11 Burst results for "Susan Kaplan"

"susan kaplan" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

06:11 min | 2 years ago

"susan kaplan" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Someone that you admire to be like on the floor and due to things when she was being young and and then remember you know you don't have that much time to play this game and you know if you're able to be remembered you know for the great things that you did a positive things that you did making people feel you know great about which day it was a pretty cool thing so my shoes and I don't think I put mom before for life eight twenty four okay be because it's really it's really that is really a mutual so so brown also went on to talk about how he is inspired by Kobe Bryant's work after just seeing a work ethic the work ethic that he put into the game he has zero falls office with zero you backed off or make issued at three you put me on your body him up a little bit he can go around you he showed me a rain check a pulse he can make free throws he has zero falls office with you know that's something art as well just being at a point where the defense will always be at bay where they can charge you at all we just felt like he was immortal office because your skill set your workers and it is also heartbreaking you know seeing the video footage of lebron getting off the chartered Lakers fly out crying from the helicopter video that you saw yesterday that was going viral I mean it shows he it's unbelievable that he was talking about him the night before I get there both Lakers both all time greats but you just the way kind of the events yeah place is just weird he talked about Kobe for good for to have five minutes after the game on Saturday night and you could get one of the media you guys said you got to wrap it up and he's like look and tell the bride like you got to wrap it up one thing that Kobe said in one of the many videos I saw last night he was talking about late this career there was a young guy who had a basket in front of me starts talking trash and Kobe said listen if if if you weren't born when I started playing can't talk trash I thought that was pretty funny and that's the way he went he was such a competitor and he you late is for every retired he one of the young guys to succeed but not when he was on the floor against them what's your favorite memory of Kobe Bryant Nick in Skokie you're on ESPN one thousand hi guys I just want to say thank you so much for doing this I've been a Laker fan that was ten years old and Pushin forty now this kind of affect me to waive the first one is called me within the beautiful position to being almost like the transition between Mike's generation and now lebron's generation to be able to see him play again Mike even though whether for long and then be able to see them play against lebron is is is amazing and when I hear you know Michael say things like you know Kobe was like a younger brother and then I hear the Bronte Kobe was like an older brother I can't think of too many other champions that fit right in between and then from a personal standpoint you know we as fans when you put things into perspective sports live sports do this beautiful thing they give us this ability to kind of escape the world an escape you know the miseries of whatever you might be going through for two hours four hours whatever sport watch and for me and for my family he did that to us for twenty years and and to wake up this morning and my wife looked over it means that they told me gone and it's just hard to stomach still because like I said sports have just an amazing way of getting your family together and you know bringing people together and sharing a routing for against them I mean it's been twenty four hours and I miss them as if I knew him or he knows me by face but thank you so much guys for having the show thank you for the call neck we appreciate he's right about that sports does those things where you see these guys you know eighty one times a year and you see them in the all star games and you think you start to feel that you know all that because you spend so much time we sold vested in this in the sports and it's amazing what sports stars I think that's one of the reasons that Chris and I and everybody that works here and everybody that listens that's why we love sports so much yes it takes us to a place that we don't go to it but we can live vicariously through these people absolutely and it you know it is it's just one of those things that like my wife's not really a sports fan she was before we got together and then she was like well you got you take care of that now so I don't have like I think she would just a sports person than me guys right life like I think that was a part of her her dating strategy but last night she was glued to the television yeah in she she was just like at a loss for words like we are and I think it hits everyone because kind of like what Nick was saying the last caller that Kobe was a constant for over the last twenty years well and you got to see his entire life kind a half right in the in the thing that I think bothers me the most yesterday was that the NBA's about legacy and legends and most of the legends in the NBA are still here and around and a part of the game right bill Russell hands the MVP trophy after the MVP of the NBA finals at the end of the season he don't legends of the game are here Jordan owns a team right Pippen's on TV you know magic bird migration you see me right yes we had yeah Jerry rice is a part of a team that in my head like I've thought about this recently to me call me I in my head I thought we would have thirty plus years easily of Kobe being around in and I that's what bothers me yeah today yeah so are way too long at forty one scoop Jackson from ESPN had a special relationship with Kobe Bryant he will join us next to help celebrate Kobe's life we are back in two minutes Susan Kaplan company phone ESPN one thousand Chicago is home for sports reading the news Bryant killed in a helicopter crash in California one of the greatest players in NBA history.

"susan kaplan" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

05:17 min | 2 years ago

"susan kaplan" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Gordon deal Jennifer can shrink us some of our top stories and headlines White House making contingency plans in case of a recession history shows that this is the day when we start seeing an increase in named tropical storms in the Atlantic Wall Street journal says there's more evidence Russia is trying to hide evidence from an explosion at a missile test sites Antonio brown of the raiders has filed another grievance against the N. F. L. trying to keep his favorite helmet and what an Ohio boy did with his winnings at a county fair that story in about twenty minutes time for business update and it's brought to you by the Capital One venture card when you were in on limited double miles on every purchase your next trip is closer than you think what's in your wallet some of the country's biggest retail names are following online startups into the cult of thrift ing casting aside long held fears that selling secondhand goods would cannibalize the market for new goods thrifty as it's known is gaining traction as shoppers have grown more bargain conscious and concerned about the environmental impact of fashion especially the throwaway clothing model popularized by fast fashion chain's it's a story by Suzanne captain a reporter at the Wall Street journal Suzanne what's up here people are extremely bargain conscious today and there are more environmentally conscious and don't want to buy clothes you wear them a few times and have them end up in a landfill so only thing there's certain driving a movement to second hand staying at the same time we've had a lot of companies like that we'll we'll and far fetched and market leading developed with the help of technology developed these platforms that make it much easier to buy a secondhand clothes today this come from it did any particular event or person inspire this interesting and been around for the local store and good will you and then you had eBay is an early adopter online but you know it's really this new crop of companies I wouldn't say it was one person in particular but new you know a handful of companies that are we we sort of making this thing into a mainstream phenomenon so who are some of the big retailers are starting to make room on shelves and racks for some of the but I'm gonna hold style clothes Macy's and if he can eat that they were partnering with thread opt to sell used clothes and some of their stories and they're going to have the same like shopping shop where we'll tell you now second hand vintage clothing and accessories so they're too big ones that have now gotten into this game and coming like Patagonia that got into this in two thousand seventeen and they're going to be opening their first store dedicated to selling used clothes fall in boulder Colorado and revised making a big push with it vintage jeans and some of their flagship stores to you you are seeing more traditional retail you get into this well as the business model here because this doesn't seem like the stuff is can be that profitable well you know like a lot of new start up you know the real real friend since which went public in June the sales are growing but they're not making money yet and some of the challenges becoming profitable it's it's a completely different business model than traditional retailing because you know instead of selling thousands of the same item you're selling thousands of one of a kind pieces that you have to stories from somebody's quiet that you have to clean them and photographed them and there's a lot of work that goes into making these good saleable speak with Susan Kaplan reporter at the Wall Street journal we're talking about retailers now embracing of this the trend of drifting so what goes into what you just reference that this the clean these things vet them somehow you know for the real real they they have like what they call white glove service where they go to the homes and apartments of people and they help them clean out their closets and and then they bring those items back to their warehouses where they you know they clean and they backed them they clean them they have a whole authentication process you know making sure that they are not counterfeit and then they have to be photographed yeah right copy and the you know for the website and they have to be you know played online and then ship to the buyer at some point down the road so there is that amount of work to can these items that into something that somebody wants to buy a says other celebrities behind this is the reference Kim Kardashian what she's been photographed a lot lately invented you know designer hard to find vinyl pieces which you know in a way is slightly different but you know I think another thing that striving that is like the reason people don't want to be seen in the same clothes twice they don't want to be seen in the thing because everybody else is wearing so we help finding that vintage Halston dress with a way.

Jennifer White House Gordon twenty minutes
"susan kaplan" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"susan kaplan" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"What's in your wallet some of the country's biggest retail names are following online startups into the cult of thrift ing casting aside long held fears that selling secondhand goods would cannibalize the market for new goods thrifty as it's known is gaining traction as shoppers have grown more bargain conscious and concerned about the environmental impact the fashion especially the throwaway clothing model popularized by fast fashion chain's it's a story by Suzanne captain a reporter at the Wall Street journal Suzanne what's up here people are extremely bargain conscious today and there are more environmentally conscious and don't want to buy clothes to wear them a few times and have them end up in a landfill so only thing they're sort of driving a movement to second hand staying at the same time we've had a lot of companies like real real and for extension market leading developed with the help of technology developed these platforms that make it much easier to buy a secondhand clothes today this come from it did any particular event or person inspire this I mean it's been around for the local store and good will you and then you had eBay is an early adopter online but you know evening it's really this new crop of companies I wouldn't say it was one person in particular but new you know a handful of companies that are we we sort of making this thing into a mainstream phenomenon so who are some of the big retailers who are starting to make room on shelves and racks for some of the but instead of old style clothes Macy's and he can eat that they were partnering with to tell you close in some of their stories and they're going to have the same like shopping shop where will you know take in hand linkage clothing and accessories so there are two big ones that have now gotten into this game and coming like Patagonia that got into this in two thousand seventeen and they're going to be opening the first store dedicated to selling used clothes fall in boulder Colorado and revised making a big push with it vintage jeans now in some of their flagship stores here you are seeing more traditional retail you get into this well as the business model here because that doesn't seem like this stuff is to be that profitable well you know like a lot of new you know the real real friend since which went public in June on the sales are growing but they're not making money yet some of the challenges to become profitable it's it's a completely different business model than traditional retailing because you know instead of selling thousands of the same item you're selling thousands of one of a kind pieces that you have to stories from somebody that you have to clean them and photographed them and there's a lot of work that goes into making these good saleable speak with Susan Kaplan reporter at the Wall Street journal we're talking about now in bracing of this the trend of drifting so what goes into what you just reference that this the clean these things vet them somehow you know the real real they they have like what they call white glove service where they go to the homes and apartments of people and they help them clean out their closets and the neighboring those items back to their warehouses where they you know they clean and they backed them they clean them they have a whole lot indication process you know making sure that they are not counterfeit and then they have to be photographed yep you're right copy and be you know for the website and they have to be you know played online and then ship to the buyer at some point down the road so there is that I work to right and into something that somebody wants to buy a says other celebrities behind this did you reference a Kim Kardashian what she's been photographed a lot lately invented you know designer pieces which you know in a way is slightly different but you know I think another thing that's driving this is like in the selfie generation people don't want to be seen in the same clothes twice I don't want to be seen in its enclosure body else is wearing you know finding that vintage Halston trash on the way to really stand out and make yourself pretty neat places in wallstreet journal reporter Suzanne.

"susan kaplan" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

What Book Hooked You?

03:12 min | 2 years ago

"susan kaplan" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

"Finished? Well, I would say it's a long list of never finished or or never finished yet. Maybe so right because it's like a fine line between never finished and. Could read. It's just like a bookmark. And so for me a lot of the classics. I like USC's, I don't I don't know. I don't know if I can. But even think of selling off of the sun also rises, which plenty of people. You know, it's short book. It's hemingway. It's not very hard. But I remember throwing that across the room in high school in being so upset about the violence in it. So that's one I'm not going to go back to you. And I think. I think sometimes I used to feel guilty about not finishing and throw. It was kind of a point of pride to make myself finish something like power through it and finish it even if I didn't like it. Now, I try to give a book like maybe a fair shot many seventy five pages or something before being like, this just isn't from me. And then finally, what is the last great book that you've read? So. About just a few weeks ago. I finished you'll miss me when I'm gone, by way, Chilin Solomon. And it's laid me it's the why that came out last year about. Twins fraternal twins show at age eighteen tape a genetic test to determine if one or both of them have Huntington's disease and disease that has devastated their family and run test positive on tests negative toll from the dole an alternating for personal point of view. And it's just eighteen maybe to fall if if all end, I just started, and she has a new book that came out this month. Call a year of maybe. And I'm you know, I'm a few pages in ready hooked. I actually did read you miss you when I'm gone. She did the podcast back last year. And yes, I agree. That is. Oh, yes. While Susan in the neighborhood of true comes out on April ninth. I want to thank you for sharing the story around this book, and and some aspects of your life, and I wish you and his book all the best. Thank you so much. It was really nice to talk to you. Thanks. And that wraps up this episode of what book do you? I wanna thank Susan Catherine Carleton for joining me, again, her book in the neighborhood of true is out on April the night, if you like this soda hope you'll check out some of our many other ones, and please tell a friend. I'm Brock Shelley. And until next time keep reading.

Susan Catherine Carleton Chilin Solomon Brock Shelley USC dole Huntington
"susan kaplan" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

What Book Hooked You?

05:16 min | 2 years ago

"susan kaplan" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

"Towards? I I have a huge teetering YouTube red pile of insurance all clever is do and there's all kinds of stuff in there. Definitely contemporary. Why a but also creative nonfiction I teach writing in in a college of communication, which is. Not fiction. You know, it's it's not kind of stuff. So I do read a lot of nonfiction style. And I love my strong defense action. And I've read. No, whatever novel is new. Catching my eye or whatever on your library half. Or you know, whatever. Yeah. Like like must writers though, I try to read a whole lot. And since you, right. Why? What are some why authors are books that? That have maybe over the years really have grabbed you an and really have stuck with you. So many. And I think like I started to think about writing wine that was the time of like the Megan McCafferty books, and I was in love with those would you know, kind of bad ass. Jessica, darling. Sloppy first second helping others. I love those. I'm John green fan. But I was particularly a fan of looking for Alaska that no I hadn't read anything like that. When I first runs out, and it seems so smart, and I remember all the talk about the great perhaps that seem to me just new fall in Rachel Cohn. Gingerbread those were all the books that I was for point over as I was thinking about doing my own writing for the first time, you know, since you mentioned you teach writing. Could you give maybe me or some listeners like what is your? What is your kind of main alcohol it an anthem that you try to drive home with your students when it comes to writing. And whether it's nonfiction, or maybe it would be fiction, or whatever case may be. What is you know, the common feedback are the the the major point that you're you find yourself commonly stressing to writers, and and maybe young developing writers that you might face. So this is like super pragmatic. I try to embrace when I call the beauty of the TK in in journalism, the capital letters, t and k are like a placeholder for something that has to come. And I don't know some weird thing about how it's intentionally misspelled. So that a copy editor will catch it. And I find for me and also for my students. The biggest problem to overcome is just staring at a link page and either being afraid to write from him that is gonna fence stupid or being a procrastinating or whatever. And so I just encourage a whole lot of peaking for the sometimes a student will turn in the beginning of peace, and then they'll be like three or four paragraphs that are just like TK potatoes exchange. Found information they know to be there, and it will come it. Just isn't there yet? And so that's maybe it sounds silly. But I think there is great freedom in just being able to know that something will having the faith that once will appear there and not being so wedded to I don't know how word count or even an assignment that you get yourself sort of in a net doubt spiral about it. Just do that. And then move on when and somehow magically the words will income it's like that. So a few questions as we want things down here. The first one being what is your favorite movie that's based on a book? I would say. Going back to my Chris school reading list. I would say the great Kathy in all its interational. No. And I I think a lot of very smart people think the gasman movies are terrible. But but another one from the seventies with Robert Redford, and the pharaoh and the more recent one hundred cap rail and carrying mall again. And I see that I see they're heavy handed or whatever. But I don't care. I love them love and left them. I think it's like the world of of the world and the booze and the lust and that toughness, I just I'm in for an in for that. And then the next question is there a book or a series that you're willing to admit you, either never read or never finished?

Rachel Cohn YouTube Megan McCafferty Robert Redford Alaska John green TK copy editor Jessica Kathy Chris school
"susan kaplan" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

What Book Hooked You?

05:06 min | 2 years ago

"susan kaplan" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

"And. When you are writing. This story are ones like it. Because you kind of mentioned there at the beginning of you know, Jewish stories are stories where the main character is Jewish. How important is it that when you're writing you're able to give maybe those characters those examples those voices to to young people today that that you had trouble finding when you were their age. Oh, that's interesting. I think. In this book. I definitely set out to write a Jewish character for sure that was like the heart of the novel in my other books the characters sort of just so happen to be Jewish and kinda feel like kind of feel like that's how I am. Like, I just don't happen to be Jewish. But in in this book, I really wanted to front and center in the site. Dear of. Dining if you wanted to hide a piece of yourself really channel for I remember in college. I was dating this adorable preppy boy who sets me, and I didn't really even think too much about it. Something about me. But he said to me before you meet my grandfather, I just want you didn't know don't mention that you're Jewish and I thought about that in a while. But if I was writing this novel, I was remembering what that's out like to be tempted to hide part of yourself. So I think I think that idea of hiding what I had in mind more in case, she's hiding she's Jewish. But I think there are other parts of ourselves we sometimes are tempted to hide until I was interested in that idea or was falling. So deeply in love with a person or with a pray gut attempted to lose part of yourself. And what was it like in your process of writing this book? You know, while it's has historic roots with the setting in some of the events, the the real world that's going on around you and the news events that you mentioned Charlottesville, and there's been others. Of course, what was it like having to trying to tell this story and composed this story in a modern day time now where they're still very visible and real prejudice and just events that Meer the setting of a story, maybe. Just this shocking and upsetting. Frankly, you know, I kept thinking I'm getting the story of the happened sixty years ago, and yet it feels so contemporary. Which felt both. Interesting that it made it in a way feel modern. But of course, upsetting to think that sixty years later, we're still having a conversation. One thing that was interesting about the what happened in Atlanta is that there was sort of aftermath in in in Atlanta. What really happened with fifty six nine and my were put in the temple on a Sunday morning. Nobody was killed. But it. Caused a lot of damage and it shocked the city and in talking reading about it and in talking to people who member it. What came through with the city through came together. After that in a way that reprise people that the in it was white supremacist tour accused of the bombing. But never the intention was to tenor the city of part, but the people felt that in some ways that brought it together. And in fact, that the rabbis video turning mischievous, Bloomberg she wrote a memoir about the blast and titled it the bomb healed. So in a weird way. There was like this moment of hope that out of of violent act to come. You know, fellowship and friendship. So on the one hand, that's inspired her anything sixty years later. I'm sure someone Pittsburgh. And it seems like maybe not yet. Sure. On top of being a writer for not only the you know, books and journalism you also teach writing. And so when you're able to find time to read books that aren't your own what types of books, do you typically gravitate towards?

Bloomberg Atlanta writer Charlottesville Pittsburgh sixty years one hand
"susan kaplan" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

What Book Hooked You?

06:10 min | 2 years ago

"susan kaplan" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

"Comes to hear creative writing. Well, I think that wants my hope because because you know, a journalist generally worked under a tight deadline, even the monthly magazine journalist for to what I was mostly even still month come around pretty quickly, and you'd have to predict you're three thousand one piece or whatever. But I just and I am disciplined. I do I write every day. But I'm just low. I it turns out I'm just a flow fiction writer on I feel like each time each morning when I'll sit down and write come. Think about how to write what forming we think I could ever do this writing? So so the although the discipline is transferable I have not yet cracked the code of how to be as a fishing of fiction writer of I as I am a nonfiction writer. I'm waiting I'm hoping. But it hasn't happened to me. And so when you started writing these stories. Did you write them? With an audience in mind, an audience being a young person a teenage towards an oral did kind of the story. Come and then you were kind of thinking, you know, who this audience would be for this book. I worked in women's magazines. And and my favorite job was at a magazine. Now now in the dust pile of magazines called Mademoiselle, and it it's written for a young woman at the time. It was like written for college age women, and I just felt like that was like that was the reader, I always had in mind. I feel like I'm still that reader myself Miller some point have arrested development now in my teens. So I feel like that voices is the voice in my head. And that's always been the voice. I wanted to point your latest book in the neighborhood of true comes out on April, the ninth. So let's start talking about this book and tell me what what it's about the story of it's historical. It's a story of love and loyalty and fitting in and speaking out, my character Ruth room moves in the summer of nineteen fifty eight she lives in New York City to Atlanta and finds herself suddenly in this land of sweet pea deputy dances and the q-quick plan. And so to get in with the popular group and her. Cool. She decides to keep the fact that she's Jewish to herself. She's just not gonna mention that. And soon she's falling in love falling in love with a foreign phone with life in the foul on them love with the country club. And and if he keeps this secret until one night when her sort of two worlds, come into conflict, and she has to decide if she is gonna stand up and leave everything she must about her view. You. So what was the inspiration then for in the neighborhood of true? Person. But the story is sort of have a personal connection to it. You know, even though I wasn't here. I'm in the fiftieth, but our family moved to Atlanta in the early two thousand and the novel is sort of inspired by an event that really happened in Atlanta in nineteen fifty eight when I the largest synagogue in in the city, and we are family members at the synagogue, and we got the like sh- Salaam yellow is as New England worth each the fast. And then I discovered about this hate crime. But have changed the congregation really change of city that when and our daughter attended Sunday school in one of the press rooms that had been decades before and now one of our daughters lives insurance, go for gin, where of course, unfortunately, that, you know. You know, anti-semitism is so church and so horrifying, and so for me, I feel like you can draw a line from Atlanta in nineteen fifty concern with Phil twenty teen. You know, because this story is based on you know, historical events in store time and also is personal to you was this. What was the difficulty for you in in writing this? What was the challenge for you? I just find it right away. I was gonna super fiction wise it, but I didn't want it to be, you know, a nonfiction account, which is interesting a half is non for Tim background. But I really wanted just to take this this. I think what I heard about what had happened in the fifty years later. It's so so. Painful to me, and it upset me so much that I wanted to find a way to kind of capture that emotion, and it seemed like the best way to do that with fiction wise, it so I think the challenge was being true with Syria of what happened, and I did do a lot of interviews with people who member including the rabbi's wife is very much alive at age ninety five now too much hear what that day was like for them. But then I also wanted to make sure that I made it, you know, a full fledged full-blooded novel. And so I I guess balancing this too is always on my mind. And.

Miller Atlanta New York City writer monthly magazine Syria country club Ruth room Tim New England Phil fifty years
"susan kaplan" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

What Book Hooked You?

07:35 min | 2 years ago

"susan kaplan" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

"This is what book you? I'm Brock Shelley and thanks for listening. Well, our episode this week. I have Susan Kaplan Carlton who newest book in the neighborhood of true comes out on April, the ninth and in this episode. We talk about her career as a writer, and what went into this book would inspired this book. So listening. So Susan what book hooked you? When I was growing up all the young adult novels that had choose characters seemed to be about like, very important Jewish issue. Very heavy. The holocaust, which of course, we all need to read about need to keep front of mind the trauma of immigration, which are also important stories, but I didn't feel like I probably felt the most so much or at least I wanted a break from some of that. And so for me, it was like thank God for Judy Blume and loved her books normal American Jewish kids doing with more model in mice. Are you there? God, it's me Margaret, so honest about periods, and bras and boys, and like many people I loved forever, which was so honest about sex. So so definitely the Judy Blume cannon and other kind of. Of different lead that really has stayed with me Harriet the spy. Because she's a bit of an outsider, and because she's a writer, and she's observational security, turn up book everywhere. She goes and scribble things down even though sometimes that's not sticking with you. Feel like she would be like just great the Twitter. It was the right now. And I'm not that. She was an observer that the way she out the world was serving people people she spied on granted. But also have friends who are also a feathers too. So I really really related to hair. And so they wanted very much to be Harriet into have tomato sandwiches for lunch that and so as a kid as you're reading these books where you always trying to were you always seeming to gravitate towards books that you could sort of, you know, find yourself in or relate to some way, you know, you weren't more you weren't into SCI fi adventure any type of those things. It was more like T our girl protagonists and just the adventures that she might have and just away that you kind of examined maybe your own life or kind of see the world. And related to someone that may be going through some listen mo- things that you might be as a kid. Interesting hemp thought about it. But the way you phrase it, I think that it's true. I am not as drawn to fantasy or to Fifi. I feel like I don't appreciate it as much as I appreciate just like a really detailed fresh feeling neurotic contemporary. That's more my lane. And I think I was really drawn to realistic fiction didn't have to necessarily be contemporary, but realistic that seems to be where I found like I saw myself in the page. And so you know, that was more kind of when you may be as a as a kid and preteen Judy Blume, Harry this by so when you got into high school because high school, you know, there's more homework there may be more social aspect or activities involved were books. Do you? Remember books still being important or were there memorable books from when you were a young at all? I think that stayed a reader even when the reading was assigned reading I generally liked it in high school. I got really into interested in journalism, and I was on the paper and on the yearbook my state interested in journalism. So I think I was still drawn to things that were like up divisional. I have a lot of appreciation for nonfiction when I lived in kind of creative nonfiction when I lived in high school, but but these these are interesting questions, I hadn't really considered that. I think that my taste my taste grew up. But it kind of phases thing. And so at this time are may was it around this time because you kind of mentioned the journalism aspect that. You really got more focus maybe on your writing. Yeah. I think I can to writing as a journalist I and I definitely did I worked in Taiwan time, and I liked writing other people schooling. And it took a while for me to figure out that I wanted to write my own. I was I was and I think actually being journalist is really good training for novelist, except, you know, turning up the later on the observational and sort of development era for what's interesting in that kind of stuff. So I I was one of those kids who knew, but she always wanted to be a writer of books and kept meticulous diaries. And I was more someone to had given up. My can petrified to open because going would write something that will be there forever. So so I. Have to kind of feel my way into the into novels. And so when then did it change for you that, you know, you're still got that journalistic I, and that's when what you were writing. But when did it come to the point what was that realization that maybe wanted to try your hand at writing fiction? Actually from me. The magazine was working when out of business, and so that was a turning point. We're headed to what I wanted to do mocks and our family had actually just moved from Maine to Atlanta. And I found that I was really missing. And so I decided to write a novel that was set in Maine. It was sort of a way to not the novel but going to talk about today, but it was a way to serve like my Valentine this place. I was missing. And then I kinda family see if I can think there was this. You know, you said you, you know, journalism has helped you a lot just kind of finding the story and as a writer than do you find that just technically you're kind of discipline about hell, you know, with writing that you journalism, you have these deadlines that, you know, you need to meet does that help you then when it comes to your fiction writing your novel writing the. Discipline of of having novels in having to have sort of more of a work ethic by trade help you when it comes

Judy Blume writer Susan Kaplan Carlton Harriet Maine Brock Shelley Twitter holocaust Margaret Taiwan Atlanta Harry
"susan kaplan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"susan kaplan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And he's a fan. That's a really nice wine aircraft the control feel to it is really solid. It's quiet airplane. Extremely fuel efficient. American has twenty four of the max eights, it's ordered more than sixty more over the next few years southwest and United also fly the max, but Goldberg was stunned to learn that a new automated flight control system called M S may have caused the crashes. We were not even informed maybe distance of the cash system, not to mention how to deal with any particular now functions that might occur with that system. Senators pressed government officials about that this week, and although Boeing has announced a software upgrade, it could take months until regulators around the world approved the plane to fly both the airlines and Boeing need each other to succeed the other major producer of fuel-efficient single-aisle aircraft is Europe's Airbus and it also has thousands of planes to build said pan says even if airlines like Indonesia's Gouda could get out of their contracts would not have the capacity to fulfill these orders financial advisor, Susan Kaplan says she still has confidence in Boeing it's got more than a century of aviation. Experience. And until these two crashes it had a stellar safety record. It's also probably too big to fail their businesses so immense whether the fighter jets helicopters guided weapons satellites they're just an enormous colossus and the assumption in the field is they'll fix it. American southwest and United all say, they're sticking to their orders. The stakes are high southwest revised its revenue forecast downward for this quarter in part because of the Boeing groundings Germany's T U I group did as well and Lufthansa says it will soon replace at least one hundred single-aisle planes and it hasn't decided whether to go with Boeing or its rival Airbus. But CEO karston sports says we have not lost.

Boeing Airbus Susan Kaplan Lufthansa Goldberg CEO Indonesia Germany pan advisor M S producer Europe
"susan kaplan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"susan kaplan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And he's a fan. That's a really nice wine aircraft the control feel to it is really solid. It's a quiet airplane. Extremely fuel efficient American has twenty four of the max aids. It's ordered more than six. More over the next few years southwest and United also fly the max, but Goldberg was stunned to learn that a new automated flight control system called M S may have caused the crashes. We were not informed gist of the cash system, not to mention how to deal with any particular malfunctions that might occur with that senators pressed government officials about that this week, and although Boeing has announced a software upgrade, it could take months until regulators around the world approved the plane to fly both the airlines and Boeing need each other to succeed the other major producer of fuel-efficient single-aisle aircraft is Europe's Airbus and it also has thousands of planes to build pan says, even if airlines like Indonesia's guru could get out of their contracts would not have the capacity to fulfill these orders financial advisor, Susan Kaplan says she still has confidence in Boeing it's got more than a century of aviation experience. And until these two crashes it had a stellar safety. Eckard? It's also probably too big to fail their businesses. So many whether the fighter jets helicopters guided weapons satellites, they're just an enormous colossus. And the assumption in the field is they'll fix it. American southwest and United all say, they're sticking to their orders. The stakes are high southwest revised its revenue forecast downward for this quarter in part because of the Boeing groundings Germany's T U I group did as well and Lufthansa says it will soon replace at least one hundred single-aisle planes, and it hasn't decided whether to go with Boeing or its rival Airbus, but CEO karston spor says we have not lost our trust in Boeing Daniele Chesler NPR news. This is NPR news. Support for WNYC comes from Atlantic theater company, presenting the US premiere of the mother.

Boeing Airbus NPR karston spor Lufthansa Susan Kaplan Goldberg WNYC Indonesia Atlantic theater company US Germany CEO pan advisor M S producer Europe
"susan kaplan" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:07 min | 2 years ago

"susan kaplan" Discussed on KCRW

"A fight between the yes. In my backyard in the no, no, no. When my backyard, Santana, one of the most overcrowded cities in the United States wants to develop more housing, but you have some people are saying we don't want any of that housing and other people saying you're not trying enough of our type of housing, affordable housing versus rich people housing. All right yourself Laureano, Orange County line and just a few minutes. Cassava? Thanks, cassius. Scattered showers across the greater L A area. This evening might make for a wet commute where you are overnight lows. Upper forties, low fifties dryer tomorrow in warmer to back into the mid sixty s. Live from NPR news in Culver City, California. I'm korva Coleman. US aviation officials want changes in Boeing seven thirty-seven max, eight jets one hundred fifty seven people were killed Sunday. When one of these jets crashed in Ethiopia NPR's Daniel Czeslaw reports Boeing shares lost ground at the start of today's US market trading. But regained more than half of that by the markets closing bell financial advisor. Susan Kaplan says Boeing's rally is based on trust. And I think the reason why the markets have not responded more punitively is the assumption that if there is a problem, they're going to fix it and fix it. Right now. Boeing says it has sent a technical team to to investigate after at seven thirty seven max, eight plane plunged to the ground minutes after takeoff the same model plane crashed off Indonesia's coast in October Ethiopia, China and Indonesia have ordered all max, eight planes grounded, US carrier, southwest American and United say, they will wait. For more information on the cause of the crash. Danielle Chaz though NPR news Boeing released a statement last hour saying it's working with US regulators to enhance software for the seven thirty seven max eight the aircraft maker says it will be deployed in coming weeks. White House press secretary Sarah Sanders, says no date has been arranged yet for trade summit between President Trump and Chinese president Xi Jinping everything on the table again negotiations are ongoing the president's team as well as the Chinese delegation continue conversations. And when they feel like it's time for the two leaders to sit down we'll make that happen. Trump has threatened to impose costly new tariffs on Chinese imports unless Beijing revises what he calls unfair trade practices on Wall Street. The Dow Jones industrials gained two hundred points today up three quarters of a percent to close at twenty five thousand six hundred fifty the NASDAQ gained nearly two percent up about one hundred fifty points. This is NPR and this is Casey. W? Good evening. I'm Steve take this local update. The LA county sheriff's department is detained two people. Now in connection with the death of a nine year old girl body was found last week her body on a hacienda heights, hiking trail, she was identified as trinity love Jones to grow the my daughter. My youngest daughter. Just want answers won't Justice. Antonio Jones who says he received the devastating news in a phone. Call. Tuesday. Full of character. Family.

United States Boeing President Trump Ethiopia Orange County NPR Santana Antonio Jones korva Coleman Culver City Indonesia Susan Kaplan president LA county Jones Danielle Chaz advisor Xi Jinping Daniel Czeslaw