you do need it right there's nothing else that can produce that size paper in that image and stuff, and so I have to say, yes, I, agree that pivot to recognize the working home it's like I just would like to see the face on I say you know and I'm going to need a plotter. sorter for that. And it's just but yet. I I have to say that that on the wishlist. If I had a fodder. I can think of many things I would I would use. I be artists. This whole thing triggers a whole lot of questions first of all about third or fourth bullet point down stand accessory. How would you use this thing without a stand? Like would you put it between trivet on the on the link? It's it's sitting there on a table. But. So is it hot mounted? I'm. Fed. So that's one of the things I didn't check was see whether it was roll fed or sheet fed or both. And if It becomes much more annoying. and really for something like this, the the materials are going to be the consumables are really going to be the thing because. Yeah I mean this is gonNa cost maybe eight hundred, maybe a thousand dollars. For this, if you don't stand. and. You know that's ten rolls a paper right there. Yeah I mean it's just I mean. I'm astounded. They've they've done. Some company to do the research they know what they're talking about. So they've done the breeze one. Yeah. There's a market for this and that's that's amazing to me, and by the way I also, if you go to the link with the extreme simplicity graphic I, want that Ladies Home Office it's Nice. I'm, amused by. The design. Of the the designer version of the design jet. So that's just it's like. Like the wood paneling and stuff on the high end designed. Is just like, oh Okay, but we are we're in that space now right that. Well we're. We're not we we're like we have. This many departments. But. Yeah. Where where you can afford toss out. Two thousand dollars to get the fancy less I. didn't look at it this way also Internet enabled right? So. Sitting in your little your Little Home Office in your shooting that file to the boss who's got that Nice wood-paneled it just shoots out and he's looking at or she's looking at right. And there's a picture of somebody with a cell phone. So. I don't maybe you're taking a picture and shooting it over maybe you're using as res design software to make a map with your phone and then. Anyway, well. It doesn't get to that point with the history. No standing world we live in I'm just going to say that. But I mean think about it the number of people who have moved from a desktop photoshop illustrator, and well okay illustrators not coming out until next month but the people who have moved to photoshop or pixel mater or something like that. That's on your your tablet. You don't need to go through a computer, just print it straight from there and. Just yet insane. Not none same just. That's Amazing future is amazing. Yes right now. Not so much future. Yeah. So in more not right now, not amazing news. I just wanted to do a quick follow onto some of what we talked about in the last podcast and we talked a little bit about how West Virginia was changing. The map on how to indicate you know covert exposure risk and that sorta thing. Well, a lot of activity happened this week in West. Virginia. Around, this and we found a lot of details that we didn't know before that. So apparently Harvard University down put out a model for states to follow the SORTA. So this classification is in this color color schemes that they had worked out were developed by Harvard, and the idea was that this would I model that all states can use? So there's some commonality. As we talked about last time Not all the states were following that model to the letter. Well, apparently West Virginia's decided to ignore all letters and start using literally paint by numbers because they have issues with the model and they've created a a new color called gold. How it significantly different from yellow you tell me we'll both know, but there's a new color called gold and They've reclassified some of the counties that are red, which means bad. To Gold Which? Is Between Orange and red and that indicates certain things like it's bad. But not bad enough. We have to keep kids out of school or that we can't have sports. That's essentially what it means There's a lot of things that have issues I have with this. I just wanted to bring it out because we talked about it so much that I think there's problems with in this particular case, the governor himself who doesn't really have any back on epidemiology or health risk or mapping, or or anything like that that I know of he's a businessman. making changes to a model like this. There's inconsistencies in it's GonNa create I think a lot of challenges. It has created large houses in the moment for the population but even long term it's going to be really tricky for researchers for academics to look at these events Three four five ten years from now and try to understand what's going on because people keep messing with the the method. And I wish they'd stop. So, head back to the last two episodes. one episode that was split into two parts because of the length of our our conversation started. over the last two weeks in what September yeah. September sixth and thirteenth. Okay, any events that were? Highlighting, that were were what we pass the the very early board registration. For A AG think that was on the fourteenth is that right? And sounds about right. Take your. Day. Now, I will say that the The station price for virtual attendees stays the same until the. October. So if you're. Virtually attending, you haven't the early bird price yet that that continues into next month. but make sure. Whether, you were attending virtually or in person that you if you WANNA present that you get your materials in. By middle late October. I don't think they push it back anymore. I think since they moved to this new, really early bird price in early price. They may not do. Did but it was the very last minute. Okay. So they found the okay. I get it in. You know what? Yeah and also ag for all those many many many ag people are in charge of things listening to our show, which is not, but it just come up with systems stick to it. Consistency pick dates don't change the dates. Well I mean the consistency was that back in the day you always had the two extra weeks. You knew you could plan for it. Now. I hope they're getting rid of that. Now they've added the really early bird. Well meet some. People so many think people procrastinate but also there are people who are places where they don't always find out right away whether or not they can afford to go. So they hold off until the very last minute you know can I do this and so you know. There's there's a cancellation policy that lets you canceled. There is a biter so. Then yeah. There's I mean there's lots of reasons why people to Lastman. Well maybe not a law why I know what Souza's. And it's not because she's waiting to find out. Plus. There's several reasons depending on the year why mine have always been actually one time it was not the last minute so to be fair. But Apparently we have a cat that's upset. Sorry. Ricky's crisis he must be able to see the bottom of his crunchy bowl. Oh, no yeah. Events that people want to highlight. No no this end. Now just to say that for regular events that you're used to attending a check out whether or not if there's this year for sure there probably virtual next year there's going to be I think more of those that are going to be a mix of potential virtual or in person So I would say as we get into abstract season, just make sure you're checking on the status. So and I don't know if we said it last week but we didn't all of the regional as GE conferences have gone virtual for this year. So that was up in the air and think until a of weeks ago, and then they were like, no, just all. Okay. So if you want us to add your event podcast Anisimov podcast at very speech lot com-. If you like to reach. US. Individually, I can be reached at two very special dot com or on twitter at GIO girl. Can It do some seamus self-promotion? Your. Time to say who you are. You can reach me at frank very spatial dot com and you can follow me on pretty much all the social media's at nodule part also launched a new podcast. If you're into role playing games, pen and paper roleplaying games have nothing to do with geography, but it's a whole new podcast called rope play geeks. I'm doing with some friends of mine that have been friends since I was a kid If you're into that sort of thing hetero played Geeks, dot com and you can check it out. and New is a relative term since it's been going on for almost a year now no no, it's been going on for since March. But we've now at the point where I feel like I could share it. It's not my friends don't have as much experience with podcasting. His is so They're we're doing a good job I think. You've found A. Stroke a strong. Rhythm rhythm as it were. So groove to start with SDR that's all I can think of. Yeah groove if he will. You can. Buy Me at kind of spatial everywhere including email and Or look on our website for that sort of infant. Could Very. Special COM last contacts. Sure. That sounds right. As always for the folks I'm very spatial. Thanks for listening LLC IN A COUPLE OF WEEKS

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More Plastics Than Fish | Maria & Camilla

Dare I Say

34:27 min | 2 years ago

More Plastics Than Fish | Maria & Camilla

"This is dare. I say the podcast from harper's bazaar where we sit in on unfiltered conversations between the most influential women of our time those daring to make the difference. We deserve <music> <music>. Maria fernandez espinosa is president of the united nations general assembly and minister of foreign affairs in ecuador. She recently launched a bold u._n. Campaign that aims to generate global awareness of plastic pollution camilla marcus is a lawyer and the founder of the all day cafe west born in manhattan which is working to become the first zero waste certified restaurant in new york one percent of each purchase the vegetarian cafe funds hospitality training for disadvantaged youth in this episode maria and camilla discuss how we can revolutionize our food systems and make them more sustainable who should bear the brunt of the cost and energy. We needed to win society off toxic plastics do micro efforts at a local level have macro reverberations for the world camilla and maria are not afraid to challenge the ways. We should eat package and purchase our food. They are women who dare last explosion which is one of the most incredible harmful situation especially for our oceans in that's why i at during my tenure this year the general assembly on the environmental action a priority and we will be working on climate change but also really really to make you know a global awareness against single use plastics and plastic pollution in our oceans. A million tones of classics go directly to our oceans tmz every year by twenty fifty. We will have more plastic than fish in our oceans. New york produces twelve thousand tones of waste every every day every day twelve thousand tones in out of that top thousand tones only seventeen percent eighteen percent. It's recycled so i really commend your leadership camilla on your restaurant idea on the sustainability approach to business sir thank you and you know i feel the same i think that ultimately i think it does have to be really sparked by public and private initiatives. She did commitment and and really partnership the all really have to work hand in hand and right now. It's a bit of a game of ping-pong is making it difficult when you look at small countries that have eh plastics in countries from other parts of the world ganor several african countries kenya. They have banned plastics so if they can. I think that we we all can the issue of incentives of course it's <hes> it's important at the issues of using the technologies that we have in hand is extremely important in. I think that this is a really an existential. Threat is not to look good. It is about future. Generations is about survival level. It's about our health. If we continue to eat fish that have micro-plastics it's really affecting our health our skin our buddies they now do have micro-plastics and we are really killing our oceans that medians of people depend for their livelihoods livelihoods on on coastal economies. We really need to be serious about this the difficulty is you know we were lucky. I've always been big on this topic. I grew up in los angeles. We've been composting recycling across the city's since i was a kid. I don't even remember a time where household didn't compost recycle. You know they won't pick up your trash. If you don't you don't start your trash properly. It stays on the street to shame you and you know when i moved to the east coast host. We still put our trash on the street. You know it's it's crazy and we're one of the largest most sophisticated cities globally why is new york city not requiring composting and recycling at a city level supported by city sanitation to me. That's another huge step because to your point of yes is one element is getting rid of single use plastics and moving into composed tool plastics where the technology exists but the other side is. What do you do with it so you do you ever recyclable or compostable plastic. Maybe not single use but say a fork which you will eventually have to use okay so you buy composed version even in your homer a restaurant right now. The entire burden is on the restaurant to compos privately. We have to contract with a private sanitation company. There's only four that exist in new york that recycle and compost they are multiple multiples more expensive and we bear that cost solely you know again. I came into it saying you know what this is important to me and ground up. We're going to do it so every element of our operation is geared towards sustainability all compatible to go goods all environmentally conscious and green equipment we use only green and clean cleaning products no food waste we really incorporate all of our food scraps into our menu but but the trouble is how do you take the friction and the cost of switching because not many are starting like us not many exist like us and if we really want that groundswell to your point of you know full buy-in. How do you mitigate that friction and the switching costs because it is right now multiples more expensive. It's more more expensive to have compostable to go goods. Massively it is more expensive to compost and recycles a private business in new york. All of those elements really stand in the way of even businesses who want to because they can't afford it and there's no help and no one saying you know what you wanna do good. We're going to help you right now. It's you want to do good you pay for your boat and you hope that consumers care and will pay a little bit more for it but i don't think that's a good solution for wide adoption. Absolutely i thing that there has to be a burden sharing a culture in there and bury concrete incentives and <hes> i come from a city in south america. Keitel won't needs two point five million people city in we do compost and we do recycle so it's very hard to understand why here in new new york <hes> you know we we do not do that but the only thing that is sustainable is to have systems in place that work you the city level and at the state level as well so proper regulations but proper system and technologies in place. That's the best way to be sustainable in the long run but also it's it's good for burden-sharing there has to be also you know a public responsibility a policy and regulatory tori responsibility at known only leave it to the very small private business that is environmentally conscious to bear the pool cost. I think it's good as an example. It's good to show that it can be on but it has to be bigger and wider especially in cities. There are so big in swimming board and new york twelve thousand tons of of of waste every day and other great inhibitor that people don't realize is if someone came to me last week and said they have this beautiful ceramic cup. That's totally green nontoxic and it's meant to be reusable. They have a cut version for cold and they have a hot insulated version for hot beverages and he said what if you got rid of the toco cups together and we provided them free and people book could just come in and come get their their food their coffee. What do you think and i said right now one of the biggest of the city systems but then you also have department of health so you think about restaurants are big portion of this issue to your point of twelve thousand tonnes. I'm sure that we are a large factor in that because that's one of the biggest biggest recurring elements in that is eating out and you know whether that's cafe coffee shop or a fine dining restaurant. I think that's probably the biggest needle moving moving in that and we by the department of health regulations are not allowed. I'm not allowed to put food in your bowl from your home. 'cause i can't prove it sanitary and i could cross contaminate all the food that i'm serving to the public so there are huge huge limitations in that and two of even if you wanted to move wait not just from single use plastic but say none of it and go full ceramic full metal utensils and we use cloth napkins from recycled denim in the restaurant but you know even if you wanted to go that way and say someone can bring in their knife fork and spoon and a ceramic bowl. I'm not allowed to bring it it to the back and go put it in it. Which i find on one hand i completely understand because we're trying to protect food safety but it is also a big limitation towards a lot of the reusable arguments of moving towards you know people coming in and i think there is a groundswell of people who want to do that. I actually think the consumer behaviors sort of advanced in what we're able to do and provide there are a lot of restaurants that are experimenting with this and trying to figure out so i'm an attorney as well and it's like near and dear to my heart art sort of fit exactly and push the legal limits equity so there's a very large food chain. That's now going to be not working on from what i hear you know if you sort of bring it up to the cashier and it doesn't sort of cross that line that may be something can be put eighteen to your bowl but then again i mean you have to have a very specific restaurant design and you have to have really figured out how like how does it get from the back pot pod to all the way up to the cashier that burning hurting someone sort of into your crossing the line again. I think you know bravo. I'm proud that restaurants are trying to do crazy operation line nasdaq create you way but yeah a lot of restaurants are testing things. It doesn't always mean it's legal and i think some are trying trying to push those boundaries intentionally to sort of wake the city up you know in the various applicable departments to say hey we're trying to comply. We want to be good. Citizens ends but we also don't wanna see twelve thousand tons of plastic. Go into our oceans anymore and we don't wanna have waste. You know we're trying. There has to be some. I'm sort of meeting in the middle that i think isn't really happening. In on a large scale single single use was the collins dictionary word of the year in two thousand eighteen. It's no surprise why last year everyone got a little smarter about plastic. In particular the type you use once and then chuck cities and food service companies across the u._s. Are now banning plastic straws west coast cities like seattle san francisco go oakland carmel and berkeley have led the way and the paper straw business is booming indiana paper straw manufacturer aardvark is building a a brand new factory to meet demand which has jumped fifty fold each year for the last two years but should municipal state and federal governments be going further to stop the production production of single use plastic products and how can they ensure that people are able to recycle all the plastics. They do collect <music>. We have to start somewhere and when you see you know other parts of the world so many countries in africa several countries in latin america america the caribbean initiative to ban single use plastics in the leave of tourism. You know we are working. Teaming up with anti one bu-but antiwar is also pushing all the caribbean community to adopt the same regulations and sometimes you need to start by the regulatory side read the legal side and then come up we the systems we do have the technology we knew how to do it who is going to do the the burden sharing the recall sharing and especially for the small businesses. It's a little unfair. I mean i'm totally with you. That's why we are lounging a worldwide campaign and and they are already green dots in the entire planet that i really making the difference in they are showing that it can be done. I i mean i think that <hes> this is a very wealthy city. New york can do more and better tomorrow at the u._n. We will be having a gathering. We've mayors from around the world on security issues on climate issues so cds have a very important role to play because they host fifty percent of the world's population at little more than fifty percent and the numbers are growing very fast too so either we become sustainable urban settings or their snow future in the united states one of the biggest challenges. I think as opposed to some of the countries that you mentioned it is we're really trying to reverse the industrial revolution. I mean we just have really strong holds of movements that happened decades ago that really we altered the food system and not a great sustainable way and that goes down to plastics producers like i said how about new york city instead of banning being plastic straws in restaurants. Where's the regulation at the source. The issue isn't the restaurant. The issue is what's available. How about hey every disposable producer in the country. You can no longer produce non-combustible straws and by twenty twenty one. You must have a top that astrologers provided. Did you know how about that because what's the onus on the restaurant. I feel that we always get sort of the end. Use regulations sort of coming down on us versus is really we'd love to source that you know. I know a lot of friends in the industry. Large companies would love to have astrologist top to their cold cups. That's fully compostable. The cost the same as the very simple plastic when it comes in where is that regulating at the source and i would say the answer is largely. The power of the footholds of the the industrial revolution are strong very strong and i guess i would say you know i my biggest vote and begging frankly would be can you in this year. Get got new york. City to implement city wide from the department of sanitation required composting and recycling citywide. I think if they could commit to that within a certain in time period i think we would see massive change. I think a lot of homes really want to do it but again. I compost at home. I take it to the restaurant but our restaurant can't support support the cost of composting for the entire neighborhood. The city said look you compost. It will pay for whatever you do for the neighborhood. You know if we have a separate bin and say hey every neighbor coming our alleyway. Go put it in the compost compost and take care of it. But how can i support the cost of an entire neighborhood even when i want to. I really think that we would see massive change even from that one element that your point lot of semi's globally have been on that beat and instituted that system <hes> frankly decades go though you win works more on the macro level wish put the macro level does not work if there is no buy in from from the microbial and to your point targeting the biggest cities with the largest populations the most global attention if we're going to start somewhere and i agree with you you gotta take one foot but in front of the other but the first foot should really be where it's going to move the needle because we do have to act fast and time is not on our side so look at countries with the largest has populations and major cities to me. You know the focus needs to be there. Yeah and they're doing the share a into china several times. They're doing doing amazing. Efforts in terms of changing their energy mattresses of <hes> addressing the poverty issue china has been very successful pulling combating poverty india. It's one of the leading forces on solar energy now they have two more on the home the plastics and the sustainability ability side but this big countries they are very aware of their responsibilities in the responsibility they have because they're densely-populated depopulated so we're dealing about millions of people so whatever india does in terms of the environment and sustainability it really has an impact on the entire humanity same same school at goes for china and for for other highly populated countries in we are working with them and they're good good news because they are part of <hes> global architecture on climate change. They have signed the paris agreement on climate change. They are committed and here in the united states. What gives us a lot of hope is the engagements being of individual states and hundreds of cds that they have gathered and to meet it to deliver on the paris agreement even if the countryside she's not ready yet or not prepared to do that. Then we rely very much on what the local governments community polities and individual states are going to do great hope for us is california. It's i think it's the seeks economy in the world so they have a big stake. They're they are and they're doing their job. They're doing their. We've been a leader yeah. I think the state of california's bellied. I'm in you know i think they're really the model and again. It's one of the great inspirations my home state for what we do at west born and you know seeing to your point if you can see it and believe it when you've lifted as a kid you know when you grew up in see that that's just part of the culture but it's part of also the state systems and i think private and public sectors are working pretty well in tandem tandem to to really think sustainability across the board around one one tenth of the one hundred million metric tons of plastic produced. Each year ends up in the ocean. There are five huge trash vortex swirling in our oceans sion's poisoning marine animals and crippling ecosystems the largest the great pacific garbage patch is the size of texas mammals fish and birds ingest or get ensnared in the plastic mess and die invisible micro-plastics found in cosmetics detergents paints and soap can be just as lethal. What's more battered plastic that is exposed to sun and water has been proven to release toxic greenhouse gases. This includes methane gas that has twenty times more impact on climate change than carbon dioxide plastic pollution is very much connected with climate change as well eve eve you really the oceans where most of the cleaning of the atmosphere atmosphere happens. Oceans are also not only life depositories but also c._o. Two absorbing mechanisms in a way so it's it's very important that we do have healthy oceans at the end of the day. It's very costly. Pollution costs a lot. It's it's much more expensive to clean gene <hes> then to use the precautionary principle not to pollute. It's good business at the end of the day. Just the pollution of oceans nowaday a it costs like eight billion dollars per year. I mean just the cleanup factor and we are not able to clean it up so i think that we need to put all the pieces of the puzzle together and i agree with you. I think large companies really taking that stance of as a corporation as the u._n. As a company that cares about sustainability this gene ability we do a lot of talks sort of around the city and around the nation and the first thing i always say. Is you know i see that. You have those little little water bottles. You know those are literally the worst thing that you could do for the environment. Why can't we have just mugs and cups harper's bazaar. I'm a big fan and a lot of your team our regulars of the restaurant and they've been so supportive you know we're sitting with plastic cup here. You know there's no reason that can't be glass and we can't wash it. You know if companies of grand scale could really commit to in their our own offices in their own teams. You know not buying little baby water bottles not buying plastic cups and really just having ceramics and glass. That's is a big statement right there to your point of you know why aren't major water companies across the world saying you know what we're gonna do compatible water bottles and we're not gonna make the small ones anymore even that though bottles well a step in the right direction in my team. They're very conscious now. Wherever i seat seat well we never use single use plastic bottle water at the u._n. In when i'm there yes and we use everybody in my team gene and we give away this famous tale bottles that we use for water and when we have guests we never used a single use plastics and and when they see that i come to a meeting room i see a lot of movement because they make away the plastic bottles and we come in for you. Yeah i mean in in. I see see that at least people are conscious and they know that that it's really not right so we are using more and more the tetra pak <hes> water containers of the of the u._n. Fella from a company. It's a female lead company from california called beaker. Okay sell a crazy amount of them. You know we try and provide. We sell our napkins. We sell our mugs. We sell beaker bottles. We sell tote bags in our goal is really to make it fun you know style forward and eco eco friendly to help someone who not only wants to support the restaurant and what we're doing but wants to integrate those zero as practices at home which to your point i i do feel strongly wrongly that the groundswell of consumer demand is there. There's just not a lot of access on production and there's not a lot of access on a city wide system to support that oh <music> millions of people migrate each year due to the impacts of climate change from droughts the decimate crops in somalia amalia to rising sea levels the threaten to sink small pacific island states and this is just the beginning october's united nations climate report predicted floods odds heatwaves food scarcity droughts rising sea levels and other extreme weather experts have forecast up to a billion climate migrants by twenty fifty so either. We want to combat migration to decrease the number of refugees around the world to fight poverty to really reduce hunger around the world. It is about changing you know production and consumption patterns around the world so it is you know for the benefit of everybody. That's why the job is to make sure that it the the reese proper awareness. That's our campaign. Basically against single use plastics be awareness. Building is important but when it comes with actions us and leading by example like you're doing. That's why it's it's a privilege really to have this conversation with you while i similarly i feel very privileged to be here. <hes> you know and it's interesting you. You talk single use plastics when you know i think there's a lot of elements to this you know i know you said one step at a time but it's also a complicated problem a complicated layered set of issues one being you know so we are a <hes> vegetarian restaurant in support of our sustainability focus. You know it is undeniable. That animal production animal consumption is one of the largest arches drivers if not the single largest drivers of climate change and where we are environmentally and you know. I'm not a vegetarian full-time. Our restaurant tries very hard. Our ethos accidentally vegetarian decidedly wholesome and our goal is not to be preachy not to sort of force in upon someone but have someone come because it's a cool interesting space yes and they feel welcomed and the food is delicious incredible and our goal is that you leave and go oh yeah i didn't have meat and i didn't even think about it so we're really not asking to change anything. Things were sort of trying to be the invisible change agent of if everyone communally could agree that we would cut down you know. I don't think it's realistic mystic to say everyone needs to become a vegetarian. I just don't think that's actually realistic. But what can we do to change. Behaviors and perceptions of well. Vegetarianism can be really really nourishing really healthy really delicious and exciting and if we can change someone to be vegetarian at least a couple meals a week think about how that could have have a ripple effect and if we could really change consumer behaviors in that way that also goes to me massively hand in hand with the attack on single use plastics and sustainable sourcing thing we have to change the way that we we can't be fishing one percent of the world's fish population and think that's not going to have an impact. We can't continue to eat animals the way consume animal products that we do you know en masse. Something has to change or us and for the united nations what is very difficult to to explain. It's that we now with the technology with the knowledge we have we are able to produce much more food in terms of the amount of food that humanity is capable of producing but the levels of hungry people have increased tremendously in the the past few years so that combined with the sustainability shoes something that how do you explain. I mean we have the knowledge we have the science we have the technology and yet we are unable to change the way we leave in the way we consume in the way we even we interact with each each other and to look at the connection between climate change and food security. He has to be very much about <hes>. You know the food chain in how we feed ourselves but also the the amount of waste in the systems again that are not in place to make sure that everybody eats. I don't have the numbers numbers with me but that's a homework. Perhaps for us look at the number of people that go to bed in new york city without eating. There's a lot of hungry people in new york. Americans use one hundred billion plastic bags a year. Each bag is used used on average for twelve minutes before it is discarded in two thousand to bangladesh became the first country to ban plastic bags. A smattering of countries including china kenya rwanda sri lanka and the netherlands have followed suit. Many corporations have economies bigger than countries. If it was a country amazon amazon would be in the top sixty richest in the world walmart earned more than the whole of belgium in twenty seventeen howard huge corporate entities being held to account for their plastic use in ecuador my own country. You know you go to to the supermarket. You bring your it's. It's very common. Now that you see you know people unfolding you know their little bag when they go grocery shopping and in in here for me i i in shock every time not only that the us the plastic bags but they put double and triple sometimes sometimes and i say why is that it's really when you line up to pay in you. Don't bring your own your own bag. People look at you. You know i lived in in geneva for awhile in you know when you don't have your back people really they look at you to say something. You're missing something worse. You're you know reusable bag in at the end. I mean the supermarket does sell. It's very expensive. They charge you for when they pull the plastic by people. Everybody looks at you like okay. You know really bad no not nice so they pulled the bag. It's very costly but sometimes you forget you. You don't have it handy and they do sell that the reusable bags there as what it's <hes> demand site kind of also a top down regulatory effort that i think needs to happen. That's point so i love that and i do think peer pressure to some extent does work and you know again a community value system and kuntar sure of hey you know you're using a plastic bag. You know it's interesting to think though how with with the growth growth of technology we have a whole new set of challenges opportunities as far as you know what the future of plastics could be. I e not but grocery grocery shopping for example you mentioned it is globally changing. Most people are shopping with amazon with insta- car. You know you have to think about the fact that now how going to stores for things like that doesn't really exist anymore or it won't be an it's fast ivan quickly changing so now the question is okay. You have a company like the amazon who i think has transformed the world in amazing ways but no one is pressuring them for sustainability efforts all those boxes all those plastics. You know that to me that makes a dent in a large way. Restaurants can only go so far. Yeah where's the discussion of those kinds of companies because to me. That could be a huge effort. You know amazon has collection spots across the cities in partnership with cities. That's okay all amazon boxes. Go here they get sent back doc and they reuse them and that footprint could actually be quite easily neutral in my mind but there's no discussion of that. I've not seen a single article. That says you know what you're not shopping the grocery store anymore so yes tote bags grade that will probably stay in existence with green markets but for basic needs. It's starting to become delivered to everyone. Everyone it's accessible. It's financially accessible so where's the pressure and discussion on. Hey what can we do again. I don't think it's just amazon's issue to solve whereas here's the partnership with cds and larger communities and saying hey let's work together and make you carbon-neutral because it's important and you are taking over the world in a lot of great ways but we have to make sure we're ahead of what that damage could be. There has to be a larger focus. I think especially when you think about the grocery game and food sourcing and how people are getting in their food the delivery and technology that's enabling. It is gonna have a very big side effect that i don't think there's any attention on yet in sometimes supermarkets change in faster ways than our ability or also scientists ability to make sure that it happens in a sustainable way. Maybe it's not a everyone in the country doesn't use single use plastic. Maybe the first phase in his hey the top ten companies that produce the most that are the biggest. Hey let's work together. We're going to do a carolina's stick and work together to make sure that there's compliance because that's really moving the needle to be very honest with you at the end of the day. It's it's cost effective off. The first bush sometimes is costly because you have to put new systems in place but the end of the day is really worthwhile and it's not just an arithmatic issue. It is an issue of future generations of survival of of healthy planet. Sometimes we tend into worry for example. You say we have to be careful with investment with business because we very much rely on them. They are job creators and we shouldn't push too much and the truth is that i have seen the private sector very committed very interested in very open and and sometimes these public private conversation really is not taking business. There's a lot of prejudice saying business. They just want to earn money. I think that has changed because i see that the private sector yes indeed they have to make money but at the same time they want to do it sustainably in they. I want to make sure that whatever money they're making profit. They're making it sustainable in the long run. What they need is just pretty ability. You know have clear rules rules and know how to to work and sometimes you know the the governing authorities. They said oh we we have to be very careful. You know we really need to to go you know step by step and sometimes we we have prejudice and think that the private sector is about greed about how you know taking out every cent in the prophet and prophet in. I think that this is a really changing so we should push a little bit in have clear rules for everybody not only predictability nick to billy tea but also equality you know in terms of rule setting so i think it's a communication it's prejudice in i would say lesson less. It is about greed because greed in limited. <hes> profit is not sustainable. This episode was produced by steph breath at edit audio to find out more about our conversation checkout. Our show notes at harper's bazaar dot com forward slash. Dare i say podcast. If you enjoyed this episode please subscribe bribe and rate us on apple podcasts <music> <music>.

new york amazon united nations harper united states california china kenya ecuador los angeles camilla marcus Maria fernandez espinosa new york south america paris
Climate Change, Fake News and Kangaroos

Safe Space

39:39 min | 2 years ago

Climate Change, Fake News and Kangaroos

"Alot. Okay, I'm gonna say because I've made the mistake of these shoes. Welcome. She say space. We are a podcast, all about politics, pop culture and anything else that really catches. I am as will said Vicki mode trauma. This is our first solo live show. Great show lined up for you now. This is an art, I run and it's our first so alive show. So we've stacked it with as many big names, as I could get for relatively free. Say speaks we are creating a safe space for bad takes to do that every week. We are joined by a couple of friends who help us to make sense of the world this week. We're going to be joined by a whole host of smart and interesting and funny people and you're gonna meet them all as they come up on the stage. But first, we're going to spend some time talking about what is possibly the greatest challenge facing humanity? We're gonna talk about climate change at the top will did the land acknowledgement and that's important. But I think if we're gonna talk about climate change. We have to talk about this land, Toronto is the traditional territory of many nations, including the mississauga's at the new credit. The Amish knob egg Chippewa the Hoda schone and the here on dad peoples and, of course, is home to many nations and Mateen, people in Toronto is covered by treaty, thirteen of the Mississauga of the new credit and what we're talking about climate change. A lot of talking about our tree. Eighties. They are treaties old and they are treaties new in contrast. The current global goals and plans around climate change are kind of new in nineteen ninety two earth summit happens. And that's what gets us the Kyoto protocol, there are whole bunch of documents that kind of back up and complicate and extend the Kyoto protocols. But the idea there is to really focus on greenhouse, gas, emissions frosh forward to twenty fifteen hundred ninety six countries. Get together in Paris and agreed to do everything they can to make sure that there isn't a rise in global temperature of two degrees celsius all these documents accords conventions and summits, all agree on one simple premise, climate change is happening in humans are the cause which kind of brings us back to the land. The land is feeling it hard and the people on the land are feeling it as well. Our of the Capital, One hundred homes or. Gulf by the Ottawa river in this area. And now the military stepping in last year this part of BC dealt with an enormous fire that burned for weeks and the end torched nearly one hundred thousand hectares, but that fire started in late July not mid may, many of us are concerned, the communities are concerned all the way around us central VC is definitely heating every year. Why won't the prime minister given taxpayers break and said of engaging in high carbon hypocrisy? Garmin. If you like the party office, your worry that you're worried about cost, you should be worrying about the cost of we were passing kids climate change. Canadians. Joining us to talk about climate change are Fatima add in investigative reporter with the national observer. We'll have ninety green former Hamilton city councillor end EP in the coming election. Let me tell you about passion fresh from dinner that. She's literally hosting at her house right now. Diane sacks the former environment Commissioner for on -tario. That we talked earlier about some of the agreements that Canada has signed onto some of the big logo ones. What are some steps that the government is taking or has taken to meet these commitments, the short answer is they haven't taken enough stuff, but at the cornerstone of their climate plan is the carbon price. So what they've done is they've implemented a cap on how much emissions businesses and industry can produce. And if you exceed that you will be charged the opposition likes to call it a carbon tax and along with that there have been other investments in cleantech in home retrofit programs and electric vehicle programs, but really Canada is betting its money on the carbon price. And Dan, I want to talk about something you wrote in a report, when you were environment Commissioner where you said, no one can do everything, but everyone can do something. It's. Not too late. What do you say the people who think that well it is too late? If Canada's going to shift from being a resource driven economy, is that a possibility will it's late, but is not too late yet if we give up, it's definitely too late. But we, we have the most educated population, we've ever had one of the most educated populations in the world. We have access to renewable energy technologies that didn't exist in mature form, ten twenty years ago, we do have the federal carbon price, which is both the put based prison system that you mentioned and the broad-based fuel tax which were, which we all pay and conservation alone can take us maybe thirty percent of the way that was our best estimate that for the same cost or less. We could be using interior thirty percent less fossil fuels and that would be better for our health. It would be better for public well-being would be better for the environment that it would be better for our economy. So there are. Our opportunities to make things better and help the climate note. Don't get me wrong. I'm not saying we can do this in not notice. We've got to make big changes and we have to have to make them faster than we want to, because we've thrown away thirty years. But there, there is still an opportunity, but it's small and the window is closing in we keep we keep throwing it away. So, you know, one of the things I saw in that clip and has to do with how the political parties are kind of struggling against each other. There's a parties that are a bit more hesitant about how Canada wants to approach its climate change plans or take any kind of climate change action. Math year running in the coming federal election. You know, that debate did not inspire confidence democracy. How do you how do you envision a plan for Canada? That works. You'll Diane leaned over. She's like you want to get involved in that. And I thought to myself, you know, as a fodder three-year-old -absolutely, we have one hundred thirty five months left, we've had lots of con. Sations around climate change as the end of existence. It's an existential question but I don't think we're talking enough about the symptoms. I don't think that you can talk about catastrophic, climate change without talking about catastrophic capitalism, and what that looks like and so on a very practical level in my city, it looks like the freezing, and thawing of our scart mints. And the erosion of, of the escarpment it looks like flash floods. It looks like displacement of people, both domestically and internationally settling in Hamilton. And it looks like, you know, the, the, the shutting the shuttering of our manufacturing jobs. So we have to have a really honest conversation around, what it is willing to sacrifice in order to offset this in a way that is meaningful. We cannot buy our way out of climate change. And so we have to have a very serious conversation around our economy. Dan ventured about opportunities, you cover a lot of the political back and forth. His happening. And we talked about it a little bit when you're on the podcast weeks ago. What kind of responsiveness are you seeing politically to the questions around climate change? Unfortunately, it's back and forth when it shouldn't be climate change is real climate change is science. There should be no back and forth. But there is I cover on -tario politics, so you have a conservative government in power who says that the carbon tax is going to hurt households without mentioning the fact that climate change is going to kill households. You have an then in opposition, your, you know, the P is currently trying to get the government to create a select committee that is nonpartisan. So it has members from all parties to actually find solutions to fight the climate crisis. Will it pass? I doubt it. But that's the back and forth that we're seeing in the political realm. The idea of climate crisis means we need to change our way of life. We know the IPC report that said that we can't go. We can't let the world get warmer by more than one point five degrees, gave us a new normal. That is our target, we need to change our lifestyles to ensure that we meet that target. It's not a sacrifice. It's a change. There are opportunities as well. One person pointed out recently ninety eight percent of the mission reductions in the world are going to happen outside Canada. Do we want to be selling into those markets? Do we want to be successful in the economy of the twenty th century, or are we really contend to let China own it, and we, we're not being very aggressive about trying to be part of that green economy, and we could be doing a lot more than we are. And what the yell at each other. In the house is I mean it doesn't accomplish very much. But I think what can MP's MP's hear from their constituents matters a lot, every politician, I've met his told me the most powerful thing they can tell they colleagues is my constituents say, and they also tell me that they hardly ever hear about environmental climate at the door that people complain to them about anything is costing them money. Anything that sort of short term personal issue, but don't speak up about. These larger issues on which the whole basis of our civilization depends. So that's really the challenge for, for everyone is to find a way to speak up. Ideally, in person to your political representatives about these larger issues because if they if all they hear about his trinity prices, all they work on is pretending that they can do something, but electric prices. I mean that's a good point. You're going to be campaigning and I had avoided for all four seasons of this having politicians on the show. But now there's an election and I only wanna talk to politicians. How you know, when someone saying talking about some of the issues that are not climate oriented, how do you make that part of the conversation? I would actually push back against the assertion that it's not topical. I think that pulls lie. I think the politicians lie and I think that there's been a corporate capture of the narrative. And so this idea that the onus is being put back on individuals to change minor consumption patterns is a capitalist frame that has been put on, on society to take the onus off of major corporations, and in framing doubt way, you know, it shifts the responsibility, I can tell you this tomorrow. I'll be with hundreds of teens at city hall for the futures for Friday's rally this next generation is very tuned in, and we, we talked about this little bit on the side where they get it, and they get it in ways that I think are going to force the question, so we can no longer lie to the public and pretend like this isn't an issue. I would say that. Climate change. Catastrophic climate change will be the number one issue of this twenty nine hundred election. I just wanna add as a twenty seven year old I've known the word pollution, my entire life. I've also known the word climate change my entire life. I think my first project was about the tropical rainforests and how it was going to die because of climate change. I didn't have the tools to protests that but young people now do, and they are protesting, and they are making themselves heard, and I think, governments are not picking up on that and not acting effectively on the action that they're asking them to provide. And I think that's the shift. We need to see we need governments to actually listen to the people knocking on their doors and saying, hey, we're not going to have a future, if you don't do anything properly, and they're not answering that call. Well, it's not loud enough, yet it's gonna be louder. I mean, I think if, if a lot one of the things I heard about in Belgium is grandparents, and grandchildren rallies, that the grant that the children March in the streets, but they take their grandparents, and then like a good approach because first of all the grandparents are more likely to have time. Secondly. I mean, come on, Secondly, the grandparents are quite pleased that the grandchildren wanted to spend time with them, so that they're also more likely to go, but the third thing is the grandparents old them. Right. This is all happened during our working laws, right? Half of the climate pollution in the atmosphere has occurred during the last thirty years. How many people were in the workplace in the for the last thirty years? Okay. Well. Well, okay. It's on our watch. So the kids strike is important. But why aren't there lots and lots and lots of boomers out there supporting the kids saying your right? If I could like I think I think is very critical. What you how you position this conversation and we, you know, we're hearing, lots about the green new deal. It's out there. It's a brand. It's a. Oh, see I understand what's contained within. It's like it's to me, it's like a magic all clear, yet environment know inside this package. If you sign up, you will get a green new deal. Always like that. It goes, well beyond environments. Jerry comprehensive it has probably fifteen or twenty two points on there. But the point is that you raised in Canada, we need to censor these conversations on digital so to pretend like this indigenous folks have been telling us this for generations that we've been heading in this direction. They are the stewarts of the land their leadership is vital. Right. And so when you see it started with I don't know, more, you know, we need to take their leadership, we need to stand behind them. You know, and we do need to take to the streets in Hamilton. We've done that we've shut down streets of, you know, being led by indigenous folks, and I think, like any conversation around a green new deal needs to be rooted in the legacy that you rooted this conversation. And Vicki that's hot take everybody listing out there that the land use question is the sustainable urban development question of lifetime. A human's Diddy cause climate change quote vote is the original OG, fake news content that and you'll drown after swimming, you won't and also that canneries isn't a talented, actor fake news. And in twenty nine thousand nine this election, fake news, misinformation, propaganda, satire, and more are just gonna be all over the place and it's not going to be like from oil companies, and, like people on Facebook, though, like don't rule them out. We're gonna find out more about it with Jane Litvinenko, Jane Lebanon co is a disinflation reporter with BuzzFeed news keeps an eagle eye on the lying misinformation and manipulated. Means that the internet comes up with. Okay. Janey. Are we going to get into all right? So I have four questions for you and Ishmael. And I have one question for the audience. So be ready? I'm very sorry for how to press you're going to walk away from the show today. But good luck, okay. Before we get started. I do want to find out how little I know but I want someone else to suffer with me. Ishmail is former safe-space co host is now digital editor at democracy. Now. This milk. You describe to the audience how much you miss me specifically. Take your time. While I'll say, I hear a lot less slander of counter Reeves now that you're not in my Orbis, you hear a lot less lender, generally now that I'm not around yelled at less. Yeah, I could call you. All right. Jane, we are ready. All right. So question one. This one's about noted a terrible TV show. Game of thrones after seeing the vast amount of displeasure over the game of thrones finale. Terrible dogfather kit. Harrington told haters to quote go fuck themselves is that real or fake? You're saying kit, Harrington told people that go fuck themselves. Like, does he know that word? And how to train your dragon like children. The children's actor I never watched game. Doesn't pet his dog. Okay. I think this is I think this is fake fake as well. All right. You're right. It is fake, but he does know that word. So it's a real quote, that was taken out of context during eighteen April interview with Esquire magazine, you guys me to read you the full quote. Yes. All right. Just just to prove that could Harrington does indeed know. The word fuck. He said, I think no matter what anyone thinks about this season, and I don't mean to sound mean about critics here, but whatever critics spend half an hour writing about this season and make their negative judgement on it in my head. They can go fuck themselves. That's a great quote, and how I feel generally. That kit Harrington still hung up on like bloggers. I can't believe I'm on the most popular show ever. But there's bloggers. All right question to we talked a little bit about the insane prices in Toronto, including the price of rent. It's too damn high. So here's question to a Silicon Valley landlord rents studio apartment to two cats for fifteen hundred dollars. Reeler. Sorry, what city Silicon Valley. That's real. That's real. Why do you say it's real? It's Silicon Valley. It's probably an apt attached to this. Okay. You look like you're happy. An existential crisis. I don't like it. Conceptually. So I'm like having trouble like my brain won't take this information. Okay. I also think it's real. Okay. You're correct. Hey okay to for two it's real. So it's a studio apartment, and it was rented by forty three year old dad named Troy good. Not that good. Because our named Tina Louise and he bought them for his daughter, who went off to college and can bring them to the dorm. And he has a dog so naturally his solution was to rent an apartment for the cats, these people late. Yeah. They also. Do you have to ask? Surprised ishmael? The cats have apple television. I don't have television. All right. Okay. All right question. Three it's really an aspirational won. A bright gutting -gree after a guest filled ten Tupperware containers with food from the wedding. Ten containers. I hope that's real. Why do you hope? Like the chutzpah. On your way out. You're like I have some Tupperware. I'm so African that. It's like why wouldn't you take it? Like, what are they doing with that after? I've never left a wedding without like everything. The flowers like any spare linens just. Okay. No. Okay. I think because I like it too much. The story has to be fake. I'm going to hope that. It's real. All right. Ishmael is correct. It's real. And yes, she did also take to centerpieces. God bless her. Love her. Also my aunt. Unclear. All right. This one is about climate change. We've talked a little bit about it today. Patrick more, cofounder of Greenpeace said the whole climate crisis is not only fake news. It's fake science. There's no climate crisis, those weather and climate all around the world. And in fact, carbon dioxide is the main building block of all life. Patrick more, cofounder of Greenpeace, Reeler fake. Sounds like a Maxine bearing that quote, really? I know this one. It's complicated. Isn't it? It's always complicated. Okay. All right. I think it's fake. Okay. Which part, I think the quota's real person Israel, I believe they're not a founder Greenpeace that they're like a sideshow to it. I'm not dumb people there. My sponsors. That's that's where I'm coming from a very loyally answer. But yeah, I'm going to say it's probably fake in some way. You're correct. Yes, he is not a founder of Greenpeace. He is very much on the anti climate change screed, and that quote, was tweeted by the president of the United States of America are cheese. Never heard of the men. Let's. Thank you so much. Jane. Thank you for revealing awful. All right. Well, now it is time for takeaways. This is the part of the show, where we share our boldest bad opinions. Our rants are -dorsements or whatever else it is. We need to get our chests to do that. We are going to need some opinionated people. Please welcome to the stage. Sarah Haggi an anti Donahue. And an welcome to the show inky for having us. This is very exciting. Matches real cute. We did. I'm her. We didn't. Oh. I'm ashamed already wonderful. All right. Ladies take take a breather Ishmail. Why don't you get started? Okay. So my take away for the week is, I've been having some conversations that people lately about prison abolition. Thank you. End e politician, he's required to clap. He walked by a conversation and someone like me saying, prison, abolition. He's like, yeah. We can do this. So most of the time I'm not talking Indy people. Sometimes you get some quizzical looks. So I think maybe to sell people I think like like a compromises if we do away with prison sentences for most like drug offenses or crimes of poverty. It cetera. I'm willing to up the criminal punishment for other stuff like social crimes. You know. You know, like I think, if you don't rinse your recycling that should be five years. We supposed to do that. Twenty but if you don't. Okay, if you don't stand on the right side of the escalator that's immediate. You know, there's a whole bunch of these. If you say goodbye on a party, but you're still there fifteen minutes later. Just call the cops right there. Or if you if you say, nice haircut, but I've had the haircut for more than a week. I just think that's jail time. So you're like, you know, small time drug, the some of the stuff people get pulled over and arrested for all of that. Get get rid of that. But now introduce absolutely more chaos into the criminal Justice system. What is the greater crime rate about it? You know did it go to regular jail? Like a social jail. I'm kind of imagining like vice squad. We haven't Saudi Arabia, but it's like prim British men who are just like enforcing manners. It'd be a little more like fun freewheeling. But like little chaotic like McDonald's play place, where nothing quite works. Get thrown into a ball pit. And there's like six balls nearly fund. I just think, you know, most people who will never deal with the criminal Justice system, but who are like route two servers now you get to know what it's like you go to jail. That's, that's my that's two of my five step plan to get prison. Evolution denton. I it sounds more like step to five step plan for empire. All right. And why don't you let us know what your takeaways this week? I mean, one of the most controversial things I think I can say in a world full of, like good, boy culture, is I really like cats and I don't care about eighty five percent of dogs, and I am seeing this out here it is spring. They're walking dogs dogs are going to the bathroom. I have to look at it in my head. I'm like, I'm going to get sick somehow because this seems kind of germy like I don't have a dog. I have a cat. Do I have to let why they're all not all of them are heroes? Like a lot of some dogs are not like I'm a lot aren't that cute. Some are not like summer in my elevator. The elevator like I don't he in the elevator. Why is your dog allowed to do this? And then everyone's like, oh, but he's cute. But he's not like he's really not like the corgis are cute, and then the tiny ones where if I look at the my mic like those are cute. But like it's like we are in full, I'm at a part. I mean for some reason, I don't know why would be at a part. But like, if for some reason, I air in the outdoors dogs are frog. Everyone's like the dogs okay, like we get it. All right. That's fine. You know what if you could team, a small horse or rabbit, I'll give shit? I don't care about your dogs. I don't secret account for your dogs. What do you do when someone talks about their dog too? I say, I have a cat. And then they know immediately that I'm an asshole so lake right off the bat. Unless your dog is like a cat. Like I don't want the first of a dog like where they're just like what have some standards like get a clue? I don't like. I don't know. You don't you don't wanna be my friend, Vicky has a dog. Absolutely. Actually got her dog, and I was like Osas for column. Writing dog ownership or something just like my dog. But I will say that I I'm the opposite. I don't love cats. Whatever I don't like I like I like the dogs like everybody because I need, like tippy validated improved all the time. I have a podcast like I need this. Don't you want to earn it like cats are like I've decided to like you. I won't like you tomorrow, but today and I'm like wine. But like a dog just like, hey, there, would you like to like sit with me like no? No. You I have to be like, are you serious? I don't have children, and I wish for none bless you. All parents of the world, but at dawn is just like a kid that doesn't grow up. I'd rather have a baby. Babies girl, and you don't take care of them anymore. Dogs are babies forever, and they don't wear diapers. They're just shitting places. All my God. A child in your house who can't talk to you who wouldn't love that. It doesn't ask me anything it looks at me and it goes. Yeah. You're great. One hundred percent of the time all day every day. It's fantastic. It's like a mirror that tells me, I'm amazing. Okay. So, and that is a wild wild takes there. What do you have res-? My take is also animal related. Cam really nervous right now you can get through this. This is a big one. So and I talked about this a lot all the time, actually we talk about this. We're very very close. And we tech Salat and this is like one of the top things we text about. And it's how much we hate kangaroo, disgusting. Okay, I'm gonna backtrack a bit. Like I don't. All I'm gonna explain this properly. I have like a weird fascination with, like, buff animals. I thought it relates. There's so much on the internet. And every once in a while, like like a whale at the six pack will go viral. For me. It's like I feel like hang, who's are the ultimate buff humanise animal, and we act like it's normal, but they exist and it's not normal. There's nothing normal about kangaroos. There's this one that was very viral. His name was Rory, which is what is that name? And there's a there's a picture of him. And he's crushing a can't like a giant like a bucket ten bucket, and it's so scary. So many videos of humans fighting kangaroos like they're humans. And it's just it's disgusting. Also found out there. Pouches are filled with mucus. I told you that I told you that which is so disgusting, it is disgusting. And there's a reason why certain things only in Australia. I'm not going to elaborate on that. I just I hate kangaroos there's nothing cute about them. They make me sick. They actually they make me sick. Can I ask something very quickly? And that is crucial to this argument every kangaroo, and we have talked about the they look like they would be like wearing jeans tying Buca jeans. They look like the kind of guy doing dishes, and you're almost done. And he goes you done. You need help with that. Yeah, like whenever you're almost finished doing a task and it's like almost complete. And he's like let me get that for you put his his fuck in kangaroo arms around your waist, and like Naslund near neck and be like you done with babe, Saint base gusting kangaroos are disgusting creatures. We'll text each other for hours, just images of them, and then the captions of what we think they would say, like can I can I go to buy to that? Like, I'm pretty sure I don't know if I conjured this image in my mind is, if it exists, but there's a kangaroo, they're wearing jeans. Wrong. It's just like I don't I can't believe I'm still talking about this. I feel like I could talk about I wish we could talk about this until, like all everyone. Here was begging to leave, and we're like, no we're not done like that. I that's how long I I, I don't know. Like I just don't think they deserve their place in pop culture. This shouldn't be movies about kangaroos. Absolutely not shouldn't be exactly one movie about king. As far as sir. Jack was a hit. You don't. I hope there's a kangaroo in here right now. And he's like do I leave like what do I do. And he's got his dog with him Instagram. Go for it Joe. We there could be a kangaroo in amongst us right now. We wouldn't know because they are so humanness, which one are you stand up, right? The fuck now. I like their buff. Isn't that? Are you kidding me? That's not normal. Oy. Shouldn't look. No. They should not. I mean he listened to shop like a nipple ring that's human s key is he caned? Okay. Definitely watched videos of like little baby kangaroos, or like Tina plight in each one's all I know. But it's like there are certain bars. I will never go to but go watching these kangaroos boxing, each other is like going to those terrible bars. It's like a great experience. Yeah. They had the chance also I'm never going to Austria. There's this, this is what changed. This is what like evoked this, and I think I should just explain to the kangaroo. Steal your buddy. I can't my boyfriend note this, there's this video of someone's home, and they go to a window and you just see a kangaroo, you know, the one I know and it's standing there at the window with claw just on the window like that. And you're like, what are you going to do? Like it's just like it's like they're planning something, and we're here, thinking they're cute animals, but they're non. We don't think they're cute. We're ready for them anyway. So that's it. Yeah. And eighty five percent of dogs. About dogs, sir. Why do people expect us to know what dog breeds are right? We'll come up to me or talk about their dogs like I'm supposed to know what their breeds are your Lassie, your airbud, your corgi other than that. Like what is the point where you're just small? And I'm just like you. Vicky has a Santa's little ho-. We're gonna move on from these people. You ask for this. And now we're here. So excited. I know. Well, we all experience regret at some point. I'm going to skip ahead and. I don't know if this is a good I actually take good idea or not. I got to see Michelle Obama when she was here gasp, right? Great great. And it was like a really cool president that a friend passed onto me because boss gave it to her, and we were both like, yeah, we're gonna lock in remove see Michelle Obama. We're gonna be inspired and relieve. And we're both gonna like chill up to our jobs on time. Yes. Like, if we get one thing out of that it's going to just be like Michelle will lead the way for careers and I enjoyed it. And my take is really I enjoyed it in the same way that I enjoy, watching HGTV and to me, that's what she's kind of political quivalent of now. I was really bummed out by that mostly because very top of the show. They have a whole bunch of people on stage before. Michelle comes out and soaring beautiful. Majestic music happening, and they turn on the lights, and there's a lady whose name, I totally apologize for forgetting who's, like I am the first black female editor of El Canada. And in fact, the only black editor across the whole magazine. You're like visit. And then the lights go up, and it's like Dan Levy and your he's like, I'm Dan Levy an I the founder a creator of shits creek, and you're like I looked like that show. That's quite nice. And then another light goes up, and it's clear more. No. And she's talking about how like now I may teen I got to write a book about refugees knows like okay more. No noted, but then the next light goes up, and I'll never remember their names. Don't plan to it's one of the property brothers. I'm one half of the property brothers. And Michelle Obama has taught me and my brain went what are you talking about? Okay fair enough. Like you gotta give a little bit of something who everybody but the whole time I was like this is gun in a weird direction, very quickly. And then the next person is the other property. Would it be get out of one that we couldn't didn't need it the other for? And then I as she kept talking, I was like this is like HDTV. This is like I could put this on mute and still be like, yeah, I like that. Alex good more pictures of that, that seems awesome. And that's how I experienced HDTV. I've never put the volume on that TV channel. And I'm so bummed out that, that's Michelle Obama has become to me, and it's not it's only for me if you really like her. Please don't talk to me or at me about it. Or Email me or say anything to me really? I'm so bummed out that I was so excited when she was like I'm gonna write this book. I'm going to go to or I'm going to become a documentarian like Michelle is gonna lead the way I shall join her army. We shall fight, whatever we're fighting Michelle will teach us. And then she was just like it's Milady being ladies kind of interesting in hard. And I was like mute. Just gonna appreciate that for what it is. And so my take really Michelle Obama is the political quivalent of. H. E. T V. I'm not proud of it. I just feel that way. It's your opinion. You're loud. All right. Well, I'm glad we settled that. Okay. Well just wrap things up. Then. All right. Well, that's it for this show this week and tonight and in fact for this season. Thank you all so so much for coming. Thank you so much to our guests. Diane Saxe Matthew green Fatima Siad, Jane, Lebanon goes there Hagi and anti Donahue. And of course. Ishmael darrow. Everyone is on Twitter so be sure to follow their work. You can follow the show on Twitter at it's a safe space on Twitter at the Chamma. Please be sure to subscribe to the show. Leave us a review especially for tonight. We wanna hear so much more from you a massive. Thank you to the hot docs, team for being so, so good to us. And to all of you for coming until next season stay safe.

Canada Dan Levy Hamilton Michelle Obama Toronto Jane founder Ishmael darrow Vicki Garmin Ottawa river Michelle Tina Louise Greenpeace editor mississauga Fatima Siad prime minister
December 9, 2020 - Full Show

Chicago Tonight

56:46 min | 4 months ago

December 9, 2020 - Full Show

"Good evening and welcome to chicago tonight. I'm parachutes and i'm brandon friedman on the show tonight we expect to receive twenty three thousand doses other vaccine starting next week. The city's public health. Commissioner joins us with what to expect from. Chicago's rollout of covid nineteen vaccine. The airline industry has been devastated by the pandemic losing flyers and billions of dollars. We'll vaccine be enough to revive it. All of us will remember who was protecting us which business owners and businesses are spotlight. Politics team on the governor's reaction to violations to the states. Covid nineteen restrictions change positive change. We have to do things differently. The role of women in the legislature with springfield on the brink of a big cultural shift. When people say oh my god you guys are trying to do so much is because inglewood needs so much business. Owners and community organizers in englewood. Talk about what's next six months after widespread civil unrest in the neighborhood concert at lyric opera of chicago. Unlike anything you've ever heard the first some of today's top stories pfizer's covid vaccine could be in the possession of all thirty four city hospitals by next week. Chicago is set to receive twenty three thousand doses of the pfizer vaccine in. Its initial shipment. It could come soon after and if fda approval happens tomorrow lightfoot says the cdc will determine who gets the first batches she says the city will eventually set up public mass vaccination sites but chicago public health director. Dr allison arwady says that cooperation from community and health organizations will be key to the city's distribution plan. We will be working as soon as we are able to pushback. Seen two partners are full. Goal is to push this vaccine to as many vaccinating partners as we can so our goal will be that people will actually be able to get their vaccine through their provider. And we'll be asking them to prioritize outreach to their patients who are over sixty-five who have these underlying conditions both mayor lightfoot and dr are would he cautioned that widespread distribution of the vaccine is still months away and dr are would he will join us on the program in just a few moments. Meanwhile illinois health officials are reporting more than eighty two hundred new cova cases and one hundred seventy nine additional deaths in the last twenty four hours that makes for a total of eight hundred twelve thousand cases and thirteen thousand six hundred. Sixty six deaths. The test positive across the state right now is eleven point four percent and life would says she's spoken with forty fourth ward alderman. Tom tunney and says she's quote deeply disappointed. The alderman acknowledged he allowed indoor dining. At and sather's the restaurant he always. I'm belmont and lakeview city. Officials are investigating and could issue sunny. A ten thousand dollar fine for violating city kovin protocols lightfoot says she expects there will be consequences the minoza he did wrong. He will absolutely be held accountable zero exceptions for that But i understand the anger and the frustration because this has been such an incredibly hard year more on this story with our spotlight politics team just a bit later in the program. Some buzz around chicago native mellody the business executive and philanthropist. We'll become chair of the board of starbucks. Non executive chair hobson has been on the board for fifteen years. There and co-ceo chicago-based ariel investments. She's also mary to star wars creator. George lucas and now back to brandis. And chicago's top. Dr brandis paris. Thank you and as you just reported. Officials are detailing their covid vaccine. Rollout planned today. An initial shipment of twenty three thousand doses is expected in chicago as soon as next week with healthcare workers receiving vaccine. I joining us with more. About chicago's covid vaccine plan. Is dr allison arwady commissioner of the chicago department of public health. Dr arnn thanks for fitting us in again. So i please remind us what are the recommendations on who should receive this vaccine. I or so we have to follow the cdc recommendations which put in the first priority healthcare workers and long term facility both workers and residents. And so that's what the whole first part of phases healthcare workers were starting with hospitals. But then we'll be expanding out from there and that's all kinds of healthcare workers. We're talking home health. Aides were talking dentist. It's a wide range. That will be talking but it starts Probably as soon as next week potentially with our hospitals. And we'll this first shipment be enough for all of the healthcare workers in chicago. Who need it not at all so we estimate we have about four hundred thousand healthcare workers in the city of chicago using that broad definition so twenty. Three thousand will be the first week and then we'll be getting more week after week after week and pushing it to help their workers to launch him care facilities and then following up and it's going to take a while for sure to get through that group but we're really excited to get started assuming the fda gives the emergency use authorization and the cdc recommends actually starting destination and then who's next after healthcare workers. So we will be waiting to hear the formal guidance of from the advisory committee on immunization practices through the cdc. They've signaled likely next. Group will include essential workers as well as people over sixty five and people with underlying conditions. That obviously is a lot of chicago. And so even as we're waiting to hear some more details about potential sub prioritisation within that. We're already planning thinking about for people who are over. Sixty-five with underlying conditions will be working closely with for example many many many Doctors offices and outpatient practices across chicago will be asking them to be reaching out to their partners. Sorry to their patients so that people who are older with conditions will especially be able to get it through their doctors offices and then we'll be working on the essential workers side with employers will be doing outreach. In communities of where the virus has hit hardest to ensure that as essential workers lived in those neighborhoods for example they know how to get vaccinated. And then we'll be having some mass vaccination sites they'll be by appointment initially and we'll start with healthcare workers. But we're doing planning in all of these streams we can handle all of the vaccine that is given to us by the federal government. And we've got plans that flex very large or very small depending on what that supply chain looks like now. During this afternoon's press conference we also heard from dr helene gayle. The chicago community. Trust us speaking specifically about equity. Tell us how equity for communities of color factor into your vaccination plan so we have thought about equity and actually put it at the center of every phase of his vaccination plan. You've heard us talk a lot about equity already on the case side on testing side and we're being more serious about it on the vaccine side because this is how we're eventually gonna get past covid i and so for example where even from the beginning where we're thinking about healthcare workers This is not just doctors and the nurses this is also thinking about people who are nurses aides people who are working sometimes in some of the more support roles which may be lower paid and which we know in chicago. A lot of black chicagoans lat next chicagoans fill those roles will be specifically doing outreach And working to make sure that they know they can get vaccinated and that once pulled especially moving into some outpatient provider side will be thinking about some of the lower paid healthcare workers and trying to prioritize them for appointments for vaccine in our mass vaccination sites. And it'll go on from there We have to follow the federal guidance. But we implement that and so we'll be pushing to make sure than some of our neighborhoods and particularly in black chicago where we've seen more deaths still than in any other group. We wanna make sure that there's good messaging about the safety of the vaccine advocacy of the vaccine. We're doing everything we can to remove barriers so that people are excited about getting. This seems to protect their communities. It also will be a free of charge to chicagoans no today in the uk public health officials. There are warning people who have a history of allergic reactions to medicine To skip the vaccine because of the case of a couple of people who received they're having those reactions of how do you how do you rectify that here. How do you deal with that here. Yes so actually for all vaccines We always have a plan for what's called. Nfl axis this allergic reaction. Even if i'm giving a single dose of a vaccine i have in my in my container The medicine use in case. Somebody has a allergic reaction so it is something we planned for. I think in this case with a new vaccine certainly what. The recommendation in the uk was. Was that anyone who has history of serious allergic reactions enough where they need to carry an abbey pen. For example it asks them to delay vaccination while they explore this And this is exactly what will happen as as we roll out a new vaccine we will be looking Really understanding harder things we need to be prepared for and if we need to change some of the guidance around who will be getting vaccine right at the beginning. Were ready to do that. Point five percent of the people in the visor. Trial had some kind of allergic reaction. It was actually very similar to the group that got the placebo. Not the real vaccine but again as the vaccine is available in the real world we also have a lot more opportunity to collect information about side effects or any concerns other robust plans for doing that. at the city level at the state level and at the federal level. We want to be transparent. Make sure people have the information they need to secure in their decision to hopefully become vaccinated when a vaccine is available for them and dr already. They're still a lot of people who are still resistant to getting this vaccine. Once it becomes available to them perhaps even some health care workers but for some folks. It's a matter of mistrust in the medical community. What do you say to that. Yeah so. I'd say there is a long history here that we want to acknowledge. I think particularly. We're talking with black chicagoans really acknowledging the racist history that is absolutely part of the medical system in the public health system. This vaccine and our recommendations around it are absolutely based insci- the fact that this visor vaccine in particular which were now able to share data about ninety five percent protective that is an amazingly effective vaccine and the advocacy was the same across different race. Ethnicity groups ages genders people with underlying conditions We wanna make sure that there has been good representation of both black and latinx acts americans in these trials and here in chicago. We've seen that by and large and we'll be wanting to share that data in details that people really can feel secure that this vaccine has had the appropriate testing That the trials have not skipped stops which they have not that we are watching close. Leave for side effects. We were able to share today. Some of the data around side effects. Things like store harms on things like people feeling fatigued and having headaches the came out of those trials we will be making more that data available on the website and really sharing That as we are on the one hand talking about how effective this vaccine is were thrilled that there were not any serious safety concerns identified. What we want to understand that there will probably be some of these lower level side effects to be inspected all right. Dr allison arwady. We look forward to having you back again in the future as this continues to roll out. Thanks again for joining us. Thank you and now back to paris for a look at whether the availability of vaccines will be enough to revive the airline industry. Paris brennan's the airline industry has been devastated by the pandemic major. Us carriers are losing millions of dollars each day and the losses could total one hundred eighteen billion dollars by the end of this year and has big ramifications for chicago. Airlines are hopeful for a twenty twenty one recovery as the nation begins the vaccination process and joining us to share their assessment of the outlook for the industry are tracy rosinsky chicago-based aviation correspondent four thompson reuters and joe sweeter men professor in the school for public service department of public policy and a sustainable urban development program at depaul university and a specialist on transportation policy. Welcome back both of you To chicago tonight. I joe are the mayor yesterday announced plans for covid nineteen testing for employees and travelers at chicago airports. How's that going to work breakthroughs this week and testing guy chicago. Rollout this plan. They're going to be a terminal to have ticketing. If you're ticketed. Pasture employer eligible uses service. And the be both rapid testing and today testing. Start sheep maybe one hundred fifty dollars a bit more but it's going to pass just some confidence that they know where to go to get tested thinking bribed here are the early and mid way is going to be close Closer to the parking garage. Cpa station it's a pretty big news story this week and there's also going to be that city testing site near the garage. Midway tracy sqi let health experts were worried about a busy travel. Week during thanksgiving. And whether there'd be breakouts tied to folks in airports and on airplanes is there any data suggest to suggest any of that materialized well and just to clarify that there really have not been any any outbreaks tied to air travel at all An terms of i mean to say is on airplanes or at but it's a little too soon to tell whether that thanksgiving travel in and of itself led to a spike in cases. Are joe swetering. We mentioned the the terrible financial for the industry does twenty twenty one. Look like a rebound here on a roller coaster. A pair of september. The airlines are optimistic. The added lots of schedules That didn't pan out. They scale back. Thanksgiving was so so Head bashed delta just announced that he's seeing flat lining for quite a while. I think though just the last day or two all felt a little bit of excitement First of all A southwest their bond rating got improve We're seeing the vaccine. Excitement spread everywhere. So i think finally. We're seeing some confidence in the public. That we're getting the vaccine and testing system down enough. So people contacting back to the skies tracy rozanski. What are the financials look like for the big players in this industry american united delta south west. Could we see a major carrier. Go out of business. I don't think we'll see a major here. You're going to business They are each burning between twelve million and thirty million dollars every single day of cash. So it's a large sum of money but they have also raised a lot of capital and they all say that that should get them through at least twenty twenty one What happens after that really depends on strength of the recovery next year and it also may depend on what further assistance they get from the government government joe sweeter men should airlines and the industry anticipate anything out of this latest stimulus bill. That is being negotiated they do. The news is spreading fast. And we're getting close to a deal. I said that before airlines did well in that first round you call with the payroll protection that kept employs on board. That allowed them to keep a lot of flights in the area. Even though the economics sport were good that ended in october. So now we're waiting for round two of this and The sense that airlines are going to do quite as well as they did. The first time but all transportation's position really well and we now know of course that the big four probably okay to skirt bankruptcy but some of these smaller airlines legion frontier sun country. They're really in a tough spot. And if something does give congress who knows what's going to happen to their ability to fly and some of those airlines have had trouble for years tracy brzezinski what about vaccine distribution. You have carriers like american saying they. They wanna distribute the vaccine. How would that work logistically. How does that play into airlines recovery. Well all there is enough vaccine distribution business to go around for all of the major carriers and this is going to not only be a big part of their cargo business a as soon as these vaccines are approved but going into next year as well and they're hoping that that that axing distribution can also help them open up some of the passenger routes that have been closed as well as the that bridge to place in which people can start traveling rural. You're done and just weird and let's let's bring this back local you know o.'hare midway thousands of jobs. The city relies on the tax revenue. That comes through their the tourism. that comes through their. how has this impacted. chicago's airports. And and what does the future look. Like for o'hare redevelopment as we do no one one is going to be down. Other some sense that things could start to Approach normalcy next summer or perhaps eighty percent of pre pandemic volumes But we know the winner and springer probably going to be pretty rough but that means fewer personal facility charges less parking revenue all those things which has got to be tough for the city. And they're gonna situation. They gotta decide how quickly to proceed with. The you know the massive o'hare twenty one plan the new terminals terminal to rebel the satellite terminals and The bond ratings are got nervous about all airports right now. So i think the good news is. We're still only in the design. Planning stage of that were not Least the terminal to project had a little time but it's going to be some tough decisions whether does whether to slow things down presents ski. Are there deals out there for passengers and will there be going forward in two thousand twenty one just given the state of the industry i yes. There are deals. If if you book ahead of time i think the closer you get your travel dave the higher the fares are because the fact is there just aren't a lot of flights out there right now. Airlines have reduced their capacity by about fifty percents. So it it. It's a tough call. They are offering low fares to entice people to get on board to start flying again but the says until people really feel comfortable traveling. They don't expect Those those troubles to to return to what they were before the pandemic all right. We're gonna have to it. There are lots to talk about. Our thanks to tracy resents ski and joseph peterman for the first time in decades. There's no clear answer to the question who will be the next speaker of the illinois house longtime speaker. Michael madigan still wants that job. But at least nineteen of his fellow. Democrats say they won't support him for another term. Amanda finicky spoke with some of the first legislators to take that position and she joins us now. Amanda would you find out. House speaker is a powerful job. And really it's been crafted into one largely by madigan. Who's held the post for all but a blips since the early eighties but it is is not the only reason why madigan is frequently referred to as one of if not the most powerful politician in illinois us also chair of the democratic party of illinois and democrats ruled the roost in this state which is why freshman state representative tara. Kosta howard running for a second term. This november says she had a lot of soul-searching to do this summer after madigan was identified in federal court papers in which comment admitted to a long running scheme to bribe him. She said she'd already been frustrated. That madigan hadn't been doing enough as illinois was fighting pandemic. I am an attorney. I am a former public defender. So you are innocent until proven guilty and for me. This wasn't about whether you know he's guilty of a crime or not. This says this doesn't feel right. This is wrong. Casa howard in july became the first democrat to essentially abandoned madigan announcing that. If she were re elected she would not support him for another term as speaker. Let me tell you. The impact was much greater than than people realize particularly because this occurred in the middle of my campaign as speaker and democratic party chairman. It doesn't matter who raises bid bucks and then uses it to send money as well as support staff polling in campaign brochures to democrats to help them get elected but kosta howard told me in an interview that she was essentially punished for her stance. It has huge ramifications for me. When i decided that i needed to say and to speak out that i would not support him. Ramifications like what while the largest ramification was fundraising. I mean i was essentially While i was basically cut off from from the typical large donors she says some changes were subtle for example. The party did send a worker to help her with the race. But this worker was inexperienced and she says not a good fit. Unlike the season campaign worker who the democratic party had sent to help her in eighteen and the party did offer to help with polling but kosta howard says that came too late in the process and also she says the party refused to let her ask on that poll. A question about madigan. It's a very fine line right because nothing you don't want any want anything to look retaliatory return. Excuse me so. I think that there was a fine line. That was walked. Kosta howard said. She didn't end up doing her own poll and she did ask about madigan again. It showed the speaker less popular with voters in her district. Them president donald trump. So all her decisions may have been controversial in political circles. That stance on madigan may have helped with voters. Well howard says she didn't accept money for madigan she did however receive and take money from campaign committees that he controls according to the democratic party of illinois money totalling about a half million dollars a dpi spokesperson says kosta. Howard faced no repercussions rather. She says it was pulling that showed. It was clear that kosta howard's race against former republican representative. Peter brin wasn't all that tight cost howard was pulling away so money was shifted to raises. That were tighter. This spokesperson saying that. Supporting strong female candidates remains a dpi priority. But retribution can come in other forms. It is a big deal. And i don't think people really understand outside of those of us who are living at every day really understand what it's like to come out and say i will not be supporting him. As a legislator we have a responsibility to pass legislation that that hopefully benefits are districts and your legislation could be held up and it could be something that you've worked on and it's important. It could mean what committee assignments it could mean on projects that come out to your district. While custom howard was the first to have previously backed madigan. Men defected democratic representative installed. A murray of naperville refused to vote for madigan as speaker two years ago. She says she did get legislation passed. Despite that i mean. I think it's a couple of things number one. I don't think this should be discounted in the metoo move. Man is his chief of staff. Tim makes was taken out of our. And from what i understand. He would have been the ringleader in quote unquote making my life. A living how she also says she may not have been punished given the reason that she opposed him as expand opposition to sexual harassment incidents in springfield. I don't think the other women and the caucus would have looked very fondly upon him very openly having retribution against someone who was who was standing up against that still summary says the for two years. She requested meetings with madigan and he never responded. Now come the twenty twenty one legislature women. Democrats will number mill democrats in the house and stop. Maria says that that's something that should be considered as democrats in the caucus battle out. Who will be the next house speaker. A seven murray says she does expect more democrats to join in the nineteen who have already said that. They will not support for another role as speaker even if they're not going to come out and say so in public. She says she doesn't necessarily feel vindicated. She says she feels grateful. We have to point out madigan nonsmoking publicly since the comrade deferred prosecution agreement was announced but he has issued statements continually denying any role in the com add scandal and denying wrongdoing. He has presented himself as democrats best choice as illinois faces. Some big budget woes. Paris lot of shaking out that needs to happen between now and late january. All right amanda. We'll see later in the program for spotlight politics. But i a unique virtual concert from lyric opera of chicago. And that's right. After this latinos who make up one third of the population continue to power. The city that works. These are the people that are working three jobs knowing that covert is out there and the people that need the help we should help them and we still have much more ahead on the show including of public official caught breaking the state's covert restrictions and other stories in this week's spotlight politics but i this sunday lyric opera of chicago is having a virtual concert. Unlike anything they've ever had before arts correspondent angel edo takes us to lyric opera which opened its doors for the first time since june. Two film. this virtual concert today. I had the joy of recording a duet. Mckee us with david petillo. And he's a beautiful tenor and We've never sung together so to have that. Experience was was really beautiful hosted by puerto rican soprano anna maria martinez with musical accompaniment. By craig terry for the first time ever. Lyric opera of chicago is hosting a concert. Entirely sung in spanish in pacione. Listen featuring students from the ryan opera center. Each singer tried to choose songs that were best reflective of their talents. Those news again for third year. Baritone ricardo rivera. It was about singing songs that reflected his upbringing in puerto rico. This songs that were danced to almost every night in certain places and there are recognized immediately by people off maybe one or two generation per two hours immediately and it's almost like a sense of going back home originally from oaxaca mexico first-year soprano. Denise villas has been a practicing singer for the past eleven years old. Georgina eighty postpartum me. As i am missy way afford to nara a the work untidiness buying your e most threatened he. Kinda is presentiment that stuck on while its virtual i for lyric and more ways than one. The artists say they're grateful to bring the community together during this time. What their love for the language did madina latin passion. And i think that there's a lot of joy and strengthen in passion some will be familiar. Some will be new discoveries. And i think the language will be the common thread and i've i've always thought that person's favourite word or the one that will open their heart the most is their own name and i think after that it's their mother tongue so i am very hopeful that everyone will rejoice who speaks spanish in this presentation but also those that don't speak it. They'll they'll see the beauty and here the beauty in it for chicago tonight. I'm angel edo on latina premieres this sunday evening at six on the lyric opera of chicago facebook and youtube channels with closed captions available in both english and spanish. Visit our website for more information and their parents who go back to you. Thanks brandis and still to come on chicago tonight. How black owned businesses and chicago's would community are managing six months. After civil unrest in the area. Recall we'll bring the state some accountability plus their spotlight. Politics team looks at the push to pass a recall measure in the state which could affect speaker madigan. But i some more of today's top stories. The fbi chicago offices asking for tips leading to the arrest of a man seen firing a rifle at a metro station. The suspect seen here in this video from the f. b. i. allegedly fired around from collapsible rifle at the mccormick place. Metra stop on december first. The fbi says the suspect is believed to be five foot eight and of medium or slender billed. The public is urged to call the chicago. Fbi office or go to website with tips and state public health officials report more than eighty two hundred new cases of covid nineteen in the last twenty four hours with one hundred seventy nine additional deaths that makes a total of more than eight hundred and twelve thousand cases and thirteen thousand six hundred sixty six deaths. The test positivity rate is eleven point four percent the cubs could be getting a tax break from the city due to covid nineteen a city council committee voted unanimously to wave two hundred fifty thousand dollar annual bill. The team is normally required to pay each year for the renovations on wrigley field. The cubs argued that they deserve the break because they were not allowed to have fans or hold concerts depriving them of major sources of their revenue. The team is expected to resume paying those yearly fees. Starting in two thousand twenty one this month. Btw news checking in on neighborhoods across chicago where civil unrest occurred this summer including instances of looting and property damage. Our next stop is englewood on the south side where businesses experienced extensive damage along commercial quarters like sixty third street and ashland avenue six months later chicago. Tonight's quinn myers. Checks in with community organizers and business owners to see how they're holding on. And what's next. I got ill to my stomach. Husband was felt ill to stomach of just the whole situation. Hacia butler is the executive director of the resident association of greater englewood or rage a group dedicated to community engagement in the south side neighborhood. This summer butler watched as businesses near her home were broken into and looted just one portion of widespread damage in the neighborhood. That's long struggled with disinvestment. Our community has been looted for the last forty fifty years. When you just turn around in front of an abandoned school you look across the street. It's abandoned homes and talking about years of segregation years of Targeting black folks out of their homes contract by making it difficult for african americans to get loans to open businesses after the civil unrest butler says people reached out to her eager to support black owned businesses and englewood but didn't have a centralized way to find them so her organization began putting together a directory. One business on the list is would hardware on sixty third street. Owner jared hicks worked here in high school and came back to buy the place a couple years ago. Got limited black ministers. They used to have here. You know years ago. When i was coming up it was. You know all down through here. Hopefully they'll those are all businesses sixty third and fifth. I mean this everywhere. You went with printshop. Somebody was always one stockton down. Sixty third street near ashland is another black owned business included in the directory clothing and apparel store. Englewood branded owner corey luckett says most of the surrounding businesses were damaged during the summer civil unrest but his store was left untouched. In fact people were coming by asking. He always everything. Okay good i have people willing to stand outside the store to protect it. I just felt that was great. Let me know that did something right. Look it says his englewood. T shirts and hoodies are about taking pride in the positive aspects of his community. Ones that don't get much attention on the six o'clock news. You can be your own business your own boss you can grow. You can help the community. You can do this all at the same time. Without having any negative surroundings or backlash with its that attitude butler and a host of other community groups like the inner city muslim action network or iman have applied to ambitious project called. Go green on racine. The initiative hopes to revitalize the entire intersection at sixty third street and racine avenue including a fresh produce market the business incubator and a resource center for people. Returning from incarceration work iman has already been doing in the community for years. Essential piece of the project is the closed green line station here at sixty third in racine which organizers say they're advocating to get reopened so for us just like having a vacant school is unacceptable having a vacant green line stop that just rolls past residents is unacceptable at the future fresh market on sixty third street. We met jake hat. Who's working on the team renovating the space. This is like a starting point for the community. We're trying to better this community Making more comfortable making more lovable hatton. Who grew up on the west side says he sees the project as a model to take to other neighborhoods across chicago. I don't want this to stop. I wanna continue on this road. And i want others to join us and become a part of this family that like i say i'm from the west side of chicago so i'm out here but i plan to bring back out and give others opportunities just like i get for chicago tonight. I'm quinn myers. And w w news is continuing our series through the month of december checking it on different communities months after civil unrest next up in this series. We'll be live tomorrow. From chicago's pilsen neighborhood has part of our chicago tonight. In your neighborhood series still to come are spotlight. Politics team looks at repercussions for alderman. Tom tunney who serve customers indoors at his and slather restaurant but first we're in chicago. Tonight's december pledge right now and we have a matching grant that will make your contribution. Go farther when you call tonight. You're matching gift will be supporting the w. t. w. fund for independent news. This new initiative will provide ongoing financial support for the quality journalism. 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From the presidential inauguration there will be much to report on between now and then and we'll be sure to keep you up to date on everything that's happening even though our political reporting increases during an election season. It's really an extension of the work we do every day. That's because we put a high priority on our political and public policy coverage we know every city likes to think their political landscape is unique but in chicago. We know that's true and during these times our political coverage takes on new urgency will keep reporting important stories. But we can't do it alone running a strong newsroom takes financial resources. That's why we're asking for your help to support this essential public service and tonight. The challenge grant sponsored by jim in k. Maybe we'll double the impact of your gift doesn't take much to make a difference but it does take the help of everyone who values what we provide here at w. w. news and chicago. Tonight you can make a matching contribution by calling seven seven three five eight eight eleven eleven or go online at. Www dot com and next our spotlight politics team tackles the latest battle against speaker. Mike madigan but first we take a look at the weather illinois house speaker. Michael madigan floats an income tax hike. Meanwhile alderman. Tom tunney rolled for serving diners indoors at his restaurant. Here with all that and much. More are are spotlight. Politics team of amanda finicky heather sharon and parachutes so embattled speaker michael madigan. He's floating this tax increases of course after governor pritzker so called fair tax amendment. The graduated income tax amendment failed at the ballot box manda so of the wealthier paying more. Does this mean we all pay more. Oh that was always going to be one of the possibilities especially with the failure of the graduated income tax illinois needs to do something particularly if governor jb pritzker is going to fulfill his promise to get illinois back on the past to having balanced budgets. There's going to be some sort of a solution cuts tax increase. They've kind of done a whole lot of the easy stuff. What madigan told this was reporting from the chicago sun times with madigan told a private meeting that was then leaked of the black caucus as he sought their support for another term speaker was been he would help to get that done. Should the governor asked for it. We really don't have a whole lot of details yet. But yeah it's it's a possibility. How much does he want to get. This done manda. I'm not sure that there is any politician who wants to vote for a tax increase. Then again madigan certainly has plenty else going on to worry about. His district has sought to even with the veil of corruption. And he said he'd done nothing wrong. But regardless his district has sought to send him back to springfield repeatedly so presumably not a big issue for him but again. The the really aren't a whole lot of choices here. If you need revenue a flat tax and increase along those lines is surely one of the key ways to do it. Heather is their support for a tax hike in the general assembly. We don't really know because we don't really know what the federal government is going to come forward with is as part of relief package. If there's no relief package it's going. The tax hike is going to be on on unavoidable. Just because simply the whole is too big to fill otherwise if the package includes aid to states which means illinois will benefit. It's possible that cuts and sort of more sort of borrowing could fill the gap but that's a completely unknown at this point however You know this is crunch time really for the state's budget There is no more low hanging fruit to pick off. These are all going to be really tough. Decisions and governor pritzker has said that he will not allow those cuts to fall hardest on the poorest illinois ins which means that all of us will probably have to pay a little bit more somewhere along the line. Heather should lawmakers then consider putting this tax hike off until they do know what they're getting from washington. Yes i think that we will know by the end of the year. So by december thirty first weather a relief package path. The gop controlled senate. So that will mean that they will have a little bit more information when they convene in january and then they'll be able to say well. How long can we wait for an additional package. After president-elect biden takes office and perhaps even has control of the senate if pending the outcome of the georgia senate runoff. So a lot is sort of really up in the air. And i think that state lawmakers will be sort of hoping in crossing their fingers that they won't have to take a vote to hike taxes but it may be inevitable. Paris republican house leader. Jim durkin wants spending cuts. Could that mean more layoffs. It could mean more layoffs brands. But it's important to remember that it's hard to find big wholesale cuts in the state budget because the state is statutorily obligated to make certain payments like the pension payments. It's it has to fund education at a certain level has to fund social services at a certain level and it seems like there's this game of chicken being played right now governor. Pritzker says okay. Well why don't you show us. What cuts you're talking about and Reportedly minority leader durkan hasn't really unveiled. What exactly he wanna cut. So you know i. It is politically popular to say. We don't want tax hikes. We want cuts. But then it becomes less politically popular when you go out and say exactly what you wanna cut and what kind of layoffs that might mean so this weekend amanda just mentioned mike madigan told the black caucus that they should support him for house speaker in spite of his waning support and house. We know that nineteen representatives have said they will not support his bid for speaker He talked about you. Know his strong leadership and about his ability to steer through a possible tax increase And guiding the remapping process amanda. What does his support. Look like in the blackhawks. It's hard to gauge that. We didn't get any comment or endorsement. To after that weekend meeting again privately held. Why didn't we get any sort of announcement from the black caucus dorsey. What had been expected to be mad again. Well it may be again because some of that audio got leaked and time to tax increase. Not particularly a popular thing again. As we've been talking about that could be part of it. I do think. Redistricting is key for example in speaking with both of representatives that were featured in the story that i did earlier. Custom howard instead of murray. They're both from the suburbs. Madigan is a big deal. There brewers don't like him. It is certainly very different in many districts. Particularly those in chicago those represented by members of the black caucus. Who don't really give that big a hoot about who is leading the illinois house. They just want other measures passed things that the black caucus promoting do have to add. There has been at least one member of the black caucus. That's marines west out of the rockford area. Who has said he does not support madigan. but he's a bit of an outlier in terms of just his district and many of his possessions. In light of the state's history of corruption to republicans have proposed a recall measure senator adjacent berkman of bloomington and representative mark baton. Nick of plainfield wanna make it easier to recall more elected officials take a look people illinois have been shut out too long. They are done with corruption. They are done with machine politics and they're done with speaker. Madigan recall will bring the state some accountability when the majority party seems to have little now paris after rod blagojevich's indictment recall measure passed. But that was just for governor. Is this proposed bill targeted at madigan. It certainly seems that way and right now you know piling on the madigan train is politically. It pays dividends for republicans you saw how it impacted the election tying speaker madigan to justice kilbride and to the graduated income tax amendments so any little opening they see to sort of tie democrats as speaker meeting and keep madigan in the news. They will All caution and say that with state representatives. It's a little bit different than the governor. They serve two year terms so there are constantly primaries and they're constantly challenges talking about running maybe makes a little more sense for a recall for a four year term But when there's a two year term it's like amanda said speaker madigan adage all the time. There are term limits already. They're called elections. I want to get to kobe. But does this have legs. Could it pass. I don't think that it is going to get to that point. It's sponsored by republicans. They're not in control in. In addition to some of the poems at paris noted constitutional questions. I don't think we're going to get to this point anytime young so not one. But two lawmakers were caught violating the states copa nineteen restrictions. Let's start with the democrat. One of the mayor's key leaders forty fourth ward alderman. Tom tunney also owns the end. Say the restaurant in lakeview. There's been dispute over how that's actually pronounced. We'll get back to that But heather what happened at his restaurant. And what's the city doing in the way of fines. Well he was allowing longtime he diners at his late. You read a restaurant. pulling in sather's i'm not gonna argue with brandis you to sign enrolls cycle which he was letting them in to dine thirty eight days into this ban imposed by governor pritzker and he was essentially caught out and there were complaints made to the cities. He's now facing two citations. Which if it's held responsible for could mean that he needs to pay ten thousand five hundred dollars to the city and it was a real embarrassment for the mayor and she said today she was quote deeply disappointed in alderman tiny and she said that she he would be held responsible and not made an exception. This is ben a clash between mayor. Lightfoot governor pritzker since almost the beginning of the pandemic mayor lightfoot wants restaurants to be able to reopen. The governor has said this is where coded is spreading. This just couldn't have been sort of a more hot button. Issue to snare one of the mayor's closest allies now governor pritzker spoke out against alderman. Tom tiny about his restaurant violations but also against republican holiday party with dozens of unmasked people. A look at what he had to say to the host state representative brad. Halbrook shame on him. Shame on him for having people in a room packed together not wearing a mask. He knows better. He should know better. If he doesn't maybe shouldn't be in the general assembly. Amanda could representative helper punishment to. I don't know how what that punishment would be. More likely the venue that hosted this event in arthur illinois is sort of a bit different given that helper is a tough thing when you have politicians not practicing what they preach when it comes to the corona virus representative. Halbrook is not one of those who've been preaching about it. He has openly said that he disagrees with the actions. That pritzker has taken. Use it as an overreach is allied with representative darren bailey. Who's been behind all of these lawsuits so this is really in keeping with hell brooks beliefs. Though it may not be safe for you'll annoyance particularly those who attended this bash now pairs. You broke the story yesterday that eleanor lawmakers want billions back from private health. Insurers tell us more about that well a brandis. These are two lawmakers one in the house. One of the senate democrats and and basically they're saying in the medicaid system in illinois. It's run as a managed care system so basically the state pays a sum billions of dollars every year. Half of that by the way is reimbursed in federal taxes to these private organizations that manage medicaid for two plus million low income residents in illinois. And what they're saying is most of these companies are big healthcare companies that are making huge profits in covid companies like meridian companies. Like blue cross blue shield. Also they say that because of ovid utilization rates are down so fewer people are going to the doctor for big elective surgeries meaning. They're using fewer insurance claims so the lawmakers are saying. Well what are you doing with that pile of money. We think you're sitting on a pile of money and frankly we think you should give that back to the state to redirect to critical care hospitals like mercy hospital. The thing is to keep that federal matching a dollar those dollars that come in from the federal government for medicaid. They have to keep this in the healthcare system so they said we don't want this when he going overwhelmingly to these big healthcare companies. Let's let's send them to hospitals now. Amanda i'm sure the hospitals are going to lobby the general assembly about this. No doubt what's going to happen lawsuits in the future. A yes for sure. If anything like this were to pass which don't necessarily expect particularly at this degree think would raise about three billion dollars. That's the equivalent of what the graduated income tax constitutional amendment would have done so makes it sound quite easy to basically plug the budget hole. But i don't think it is going to be that there certainly is going to be a lot of negotiating around healthcare and there are issues around these mc organizations period when those contracts are up but given both federal and state law. I don't think that this is something that will readily fly. Heather raw manual continues to make his case for biden's transportation secretary you've written extensively about this Now the former mayor's facing a good bit of pushback from liberals who oppose his nomination or potential nomination over the way he handled the liquid mcdonald case. Tell us about your story. well i just. I wanted to look back at his eight years in office to really figure out if the case that he's making for himself that his legacy in chicago as a transportation focused mayor didn't what did that. Tell us about what he would do at in abidjan cabinet and really he focused primarily on two areas o'hare and the cpa and nobody can deny that he really sort of positioned o'hare once the pandemic is over to be expanded by nearly forty percent more flights and sort of securing. Its place like a mobile hub in the united states also he. He directed nearly eight billion dollars. This eta rebuilding all sorts of train lines. But the question is i think is worse those decisions made equitably and i think if you talk to people on the south side so they'll say they're still waiting for the red line extension to one hundred thirty th street and that bus ridership really drop during his tenure and buses are what you know. Poor chicagoans rely on. So it's he definitely had an ambitious agenda but in some ways. It was clouded with some of those equity issues. That were talking so much about in the wake of george floyd staff in police custody and after as part of the black lives matter movement and had her husband's name also been floated for us. Trade representative yes and we found out today that he will not be getting that job so it seems like transportation secretary or bust and we will be waiting to hear if he is named to. Joe biden's cabinet along with illinois senator. Tammy duckworth who is believed to be a leading contender to lead the veterans affairs department. So we're all on pins and needles or at least i am vacancy. See for governor pritzker two point in the senate if that happens a man we've got about twenty seconds left five politicians talking about running for secretary of state. who are they. Is it early. Who i don't know if i'm going to get them all in the clerk. Karen yarbrough city clerk in valencia former state treasurer alexi genucel. Elliot's of ultimate. Run out of getting somebody. That won't be the like thing. Everybody wants this job jesse white. His said before that he was going to retire. Never actually done it. He says he actually means it. It is going to be a hot contest. Should be fun to watch for those of us. Who enjoy watching it. My thanks our spotlight. Politics team periods shuts heather serono and amanda energy. And you can visit our website for more on the stories discussed tonight with our spotlight politics team. And while you're there make sure to check on our died for things to know about the state's plan for a covid nineteen vaccine that's all it. Wtt w dot com slash news. And that's our show for this wednesday night don't forget to stay connected with us by signing up for our daily briefing and you can get chicago. Tonight streamed on facebook youtube and our website. Wtt w dot com slash news can also give the show via podcast and the pbs video. App please join us tomorrow night. Live at seven. We visit pilsen and its businesses and community leaders for next in your neighborhood and an update on the long awaited final stretch of the lakefront trail which the city hopes to complete by year's end. And we leave you tonight with some more of the lyric opera's pass the own latina performance now for all of us here at chicago tonight. I'm brandon friedman and i'm parachutes. Thank you so much for watching. Stay healthy and safe and good night closed. Captioning is made possible in part by robert a clifford and clifford law offices wishing a happy and healthy holiday season.

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