3 Burst results for "Susie Boyd"

"susie boyd" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

03:13 min | 11 months ago

"susie boyd" Discussed on Backlisted

"Self esteem. Self image. Whatever parcels of guilt or inadequacy Ruth may have picked up in her 60 odd years before we meet her, how are those in turn catalyzed by having to deal with her daughter Eleanor and Ellen's decision to have a daughter of her own? I mean, in narrative terms what it means is that Ruth effectively kidnaps Eleanor's daughter for, as she tells herself, her granddaughter's protection, but it's also made clear that. Bringing up the granddaughter becomes an opportunity to try and do things right. That she feels may have gone wrong, even though nothing may have gone wrong in relationship in relation to her daughter. And if I've made that sound a bit Chewy, that's my fault, that's not Suzy boy's fault because it's written with such clarity and with such emotional poise. It's also sort of quietly experimental. The narrative voice switches around in a way which is sort of ambitious and risky. And I just found it, I found it incredibly moving. Not sentimentally so, really deeply moving. I had to keep pausing between the chapters to try and weigh up. What had happened to any one of those four women at any given moment? And I found it profoundly illuminating. So Susie, if you listen to this, thank you very, very much. I feel like I learned so much. Can I just read two paragraphs? The start of chapter two, a particularly like to draw listener's attention to the first sentence of this. I mean, if one would be so happy if one wrote this sentence and Susie Boyd did write it. So here it is. On the morning of the christening, I took the sickert in a Sainsbury's carrier to a man off Bond street. I'm just going to read that again because I like it so much. On the morning of the christening, I took the sickert in a Sainsbury's carrier to a man of Bond street. We stood facing each other while I muttered something formal and incoherent. We were in a darkish Italian cafe three quarters empty. 12 shiny lozenge shaped rosewood effect tables, not much wider than ironing boards and Elvis droning on and on about missed opportunities. I was nervous. I felt shipwrecked almost. Ship wracked. He took the brown paper from the painting, narrowed his mouth, dipped his shoulders. He was organizing himself for disappointment I could see. I stalled it up his little insincere routine. Thought it might come in useful later, the man was wiry, and weak chested, with a stale dickensian pallor. Nicotine stones on all ten of his fingers..

Eleanor Ruth Susie Boyd Ellen Suzy Sainsbury Susie Elvis
"susie boyd" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:28 min | 1 year ago

"susie boyd" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Susie, thank you very much. Susie Boyd's book loved and missed it was out in the summer, and the paperback will be available in the new year. The beer akram is a Pakistani disability rights activist. She's the founder of the national forum of women with disabilities in Pakistan and a leading figure within the disability rights movement in the country, as well as in Asia and the Pacific. And she's now been named one of the BBC's 100 women in 2021. She joins me now. I feel welcome. Can you tell me a little bit about your upbringing and what it was that made you want to become a disabilities rights campaigner? Thank you so much. Thank you. I think from our perspective, the civility is this at different lifestyle. And how we are bringing that obviously most difficult and challenging when I started the work because most of the women I would say before the medical based approach of people will not recognize as the human being. So for that, this has started the work in the disability sectors since 1997 and I thought they are not the only one in this world who are facing the discrimination and the challenges because of my disability because of the background in all, but it's really important to see there are 1 billion people with disabilities around the world. And 50% of them are women and girls with disability. And more than 80% they were living in the global south who were facing all the challenges and the discrimination in their life. And they were like struggling for the basic health education employment opportunities and during the disastrous response that recently in the COVID response we have witnessed like women with disabilities are the first one who are facing the gender based violence, sexual harassment. And they would like the completely ignored by the family members and people will bring that our daughters die before we die because nobody is going to take care of them. And they don't have the support mechanism by the state by the government or the locally organization that are not supporting them to how we can protect the rights of women and girls with disabilities. I think your question like I would say it's support and also the economic men and I of a lot of other women with disabilities from their everyday experiences has given me that power to work on the right of women with disability and collectively with sightseeing was we are working to make that more visible visibility of the disability in the overall development and how we can make their voices more visible and they can be included in the overall development. Appear your background, you are actually able to get a mainstream education, which I gather as something that is very often not available to disabled women or disabled anyone who's got disabilities in Pakistan..

Susie Boyd national forum of women with d akram Susie COVID Pakistan BBC Pacific Asia
"susie boyd" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"susie boyd" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Now, as you'll have no doubt heard on the news Ghislaine Maxwell has been fine guilty by a New York court of sex trafficking girls, aiding Jeffrey Epstein in his abuse of miners. We're going to look at what this means for those women who came forward to testify, and the wider impact that this case may have, will women be more likely to speak out? Will they feel more likely to be believed? We're going to have all the latest reaction this morning. We'll also look at what's happening in Afghanistan. It's been a hundred days since many girls were banned from attending secondary school by the Taliban in the country. And the country is also facing a real risk of famine. Author Susie Boyd will be joining me in the studio to discuss her latest novel, loved and missed. And in our series on scars, we're going to meet Laura care worker in South Wales, he lives with childhood burns, and abiy Akron is Pakistani disabilities activist. And she's going to be talking to me about how she's working to change attitudes in the subcontinent and beyond. Well, as ever, we are very keen to hear from you. You can text a woman's on 8 four 8 four four texts will be charged at your standard message rate. Do check with your network provider, for exact costs on social media, it's at BBC women's hour and of course you can email us through our website. Now Ghislaine Maxwell is facing the prospect of spending the rest of her life in jail after a jury in New York, find her guilty of grooming and sex trafficking teenage girls to be abused by the sex offender Jeffrey Epstein. The 60 year old British socialite was convicted on 5 out of 6 charges, she's going to be sentenced at a later date. The jury gave their verdicts after 5 days of deliberations. Damian Williams the U.S. attorney general for the southern state of New York hailed the verdict against Maxwell for one of the worst crimes imaginable. Facilitating.

Ghislaine Maxwell Jeffrey Epstein New York court of sex traffick Susie Boyd Taliban Afghanistan Akron South Wales Laura BBC Damian Williams New York U.S. Maxwell