15 Burst results for "Susie Boyt"

"susie boyt" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

04:42 min | 9 months ago

"susie boyt" Discussed on Backlisted

"Gale Jones imagine that. As Gail Jones publishes novel after novel at the moment, incredible. I think we inspired her, don't you think? Yeah. William. He's got one coming out too. And she made a cameo appearance on a priest miss not so priest episode as well, which was great. Johnny. The book we're here to discuss is the crying of lot 49. The second novel by Thomas pynchon, first published in the U.S. in 1966 by JB lippincott and co, although excerpts that appeared the previous year in esquire and cavalier magazines. Its first UK publication was in 1967 by Jonathan cape. Usually described, we might come on to this as a classic of postmodern fiction, it follows the attempts of a young Californian woman oedipal mass to make sense of why she's been made executives of a former lover's estate. As we will doubtless discover, the book is impossible to describe succinctly. It's a brilliant and intricate satire in 60s America a gripping page Turner, a literary hall of mirrors which scorches its way into the reader's consciousness through the strange beauty of its language, your destiny of its ideas and the zaniness of its plot and characters. Anyway, before we start comparing notes on jacobean tragedy or trolling Instagram in search of muted post horns, Andy, what have you been reading this week? So I've been reading a book that came out last year by art former guest on blacklisted Susie boyt. It's her 7th novel and it's called loved and missed. And. Susie said something to me after we recorded the episode. John berry man, wasn't it? John berryman and the dream songs, and Sam, I know you're a big fan, aren't you? We were talking about what the role that alcohol and addiction played in berryman's life and work. Both those things, life and work. And she said to me, you know, my novel that I've.

Gale Jones Gail Jones JB lippincott and co Thomas pynchon Jonathan cape esquire U.S. Johnny William Susie boyt Turner UK John berryman Andy John berry Susie Sam berryman
"susie boyt" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"susie boyt" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"And they can talk about the avoid and be engaged in the platforms. You mentioned that you went to university on a scholarship to the UK. Did you notice a big difference in the way that you were treated in the UK as compared to Pakistan? Yeah. That was like a huge difference because they have to invest accessibility for persons with disability. I can go anywhere with my dignity when I land it in the airport than four people have to carry me down from the plane because then there is no accessibility over there. So that's the mean thing like how you're enabling the environment for person with disabilities. Now we are talking with the government very luckily with the site savers, but different stakeholders we will manage to get the first ever accessibility or it of the parliament House. We are translated the constitution of Pakistan in the Braille so people get that understanding. You've made real achievements, you know. You've really made concrete achievements, both with translating the constitution into Braille. Also, you're working to get the census to actually count people with disabilities. What difference will that make? Yes, that will make a huge, huge difference because now we are not accounted for the country. People don't know doing the disasters, any situation they are not making of a plan because they thought we are not the counter people. It's only ten to 15%, but Pakistan is also .1 to three important to do a complete sentence and include the person with disabilities there. Thank you very much indeed for sharing that with us. And that's all we've got time for today. Thank you very much for your company. I hope you can join us the same time tomorrow. That's all for today's woman's hour. Join us again next time..

Pakistan UK parliament House
"susie boyt" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:28 min | 1 year ago

"susie boyt" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Susie, thank you very much. Susie Boyd's book loved and missed it was out in the summer, and the paperback will be available in the new year. The beer akram is a Pakistani disability rights activist. She's the founder of the national forum of women with disabilities in Pakistan and a leading figure within the disability rights movement in the country, as well as in Asia and the Pacific. And she's now been named one of the BBC's 100 women in 2021. She joins me now. I feel welcome. Can you tell me a little bit about your upbringing and what it was that made you want to become a disabilities rights campaigner? Thank you so much. Thank you. I think from our perspective, the civility is this at different lifestyle. And how we are bringing that obviously most difficult and challenging when I started the work because most of the women I would say before the medical based approach of people will not recognize as the human being. So for that, this has started the work in the disability sectors since 1997 and I thought they are not the only one in this world who are facing the discrimination and the challenges because of my disability because of the background in all, but it's really important to see there are 1 billion people with disabilities around the world. And 50% of them are women and girls with disability. And more than 80% they were living in the global south who were facing all the challenges and the discrimination in their life. And they were like struggling for the basic health education employment opportunities and during the disastrous response that recently in the COVID response we have witnessed like women with disabilities are the first one who are facing the gender based violence, sexual harassment. And they would like the completely ignored by the family members and people will bring that our daughters die before we die because nobody is going to take care of them. And they don't have the support mechanism by the state by the government or the locally organization that are not supporting them to how we can protect the rights of women and girls with disabilities. I think your question like I would say it's support and also the economic men and I of a lot of other women with disabilities from their everyday experiences has given me that power to work on the right of women with disability and collectively with sightseeing was we are working to make that more visible visibility of the disability in the overall development and how we can make their voices more visible and they can be included in the overall development. Appear your background, you are actually able to get a mainstream education, which I gather as something that is very often not available to disabled women or disabled anyone who's got disabilities in Pakistan..

Susie Boyd national forum of women with d akram Susie COVID Pakistan BBC Pacific Asia
"susie boyt" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"susie boyt" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"The other thing that comes through in this book is that it's really about it's about love, all different types of love unconditional love, that kind of nasty love that's difficult and people who are hard to love. It is clear something you're very interested in. Yes. And the idea that people may not seem to have earned our love, but they still deserve it, and I wanted to be very respectful to all the characters in the book. And obviously any book that's written in the first person, your very aware of all the other books that might be hovering in the air, Eleanor's story, for example, we never hear and her version of events would be completely different. There's quite a lot in the book about how feelings of shame stop us from full disclosure and prevent us from being completely honest, and that that's a sort of theme in the book. The other theme is friendship, old friendships between women and what happens as well when trouble comes to those friendships and Ruth's friends want very badly to help her, which I'm sure we've all been there, but they're not. They don't always do the right thing. No, I'm very interested in the sort of cadence of friendship what it can run to how elastic and how sometimes our friends can seem to do almost more than our family would be able to. And how they can utterly save the day on a Monday and on Tuesday, drive us completely mad, so I want it to have that in. There is a one friendship in the book that grows throughout the book and by the end of it sort of takes on enormous levels of responsibility and yet still isn't immune to petty jealousies and things that shouldn't quite happen and things that have to be ignored and that cause eyes to roll when maybe there should have been more courtesy and so I'm very interested in the rhythm of friendship. You said in an interview that you're very Freudian in your approach to writing. And I know that's appropriate enough as you're the great granddaughter of Sigmund Freud. But what did you mean by that? Well, I suppose whenever I create a character, I'm very aware of how that character would have been brought up how their parents would have been brought up going back and back and back and how how the children sort of build the adults in the book. And so I suppose I'm always, there'll be a lot of history of the family that will be in the back of my mind that won't actually make it onto the page. That you could be forgiven for thinking that this book is bleak. And at times when I was reading it over Christmas, it did seem quite harrowing. But there's a lot of humor in it too in the way that Ruth views the world. I mean, she's constantly giving it the side eye if you like, isn't she? Yes, she is. She's both deeply impressed and rather unimpressed with life and her best friend genius extremely sardonic to put it mildly. There's quite a nice bit where Ruth has to go to a lot of funerals in a row, which is pretty overwhelming. And Jean, her friend says, well, at least they're not as bad as weddings because the damage is already done. I remember that..

Eleanor Ruth Sigmund Freud Jean
"susie boyt" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"susie boyt" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"And then when the priest gave the sermon, it was all about grief, which was very, very powerful, so there was a sense of this occasion that was filled with threat and peril but also tremendous consolation and when I got back to London I wrote the christening scene in the novel as a short story and then that sort of all grew from there. And it ends up that Ruth actually brings up the granddaughter her granddaughter. We've talked a lot on woman's era by about kinship care when family members bring up a child that for whatever reasons can't be with their parents. What does the arrival of her granddaughter lily mean to Ruth? Well, I suppose I've always been interested in all the different ways of being a family and that two sisters with no other relatives can be a family and a grandmother and a baby might be almost a couple. And I wanted to create a baby that was really, really spectacular, a lot of there's a lot of talk about babies being the last straw and ruining your sleep and having in your plans, but life with babies when it's at its best when you're almost in a swoon at that hot little limbs or the feel of that curls on the side of your arm or I wanted to bring some of that in and the side of babies that can be almost ecstatic at the sight of a cotton reel or a mushroom and that kind of thing that that's a very powerful thing to be around and it's very powerful for the Ruth character who doesn't find life the easiest, but really gets a lot receives a lot from the child who does seem to know how to live life. There's an interesting thing in the children being brought up by grandparents. Billy Connolly writes about it. He calls them granny's boys. He's very funny about it. Obviously, he naturally is. And, in fact, he was a granny's boy himself. It's that idea that children who brought up by their grandparents are slightly set apart, they have a slightly different upbringing. Definitely in about granny's boys they always say that they have the neatest hair in the whitest shirts. But I think even if you meet a 7 year old now, who knows tons about flowers and birds there's a big chance they'll spend a lot of time with their grandparents, and I like that thing of the sort of generational mix up that a child might know the songs instead of knowing the songs from the 90s and the 70s might know songs from the 50s and the 30s and that suddenly they're a little bit out of step, and often they'll hold on to values of kindness and courtesy that might not be so in fashion nowadays. Ruth's daughter, Eleanor is an addict that's the reason that she can't bring up her own child really. You don't write much about her journey from being a bright loving child. We know she was one. Into the desperate woman that she now becomes. Why did you not write about that? Well, I wanted to keep all that at the edge of the story really because it's.

Ruth lily Billy Connolly London Eleanor
"susie boyt" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"susie boyt" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Boyd joins me now Ruth Susie just explained how Ruth comes to be setting up her dinner on a park bench on Christmas Day. Well, I suppose she wants to make a lovely Christmas in his aware that a lovely Christmas isn't really wanted, and she gets her daughter to agree to go for a walk and Ruth wants to go somewhere with a swans and a band stand, but her daughter suggests just a little bit of almost a sort of glorified traffic island by a side of a main road. And they go there Ruth led a Christmas dinner out on a bench and she's made turkey sandwiches that are still warm and cranberry sauce and she brings a little stocking for her daughter and at this point it's set in the 1970s. So there's also Turkish Delight, which I thought was a lovely touch. Yes, and so she sort of performs the idea of this lovely Christmas that means something to her, but isn't really wanted. And so it's delivered and received with pain, and yet it still stands for something that's a bit unclear exactly what, but that feeling of wanting to give something to someone who doesn't really want it and how sort of painful that can be at times. Let's just hear a reading from the end of the picnic. Of course memories always change a little each time you retrieve them. Small and big adjustments to the proportions were necessary, as they served your purpose or you serve theirs. But it was such a hard day. We said our goodbyes. They were glazed with boredom now. Ellen is head swiveled round when I made to kiss her, so all I got was a mouthful of hair. If people asked with not enough or too much tact, did you get a chance to cross over without honor during the break at all? At least I would be able to answer truthfully that mom yes tell you something, please go to have a child, she said, a little girl. I saw a sudden brightness in her eyes, and then I flung my arms around her. What do you need? What do you need to see that's very poignant? Because Ruth does spring into action then doesn't she? Tell me a little bit about the christening scene because that was really the starting point of this book, wasn't it? Yes. The year my mother died, the idea of having Christmas without her was completely intolerable, so I decided to go to America to swerve the whole thing, and on Christmas Eve we went to see La La Land, and when we came out we passed this big white building that had huge presents outside it, and two banners, one of which said, one of which said, extreme empathy in the other, said radical compassion. And I thought, gosh, and we walked in and it turned out it was a church, and it was a church that specialized in welcoming people with mental health problems and particularly addiction and a lot of the congregation were suffering from the effects of drugs and alcohol, and a woman standing next to me was nodding in and out of consciousness and there were three tiny girls in for a menco dresses with a lot of red frills right next to a big bank of candles, and so my inner fireman Sam was really activated..

Ruth Ruth Susie Boyd Ellen La La Land America Sam
"susie boyt" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

03:28 min | 1 year ago

"susie boyt" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Was that with all of this and you have a partner and going up and you know you get to the age where you think boys what happens when you get to that age of boys and your burn scars from the waist down, how does that all work? My first boyfriend was tricky because I oh tricky. Yeah, tricky. I think they just call Ricky. Okay, that's fine. Yeah, tricky. Yeah, it was hard trying to explain to him or it was like and he adapted to it. I was about 18 and we were talking on Facebook. And I was explaining it to him that I had burns and he's like, what do you mean? So I took a photo and I sent it to him. And he was absolutely fine with it to be honest with you. Were you nervous? I was nervous by water because I think if he likes me for me, that's all I care about. My partner that I'm with now, explaining that to him was hard. I was numerous. When he first saw my scars as well, he was a bit shocked. And he thought, how can somebody do this to a person? Do you ever forget about it? We do. Yes, nasty questions since we met. And I was like three years ago. So it is all normal because of my daddy so skin tight. I'm afraid to have kids because of it. That was more important for him as well because he wants kids in the future. And I will scare that I couldn't give it to him. And is that possible? It can be, but we'll have to wait and see. One day I'm hoping to have kids one day, but my God, my dogs. I know. I've spent a lot of time with them. I can do my dogs. That was Laura talking to Anna Miller. Well, sources of information and support are available on the women's website. Tomorrow, Emily explains what her self harm scars mean to her. Now you probably won't be surprised to know that we've had quite a reaction from the Ghislaine Maxwell verdict from you. Really bringing up the wider issues that are involved. For example, Julia has text and to say, I'm over 70 and we've come a long way in my lifetime. Years ago, the abuse of these teenage girls, as they were then, probably wouldn't have been considered a crime. Most people would have said it was consensual. Now, we understand grooming. It's so easy for predatory adults to target young girls who feel unwanted in their own families and offer them the love that's missing from their lives. Thank goodness this is now recognized. And another listener on Twitter has wrote to say, I think that we need to talk to women who don't speak id in these relationships. There's a hidden layer of female society that's codependent and abusive and hypersexual relationships living in fear and self loathing because men train them to behave in a sexually disoriented way. Thank you very much indeed for those views. You can, of course, get in touch with us by texting womans on 8 four 8 four four. And it's at BBC women's hour on social media. Now many of us will have had empty chairs at the Christmas table this year for lots of reasons. In Susie points 7th novel loved and missed which came out in the summer. There is a particularly memorable Christmas dinner scene. In order to see her daughter on Christmas Day, Ruth has to improvise.

Ghislaine Maxwell Ricky Anna Miller Facebook Laura Emily Julia Twitter BBC Susie Ruth
"susie boyt" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"susie boyt" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"I remember having an operation on him because I remember the doctor saying, well, my mom told me that the doctor said I wouldn't be able to walk again. And what they did was the first time they've ever done it on a human being in the UK was cast a little insurgent in my first and put my own skin inside it from a top half to make my feet grow. Wow. I know. It was pretty amazing. And then they put pins on the top so it straightened my feet out and my toes out a bit more as well so they're not curled or crumpled. I was reading forums about burn survivors and a lot of them say it wasn't the actual pain of what happened. They said the real pain is the recovery and therapy. Yeah. The recovery is the hardest. If you had an operation on my knee, that was hard because then you had to get back into the physio of things you had to get back to moving it sorry as my dog again. You decided that you wanted to help other people? Yeah. And the people like family members because not just as schools related to depression, stage or the mental health, it's them as well. My mom stayed with me. All through my operations and she stayed at my site and that's hard as well. I didn't blame him. I took it out on my adoptive parents, because I noticed how they felt, and I think it was pretty hard for them as well, because they couldn't do anything for me. They couldn't understand it. As well as the frustration, they could see it in their eyes. How did you take it out on them? I used to rebel. Like if I had an operation to do up, I would play up for like a week some weeks..

UK depression
"susie boyt" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"susie boyt" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"She describes her scars. From my belly button down to my toes, I've always said that my scars look like scrambled up tights. They feel smooth and normal. But not normal to look at. They've got lumps and bumps. But it looks like you weigh in a corset. And then you're slightly bitter and so when you see wearing a corset, it just goes tight, skin in. Yeah. It's really tight on my hips because I've got the scars going around my hips as well. Nobody's questioned it when I was wearing jeans, but you can definitely notice it from the outline of the jeans. It does make me feel uncomfortable sometimes because you think all people are going to notice because you are all oddly shaped. But yeah, it does play online sometimes. If I'm going to card if shopping, people will stay at you. How did it happen? When I was about one, a non member of my family put me in the bath and my birth mom came in and saw what happened. She dialed in 9. So the path was too hot. It was really hot. Definitely for the baby skin. It happened at 9 a.m. and I got seen at 2 o'clock, which led into dehydration and also there is effect in the brain as well in the lung difficulty sometimes. So it's not just like your physical appearance. How has it been dealt with? Well, I gotta move from the situation from a birth family. Because that's the story of the day. So now I'm adopted with a meeting parents. They've taught me from the start, what's happened, would you call a scar, would you call a skin difference? What would you like to be labeled as because people do like to label? I like to believe it as a boon survivor. Because in all victim, but you are a survivor of what happened in the accident. And that you've come out stronger. And so what's it been like growing up with it? As a child, it's been hard because you get children will be nasty and bullying. Remember this one lad, and he said that I had zombie legs. And basically I should have died in the bath. I remember my first day of high school I did what a skirt. I wore a skirt with high socks and these horrible club hoppers. You call them. 1516. I started wearing trousers. So I had to just hide it all up. And then you get your two teenage stage and I went really quiet. I didn't have the confidence to talk to people. I had very close friends and that's the way I dealt with it. I hit myself as well from the world, and then about 1821, I decided I me and this is why I should do. And what made you decide that? Because it just doesn't happen overnight, does it? No. I had a lot of talks with people that I'm Friends with this adult boons club. And the children's bones club as well. And I hear the story from somebody else. I thought my lifestyle that everybody accepted you for who you are. And I was really nice because then you could show off your burns. You can tell your stories. You can encourage each other..

children's bones club
"susie boyt" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"susie boyt" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"He messaged me last night and he wrote, I am embarrassed to say this, but it is true that I am nearly starving. A high typical is this. I mean, this is this is an educated middle class man who was in Kabul. This isn't a farmer in a drought stricken province. What are you hearing from friends and contacts in Kabul? Yeah, and I think this is what's been most devastating when I was in Kabul just a few weeks ago. I mean, you see very educated middle class families. And we mustn't forget that in the last 20 years, 60% of the population have moved into urban areas. Most people rely on bank accounts and salaries to survive. This is no longer a society that's relying on food security from farmland. The salaries don't exist. I mean, I spoke to health workers, female health workers, and the one thing that the Taliban has done is allowed female health workers to continue to operate and function in the hospitals and the health facilities. I spoke to one woman in a Kabul hospital who told me I live on top of a mountain. It's now winter and it's cold. It's freezing cold. So I slide down the bottom to the bottom of the mountain because of the snow. When I get down to the bottom, injured because she tumbles over several times. She can not afford 11 cents to get the bus to work. When she gets to work, she says to me that she used to be fed at work, but she says, now they can't even feed us out our lunch. And I said to her, why do you continue to come? It's been three and a half months, four months that you continue to come to the workplace. And she said, if I don't come, these children that are suffering from malnutrition will die, the ventilators will stop. The hospital will be dirty and if we don't continue to clean it, the children will die. And just to give you a sense, the hospital beds they were about 35 hospital beds in some of these hospitals in Kabul in Kandahar and Helmand. Children as many as 75 or 80 are in those hospitals. I saw mothers sleeping on the beds of the hospitals and on the floors because they were at capacity. So this idea that 97% of the population now are below the poverty line or 23 24 million people are suffering from famine. It is evident right across the board. You see hungry people, not just suffering from malnutrition in hospitals, but on the streets. I mean, I was shocked, I've been reporting from their country for 15 years. And I haven't seen the scale of hunger and poverty, which was so evident right from the youngest of victims right through to the oldest of people, the most vulnerable of people. Everywhere, right across the board, people were suffering. It's a grim picture. Thank you very much indeed for talking to us about it today. Well, it's still to come, we're going to be meeting Pakistani disability activists whose championing women and girls and working to change attitudes and lives. Akron has been named one of the BBC's women in 2021. Now we've been talking two women about their scars in a Miller went to meet Laura, whose 29 she's a care worker from South Wales, and she's a bone survivor..

Kabul Taliban Helmand Kandahar Akron BBC Miller Laura South Wales
"susie boyt" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:13 min | 1 year ago

"susie boyt" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Were really shocking, 97% of people there, he said, would soon be too poor to fend for themselves. I'm just going to read you a few lines of what he wrote. He said, by standing aside, we've not just taken leave of the country. Historians will look back and ask if we've taken leave of our collective sensors. Well, at women's art we've been keeping across the situation, particularly with what's happening to women and girls and the BBC's yalda hakim joins me now yelled welcome. Thank you so much. It's about a hundred days since teenage girls were prevented many of them from going to school at the time, the Taliban said that that van was temporary for the girl's own safety and they cited security reasons. Obviously, the fear is that it's permanent. What are your thoughts? Well, indeed, I mean, the Afghan people have a reference point. And that is the rule of the Taliban in the 90s, when they said that they were putting a de facto ban on girls education and women going to work because of security concerns. Now, those security concerns lasted for the duration of the Taliban rule that was a total of 5 years. The big question has been for the last more than hundred days now, a 104 days to be precise. Why this ban on girls over the age of 12? Why, when they put out the statement more than a hundred days ago that all boys across the country could go to school and girls under the age of 12 could go to school, why then this ban on teenage girls? And this really has been the concern of so many young girls young women who are not just banned from school, but also public universities. Kabul university, for example, remains closed. Girls and mostly women can not go to work. So there are huge concerns. I was in Afghanistan about two weeks ago. And I traveled from cardboard down to Kandahar to Helmand right across the board. There continues to be concern from women's groups from civil society about the future of girls education as well as women. This feels like such a regression. You know, we were told that this was a new modern Taliban and there is a real concern as you say that we're heading back to the dark days of the 90s when women and girls were basically moved to the fringes of society. Are the Taliban actually saying anything about this? I mean, are they giving you any explanations? Well, I interviewed everyone from one of the leaders of the Haqqani network and you'll remember the infamous Haqqani network were accused of being behind some of the huge large scale attacks on civilians over the last 20 years. I also interviewed the spokesperson of the foreign ministry and also the international spokesperson of the Taliban. They continue to say that women have the right to work..

Taliban yalda hakim BBC Kabul university van Helmand Kandahar Afghanistan Haqqani network foreign ministry
"susie boyt" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"susie boyt" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Now is and what we should see is what about the rest of the entourage who facilitated the grooming and trafficking and abuse of these young women and what about all the powerful men that were provided with young underage girls to write what about them? Are they going to be held to account now? You mentioned that this is one in a series of high profile cases recently. Do you think they really have a positive impact? Do you see more women coming forward and stepping up to go through what is a very harrowing process because of these high profile show trials that we can call them up? Yes, I think they are an important signal. They're important signal, particularly if you've been abused by somebody powerful to know that this is not the coming forward can result in justice. So I think it is important. And I think we have seen increased reporting because there is an increase focus and possibility of justice. But it is an incredibly tough journey to undertake. And we should absolutely salute the courage of those that do come forward. And they do so not just for themselves, but they do so because they know there are other victims out there. And that is why so many women put themselves through what is an incredibly tough process to try and bring as rapists sex traffickers and abusers to justice. It's a very adversarial process, and we understand, of course, that when someone has been accused of very serious crimes, there needs to be a robust process to make sure that the right person is being convicted. But is there, is there a way? That it could be done that would put less of a less onerous burden on those women and on victims, whatever their gender who come forward. Yes, I mean, I think that the process is incredibly brutal and in fact we are certainly in England looking at a whole range of different sorts of measures that can make women feel less like the ones on trial. And that starts at the very point at which women report that they should be taken seriously and believed unless there is absolute evidence that they're not giving a proper account that they shouldn't be subject to scrutiny as though they are coming forward to report for some ulterior motive. They should be they should be supported and all the way through the investigation process. They should be given much more support and they should the focus of these investigations should very much be on suspects not on the victims and in finding ways in which to support and corroborate their evidence rather than that the whole case is based just on them and finding a way to try and undermine their credibility. Harriet was from the center for women's justice. Thank you very much indeed for giving us your insights today. Now it is a hundred days since many teenage girls in Afghanistan have been banned from going to school. The Taliban has been in control since August and American and British troops pulled out just days before. It's very difficult now to see those hard won rights and opportunities for girls that have been accrued over decades slipping away. Yesterday, former prime minister Gordon Bryan, who is now UN special envoy for global education, said, we're sleepwalking towards the biggest humanitarian crisis of our times in Afghanistan..

center for women's justice England Harriet Afghanistan Taliban Gordon Bryan UN
"susie boyt" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

03:37 min | 1 year ago

"susie boyt" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Diminished and damaged by the abhorrent actions of Ghislaine Maxwell. I wonder what you think this verdict means for women being believed. Well, it's obviously really important that there's been an outcome and that these women have been believed. Of course, we've been here again and again and again in the last decade. We go back to the savile case. The max earth thing. You know, the recent conviction. There are a whole series of cases where women are now beginning to be believed in some of these high profile cases. That's incredibly important because, of course, for so long, powerful men in particular have relied on their power and their ability to continue to abuse because they can pay people off. They can defend themselves because of their power. And so the fact that there's some degree of crumbling of that ability to protect themselves and their power is very positive. But we must forget that we still facing a massive problem in terms of the day to today prosecution and convictions of sexual offenses and it's a huge problem. And there needs to be, you know, the sort of resources put into this case put into prosecuting all the other men who benefited from the trafficking that Maxwell provided that Epstein facilitated. And of course, just more generally to sexual violence cases. Ghislaine Maxwell was obviously very well known. She was already the daughter of a former press baron Robert Maxwell and Jeffrey Epstein and Maxwell moved in the highest circles of American celebrity. So this was always going to be a very high profile trial. Do you think the fact that she is a woman is important? Because it may be that there are people who feel that a woman is less likely to have committed these crimes and indeed, the girls themselves actually testified that one of the reasons they trusted her was because of her gender. Yeah. Well, this is a very common tactic of traffickers and abusers. If they can use a woman to lure in other women, then they will do. Precisely for that reason that women that young women may be more likely to trust a female, that doesn't make her crime more upon than the crime of the men that actually abuse and rate these young women. But certainly makes her very complicit in that. But the focus of her as a defendant because she's female and the way in which she's monstrous as a female. In some ways, disproportionate to the way in which male abusers are focused on. So that is not in any way to say her crimes are not very, very grave. But when a woman steps out of line and behaves in this way, she will she will be the focus of extreme media attention a monster rising..

Ghislaine Maxwell baron Robert Maxwell Jeffrey Epstein Maxwell Epstein
"susie boyt" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"susie boyt" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Well, Harriet wistrich is the founder and director for the center of women's justice and is a solicitor and she joins me now. Harriet, let's start by just thinking about those four women who have been testifying in that New York courtroom. Today we got this sort of outpouring of relief. Just what have they been through in the past weeks? Well, and anyone who chooses to come forward to report sexual violence and anyone who eventually gets to the courtroom and we know that there are so many other women who were accusers as well who haven't participated in that trial. But for these women, going through the trial process and being subject to great scrutiny, fierce cross examination from the defense will have been incredibly tough. And it's a huge relief to them and on this occasion they have got justice. But we know that women across, well, whether they're accusing somebody famous or not, do not get a regular justice in the UK less than 1.5% of women who report rape, for example, end up with their cases charged and the trial process itself is incredibly hard. So it's incredibly tough. And it just shows how important it is that women will put themselves through this. Sometimes for years, constantly facing suspicion and their credibility being questioned in order. That is what happened in this case. I'm going to line that stood out from me was used by one of the U.S. lawyers Lisa bloom. She said that the lesson is that you do not have to be perfect to stand up for justice. All four of Maxwell's accusers endured pretty tough cross questioning. I mean, they're asked about their drug use, their sexual behavior, inconsistent statements. Is that something that all victims have to be prepared for? Well, unfortunately, that is the way in which these cases tend to be tried. And you know, it's really unfortunate that they feel like the people that are on trial themselves rather than the person they're accusing their credibility in anything that can be found to undermine their credibility. What we do know is that women who tend to be targeted and groomed will often come from more damaged backgrounds. That's why they're easier to groom often. And so there will be things that one can try and find to cross examine them on. And of course, once they've suffered abuse, often they will resort to drugs and other ways in which to survive. So the fact of the abuse itself, then works to undermine their credibility. And that's very common in many of these cases. And certainly, with young women who are trafficked, that they suffer immense damage. And that's why these convictions are so important. But it's very hard. Yeah, I wanted to ask you about something that the defense relied on. They had an expert talking about memory. She was called doctor Elizabeth Loftus. And so the implication was that when women are when people suffer from very traumatic events, they're often wrongly.

Harriet wistrich center of women's justice Harriet Lisa bloom New York Maxwell UK U.S. Elizabeth Loftus
"susie boyt" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"susie boyt" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Now, as you'll have no doubt heard on the news Ghislaine Maxwell has been fine guilty by a New York court of sex trafficking girls, aiding Jeffrey Epstein in his abuse of miners. We're going to look at what this means for those women who came forward to testify, and the wider impact that this case may have, will women be more likely to speak out? Will they feel more likely to be believed? We're going to have all the latest reaction this morning. We'll also look at what's happening in Afghanistan. It's been a hundred days since many girls were banned from attending secondary school by the Taliban in the country. And the country is also facing a real risk of famine. Author Susie Boyd will be joining me in the studio to discuss her latest novel, loved and missed. And in our series on scars, we're going to meet Laura care worker in South Wales, he lives with childhood burns, and abiy Akron is Pakistani disabilities activist. And she's going to be talking to me about how she's working to change attitudes in the subcontinent and beyond. Well, as ever, we are very keen to hear from you. You can text a woman's on 8 four 8 four four texts will be charged at your standard message rate. Do check with your network provider, for exact costs on social media, it's at BBC women's hour and of course you can email us through our website. Now Ghislaine Maxwell is facing the prospect of spending the rest of her life in jail after a jury in New York, find her guilty of grooming and sex trafficking teenage girls to be abused by the sex offender Jeffrey Epstein. The 60 year old British socialite was convicted on 5 out of 6 charges, she's going to be sentenced at a later date. The jury gave their verdicts after 5 days of deliberations. Damian Williams the U.S. attorney general for the southern state of New York hailed the verdict against Maxwell for one of the worst crimes imaginable. Facilitating.

Ghislaine Maxwell Jeffrey Epstein New York court of sex traffick Susie Boyd Taliban Afghanistan Akron South Wales Laura BBC Damian Williams New York U.S. Maxwell