17 Burst results for "Sustainable Urban"

"sustainable urban" Discussed on UN News

UN News

04:43 min | 2 weeks ago

"sustainable urban" Discussed on UN News

"Is not only concerned with designing new buildings to the highest environmental standards. She's also helping to transform those extremely leaky buildings. She mentioned. we are in grove street in brooklyn and these are four buildings that are part of a nine ding project called casa pacifica and the project is to take existing buildings and bring them to the passive house standard. The passive house is based mostly on creating an airtight enclosure. That is insulated with continuous installation. Ventilation that is done with heat recovery. So that when we're taking heated air or air condition air out of an apartment. Were taking energy that we put into that conditioning and putting it back into the incoming airstream you've really put a new brand new skin on outer layer on the existing building. A how complicated is that to do. Well you know it kind of looks simple when you look at it now but it was It was a puzzle to figure it out. Most projects such as cassava are encouraging examples of innovation. Climate action. agenda. It's clear that they contact place in isolation as giant. Joseph explains joined up thinking is needed if the city and state to achieve their goals. We need high-efficiency electricity to heat and cool our buildings so that means moving off of the fossil fuel based sources of heating that. We have today for buildings. We need to make our buildings. Energy-efficient contain the costs associated with expanding the electric grid because we are going to need to build out the electric grid if we are to electrify the four million buildings and in new york state. And then the third thing we need to do is Incorporate more load flexibility into buildings so that buildings can communicate with the electric grid and buildings can ramp down and ramp up their loads to balance the overall systems and whilst established cities such as new york are grappling with the legacy of their past other parts of the world or urbanizing at breakneck speed. Potentially storing up problems for the future. Christofle is the head of the housing unit at un habitat the un agency that promotes safe and sustainable urban environments a supporter of retrofitting products like cazar perceive which improve existing housing stock. He's confident that the developing economies of the global south can benefit from the kind of innovation seen in new york from the best figure. I'll work on housing with his very large share of the emissions to come about of like the new housing stock that is required to be built in your future. So when we work as you touching on the future of cities your forensic for it's really key consideration to make sure that decision and this new housing stock can mitigate the impact undo on the climate but also contract to reduce greenhouse gas emission. some companies are pretty printing houses in africa sub saharan africa. And some years ago this would have not been really maybe like the most attractive approach to reducing greenhouse gas emission. And especially from the lakers. Joel point of view. But it's a very. It's a very interesting solution to be able to produce housing at scale at cost but also By streamlining the way that you are building house in the also like sourcing sourcing materials. You can really have a positive impact on the environment by reducing emissions christofle alone head of housing at un habitat back in new york. No one is underestimating. The scale of task ahead but there is a sense that the political technical and logistical stars are running and that we have a fighting chance of achieving the goal of bringing down global temperatures one building at a time. It's not rocket science. The challenges that we need to achieve. There's just a a lot of issues. We need to work out on the ground. We gotta get the costs down. Are we going to get care. I've traveled to some european countries where they set these goals. And they say they're gonna try and that's what we're gonna do. We're going try. I'm katelyn and you've been listening to the latest on the flagship podcast from news for daily texts audio and video stories. Go to a website. News dot u. n. dot org..

Joseph africa katelyn new york Joel Christofle four million grove street some years ago nine ding project third thing today sub saharan africa four buildings casa pacifica brooklyn christofle cassava european u. n.
"sustainable urban" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

03:59 min | 5 months ago

"sustainable urban" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Architecture in order for people not to move because of these things that are happening? There's two fundamental things that need to happen, particularly in state of California, the state Legislature working together with climate scientists, geologists and experts in Geospatial Intelligence. Need to draw maps on really where the highest risk zones are for fire, and they need to coordinate land use and where they build and rebuild. So that they basically begin to move and transition people out of high risk areas. The other thing that needs to happen in California and this is a longstanding debate, of course in Sacramento. Ultimately, the state is me going to need to step in and override local land use decisions. That is how and when and where to build to incentivize greater density and get around what we would know It's not my backyard phenomenon. Because all you know people are moving into what we call the wild urban interface. In part because of the existing challenges. We're all aware of in terms of housing, affordability and the like, in one way to really combat wildfires, believe it or not, is actually building more sustainable urban development. In our urban course. Now, Jessie. I know in places like in Hawaii, you know, on the Big island they have, you know, lava zones and really estate prices. You know, a greatly affected depending on if you live in a in a particular lava zone. Did you see something like that down the road say for California's a wildfire zone or something like that. Could that make a difference? It could. It is exactly what I'm calling for. And I think you're right that you know, One of the collateral effects here is that when you remove land, it creates more scarcity. And that increases howling, of course. By some measures undermines affordability. But we have to come back that by actually producing Mohr housing in the type of housing that avails itself. Of density access to mass transportation on the light. You know, I'd like to blame Berkeley, California for wildfires because Berkeley, California refuses to build high density affordable housing near their mass transit stops. So you know, and that's a little bit of a hyperbole, of course, but It's not too far off from the challenges that we face. I think, Jesse when people here and we talk about climate based migration there, you know a lot of times were thinking, California. We're thinking, Florida. We're thinking of these places where we keep repeatedly hearing about hurricanes and wildfires and things like that. With that said, when people are relocating out of these places, where are they heading? I mean, you still have issues you when you're talking Tornadoes and things like that in the Midwest. I mean, where are people going? No, there's nowhere that is unaffected from climate change. You know, certain cities and communities and geography is would be better off or have less perils or less risk. But there's nowhere you can hide. That being said. I think it's work stepping back and taking big picture here that at least in the northern Hemisphere flora and fauna, plants and animals are in a slow northern migration. And I don't think that people are any different in this broader ecological realm. We will slowly be shifting our populations further and further north, and I think certainly in terms of the Northeast the Midwest in the upper Midwest, United States, There's a real opportunity there to think about sustainable urban development that Give consideration to affordability, access to transportation and many of the urban amenities that we have taken for granted. And that is just a keen, an associate professor of real estate in the school of architecture at Tulane University..

California Midwest Berkeley Legislature Hawaii Sacramento Big island Jessie associate professor United States Jesse Tulane University Florida
"sustainable urban" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

06:11 min | 5 months ago

"sustainable urban" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Eighties inland and fall begins Tuesday morning. Traffic and weather together on the eights on all news, one of 69 and Am 7 40 KCBS case. CBS News Time made 20 as fires continue to pose an immediate threat to homeowners across the West Coast climate based migration. Has become a hot topic for more Now we're joined down the case to be S Ring Central News Line by Jesse Keen, an associate professor of real estate in the School of Architecture at Tulane University. Good morning, Jessie. Hey, thank you so much for having so, Jesse. What would need to happen in building an architecture in order for people not to move because of these things that are happening. There's two fundamental things that needs to happen, particularly the state of California, the state Legislature working together with climate scientists, geologists and experts in Geospatial Intelligence. Need to draw maps. On really where the highest risk zones are for fire, and they need to coordinate land use and where they build and rebuild so that they basically begin to move and transition people out of high risk areas. The other thing that needs to happen in California, and this is a longstanding debate, of course in Sacramento. Ultimately, the state is me going to need to step in and override local land use decisions. That is how and when and where to build to incentivize greater density and get around what we would Noah's not my backyard phenomenon. Because all you know people are moving into what we call the wild urban interface. In part because of the existing challenges. We're all aware of in terms of housing, affordability and the like, in one way to really combat wildfires, believe it or not, is actually building more sustainable urban development. In our urban course. Now, Jessie. I know in places like in Hawaii, you know, on the Big island they have, you know, lava zones and realestate prices. You know, a greatly affected depending on if you live in a in a particular lava zone. Did you see something like that down the road say for California's a wildfire zone or something like that. Could that make a difference? It could. It is exactly what I'm calling for. And I think you're right that you know, One of the collateral effects here is that when you remove land, it creates more scarcity and that increases housing and, of course, By some measures undermines affordability. But we have to come back that by actually producing Mohr housing in the type of housing that avails itself. Of density access to master transportation on the light. You know, I'd like to blame Berkeley, California for wildfires because Berkeley, California refuses to build high density affordable housing near their mass transit stops. So you know, and that's a little bit of a hyperbole, of course, but It's not too far off from the challenges that we face. I think, Jesse when people here and we talk about climate based migration there, you know a lot of times were thinking, California. We're thinking, Florida. We're thinking of these places where we keep repeatedly hearing about hurricanes and wildfires and things like that. With that said, when people are relocating out of these places, where are they heading? I mean, you still have issues when you're talking. Tornadoes and things like that in the Midwest. I mean, where are people going? No, there's nowhere that is unaffected from climate change, You know, certain cities and communities and geography is would be better off or have less perils or less risk. But there's nowhere you can hide. But that being said, I think it's work stepping back and thinking big picture here that at least in the Northern Hemisphere flora and fauna, plants and animals are in a slow northern migration, and I don't think that people are any different in the broader ecological realm. We will slowly be shifting our populations further and further North. I think certainly in terms of the Northeast the Midwest in the upper Midwest, United States, There's a real opportunity there to think about sustainable urban development that give consideration to affordability. Access to transportation and Many of the urban amenities that we have taken for granted. You touched on it a little bit already, but and we do know that other countries are building, you know, entire cities that combat for instance, extreme heat. You know, with homes that could be built with fire resistant materials. That sort of thing, talk a little bit about some of the strategies that we can use to relieve some of the pressure of natural disasters or climate change. So, building codes are important on building codes in California, of course, have gotten better on and enforcement is always a challenge. But building codes can only go so far. Ultimately, it's about land you it's about where people build And there's no two ways of getting around that. And I think that not only does that mitigate future losses for communities and homeowners in the future that also offers an opportunity for ecological restoration. And, you know, improving water quality and water access, particularly in California, which is a long perennial challenge, if you will. So you know, building codes are important. Regulation is important in very localized term, but you know, I come back. To fire zones and more resolute relationship between zoning and where these fires are going to essentially drive people out in the future. Just so many unknowns. That's true, Jesse. Thanks so much for joining us. That's Jessica Keenan. He's an associate professor of realestate in the School of Architecture at Tulane University K CBS News Time. 8 25. An update on traffic with Caroline Burns is coming up. Next J. Foreigner here, CEO of Rocket.

California Jesse Keen Jessie Midwest associate professor CBS KCBS School of Architecture Berkeley West Coast Hawaii Sacramento Jessica Keenan Noah Caroline Burns Tulane University Legislature
"sustainable urban" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:48 min | 1 year ago

"sustainable urban" Discussed on KQED Radio

"That was Eric Jones in our system Rodriguez the California department of public health says there have been at least ninety eight potential cases of acute lung disease among people with the recent history of vaping and there have been two reported deaths in California one in Los Angeles county and one in to Larry county UC San Diego's doctor lar Crowdy Alexander studies the effects of vaping on the lungs she says hundreds of unknown chemicals could be invade cartridges none of the chemicals there including in their electorates have ever that tested for safety they don't have animals and hail there're chemicals that they're using to make sure that they're not toxic they just put these chemical the solution and sell them doctor Alexander says a common denominator in the cases are vague carts with a mixture of nicotine and T. H. C. but she says the toxicology is still being done or what's causing the long disease let's turn to matters of justice the riverside county district attorney announced Wednesday that a grand jury has declined to indict an off duty LAPD officer who shot it intellectually disabled man and have and when empire cosco in June from KBC are in Stamford and you know Benjamin perper reports the shooting occurred in corona at city an hour and a half from Los Angeles riverside county district attorney my cash and said that Kenneth French assaulted Salvador Sanchez who was holding his infant son in his arms the off duty LAPD officer fired ten rounds killing French and seriously wounding his parents all inside the Costco store the corona police department and the riverside DA's office investigated the incident and presented the case to a criminal grand jury it decided not to indict Sanchez based upon the evidence the A. has been said he wanted the case to be examined by the grand jury to get public input on when deadly force can be used I think that the community should weigh in and should have a say in in setting these kinds of standards Hester declined to file charges saying you consider the process to be fair they'll believe all the French family attorney said in a statement that he plans to file if. civil rights lawsuit in the near future in a statement the LAPD said that its investigation into the incident is ongoing officer Sanchez is currently on paid administrative leave for the California report im Benjamin perper and finally let in by celebrating some very smart Californians the macarthur foundation has announced its two thousand and nineteen fellows the price is known as the genius grants honoring people for their groundbreaking work in a variety of fields three people from California are in this year's group of twenty six fellows they are soo Java but Liga and Oakland attorney who works to prevent prison recidivism among people of color also from Oakland Walter hood a landscape artist who creates ecologically sustainable urban spaces and in Los Angeles Kelly little Hernandez and UCLA.

Eric Jones Rodriguez California
"sustainable urban" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"sustainable urban" Discussed on The Vergecast

"I mean those are all things up. I think there is some sort of like weird eight. Oh Two dot standard around this stuff anyway anyway it's there. I all certain it's there to support. This like tag. Competitor tile competitor called Tag. It didn't show up so that's like to right diffusion. I think was supposed goes to be the big feature of the camera the teased it later. They're not gonNA tease a hardware product. They already did that with airpower. We know how that went. They've learned that lesson. They're going to wait for it to be done and ready but I think this chip is there to spend my support that thing and then whatever other races why do you think they didn't ship a reverse wireless wireless charging from the phone to like Air Pods 'cause. I don't think anybody cares yeah. That's her right like I. I don't know like it doesn't occur to me that I wanna WanNa do that ever it's real cute in the Samsung out and watching the Samsung out. It's like yeah but I'm how often am I anna coffee shop and someone has the exact same phone conus me but there have is a little more often with iphone. Yeah and I think it'd be cool. We're just traveling. Ub Cool Financial Watch charger around just like put my watching the phone in charge but like I think that's why they didn't include it because the Apple Watch us is slightly different charging than standard. You know whatever they use for everything else and and so they they couldn't figure out how to get on the phone. You think if I like it's a wacky conspiracy theory but that's that's why wacky conspiracy theory well so the good news is they make all of those products so they could probably make that change speaking to watch. We should take a break. Come back talk about the watch the IPAD. We're going to review them. It's going to happen. I will tell you right now. I think most people by Knife and eleven but we're going to put that to the test so stay tuned for that stuff. Okay we're break. We're and talk about the Apple Watch and the IPAD averge cast is brought to you by urban ex right now. A majority of people live in cities and that trend is intensifying sixty years ago just two cities. He's had a population greater than ten million but five years from now they'll likely be more than thirty. The challenges facing urban populations are only harder. It's pastime to start developing good public policy. An innovative innovative solutions acquired by sustainable urban.

Samsung Apple WanNa Knife sixty years five years
"sustainable urban" Discussed on Reasons to be Cheerful

Reasons to be Cheerful

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"sustainable urban" Discussed on Reasons to be Cheerful

"But the but they need a balanced diet and we weren't worried that the forest we're looking at <hes> would not be able to make use of this extra carbon dioxide in fact we are finding is that it is he's making use of that carbon dioxide and it's making us to explore what at extra resources it confined below ground. Tell us about the other benefits of trees cool cities emmy sort of Kintu this cool cities wellbeing. Who was that part of your research shade element that amy mentioned is is very well attested and is going to be very obvious in the next few days because when it gets hold in cities you will find that the inhabitants the city hate for Parkland and they head for trees and get themselves into the shade of trees? You get a huge benefit from taking yourself out of the direct solar loading the direct ex- sunshine load on your on your person especially when you're bald head if you bowled like I am becoming that shade at is is a very significant benefit but of course it benefits very locally so we need to disperse doc benefits out into those communities which currently are very nature poor as sustainable urban drainage is something that engineers have worked on for a few decades now they know very well. It's very handy to have trees. He's as part of those green areas that just soak away the floodwater try and prevent these floods very flash flash floods that we get from having so much hard surface in our in our cities doc last element that any mentioned is a little bit more amorphous. It's a little bit more difficult to grasp and harder to get really rigorous scientific proof but there is a there is a greater and greater body of evidence the all points in the same direction as far as well being and can I ask you about how we get to your target. What does it look like? How do we do it? Where do these trees go very good question? We are proposing so when you go out of your town the city there's an area called green belts. I don't know if you kind of reflect back on a train journey that you've gone out of town or city and when you go right outside of it the land looks slightly. I don't WanNa say the word baron but it's just not that well used and some of it is farmland homeland and it's very very important farmland but what we're saying is around these towns and cities in these green belt areas. We can have some trees plants at their and is kind of lots of crew lots of trees. Lots of trees flaunted their that's in part as well. We've this kind of grading where it goes from one to five on soil and we're saying grateful poor soil conditions are k. for lots of trees and having them outside of towns and cities will <music> awesome mean that people can access it a lot better as well from their towns and cities because they want the nation or not people want nature on their doorstep again so it's a mixture of that and then on the uplands as well a lot is in Scotland at the moment but these uplands can and be also where trees can be planted which means that we're not kind of growing over like I said valuable food crops or housing developments but tree should be part of the landscape and that's why we really really keen to focus on the Green Bell in particular we say doubling tree cover it is possible because interestingly the last hundred years right after the first World War. We were on five percent of tree cover in the U._k.. And now we're up to thirteen percent. Your husband wouldn't expect people wouldn't certainly expecter yeah exactly some of it is for partly the wrong reasons of really important have the right trees in the right place. We don't want to be planting trees on a peatland for example which are huge carbon sinks the incredibly it'd be valuable for us and it's part of this package of natural climate solutions restoring peatlands is a separate thing that could help us on climate tall you yes yes and we should absolutely not replanting trees and then we should let them kind of be as they want to be the.

amy Green Bell Scotland thirteen percent hundred years five percent
"sustainable urban" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

13:03 min | 1 year ago

"sustainable urban" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Multiple cars in your driveway and other factors, which have suddenly become burdensome or more expensive than alternatives, or given the state of the planet, arguably questionable speak with Peter Cal Thorpe, the founder of health associates, which focuses on sustainable urban growth and planning. And now with the emergence of data. Analytics Peter is a co founder and principal at urban footprint. You may know his ideas from his books, which started with sustainable communities up to his most recent urbanism in the age of climate change. And now the interview, well, Peter welcome back to tech nation. Thank you. It's been twenty five years. I couldn't remember. Short term memory that goes night your long term for some of us. It's both. It's, it's. One of the things I wanted to talk about was sort of what's happened, not just in that period of time. But we'll just stretch it to maybe fifty years, or so, after World War Two the landscape of America change every family had a car. The suburbs nibbled everyone to have a little bit of land, and their own free standing home and shopping centres, replaced main street. Why and win that stop working. Well, let's talk about how it started working before he talked about how it ends it was a. It was a huge huge, it was you for you. It was the fact that America was the only surviving middle class after World War. Two it was that we had an industrial complex that needed to retool for domestic consumption. And we, we were caught up in the idea that we had to build a brand new world. The old world was no good knows not much where saving. So there was a motion sides economic side, special interests sides. And there wasn't a lot of thinking about the downside of it. So it got rolled out wouldn't happen without the federal highway Bill, nineteen fifty-six, which basically was the biggest infrastructure problem project in the history of mankind. I mean who would have thought that we would pay for, you know, concrete in the sky? In order to move four. Tons of steel with us wherever we went, I mean, when you just stand back from that proposition, you think this is a strange idea. Now what do you mean by concrete in the sky, all the, you know, the freeways with overpasses it's just. Country, each inner city freeway intersection, and this is once again going to age. But back in the day, it was, you know, ten twenty million dollars each each intersection elevated intersection. And so now it's probably ten times that much even more. So the, the amount of money spent was fine because we had to motivate the economy, and it was a huge public works program. It was a keen Zine strategy really, when you think about it, and then retooling the military capacity own the Beales, it's the same stuff in of steel and engines and rubber and gasoline. I mean so all of a sudden, these seems kind of fit together with an economic future, for the only surviving middle class in the world. And then the idea was to define a totally new, and we are course the only place on the planet with infinite, or at least that. Point infinite, what seemed like infinite supplies of land. So we could sprawl out, and nobody really saw the environmental consequences. Did they ever talk about environmental consequences, not much? You know silent spring came a little later, and that was not so much built around how we live. It was how we raised food DC and things like that. It's the Rachel Carson. Yeah silence spring. But you know on some level, it was all modernist it goes back to the thirties. When the modernists said the historic city was bad. We have a brave new world. We can build high rises now because we have elevators, we can build freeways, instead of, you know, neighborhood streets, and street cars, and the proposition was to demolish, even the left Bank of Paris and put in its place, a series of high rises in the park and division, was everybody had lighten air everybody lived in a park, and everybody got around conveniently in cars, and so it was a compelling vision, will the American version of that. Brought to you by frankly. Right. Was, of course product or cities, which was took the same idea. And just pushed it down to two stories in Europe. It was high rise in a park in America. It was a single family to alley in a park the yard. So, you know, there was a confluence of ideology economics that was pretty powerful, but fast forward and of course, we created a whole lifestyle that is long-term unsustainable. Unsustainable, economically now ironically, and unsustainably environmentally. So an economic standpoint, I still look at two thousand eight. The, the financial crash as not, not only the malignant financing systems that were developed they were developed in order to sell a product, a large lot, single family, twelve in a very remote location because it could only be remote if it was going to be affordable. Two people that didn't need it and couldn't afford it. The two thousand eight inch loans called liar's loans because you could put anything anything you want it on the paper and you could you could buy an eventually, it crashed and fast forward from the fifties, when we came back from the war, and we were dominated by family households. They were, you know, the married couple and we were producing kids like crazy, and it was everything was about what works for the family and the yard, no cold sack, and all that evolved data that we're only twenty four percent families with kids now. The other seventy six percent are single people older people empty nesters, and then we don't have a robust middle class anymore. They can afford that big house on a big lot down. The irony is in the sixties went to heyday of the suburbs. The average home size was around eleven hundred square feet and we had one car now. And there were about three people average per. Household and cross America. That's Maxine all the apartments and all the rest of that. Now, we're down to about I think two point three people, perhaps hold and average sizes up to twenty three hundred square feet. We double the size and we've reduced the number of people there. And we have two cars on average. So this mismatch, I mean, we just kept growing, and growing, and bloating and bloating to the point where it popped, and that's what I believe happened in await. It wasn't just about Wall Street. It was about the kind of neighborhoods we were building. You're listening to tech nation. I'm regaining. My guest today is Peter Cal Thorpe. He's the founder of Cal Thorpe associates, located in Berkeley, California, which for decades is focused on sustainable urban growth and planning. And now a co founder and a principle of urban footprint in might also know him from his books, his first, sustainable community. Ladies or the next American metropolis where we see the concept of transit oriented development to his most recent urbanism in the age of climate change. He's the recipient of the urban land. Institute's JC Nichols prize for visionaries in urban development. It salvaging the talk about urban planning when you never seem to start with a blank slate. You're always here, always inheriting, something that came before, and I was fascinated by one of the studies that you did, and recommendations are possibilities, you developed take L communion rail. That's that Spanish for the king's highway and literally, the king of Spain's highway for those who don't know that it was a six hundred mile footpath trail road, which connected the twenty one California missions starting in Baja California. That's in Mexico and extending north of San Francisco to the last mission. And if you remember your history every mission. Was, you know, a full day's walking between one mission to the other so they could all be connected while many parts of that road are alive and active today, including El Camino real, which goes from San Jose, and the in the heart of Silicon Valley north forty five miles to just sure to San Francisco. So describe for us. What is that become today? Well, let me back up a little bit part of the formula. The suburban formula was subdivisions but then their office parks there were shopping centers and there were apartment complex. It was almost like you, you had a chess board of four different pieces, and you could just put them around while you put them around an arterial network, that was about a one mile grit, which is the jeffersonian system of planning land. So every mile, we had a quote unquote, arterial long with this win a whole philosophy of transportation, which is that cul de sacs lead to tonight. Neighborhood streets, neighborhood streets lead to collectors, all collectors lead to arterials and the only way to get from to be was to go out onto arterial. So you could live in a neighborhood that literally backs up on a shopping center. But you couldn't get there you had to go out through all four street types, and get on the arterial, and then pull into the parking lot. It was kind of a tragic system that was very you know, in a way controlled our options dramatically. And so, you know, in historic areas like El Camino and the peninsula, the arterials the old big streets became the arterial network, and they became where the shopping centers went with the big parking lots and the office parks with their surface surrounded by acres and acres of parking. And they were all it was all about moving automobiles not moving people not connecting people to destinations not connecting people to one another. It was just about cars and how to move cars efficiently. And so the tragedy was historically on the peninsula. There were towns. Each town had a real main street, I grew up in Palo Alto. And, you know, there's a great little main street on University Avenue, there that, you know, had quite a distance relationship to Stanford, but nonetheless, town and gown was present. Until it was well, and it was severed by El Camino. So there were these real places that went in decline, just as our cities did as we emptied the middle class out of the cities as we ended. The businesses out of the city says we ended the shopping from main street to shopping mall and all these places died. These main streets died and all of the suburbs for then were built away on both sides as much as you could away from El Camino in that area in that whole peninsula area. And so you had your sever bes and they all came back in two L community. Yeah. Well, they only came back by car. I mean that was the tragic do you know, it wasn't like kids were on their bicycles running up and down. El camino. I remember I used to go quite some distances on bike, but never on that street. So it's the most inhospitable place in every community. And it was the place that stole away the economic inactivity, energy of the historic human scale walkable places that we always had. Now, remember prior to World War, Two, we were city, a world or country of beautiful cities, with great civic monuments, in public spaces mix use people living downtown from all economic classes mixed together. And then we had streak our suburbs. We had transit. They were streetcars, and they went out to these beautiful, little towns and villages, and each one, each stop had a little main street at it, where people would walk from elm street down to their. Local spot, and do their shopping and whatever and see their neighbors, and then get on the streetcar. Now I know that's a Norman. Rockwell painting..

Peter Cal Thorpe El Camino America founder co founder San Francisco California bloating Rachel Carson Europe Beales Palo Alto Bank of Paris San Jose Mexico Spain Maxine
"sustainable urban" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:56 min | 2 years ago

"sustainable urban" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Map. What's the reaction? When you go into the community and talk to people about what you're doing the reaction used to be very hush like, what are you doing to us society? Like, what are you trying to take our information from us? Least we try to use the local language to explain to them. Like, we want to see the drainage systems at your place. And we want to be how we can help you either racism and in case of floods and sensitivities wouldn't wouldn't fo- lot? So you've got an app on your smartphone the data. So it's telling you what information you need. And when you've got it, you put it straight into a phone, and it goes up to the volunteers that we met who processing the data, and that gives you a sense why flooding softening whiteouts the drains aren't functioning executive. But how are we going to cross the road? Edward Anderson again. Simply a tool, it's a means to an end, our end is a more sustainable urban development. Pathway can be a good thing for Tanzania. But so long as we said God those gains by managing the risk that is being built unseen. What we've seen in the last few years is recognition that businesses usual, the traditional external expert comes in once every five years and makes the database of the update for a project specific purpose is not scaling. And we've seen a lot of examples of really good data collected and gets used to inform one particular climate. We need to sort of see data input. To one project. But as a good to be shared amongst all development projects for you feeling that sharing is happening. Between government departments the data that your your. Changing culture. Historically, governments have limited budgets, and how many of them are incentivized recovery. And this is a story across the world. Cost-recovery means. Yes. And this is a barrier to sharing it freely and openly. But then if you share it freely, how do you? So this is I think a business model reform, and it's also a mindset change about how we value data. We have the tools we have the methods. And I think it begins with demonstrating cheaper, simpler, actionable data and this appetite to reuse it we've seen other cities get this done. This is not the first time. He's going very fast reform how they live with rivers landslides. So I think we begin with having a vision and the plan, but it needs to be with with good information. The maps created by the drones and students offer a glimmer of hope for those working in Doris alarms, most flood prone areas like kikoko. Muslims. Visit.

Edward Anderson Tanzania executive Doris five years
"sustainable urban" Discussed on The SodShow

The SodShow

02:51 min | 2 years ago

"sustainable urban" Discussed on The SodShow

"We're being a bit more considerate of what's happening around is or as womb client said to me when my daughter at six years of age say mom, you need to plan to clear, and I'm having a horticultural disagreement with the with the six year old, you know, you're heading towards the right place. Yeah. I think I we would come to the fact that we need to look at what we're doing in the world, you know, ten years ago took all to land in especially into London. Yeah. We have some pretty heavy floods. Ears. But from that all the councils went hang on. We've got to have Saad sustainable, urban drainage systems, whatever the called, and it will become legal. You know, you have to find a way to make sure that any water that landed on your premises site on your premises. If at all possible. From that the industry has been driven to find solutions. You gets restrain, you know, as one of those solutions is it the right one who knows, but it enabled people aren't myself and other landscape designs, go hang on a minute. Why don't we just let water let rain drains for the surface? There are ways of doing it. And I was ways of being develops and understood better. And now says we're not only can we have an unbound surface. That is permeable we also have bound services which opponent. So we can have hard concrete standing or hard paved standing which allows huge amounts of rain to wash through it straight since the ground. So the environmental issues that we had ten years ago. I think actually made a stink. Well, they have made us think. What can we do to make it better on top of that? Yes. There's a much greater awareness of environmental pressures more seven year old. She's the same. She came home from school last week and said to me daddy. Can we stop using plastic lose? No. But we can try to reduce it. We can't physically stop because so much that we do is based around plastic and to be honest. It's okay. I'm going to be a bit controversial. We sell plastic graphs. We sell competent woods because we have to. But the landscape industry stands up and shouts out so much about we've got to be sustainable. We've got to look at environment. And yet we're actually using more and more mastic in screams. That's a little bit hypocritical. Now, I have to stand here sites. You know? I'm also Ambra hypocritical because I do so some do solid official gross. And we do so compass it would and actually they sell very well. And there's a place for is. But when you walk around a lot of exhibitions and a third of the exhibition is based around plastic products. You have to ask yourself are we actually going into direction here, or is it just an addiction to an easy landscape? That's actually a really tricky question on off to be honest, which it we didn't have a script for this. Because I wouldn't have put this in there..

London Saad Ambra official ten years seven year six years six year
"sustainable urban" Discussed on The SodShow

The SodShow

02:51 min | 2 years ago

"sustainable urban" Discussed on The SodShow

"We're being a bit more considerate of what's happening around is or as womb client said to me when my daughter at six years of age say mom, you need to plan to clear, and I'm having a horticultural disagreement with the with the six year old, you know, you're heading towards the right place. Yeah. I think I we would come to the fact that we need to look at what we're doing in the world, you know, ten years ago took all to land in especially into London. Yeah. We have some pretty heavy floods. Ears. But from that all the councils went hang on. We've got to have Saad sustainable, urban drainage systems, whatever the called, and it will become legal. You know, you have to find a way to make sure that any water that landed on your premises site on your premises. If at all possible. From that the industry has been driven to find solutions. You gets restrain, you know, as one of those solutions is it the right one who knows, but it enabled people aren't myself and other landscape designs, go hang on a minute. Why don't we just let water let rain drains for the surface? There are ways of doing it. And I was ways of being develops and understood better. And now says we're not only can we have an unbound surface. That is permeable we also have bound services which opponent. So we can have hard concrete standing or hard paved standing which allows huge amounts of rain to wash through it straight since the ground. So the environmental issues that we had ten years ago. I think actually made a stink. Well, they have made us think. What can we do to make it better on top of that? Yes. There's a much greater awareness of environmental pressures more seven year old. She's the same. She came home from school last week and said to me daddy. Can we stop using plastic lose? No. But we can try to reduce it. We can't physically stop because so much that we do is based around plastic and to be honest. It's okay. I'm going to be a bit controversial. We sell plastic graphs. We sell competent woods because we have to. But the landscape industry stands up and shouts out so much about we've got to be sustainable. We've got to look at environment. And yet we're actually using more and more mastic in screams. That's a little bit hypocritical. Now, I have to stand here sites. You know? I'm also Ambra hypocritical because I do so some do solid official gross. And we do so compass it would and actually they sell very well. And there's a place for is. But when you walk around a lot of exhibitions and a third of the exhibition is based around plastic products. You have to ask yourself are we actually going into direction here, or is it just an addiction to an easy landscape? That's actually a really tricky question on off to be honest, which it we didn't have a script for this. Because I wouldn't have put this in there..

London Saad Ambra official ten years seven year six years six year
"sustainable urban" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"sustainable urban" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"I don't i think we may perhaps we lost doug is that correct so let's let's let's skip over that and over dog and go to and go to fail who is calling us from portland maine hello pay hi linda how are you today pretty good go ahead and tell us tell us what you called about source so i am from portland maine i have had to move out of portland maine because i can longer if it i live twenty minutes out i had to purchase a home and my mortgage payment is less expensive than the cheapest aren't we could find there have been a lot of issues that we've had in our city you know being unsure how to make policies how to ensure that there's affordable housing right now we're in a position where there's a lot of a lot of squeeze on land on the peninsula which is you know the walkable part of the city that people wanna live on so they've been moving a lot of services out like the department and right now they're working on moving the ocsar homeless shelter out you know fifteen minutes out on right now and it's it's an issue because a lot of those resources that were centrally located for a lot of these individuals are going to be spread out and it's you know already causing a lot of problems but it's just crazy too seen the city change in the last six years and it's it doesn't make any sense to me thanks very much for that now joining us from berlin pennsylvania's susan wachter she's a professor of real estate and finance at the university of pennsylvania's wharton school and the co director of the penn institute for urban research which focuses on sustainable urban growth and outreach susan welcome back to all on point thank you very much for doing this now let me just ask you it sort of pro conway what do you think about the about gentrification is it if you if you if you can remove individuals in their upset from you know from the equation is it the do the cons outweigh the pros or the pros outweigh the cons well i think the first bottom line point is that there are pros which we've heard but there are cons which we have not heard in the comments are not just a rational they're not just people's feelings it's hard economics and the hard economics we just heard from faye faye is not in seattle san francisco washington boston new york she's in a second here city portland which is suffering from loss of affordable homes in philadelphia which is perhaps apprising philadelphia's known for its forcible housing a study by the philadelphia fed has pointed to a severe loss of affordable housing in gentrifying neighborhoods so we're the kind of may say so which you know interesting article but where it fails on this very important issue is it speaks about displacement of particular poor families but we were generally as a communist point to the declined despite if you will rental unit affordable rental units the destruction of ford able rental units for the poor and actually for moderate income households as well and that is an outcome of gentrification this is an it's an interesting question to think that in portland as i gather that geography was one of the things that sort of pushed the gentrification process alone because they land close to the water land in a on a narrow peninsula that portland is on is is in demand so geographies absolutely right on and its geography that's not just endemic if you're on a coast which of course is true of places like san francisco seattle new york which are confined but cities have boundaries politically by their nature and cities are have economic benefits that are central and central conceptually.

doug fifteen minutes twenty minutes six years
"sustainable urban" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"sustainable urban" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of the coolest technologies and put together a system to help maximize yield and efficiency of growing the stem box is a self contained vertical hydroponic pot farm roots mounted in twenty four plastic columns that slide in and out for harvesting are automatically fed precise amounts of water and nutrients a five ton ac two hundred forty plants goldilocks we just plugged in the pump to get the recirculating hydroponic system going now we're going to turn on the lights that's brian i feel like you have to wear shades the state of the art led's lining the stem box are made by massachusetts company the lights are intense and position just right to maximize plant canopy exposure to us officiency equals cost more efficiency lower costs too simple as that stem cultivation ceo kyle moffitt is the money guide he estimates that in the three months it takes to grow forty pounds of pot in a stem box the system will use the same amount of electricity as the average home in a year licensed grow is will rent the boxes and grow the plants moffitt says his startup need seed money what we'd like to do is grow ourselves get a microbusiness cultivator license just for five up to five thousand square feet we're not trying to be because that rnd will help fund the business grow the business by growing minds despite his grown i'll moffitt predicts the future of stem is bright it could get big fast because our objective is so clear we're trying to figure out what is the absolute most efficient way to grow cannabis really any plant and that's why we call it a universal agronomy system can be for anything marijuana could be just the tip of the iceberg lettuce that is there are already few companies in boston using hydroponics in shipping containers to raise crops energy consultant sam milton runs climate resources group in arlington massachusetts for me about this industry is that bridge to a future where we have real sustainable urban agriculture where growing plants that we need to feed our community here in boston imagine energy efficient sustainable vertical indoor farming pioneered in part by pot now that's dank for here now i'm bruce kellerman and you're listening to here now san francisco pursues innovation at a price jobs jobs jobs everything was about jobs we basically created for every eight jobs one new unit of housing london breed the city's mayor elect and a renter herself says housing is her priority i'm vega and that's next time on the takeaway from wnyc npr i public radio international stay with us for the takeaway it'll be a long right after here now.

kyle moffitt cannabis marijuana boston sam milton massachusetts bruce kellerman ceo consultant arlington san francisco forty pounds three months five ton milton
"sustainable urban" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"sustainable urban" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"In giles of a more stories like that be sure to catch the next is next edition of our dedicated design show sanction d which airs at 1990s london time today thus in just over eleven hours from now at fifty three minutes past the hour we finish today's globalist aim kuala lumpur malaysia where the ninth world urban forum is currently in full swing the bienniel u n sponsored event gathers together policymakers and practitioners in the field of sustainable urban development to hash out the ideas that will shape these cities of the future will at zulkifli is the associate bureau chief at monaco's associate bureau chief in singapore and has she's just returned from the former joins me on the line now zaina welcome at what are the big ideas that you've been hearing about wow right that's up with that to my knowledge eu at her office uh so you know she gave me a little bit about uh she gave me a little bit of a better idea off her vision in the office and she's just been in the office since january twenty two i'm very very early days and do have four yet ten year old but uh she's hoping come management style from the time it off its knack will carry had through his office on her leadership cell is there too that makes she got office and sitting have reports every two hours just over this um well of and forum this week and she's very proud of her teams recordbreaking eight international organisation for send a delegation simplification which is kind of exemplary leadership the rest of the world meet they think if the next twenty as it's going to be about putting in their own system implement the new uh but uh agenda ten you give us a a sense i suppose of the big picture that this event is trying to to jewels of.

zulkifli bureau chief monaco singapore kuala lumpur fifty three minutes eleven hours two hours ten year
"sustainable urban" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:56 min | 3 years ago

"sustainable urban" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"I county mr chairman my dear fellow mayors ladies and gentlemen thank you for it might inviting me to the united states conference of mayors centrehalf me speak here in my capacity as mayor of bond endesa first vice president of clay local governments for sustainability one in germany is proud home to some twenty un organisations in particular to the climate change secretariat of the united nations one has also been venue two of coq 23 of climate cup 23 on november last year equally has been the voice of cities in the global climate debate since 1995 equally us was launched more than two decades ago and looks back on the fruitful cooperation with the cities all over the country this cop showed that climate action is unstoppable irreversible and it showed that likeminded local leaderships has had has manifested all over the globe i'm convinced that we are still all movement has been a vital momentum taken at the cup 23 i therefore applaud to the signatories to us mayors and governors united in their support for a better climate future and i thank those vetoes from us cities and states who came to bonn and stand by their peers from all over the world des moines new york city pittsburgh and the state level california origin or reagan and washington were part of over three hundred thirty local and regional leaders from more than sixty countries who made it to the climate summit of local and regional leaders on november twelve last year us conference of mayors meeting today in washington dc wcs pm washington held inside grounds opponent invitation of the u n f tripled c and the trump presidency the summit was a manifestation of dedication and dr unprecedented in number and diversity of local and regional leadership the bonn ficci commitment expresses our willingness to be full partners in the process to come before and beyond 2020 we affirm our commitments to raise our climate sharon and connected to the rest of sustainability a joined us in a holistic way we will make sustainable urban development a driving force in the climate agenda we also called on the parties of the unf tripled c and the nations of the un to collaborate with us to enhance the nationally determined contributions we also called for an inclusive and ambitious goal climate architecture implemented.

chairman first vice president pittsburgh un united states germany climate change bonn york city california reagan washington unf two decades
"sustainable urban" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"sustainable urban" Discussed on WGN Radio

"The top of every hour i'm vic vaughn on chicago's very own seven twenty wgn wgn radio's daily conversation about the life of business and the business of life this is the opening bell with steve manage on seven twenty two with each new year good morning everyone welcome back to the program thanks for being here with us at our wednesday edition of the opening bell the 2017 sustainable cities mobility index is out the study put together by arkadiusz a global engineering design and consultancy firm when talk more about this morning with lee and thomas foster who is an associate vice president added latest good morning block into the opening bell warning and how are you this morning i'm doing very well thank you i am there i hope you're doing well as so as well let's talk a little bit about your study first tell us of wh what it is that that you mean by sustainable and what kinds of things did you study here well sure looked at the interval piedmont on mobility index is a comprehensive report it looks his sustainable transportation uh we measured one hundred cities worldwide are we commissioned a renowned research um per me commissioner renowned research firm called center for economics and business research from london and this a study exports three pillars of sustainability which are the social which if the people aspect of the environmental which is the planetary aspect and the economic which is the offer profit aspect uh we also looked at one hundred uh cities for sustainable urban mobility system uh the goal was to demonstrate the understanding of mobility challenges in urban city is focused on her ear forum joel singer portsea your a transits uh doing around basically is what you were latina you don't quite a bit um so named three three pillars like we talked about so there's people on the planet during the profit so for the unturned to the people indicators we looked at several different indicators like the taliban for example the traffic fatalities per one hundred thousand inhabitants of we looked at the.

vic vaughn chicago associate vice president london taliban steve lee thomas foster commissioner
"sustainable urban" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"sustainable urban" Discussed on WGTK

"The latest on a survey released today the number of us adults without health insurance was up to nearly three and a half million this year according to the gallup cher care wellbeing index the increase comes at a time of rising premiums in political turmoil over obama care the uninsured rate among adults was twelve point three percent from july through september that's an increase of nearly one and a half percentage points since the end of last year insurance analysts think the number of uninsured will continue to rise unless president trump in congress take steps to stabilise insurance maher it's my camp in washington a month after hurricane maria rolled across the center puerto rico powers to laugh at the vast majority of people hundreds of miles of transmission lines and thousands of miles of distribution lines were damaged officials estimate it will take more contractors to restore power hopefully by the end of the year more in these stories a town hall i'm jennifer kushinka with your money now they're happy a city in the country is boulder colorado according to a gallup study the progressive town sense of community access to nature sustainable urban development and preservation policies just a few of the reasons residents of the rocky mountain city are happy other cities in the happy top five are santa cruz and san luis obispo california fort collins colorado and charlottesville virginia talk about supply and demand the entry the packers quarterback arron rogers has dramatically affected how much green bay fans are willing to spend to see this week's game ticket king says ticket prices for sunday's home game against the saints have do declined by at least fifty percent the packers will be favoured if rogers who are playing but now they're a fivepoint underdog on wall street the dow industrials up another one hundred eight at twenty three thousand to seventy one the nasdaq is up twenty seven sp 500 up eight crude oil trading at fifty one fifty nine a.

dow industrials crude oil virginia charlottesville san luis obispo california for jennifer kushinka center puerto rico president obama nasdaq health insurance packers saints arron rogers santa cruz colorado hurricane maria washington congress fifty percent three percent
"sustainable urban" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"sustainable urban" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"As here like the center of the area and the other thing is that they are build for people to go to and to focus or meditate very often you find a very complicated area if you go if you enter church and this is exactly what you hope for an you show out for example or invite people who listen to music you want them to find the atmosphere i was cassi crawls up and who's reporting from berlin and finally wants to show off to hong kong for our bureau chief james chambers tells us about the religious rituals on the towers and buddhist temples the scattered were the city and why some of them are not good for pollution it is often said money is the only religion masters in hong kong and the most visible displays of faith happen every wednesday saturday when punches prayed horses that when the races but faith and religion a prevalent right across the city what did you know where and when to look building paper is in fact a cornerstone of ritual worship fences and deities in chinese culture but takes place during religious ceremonies festivals on funerals yet this popular expression of faith could be facing a crisis as authorities in asian cities pay closer attention detecting pollution and creating a more sustainable urban environment towers and buddhist temples can be seen all over hong kong and many date back to the founding of the city in the mid nineteenthcentury these equipment by other temples honoring local deputies who originally hailed from the surrounding region of southern china such as the memo temple showing one the tin hau temple in causeway bay the difference between these religious buildings on the monumental churches that can be seen in many western cities so they tend to be modest onestorey oneroom structures that have to cram into every nook and cranny of his jampacked urban environment.

berlin bureau chief hong kong china tin hau temple causeway bay james chambers