17 Burst results for "Susan Horowitz"

"susan horowitz" Discussed on REALITY OF REALITY

REALITY OF REALITY

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"susan horowitz" Discussed on REALITY OF REALITY

"Production process was just getting. I mean almost too much to handle where you have i this year. I was making a decision do i. How do i sustain the level of work. The hours just kind of bleeding in with kogan when it was brought to my home. You know you're working out of your home and you're realizing you know you already set up for a twelve hour day by you. Know that's crazy to some who aren't in the industry but you know what you're getting into but when it starts just kind of head in a direction where literally stopped down your whole world and then there is no boundaries. Even at home you think you know. How is this. Where the one is this where the industry is headed to. You knew you'd like for me. I knew that story producing role had changed just by the superiors people above me. They're like well. I used to have to do this. And i used to have to do that right. That means though short. Yeah absolutely you know. For example i mean what was interesting. Elise is an e you had a guest. Susan horowitz On your on your podcast. And i when i heard her say that she started as a story producer but was working looking at current affair articles. And you just think how far back you know this this role kind of change. One minute you're looking at an article to find stories. And then it. Just slowly evolves where. I mean that. You're on avid. Almost doing what you know. An assistant editor may Will was was doing. And now you're you know taking on the reins of the whole story but not just story but actually producing it on and editing software that You know which is great for some but after a while you know that skill you're kind of like well go on this ride forbid but then you sit back and you see that you know if you're working a six day week and then you're editors off you know and only working a five day week in europe. They're pulling the slack trying to catch up to to what you need to do It was it was getting to a point where i said you know. Do i leave this industry like so many other great creative producers or do i try to step up and make a change so i know others had tried before but i figured you know this is a new time And to to put down my thoughts when i was feeling it Me give it more of an authentic voice. And and so i did that and that's why i was at a crossroads like do i continue doing this or do i get chased out of the industry that i like to do so right. I mean i want to jump in there to kind of to explain sort of how the industry has changed. So i used to work in corporate in media at sony pictures and then you went over to comedy central and i was sort of in the track of doing more scripted productions and then the kind of jazzy looked. You can bypass all the steps in you. Don't have to be You know. pa forever and forever and then get your earnings like literally..

Susan horowitz europe sony pictures six day twelve hour five day Elise Will this year comedy central One minute
"susan horowitz" Discussed on REALITY OF REALITY

REALITY OF REALITY

05:12 min | 1 year ago

"susan horowitz" Discussed on REALITY OF REALITY

"Finished now. Flex yes pretty. Almost you know core watch now that we really like flight attendant. Okay let's listen to my end of your podcast with brian samuels. That's all sounds away. I did half i stop. I want and it's up my alley. I wonder like it. I will say this were maybe seven or eight him it did. There was a point at which i was like. Okay i get it. Yeah but she's really good rainy. Yeah she's really the first four or five episodes. I thought were really. It's so well done like i just. I think it's very stylized. I like all of that. Do you agree. I really don't wanna go back. Because i just finished talking about this on my last podcast but you agree that rosie perez went to an acting school like someone deprogrammed her teacher not to act. She didn't nicole. Kidman went to the same stop on coal kidman. Why do people like that show. I can't don't we gotta stay watched until the bitter end all and by the way on. Just say this about flight attendant is that even though i like the show. I think it's fun different. I was kind of disappointed when i heard. There's a season to lake. It's you don candidate. But i still what they don't. We watched yesterday that Actually came out a while ago. And i don't know how we just got around to watching now. The case against unknown on hbo random. That's like old. I didn't like it personally. I i thought it did nothing to really advance the podcast. I feel like if you're gonna do it. Give me new information. Give me something interesting. Give me apart to like. I was like okay. I know this already. I listened to the podcast. But you now but i wonder if it's because it's been a minute since i think that's i think that's not only some of the information you'll new but i also think having being able to see some of these people could mother. Oh my god her do it right. I don't think he did it. I don't think he did it did it. There's five percent chance he did it. But i think it's like ninety five percent like i can't say one hundred percent because there are some weird shit that i will never understand like j. in the car but we won't go down that route. There's so much more. We only wish to tell moody. We did nothing good. we wait on. You owe the lesbian christmas movie. I've so cute. I got my podcast. Yes very do so cooks like ten percent better which is also like ninety percent. Better than every christmas movie current. I've watched a lot of them. This break so i out on its own level. What's his face was the best part of it was going to say it's creepy. Yeah david rose on it. We'll see. I really trying to be a person who liked doesn't hate on people should know kristen. Stewart like your. There's no christmas you're type. Everyone across the video works she gets cast all the time and donald trump was our president. I mean literally. there's no one on the other side. Everyone agrees with you. No one understands it. And we just maryland utah. What else did we want the night sky which we did you watch that. Roger jewish tiny and look freeze. You know. i don't like being called hold was like a lotta movies. We watch in the last days long way to go to make a point. I bet you'll love solo. Did you see soul. I heard so great. We have to watch your loved one. Yeah you'll cry like a baby to wasn't as great as everybody said like. I thought it was a little meandering. You know by the us you will. It was what like a jazz melody if you will that very very true. I never elected that way. While you guys we could talk forever as you know we do when we see each other. I love you both so much. So lobbied lightly did as you've earned a pass to come back but we'll decide when that will be listen. Here's here's my mind proposal that we have a sarah in mariam. Susan and irena elise of podcasts for all tv. i. I don't know i've never had for on the pod. The three is my max. Seems a little crazy. But i'll take it under consideration. I just bring us back in a closet talking. I'll have them. But they're mike's.

donald trump Susan brian samuels five percent rosie perez one hundred percent yesterday irena elise ninety five percent Stewart david rose ninety percent ten percent mike five episodes eight seven both first four three
"susan horowitz" Discussed on REALITY OF REALITY

REALITY OF REALITY

07:02 min | 1 year ago

"susan horowitz" Discussed on REALITY OF REALITY

"That she went sailing. We'll have some blue. Call me when that happens. Okay so obviously we been. I mentioned that that montclair gotten hotter than ever during the pandemic. That's something that's been really interesting right because so many industries are suffering. Obviously the restaurant industry and concerts and and all of that Ironically or not ironically the real estate market in definitely in l. a. And in these hot suburbs like montclair has has taken up. What is it been like to do more business than ever in a pandemic like literally. I know you have to do like facetime tour. We're gonna hopefully be renting a storehouse. The summer in the guy had to go in with a face mask. Can you know. Show us the place on facetime. Obviously we're across the country but like what has it been like to like practically do your job where you're not being able to have all that face time that you're used to but still like being busy as hell You know i think the thing that that's the weirdest We're having a year like you can people dream to have a year like we've had this year and there's something there's an initial sort of like horrible guilt feeling that we're doing so incredibly well when so much of the country is is not but then i think we remember what it is doing And i think about people seriously. Like stephen miriam And they're not the first couple that came to me pregnant than desperate to get out of the city. That's been pretty much every client. We had this year may not necessarily pregnant but certain desperate to get out of the city And then it feels like again like performing a service but it is weird. It's weird to you. Know i spent several weekends with people just in the car behind me. And i'm just rolling on over the phone telling them about the town that we're in and we get out of the car and we walk into a house together. I'm way far away from now. And then we stand outside sort of on separate side to the straight talking about the house it's weird. That part's weird in. It's weird you know until also really really weird. When at some point somebody takes their mask off outside. You're like oh what you like right. It's like it's like wearing a sunglass a disguise so two questions first of all. What do you think the next five year. Five to ten years looks like are what are your as you mentioned. You're very enterpreneurial ambitious. What are your goals. What are like. I can't see at least susan. I cannot see you see irena totally retiring. I cannot see. Sue gets iran is like me. She likes to chill. But soon as i could never be you ever like just sitting around. She's changed to you're comfortable doing. Let's put it this way. We have sort of a five to seven year plan. That includes me hanging it up. If we can make it happen will say. But i don't really imagine that even if i even if i stopped doing real estate that i would stop working together i could see you guys teaching like teaching real estate. I know your mission. And lastly and lastly what advice can you give to people who are together like i said this many times in a million years. I work with brian. Like there's even sometimes we have to write an email together. It's like i barely make it through the email. So how i know. You have to have specific types of personalities. But what do you think is sort of like the secret to working together and being together as life partners. Well the first thing i want to say is that we like each other. But that's not to say that people who don't want to work with their spouse don't like each other very clear your fight. This is not harmony all the time right. Yeah let's let's not make people think this is nirvana. Yeah none and now. We have argued other respect each other spending time together but also i think We do have some different strengths and different interests. And we're really okay to let the other one do the thing that they like. Another good at Because then that takes the things that we don't like to join aren't gonna baron plate so really copper church and i think you know. I think if you can do that if you're able to do that he wanna do that. That's great you know. I think we see this as a partnership because by the way over the last couple of years we've really changed how we work together instead of working in parallel and as each having our clients. We really sort of teamed up more. And now even branding ourselves as susan irena team and we look at all of our clients as our clients with the majority like face to face stuff and me. Doing i do that as well. But i also do marketing and social media and organization in all kind of you know when someone's tedious stuff that i actually really liked doing. That's so true. That's that's that's good advice. And i gave the thing with you guys like mrs biko. This is a lot of people who work for themselves. The you know. The separation between work and personal life is so blurred. But i think they used to be bad and now it's like great because you realize that you can still design your life the way as you're have enough to you know to live if you're that fortunate that you you can decide so like if you wanna take off on a wednesday and go do something i mean in normal times. You can do that like there's no boss you know but at the same time you probably are going to work the weekends. 'cause that's what most realtors do so all right last but not least what are you guys watching over the break that you like. We watched so much. What haven't you watch every flex.

five Five biko two questions ten years brian susan seven year Sue stephen miriam first couple this year wednesday next five year montclair flex last couple of years year one l.
"susan horowitz" Discussed on REALITY OF REALITY

REALITY OF REALITY

07:58 min | 1 year ago

"susan horowitz" Discussed on REALITY OF REALITY

"Thing just felt like why. Why is it. So corporate nan n. We also you know there was a lot going on at the company they. We were all app together that we did not agree with at all and so you know over dinner one night. There were like eleven of us out for dinner one night and we start of started batting this idea round. And you know the doug with the bone By the next morning you know. I had these or other friends and colleagues semi signed up for the idea. You're in and i think robin was definitely in our other. Two partners need a little bit more. Right is your tv where it really doesn't matter. What the name of the firm is like see ya. Uta like people know the agents. They don't even remember what agency there with is like that with real estate. I mean it is an isn't it's actually kind of like a to prompt answer but let me go back a little bit to your earlier question about wise somebody. Like frederick wooden start there and company is i think about when you were producer and then when you had your company when you're a producer you're being hired you have a general you get your paycheck no matter what when you have company you hire people and they get paid first in it. Nobody's buying your show. You still have to pay rent for the you're renting if god forbid there is overtime on production right you're paying yourself last. So basically somebody. Like frederick can decide what i'm going to go to europe for three years and i'm gonna close the door and go do my thing and not have to worry about deep. Here's the other thing about somebody. Like frederick and like any agent crew is very successful when you get to a place where you start doing. I mean listen. There's four people in the world who sell two hundred million dollars rise right. Never mind right right. So i mean that's just that he's the one percent of the one percent of the one percent and then one percent nude bernie sanders accent by the way. That was very good very much. I didn't go full force but you get the the point way back to my question though about does it matter what agency you're with ultimately so i don't think it matters more to the agent than it does to diane right away although i will say. Listen we we've created a small boutique agency in a town right so even now like i went out on an appointment a couple of weeks ago and these are people who are referred by very close friends of ours And you know the last part of my conversation with them. The husband said so why. Why would we list our house with west of hudson which is a fairly normal questions from anybody who selling i think for sellers. They they feel like that remains should ask. The truth is it doesn't matter what company you're with. It never matters what company you're with whether you're buying or selling a house imagine who your agent is because every company company isn't selling your house. Me susan horowitz as the agent is selling your house. i'm paying for the advertising. I'm paying for the photographs on. My experience is walking through the house. With irena sang's is what we need to do to stage your house. We're doing those things like that's not anything might company does what we do as individual agents but most people don't really get that whether there some by the way of all the agencies in our area we happen to have the. This was really important to us when we were sitting around. Trying to figure out what we're gonna call our company. All the other companies are called like some Name algorithm anchor. Keller berkshire-hathaway what is any of that we we spent. We had a lot of hours in a lot of tears. Lower shopping of coming up with the name and the name is west of hudson. I get it okay. So you guys are in montclair ours like that area specifically and now as we know montclair has become hotter than ever been half for a while but especially in the pandemic even. Npr did a whole story on it. Which your n people should google at That like specially in the pandemic my cousin and her husband were definitely emblematic of new yorkers. Trying to escape the city. So i love montclair. Love forever question. Let's talk about the celebrities Very important discussion. Men my boyfriend's wilson. I hope he's well but we saw today. And can you confirm or deny. Is josh charles. Amount claire resident arena. Just flipped out. He there's a picture of him on instagram today. And the location. He's just like hanging out. It doesn't look like he's visiting. The location is montclair. rina's boyfriend by well. It's america's boyfriend i mean. Let's be fair. he's so cute. Okay so fi find that out so you say you're going to have to come clean on the fact that scandal hit montclair. Has carl lentz from the hilson church and you were his realtor. Can you comment. What comment can we have from you on on the situation up lenses. Tell us they are a love. That family i really do i i. They are the kindest loveliest people they have. Fantastic kids who i just. You know those kids. Jimmy like those are really awesome. Kids who are raised well. I was blown away when all of this happened. And i'm actually really kind of heartbroken for them. Well they will they make it. What's going to happen. no i hope. So it's really do and they have always been so incredibly kind to me They've they've sent a lot of their friends and people away. And i have nothing but really just positive things to say about them and i i am. You know everybody always says me. Can you say. I don't really have anything bad to say. They're they're lovely and i. I hope that they can figure it all out. Listen i can't imagine what it is to be either one of them. I can't imagine what it is to stay on stage They're both incredibly good looking people No they are very dynamic there rockstars they were rock stars as lovely as a human can be. She is charismatic. He is over the top charismatic. It is impossible not devolve for each one of them. Haven't get it okay. Have you met stephen colbert. I think co bear one night trick or treating a hundred years ago but is the atom. And you know my your boyfriend. Wilson came to my house to look at be still my heart and by your has meaning one of the houses.

stephen colbert susan horowitz Jimmy josh charles montclair europe rina three years new yorkers today one percent Wilson one night two hundred million dollars Two partners carl lentz four people both next morning eleven
"susan horowitz" Discussed on REALITY OF REALITY

REALITY OF REALITY

08:20 min | 1 year ago

"susan horowitz" Discussed on REALITY OF REALITY

"That's how tardy ads and the spin off. I did two seasons honestly in camera because to me like a light drago seven years. Tell us all right so longer than i've worked on a lot longer ago that were no-shows i tell us something about nina leaks that nobody knows not to spot or anything i think she's an open book their hair. No i don't believe it. So what did you learn like. The housewives is a very specific type of show a specific type of producing that show for the longest time was the crown jewel of the franchise. The most successful when why. What did you learn doing that. Show for that law. That you know is a skill that now you have. You could apply to everything else. That's a very good question. Because i think by the way i primarily did post on that show right so explain to the uninformed what that means yeah so mostly in reality. Tv you have two teams. You have a field team that works with talent Challenges anybody. Who's on camera showing this case. It's the reality stars themselves and the field team shoots the actual and as part of post team. That was me. I would get the footage look through it. Craft a story work with an editor to sort of. Put it together on vanessa and you know along with the matter. We would create the thing that you see on tv. So you know it's interesting. I think sometimes about whether the skills from that translate into real estate. And i think the only thing that i can really think about is that being able to tell a story have to have an understanding of people both the characters themselves and the people who are going to be watching story. So there's a lot of psychology that's involved because that's really what you need to work in real estate. It is really all that because a lot of people knew real estate the business real estate. Come into thinking. oh. I really love houses. I'm going to be great at it. Which is fine you know. I like houses to job is actually not as much of that houses as it is about people so anyone who knows you guys know that you like to spend a lot of time together an inordinate amount of time together so frankly i was surprised how long it actually took you to leave tv and migrate over to real estate. Was that something that literally was just like financially motivated. I mean in terms of like you couldn't leave something that was well paying to make that leap because it was like two people that had to be what you kill at the same time as too risky or do you know he wanted to do real estate. No here's the thing. When susan laughed and went into real estate. That was very much for thing was very journey into taking on a journey. It's great when she likes journey for me for you. But i had no intention of leaving. I was like where was i was like i was doing so it was maybe three four five years that we continue doing tv. And she was in real estate. And as a freelance producers for the longest time. I went from project to project even if it was within the same company with very little downtime and then at the end of maybe twenty thirteen. I happened to end up with a few months between gigs which was extremely unusual and at that point season did really well with real estate. And i thought oh. Maybe i'll get my real estate licence. So that when she's really busy in the spring doing open houses do that with her. And it's just be able to help because having the cetera pans. Another person is always. How can we can be together because we actually do like exemplify. Let's get reorientation to breathe in a very short period of time. I got my license. Because if you can accelerate celebrate a program or sixty rights right to class and then you get your test or whatever sunday's short period of time i got my license. Did a couple open houses with her and we got to spend some time together. And i got some clients that i took out and i got a sense of having my own schedule and being charged mile time huge. Yeah by the way. The wage huge. That's a very very hard to give that up. Yeah and then when the gig that i was supposed to start fell through i just decided to not look gig so it almost kind of just happen. Yeah emma insured. Also helped that. When i started in real estate. I already had somebody that was very well. Established right the people in the office and it was a great support system. So it's not like. I was starting from scratch. We susan with starting from scratch. I was kind of joining something that not was already progress. Even those a little bit of that but we have been peril because susan had grown clients. I had my own clients yet. Restarted from scratch okay. So here's my question. So at a certain point you guys made the bold move of leaving the keller real estate the firm that you had joined and starting your own brokerage firm and brian and i were talking about this this morning. Because here's what. I don't understand because we were always talking about frederick ulcand at he. So he's the guy from million dollar listing new york and kind of la he did. I don't know if you guys follow him on instagram. But he did two hundred million dollars in sales last week. Okay so he's killing it like in multiple places. So brian's like we'll does he have his own brokerage firm and so i was looking down on the thing and i see that he's worked for douglas element so brian asked and i was like. That's actually a good question. Why does someone like him. Who is probably one of the top in the country. Not do what you guys did. So explain how that all works and why everyone is killing. It wouldn't do that so i think. Here's the thing. I think you know me better than most people. In the universe. I have always had an entrepreneurial streak running through me. I don't think i think a long time ago. When i first got into real estate people would say only gonna open your own brokerage Now there's no reason to so that's the truth about frederick. There's really no reason to but but a broker at the firm so in this case. Douglas element get a percentage of every sale. So the reason is you get to keep all the money. That's the reason. Yes yes that's the reason. But but here's the thing we started our company with three other women Not so much because we wanted to keep all the money because frankly we don't right now. We participate just like all the other agents in our office. Do it was more about what we saw going on in real estate. Which is that real estate had become incredibly corporate and it's such an unbelievably intimate personal.

seven years two people new york susan two seasons two hundred million dollars last week frederick ulcand two teams both brian frederick three other women one keller twenty thirteen first three four five years instagram sixty rights
"susan horowitz" Discussed on REALITY OF REALITY

REALITY OF REALITY

06:54 min | 1 year ago

"susan horowitz" Discussed on REALITY OF REALITY

"You know listen a Smart person i'm not. You know. I always say you've got nyu not forget it. S she's the smartest Red ably smart area. I don't have though other than a leeza say smart christner then elise that i know And i'm smart. I'm smart enough to notice. Say took nights guelfi. Good no seriously my skill set. Because i'm not. I'm not that that's not my world. Don't travel the world of the big into lax. But i'm certainly not a stupid person but what might real skill set is people. I'm i can walk into a room. I can read a room i can. I know a in five minutes had talked to somebody in a way. That's going to work for them. And i know that in my life now my entire job is about you never ever ever ever and i think there are a lot of things that that came to bear on my getting all this not the least of which is being a parent cause i've also learned how to be patient and to be selfless and i get really what people are doing when they're looking for. They're finding a place to raise their family. It's a big freaking deal. And i don't take that lightly. Yeah you i mean. Look i you know i think one of my best skills as i'm really good in a room but you. I have never seen anyone as comfortable in a room when you and i will go out to pitch together. It was like. Did you already know. These people like what that how so. But but i remember at the beginning when you started in real estate saying to you like it was like the light bulb went off. And i'm like. Oh my god makes perfect sense. Because you're using literally all of the skills from doing development and and using them for real estate so i i was just curious Like in your my. What are those similar skills that translated from selling shows developing and selling shows to to being a realtor. Yeah i think this is what i really think it is. It's about helping people see vision right when we would pick shows that was about okay. Here's the idea. And it was about united believing what we were pitching so much that we could spoonfeed that to somebody else so that they were government. Gotta love that. I love that it's kind of the same thing with real estate. Is you know one of i've always done in that. I've spent obviously the last nine months doing especially with the pandemic is taking people on tours of whatever town were looking at. And i also i won't work in places that i don't know really well because that's not fair somebody like here's the thing about real estate and i think here's where all the cliches come from real realtors real estate agents. Whatever can be sales people or they can be people who have a mission. I am without sounding really corny. Whatever i look at what. I'm doing as a service to somebody else that i ended up getting a paycheck her seriously but but when i stopped and i remember i remember when i was aware for the very first time what it really was that i did because i remember i used to be the president of the board of realtors in our area and at my called inauguration yet i wasn't called but installation when they start a coronation. What's that coronation. Four inch the queen of real estate. You haven't seen on tv. No when they did my installation united to say something after and you know i think i just sort of spitball what i was saying but i got weirdly emotional about it because for me what i really did realize was i used to have this jabeen. Tv and everybody else thought it was very sexy interview celebrities. Ou you travel all the time. Louis do this do that. That's really fun but mostly for me for me. It was fun about me. What i do as a real estate agent. Is i do something that feels for me so much more important than helping. Let's take your cousin on taking on helping stephen miriam. I'm gonna cry. Who was so pregnant in manhattan in the panorama their example ryan with a horrible upstairs tenant and i love those crazy kids. They're so sweet to them. And i could see the anxiety. Every time they came out. I could feel that they were feeling all i wanted to do was help them find a place where they could feel safe where they could put their heads down on a pillow at night and feel like they were planting deep roots in a community where they would know their neighbors like that is so huge and important for me. So that's how. I look at what i do now. I don't end because that's my attitude again without sounding really trade goofy. I think that's why. I have that why i'm successful. Because it doesn't. It's not a bow. i'm not chasing something. I'm doing something for somebody. Yeah i mean you hit the jackpot in the sense. I always say this like the home. Run is when you can do something while the tv equivalent when you could do something entertaining but also socially conscious or make a difference at it's endure quivalent like you're making money. It's not pro bono. But you're able to get back as you really are changing people's lives. I mean they had like. Miriam and steve like you said they had like you guys had like the last minute change of house that ended up being totally the right house for them. That not you know. Thank god that you brea but help with that. So irena backing up with. Susan transitioned to real estate. You stated tv for a while you ended up going to truly original which was true entertainment back in the day working at a bunch of bravo shows so for all the bravo fans out there. You were mostly most Tardy for the party. We'll see we're housewives of.

Susan Miriam steve manhattan stephen miriam Four inch five minutes ryan one first time elise united Louis leeza last nine months board of irena jabeen christner
"susan horowitz" Discussed on REALITY OF REALITY

REALITY OF REALITY

08:18 min | 1 year ago

"susan horowitz" Discussed on REALITY OF REALITY

"Was fun for me because the thing that i naturally gravitated to. Yes okay. so we can't. We can't move on from this chapter without acknowledging that at this point you guys also came together as a couple and mazal tov said it wouldn't last and look at ya save probably said listen. There's a very big age gap. But we didn't realize how mature irena wasn't how immature. Susan was well. That work really miss winner. Man is it twenty to twenty twenty years okay. so so looking back on it now. I was really young when you guys while very way too young so had it like honestly do both of you think it would be twenty eight like did you both think like from the beginning like we really think this is gonna. Last said is in saint prime. I did with probably very naive kind. Romanticism of a twenty. One year old it turns out i was right. Yeah i won't say she's usually right but she has sadly and unfortunately that naive but at the same time in can imagine you know for younger people at Size things and think everything is forever but into bula way through beginning. oh and i can. I can attest to you. Guys are hashtag cup of goals. You really are a wonderful and And we'll get into what it's like to work together a little later okay. So then at some point Susan leaves vh1. I read a. You've moved onto producing Susan i start our company I think in two thousand four that right around there. Yeah which was like so much fun. I mean we were together obviously h one. But the titanic was different. Because you're my boss. And i was sorta out on my own at some point. Not even working for you and just doing my thing so then when we got to work together as equals we laughed so hard we just had to remember queen. Latifah's off robin quivers. Had that pilot there was of course the highlight of my life. And then grandma orton. Was there for a little while. I was like the hub of everything of your penn station so obvious now living philly. It was great for me and then we travelled. I mean we did some great stuff. I've had talked about it before on the podcast so i won't bore people but listen You know if you ever get a chance to work with such a close friend who you just like family that was that was that period for me. I will cherish the. Here's what else that can go so horribly seriously can because you know listen we work with friends on a regular basis and it can potentially go horribly wrong when it's the right combination and i think the thing that was so perfect about you and i we had very different skill sets and yet a lot of are there is a lot of overlap too but i think we had such chelsea love and respect for each other and no competition between us. There was no sort of there was none of that. We just wanted our collective selves to win. Yeah totally my only my only regret. I always say this that neither of us went to business. School gives him would have been nice to have some business acumen as opposed to just because we were very creative very good sales he had no idea what your butt lift. Said it was fun. It was really fun lasted as long as it showed so then at a certain point says you went on to run development for a company in new york for a few years. What what was it like what. What was the moment where you realized. I can't remember if it was like overnight or if it was gradual but but it was a few years after that where you're just like i'm i'm actually done with ti. So here's what i was saying and i say this all the time and this is my mother's favorite thing to hear not that she'll be listening to your podcast which you might. I'll shave well. Of course you can't depend on parents. I have nothing really. My mother always said to me simpson. You should go into sales. You'd be so good at right and did you say what kind of sales too sales sales in different points. She said you should think about real estate. Be so good at it and of course like everyone else. I had this image of what real estate was right. It's a cliche in every tv. Show in every movie it's an banning you know it's all i thought you're gonna say like everyone else. I don't like listening to my mother. And that much. like irena. my mother as it turns out is almost always right. And so when. I you know i did development for a couple of years and i was back in forced to la all in time. Never some kid you know. I felt like i was always running to something in giving her a kiss in saying you know i'll i'll call you later. It just felt awful. You know that. Paul apparent and you know i also was not a kid. That was a long time ago where i was not a kid. You know the tv business isn't always kind to women. It's not always kind to mothers for sure. And it's not always kind to women at a certain age and so You know i was. I was you know. I parted ways at my development job. And you know the grind of looking for another job and i was just like you know what i came on monday and i said to him think on get my real estate license. I think i wanna just listen. We were two income family. And and you know i made decent money in my and you know we sat down and crunched numbers and said can we do this and so he said sure. Why not. let's do it. Let's try it so you've got your license enin. You joined a brokerage firm and like what was the first year. Like because i know. That's like the most daunting part right. When you're starting out to get the shit listings. you gotta work your way Like how did you get those series status. No joe because let's be clear resume. You don't make anything real estate unless you do business. You don't get a page you what you kill you eat what you kill and a long time between animals. Any have to figure out how to make that work in. Luckily we had irene income. But it wasn't those first couple of years really tough a little bit of beginner's luck Was leaned for a while. But i'm also an incredibly driven ambitious person. I said crazy huge goals for myself and it probably took me until the end of year two before. I really started to feel confident. That i was going to be okay and then every year for probably three four five years i would double my business from the year before it because you knew that you had the scale like the it was. I think you knew you were good at it out of the out of the gate even if it had to catch up to the success of right yeah. So here's here's what. My mother was right about.

Susan new york twenty monday simpson both first year orton mazal tov two income irena Paul apparent One year old twenty eight first couple of years three four five years twenty years Latifah two thousand four years
"susan horowitz" Discussed on REALITY OF REALITY

REALITY OF REALITY

08:40 min | 1 year ago

"susan horowitz" Discussed on REALITY OF REALITY

"The backyard. And you would have to call the It was like local basically. Yeah it was awful. This susan horri- for the current affair. I am so sorry for like you had to learn how to finesse that conversation so they wouldn't hang up on you and you had to find a new way to say if you could just talk. Your story could help just one person you know he had to find. You had to just be fearless and it was. That was maybe the greatest thing ever learned my life now. Did it get to a point where that started. Phil really sleazy bike lane the first hour. I mean 'cause for me working. It's the same thing as local news like a kid gets hit by a car. And you're like oh my god. We have our lead story. And then you're like you. I'm so disgusting. So it's really the people that stay with that and are able to do it their whole lives. I mean god bless like being an ambulance being a defense attorney like we need them so good for you all right. so irena. about seventy years later your career started. Yeah now where were you in. Susan was that occurred affair. I would exist yet so senior college because you have a really interesting background. Because you're russian and you came to the states. How old were you when you came to the states. I was eleven. Okay so you did. Did you know a word of english. So i actually did. In russia i went to i guess was called a specialized english school where you really started learning a second language english starting second grade so it wasn't totally new to me but at the same time it wasn't second nature and it wasn't super easy in some things i understood in some things i really didn't end. I feel like just probably navy. Typical of Kids that age immigrant his age. I probably the first year now really saying much in school but really listening and watching like a ton of tell. What did you guys were. The shows like the seminole shows. While i watched i watched in charge but i also watched the golden girls glass. You're like a gay man and training at ray -scriminate literally delight from one to the other. And you my parents works. I came home from school. And i had several hours of just basically sitting in front of the tv watching whatever was on I mean i'm sure there's some cartoons and things that are like to and thirty minutes before would come home. I would cook do homework but it definitely. I think it's probably how i got comfortable with english. How i learned not just english slang pop culture. You know all those references there are important to just being a person in the world the society. You know whatever her first words were thank you for being a friend okay. So you ended up at nyu. No slouch and then number. I did not end up in. Nyu pretend waiting for this whole time. I thought it was. Nyu this is life changing. Why did i always think that my fordham's fine we'll give it to. You really discuss okay. So then when you're afforded what what did you study. Play stuff theater. I studied theater because For a minute. I thought i wanted to be an actress but the truth is i just wanted to kind of be in that world. Nine didn't know when you're young. You're so limited in the profession that you're aware of their sort of like basic things Doctor nurse so lawyer also being an immigrant like you're not seeing your family here in a variety of different. You know things that are available. Yeah but like even knowing that. I'd wanna work in to your wanna work in cedar. You don't necessarily understand that they're like fifty different things that you can do being eater and it doesn't mean that you have to be on stage or on camera because i figured out pretty quickly but actually didn't like that i wasn't good at it So i shifted my focus to directing. And i really liked that and i did some other things with friends plays at that stage management lighting. Operator all that kind of behind the scenes stuff. And i really like that. A lot better being on stage was not like so. Then what made you even apply for internship. Vh1 if you're headed in the theater direction. Because i think. I sort of weirdly practical for somebody that age and i was really thinking. Yes i loved theater but do i want my life to be you know every single night i am at the theater because that's my job. Do you know what i mean. Style almost was considering. Not you know i thought opening in television could be really great to it's close to now it's the same kind of you know in my mind that was a creative fund yield Wanted to shroud. You know having an internship because ahead of the reich theater internships that so just something different than i wanted to try. I realized that i really liked it. I've known you for a long time extremely smart but you're also A very quick study and so when You know when. I went back to vh one and i was working with you. I was amazed you have been in the business ten minutes in. You're already. I was like this girl is gonna move up very quickly because you just like is interesting. What you said about Being the little girl like in the classroom. That was just listening. And not talking. Because first of all. When i met you. We're like that. You're super shy. And i think that you are absorbing so much and that's how you were learning. And i don't think it's that you know it's not that easy especially you know for i. I think that you know people can be good at producing. But i think to have like a natural knack for and to learn it that quickly. I don't think that easy. So so i saw you move up really quickly and you're also was very ambitious. So at what point did like how long did actually take from when you were like from intern to getting higher fulltime to like basically show running within a few years right well. I think i was an intern at the beginning of my senior year. College and i think maybe few months it i was offered. I mean i think it was a more or less full-time p position because most of my classes weren't night. So i think i worked for days. Weeks odds allow one day to do like some of my day classes. And i started as a pa. And i think. I ended up getting promoted navy once a year from the beginning. Pa ap story producer segment producer. Whatever because at the beginning the aba. Vh1 the majority of the shows that i did were What would you call him. The like base cut the asam clip shows but then we did some behind the scenes. Things don't even know what to call it like making a movie kind of a special. You know so. It's really a mix of things and it wasn't until after each one. I ended up at mtv news for a little bit. Which i think was so probably not the right fit for me But sweet sixteen. Yes yes but that was. That was a totally different category. That was way more. Storytelling unite the fact. That the stories you're telling are very straightforward very fluffy. But they're meant to be fun in their mentality exaggerated in they're meant to be entertaining and that was definitely fun. I don't wanna say was easy easy because obviously it was a lot of work but it.

Susan russia ten minutes Phil english one day mtv news eleven first year Nine first hour about seventy years later second grade first words thirty minutes Nyu golden girls one person each one once a year
"susan horowitz" Discussed on REALITY OF REALITY

REALITY OF REALITY

08:18 min | 1 year ago

"susan horowitz" Discussed on REALITY OF REALITY

"Hello hello this is reality of reality. I'm elise arose in a longtime tv producer and development executive every week on the podcast. I talked to interesting people in all aspects of unscripted content. Okay so before. I introduce my guess. I just wanted to let you know some stuff that i've been watching the last week or two i binged cobra kai with my daughter season. Three it was fun. I mean it's a silly show. But it's a lot of fun and i i recommend it. If you like that kind of eighty s and a stall dick kitsch. I watched three episodes of surviving death. A net flex. It's really interesting. If you're into that kinda thing. I do want to watch the rest of it and i like it. I mean some of it silly and kind of you know out there but a lot of it is really also so i listen if you're interested at all and what happens after we die and you're open to that i really recommended. I think it's very well done. Also i started watching tiger. The documentary tiger woods on hbo the first part aired on sunday night and then the second part airs. This sunday. i'm trying to get one of the directors on. Hopefully that will happen great. I knew it'd be great. It's so great. I mean again you know could care less about golf and You really don't have to care about gov to be interested in the story there's just so many interesting facets of his life and his relationship with his father and kind of you know insight into who is as a person and i guess why he blew his life up. But i anticipate we're gonna find out a lot more about that in episode two and lastly just for some fun I started watching mr mayor. Which is the new ted danson sitcom on. Well it's on nbc. But i was watching it on hulu. It's fun it's tina fey like her into her shows. It's it's a lot of fun so today on the podcast. Two of my very close friends. Susan horowitz and irena grubman. They are partners in real estate. And they partners in life. And i've been wanting to talk to them forever. Because i had this name of a book really for them stuck in my head from reality to real estate and i thought it could be really interesting and fun podcast. Not just because they're friends for so long and we have such a great report. But also because i. I'm always interested by people who switched careers kind of midlife. And i know a lot of us in entertainment. Whenever we're asked what else would we do. Usually it's like. I have no idea but seems like a lot of us. Say i could see myself going into real estate or flipping houses so And it's interesting because we do talk about a lot of similarities in selling real estate and selling shows or content. Susan and i had a company together way back when we go down memory lane in that You know just sort of some of our experiences together. And they're based in montclair new jersey. So we talk a little bit about the celebrity seen going on among enjoy well. Isn't this exciting. We are long last doing the podcast. I've been dreaming of. I had a title for like a year and a half ago. I think i texted you. Well i think. I said this should be the name of your book from reality real estate. You're welcome and then i said well let's do a podcast on it so while while was said so welcome. Were very excited to be with you as you might imagine. I mean i can only imagine begging me. I finally had to just give it to you mike. God highlight of our year. Obviously well that and they hilaria baldwin staff of you've been following that she has not my god we'll side mark. It's the best end of year like post christmas gift. I never knew him. We can't we'll tell you later but has Allen come out my god. He released like the craziest in gram. He's crazy as someone said on twitter there like isn't the fact that she's married to alec baldwin the first red flag which is fair which is fair. Yeah so that's a really fun thing. Okay so as i said in my intro. I've known you for a very long time s- probably longer than most anyone i've had on the podcast as soon as you and i met a fee. H one in nineteen ninety nine. You're my boss. And that i met arena. I think in two thousand When she started if the h. one. And i was. I came back. Maybe it's two thousand one. I back to freelance one. Yeah oh god. The dates are fuzzy. It's been a long time a long time. So okay so we're going to you know it's always a little tricky with two people With the fact that you guys are in the same places is good. So we're gonna start where i usually start. Which is at the beginning. So let's start with you. How how did you so you start your all that you started reality was even reality. You started in talk shows right so like what was ally like. Okay i wanna work tacos or was that just like that's what's available to me yet. No so here's how it when it was like this. I wanted to work in broadcast. Tv because prior to i been doing Corporate videos and it was not what i fantasized about. I really wanted to be in the broadcast for And i ended up getting a job at a current affair too. That was. I was for a long time. Very good at going to shows that had one year left their lights. Not that i was grimly. Anything under current affair. And i was there for its last year and the funeral dinner table. The funeral in kearns. They're the future of current affair. Your wrap party was literally a funeral. Everyone were black ever own worth lag. And but if uc irvine mary jo were there and cater mccain lynn and like it was like maize the greatest of all of the best heard incubated that was the incubator for surreal life. Basically and then when a current affair was over. I got a call from gordon elliott and i ended up going there and then i did that for a while and then i think for yeah because when i was at corn gordon elliott. Did you know the fagin twins. Vh1 today proceed you. I don't i don't know. I don't remember that they're the best Leslie in cynthia fagan's says they're awesome. They're amazing producers like hard core old school right producers. And i think tonight. No them for gordon or current affair. Can't remember which one but they ended up cindy ended up. Vh one doing an elvis presley gigs. Special for like the four hundred fiftieth anniversary of his death or one of those and she called me up and asked me to come and work with her. I i don't think i ever knew how you ended up there. That's creatine oh my okay. So what's the number. One thing that working at a tabloid newsmagazine taught you like that helps you with your career and honestly my whole career in my entire life You can't be afraid of anything. Because when i was at a current affair what i what my job was at a current affair was as called like a story producer. Something basically what that meant. This is how old i am. And how will that job was. We used to get the newspapers every day. We'd open up the newspaper. I was assigned. Like i don't know five or six. Newspapers houston is one of them. I can't remember what the other ones were. But you would open up the papers and you go through the stories. A new those stories like the football star who hung himself in.

Susan horowitz alec baldwin Susan Leslie irena grubman elise arose five Two six tiger woods today second part last week three episodes sunday night last year two thousand tonight montclair new jersey hilaria baldwin
"susan horowitz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"susan horowitz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Dave Mattingly. There are four days left in the 2020 presidential campaign. President Trump and Democratic nominee Joe Biden are focusing on the Midwest this afternoon. Each is holding campaign events in Wisconsin and Minnesota. The president will also visit Michigan. Trump and Biden each campaign yesterday in Tampa, Florida. Stephanie Column B Me with member station WSF has more. Thousands of Trump supporters stood shoulder to shoulder for hours in the Florida heat to cheer on the president. Most didn't wear masks, but said they felt perfectly safe because they were outside. Hours later, Biden hosted a driving event sum of the 200 or so supporters who showed up in their cars said they appreciated the safety measures given the rising number of Corona virus cases in the state. The U. S continues to lead the world in cases of the Corona virus, with nearly nine million infections reported since the pandemic began. As will stone reports, outbreaks in the Midwest and West or driving up hospitalizations for the first time, the U. S added more than half a million new Corona virus cases in just a week. Nationally, cases are up more than 40% compared to just two weeks ago, and every region of the country is seeing a big increase. Although the Midwest is still the worst affected. Meanwhile, hospitals in more than 35 states are seeing a surge of patients, especially Texas and Utah. This is NPR news. And this is WNBC in New York at 7 32. Good morning. I'm David 1st 43 degrees now in Central Park rain this morning clearing skies this afternoon. New Jersey election officials are telling voters to avoid using the Postal Service to return their ballots. State Division of Elections spokesperson Alicia Dalesandro says reports indicate the post office is overwhelmed. I'm saying that for all New Jersey voters at in the election if you haven't put it in the mail Take a different option to return it. Voters can return their ballot to a secure drop box. Each county has a minimum of 10 Dropbox locations. Voters can also hand deliver their ballot to their county Elections department. Or drop it off at their polling place on Election day. Nearly three million ballots have already arrived. That is 75% of the state's record breaking turnout in 2016. While Mayor de Blasio has committed to installing WiFi and homeless shelters to help Children with remote learning. It turns out it will take much longer than expected. These Morella, Ivory reports many homeless Children have had problems studying remotely because very few shelters have Internet access. The city says it will install WiFi in 240 family shelters. But in a letter to the legal aid society, they said that wouldn't happen until the summer of 2021 legal aid attorney Susan Horowitz says that's not fast enough. But the longer it goes, the more instruction kids are missing, which is putting them further and further behind the city, says around 30 shelters that have had the most problems. We'll have WiFi by this winter. A new report on the wages of New York City municipal workers found a staggering pay gap between men and women and between white workers and everyone else. City Council Speaker Corey Johnson called the findings damning. Now we know because of the law that we pass and because of this data That is happening in New York City. It's been happening for years in seemingly a systemic way. In 2018, the council passed a law requiring the city to report payroll data. The preliminary report published yesterday found men made an average of $4500 more than women. Black workers made $7600 a year less than white workers and Asian workers made 6500 less Latino workers earned about $8700 a year less than non Hispanic and non Latino employees..

New York City President Trump Joe Biden Midwest NPR president Florida New Jersey Dave Mattingly City Council Elections department Washington Wisconsin State Division of Elections Corey Johnson Stephanie Column Minnesota
"susan horowitz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:02 min | 1 year ago

"susan horowitz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"From NPR News in Washington. I'm Dave Mattingly, President Trump and Democratic nominee Joe Biden will be campaigning in the Midwest today as the 2020 campaign nears the finish line. Both are holding events in Wisconsin and Minnesota. The president will also visit Michigan. Trump and Biden each campaigned in Tampa, Florida yesterday. The president touted the rebounding US economy following a report from the Commerce Department of Record growth during the third quarter. This is the greatest number 33.1%. USB two weeks ago, I would have said I'll take 12% 12% would have been very nice. Nobody ever heard of 12%. Biden repeated his criticism of how the president has handled the Corona virus pandemic, and he predicted Democratic supporters will make their voices heard on November 3rd. We literally are going to change the course of this country for generations to come. 82 million Americans have already voted by mail or in person. Early voting ends this weekend in a number of large states, including Wisconsin and Florida. At least six deaths are reported from Hurricane Zeta and its remnants. Fatalities are reported in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Georgia. Louisiana Governor John Bell Edwards describes the damage in Grand Isle is catastrophic. It's a barrier island south of New Orleans. He's called in the National Guard to help with search and rescue efforts. This is NPR news from Washington. And this is WNBC in New York. It's 5 32. Good morning. I'm David first rain this morning, clearing this afternoon 44 degrees now in Central Park. New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy says the recent surge in covert 19 cases in the state means the second wave of the pandemic is imminent. The second wave of the Corona virus is no longer something off in the future. It is coming and it is coming now. We have been seeing the numbers of new cases grow exponentially across the past several weeks. New cases are now averaging nearly 1500 a day and hospitalizations have reached a three month high. The state's positivity rate for tests is also above 6%. Murphy says The rising numbers are in large part attributable to private gatherings and since there's no link to widespread transmission in reopen schools Or indoor restaurants. The governor hasn't implemented any new lock down restrictions, but he says nothing is off the table. While Mayor de Blasio has committed to installing WiFi in homeless shelters to help Children with remote learning, it turns out it will take much longer than expected. Morella, Ivory reports. Many homeless Children have had problems studying remotely because very few shelters have Internet access. The city says it will install WiFi in 240 family shelters. But in a letter to the legal aid society, they said, that wouldn't happen until the summer of 2021. Legal aid attorney Susan Horowitz says. That's not fast enough. But the longer it goes, the more instruction kids are missing, which is putting them further and further behind the city, says around 30 shelters that have had the most problems. We'll have WiFi by this winter. The empty has approved a rent relief program for the shops and restaurants that line there terminals and which have seen a drop in sales and foot traffic and eye sees Emily Lang reports, tenants were allowed to put off the ramp payments from April to July. Now none of that rent is owed and current rent will be reduced significantly. National banks or retail chains aren't eligible. The program is intended for small New York City businesses like Lilac chocolates and Grand Central Terminal. Chris Taylor is one of the owners. He says The program is a big help, but he's not expecting business to pick up any time soon. Are we in the clear? No, I mean, you know the train traffic is down significantly in the tourism traffic is virtually non existent. The reductions will be in place until 2023 or until ridership is back at 75%. Rainy.

Joe Biden president President Trump Governor Phil Murphy NPR News Governor John Bell Edwards New York Wisconsin Washington Morella Florida Louisiana New Orleans Chris Taylor Midwest New Jersey Michigan Dave Mattingly Tampa
"susan horowitz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"susan horowitz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Live from NPR news on Janine Herbst ally was governor says the state has broken its own Corona virus. New case record In just a few days, Governor Mike DeWine, a Republican, says the state has another 3590 cases today, and he's pleading with Ojai inst to follow social distancing rules virus is raging. Throughout the state of Ohio. There's no place to hide. He says he wants to establish hopefully, defense teams to assess the virus has spread in different communities. An investigation by Democrats on the House Judiciary Committee finds the Trump Administration's family separation policy of the U. S border proceeded despite administrative shortcomings in the early stages of the initiative. Beth verdict of member station WNYC reports The findings were lied on government documents. Democrats say the documents reveal reckless incompetence and intentional cruelty. They show the administration developed its family separation policy in February of 2017 to deter migrants from crossing the border. A pilot program started in El Paso. But even though officials discovered they couldn't track all the separated parents and Children, they expanded the policy in May of 2018. Two months later, a federal judge ordered the administration to reunify the family's AH process filled with problems. This month, the administration acknowledged it hasn't been able to locate the parents of 545 Children for NPR news. I'm Beth for take in New York. Clean up from Hurricane Zeta is underway in New Orleans. At least three people died. Hundreds of thousands are without power from heavy rains and strong gusty winds. But Governor John Bell Edwards says polling places are among the sites taking priority in the effort to restore electricity. He says he's consulting with the Louisiana secretary of state to see whether some polling sites may have to be changed. Ahead of next week's election. Wall Street higher by the closing bell. You're listening to NPR news. And this is WNBC in New York. I'm Sean Carlson. Early voters in Brooklyn today We're beaming as they left the Barclays Center polling site in spite of the rainy weather after they said there was no wait, and it took just a few minutes to get in and out. Elaine Bruder turns 34 today and she bonded with the poll worker who checked her in who also happen to be celebrating her birthday today. We kind of talked about how this is like the most important thing you could do The best gift you could give yourself is participating in democracy. But Bruder says she won't know if she's really gotten the president she's been waiting for until election day next Tuesday, or she hopes not long afterwards. Well, maybe Blasio has committed to installing WiFi and homeless shelters to help Children with remote learning. It turns out, it'll take much longer than expected. W Nice he's more alive. Rack has more. Many homeless Children have had problems studying remotely because very few shelters have Internet access. The city says it will install WiFi in 240 family shelters. But in a letter to the legal aid society, they said that wouldn't happen until the summer of 2021 legal aid attorney Susan Horowitz says that's not fast enough. But the longer it goes, the more instruction kids are missing, which is putting them further and further behind the city, says around 30 shelters that have had the most problems. We'll have WiFi by this winter. More than 78,000. People in New York and New Jersey, applied for unemployment last week. That's a slight decline from the previous week. U S Department of Labor says more than 52,000 people filed claims in New York of 4% decrease More than 26,000. People did So in New Jersey. That's a 7% drop. New York says It's saw fewer layoffs and accommodation and food services earlier this month nationwide more than 750,000 people filed for unemployment last week. For.

New York Trump Administration NPR Elaine Bruder Governor Mike DeWine Governor John Bell Edwards Beth New Jersey Janine Herbst Ohio New Orleans Sean Carlson Ojai Blasio Hurricane Zeta Department of Labor WNYC El Paso
"susan horowitz" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:34 min | 2 years ago

"susan horowitz" Discussed on KQED Radio

"But I mean, who's free? Eli Armel lives in California and is the vocalist for a metal band called Salto. He's thinking about July 4th a little differently this year. I mean, there is this black folks like me who are not free to just walk around in their own neighbourhood for fear that they might get. The police called on them. So I mean, I know I don't have is much freedom. I feel like as everyone else does, Mr Arnold says he's always felt like this. But this year that feeling has grown sharper and here's pastor used to go like hang out at a friend's party. I live down the street to Disneyland. So we've got man watched fireworks. For now, I've realized that a lot of the friends that I used to hang out with don't think my life matters. So those aren't people I really want to hang out with anymore. I feel very isolated in that respect. I don't think I think differently about it. Perhaps it's even more accent it. There's more emphasis more impact on the meaning of July 4th on her lead to raises a professor emeritus at Arizona State University. Her father's family immigrated from Honduras and her mother's family was part of the great migration of African Americans in this country. And so there was always an idea of betterment of striving of improving. We knew where we came from. We had this wholeness, and we celebrated as family members. The fourth of July, There were the barbecue, so I had all these good memories of what the fourth means, As I got older, Of course, I said, Well, maybe we Arm have not cashed in yet on this American dream, Miss Ray says she started to think more critically about the holiday after she got to university I was introduced to Langston Hughes in his famous signature poem I to Sing America. They tell me to go to the kitchen. That's where I eat. But I eat, but I am American Frederick Douglas. What is the Fourth of July mean? To the Negro. All of these ideas. Thes metaphors are saying we are a part of the Fourth of July and we want Should be invested in that complete reality that complete acceptance and, she says, despite police brutality and decades of deeply rooted racism. She still feels her worth is an American. Today. The Fourth of July is home. I've traveled the world over and I always wanted to come back home. And so this is where we have to work to improve. The situation to be a part of this social movement. Apart of black lives matter apart of striving for racial unity. Honestly, I think I'm not thinking about July 4th differently just because of always had a thing about it differently. Joel Burrell is a second year medical student in Spokane, Washington. So much out of immigrants. My pants from Ghana, West Africa, mostly black man that's grown up the United States. So because of that, July 4th has always kind of been a day of reflection for me, and I think a large segment of the US population has always grappled with the meaning of July 4th. Mr Prevail, says he feels lucky to have grown up is the child of immigrants during these Piercing conversations these days about what the Fourth of July means to different people. They feel it's giving me kind of that perspective to put myself in someone else's shoes to understand that the world isn't black or white, but there's so many different, diverse perspectives. Joel Bovell has plans to celebrate today and then To reflect thinking about what did July 4th mean 244 years ago for different types of people? What does it mean today for those different groups of people as well? So for people like an undocumented immigrant or mother of a black boy? What does freedom mean for them when people are literally trying to deport you or Kim, take away your son at any moment? Starting July 4th is the time to think about what independence means, but it has to be equal parts celebration of how far we've come, but also recognition of how far we stuff to go. But Eli Arnold The vocalist in California says that He's finding it hard to think about celebrating at all this year. I'm just going to let off some fireworks in the street and then go inside before someone calls the cops on me. Let me share. We're celebrating America's Independence it, sire. 1 200 Something birthday. Cool. What else we got on the table. You know, we have 130,000 deaths from Corona virus. People are marching in the streets because of racial inequality. People think that my life mattering. Is a point of contention. So what are we celebrating? Eli, Arnold, Joe Albertville and Anneli to raise Friends often start in New York. Like BJ Liederman, who writes our theme music. People have been moving to the suburbs for decades. But now the Corona virus outbreak may have Haitian that movement, even in New York. That has a lot of people talking about the future of cities. NPR's Uri Berliner reports. Susan Horowitz has never seen anything like it. We're seeing 20 offers on houses. We're seeing things going 30% over the asking price. It's kind of insane. Horowitz is a veteran Realestate agent, and she's talking about the frantic, hyper competitive market in Montclair, New Jersey. Suburb about 12 miles from New York City. It is a blood sport. Montclair is the kind of suburb that even appeals to demanding New Yorkers. It has yoga studios restaurants, you can walk to art galleries, even a film festival. Horowitz says. It's always been popular. But now on a completely different skill every last bit of it is covert related. New Yorkers used to say maybe one of their one day now they've decided we don't have look e lose anymore. We don't have people coming out. A sort of test the market and see what's out. There are which says people are eager to buy like Marion Cantor and Steve can a plume. They're expecting their first child in September, Miriam works in ad sales, Steve's and risk management, and Until recently,.

Susan Horowitz Mr Arnold Montclair California America Eli Armel United States New York Eli Arnold Disneyland Steve Arizona State University Corona New York City Mr Prevail Langston Hughes Joel Bovell professor Joel Burrell
"susan horowitz" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:33 min | 2 years ago

"susan horowitz" Discussed on KCRW

"But I mean, who's free? Eli Armel lives in California and is the vocalist for a metal band called Salto. He's thinking about July 4th a little differently this year. I mean, there is this black folks like me who are not three to just walk around in their own neighbourhood for fear that they might get. The police called on them. So I mean, I don't. I don't have as much freedom. I feel like as everyone else does. Mr. Arnold says he'd always felt like this. But this year that feeling has grown sharper and here's pastor used to go like hang out at a friend's party. I live down the street from Disneyland. So we've got man watched fireworks before, But now I realize that a lot of the friends that I used to hang out with don't think my life matters. So those aren't people I really want to hang out with anymore. I feel very isolated in that respect. I don't think I think differently about it. Perhaps it's even more accent it. There's more emphasis more impact on the meaning of July 4th on her lead two races, a professor emeritus at Arizona State University. Her father's family immigrated from Honduras and her mother's family was part of the great migration of African Americans in this country. And so there was always an idea of betterment of striving of improving. We knew where we came from. We had this wholeness, and we celebrated as family members. The fourth of July, There were the barbecue, so I had all these good memories of what the fourth means, As I got older, Of course, I said, Well, maybe we Arm have not cashed in yet on this American dream, Ms Wei Ai says she started to think more critically about the holiday after she got to university. I was introduced to Langston Hughes in his famous signature poem I to Sing America. They tell me to go to the kitchen. That's where I eat. But I eat, but I am American Frederick Douglas. What is the Fourth of July mean? To the Negro. All of these ideas. Thes metaphors are saying we are a part of the Fourth of July and we want Should be invested in that complete reality that complete acceptance and, she says, despite police brutality and decades of deeply rooted racism. She still feels her worth as an American. Today, the fourth of July his home I've traveled the world over and I always wanted to come back home, and so this is where we have to work to improve the situation. To be a part of this social movement. Apart of black lives matter apart of striving for racial unity. Honestly, I think I'm not thinking about July 4th differently just because of always had a thing about it differently. Joel Burrell is a second year medical student in Spokane, Washington. So much out of immigrants my parent from Ghana, West Africa, mostly black man. That's grown up in the United States. So because of that, July 4th has always kind of been a day of reflection for me, and I think a large segment of the US population has always grappled with the meaning of July 4th. Mr Pavel says he feels lucky to have grown up is the child of immigrants during these Piercing conversations these days about what the Fourth of July means to different people they feel gets giving me kind of that perspective to put myself in someone else's shoes to understand up. The world isn't black or white. But there's so many different, diverse perspectives. Joel Bovell has plans to celebrate today and then To reflect thinking about what did July 4th mean 244 years ago for different types of people? What does it mean today for those different groups of people as well? So for people like an undocumented immigrant or mother of a black boy? What does freedom mean for them when people are literally trying to deport you or Kim, take away your son at any moment? I think, July 4th is the time to think about what independence means, But it has to be equal parts celebration of how far we've come, but also recognition of how far we stuff to go. But Eli Arnold The vocalist in California, says that he's finding it hard to think about celebrating at all. This year. I'm just going to let off some fireworks in the street and then go inside before someone calls the cops on me. I mean, sure, we're celebrating America's independence it, sire. What? 200 something birthday. Cool. What else we got on the table, you know? We have 130,000 deaths from Corona virus. People are marching in the streets because of racial inequality. People think that my life mattering is a point of contention. So what are we celebrating? Eli Arnold, Joel Brill and Anneli to raise Friends often start in New York, like BJ Liederman, who writes our theme music. People have been moving to the suburbs for decades. But now the Corona virus outbreak may of Haitian that movement even in New York. That has a lot of people talking about the future of cities. NPR's Uri Berliner reports. Susan Horowitz has never seen anything like it. We're seeing 20 offers on houses. We're seeing things going 30% over the asking price. It's kind of insane. Horowitz is a veteran Realestate agent. And she's talking about the frantic, hyper competitive market in Montclair, New Jersey, a suburb about 12 miles from New York City. It is a blood sport. Montclair is the kind of suburb that even appeals to demanding New Yorkers. It has yoga studios restaurants. You can walk to art galleries, even a film festival, Horowitz says. It's always been popular. But now on a completely different scale, every last bit of it is Cove In related New Yorkers used to say, Maybe we'll move there One day now. They've decided we don't have look e lose anymore. We don't have people coming out. A sort of test the market and see what's out. There are which says people are eager to buy like Miriam Cantor and Steve can a plume. They're expecting their first child in September. Miriam works in ad sales, Steve's and risk management. And.

Susan Horowitz Mr. Arnold California America Eli Armel Miriam Cantor United States Montclair New York Eli Arnold Langston Hughes Steve Arizona State University Joel Bovell Corona Joel Burrell Disneyland Mr Pavel professor
"susan horowitz" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:21 min | 2 years ago

"susan horowitz" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In New York. Like BJ Liederman, who writes our theme music. People have been moving to the suburbs for decades. But now the Corona virus outbreak may have Haitian that movement, even in New York. That has a lot of people talking about the future of cities. NPR's Uri Berliner reports. Susan Horowitz has never seen anything like it. We're seeing 20 offers on houses. We're seeing things going 30% over the asking price. It's kind of insane. Horowitz is a veteran Realestate agent. And she's talking about the frantic, hyper competitive market in Montclair, New Jersey, a suburb about 12 miles from New York City. It is a blood sport. Montclair is the kind of suburb that even appeals to demanding New Yorkers. It has yoga studios. Restaurants. You can walk to art galleries, even a film festival, Horowitz says. It's always been popular. But now on a completely different scale, every last bit of it is covert related. New Yorkers used to say maybe one of their one day now they've decided we don't have. Look you lose anymore. We don't have people coming out. A sort of test the market and see what's out. There are which says people are eager to buy like Miriam Cantor and Steve can a plume. They're expecting their first child in September. Miriam works in ad sales, Steve's and risk management, and Until recently they were living in a one bedroom apartment on Manhattan's Upper West Side with their dog buoy as the virus spiked in the spring there, anxiety about going outside mounted, so it was coming in and out of the building at least 4 to 5 times a day to walk him. It was getting really stressful. Miriam and Steve had been planning to move to the suburbs since January. The pandemic clinched it being an epicenter, the washing of the hands just the nerves of it all. It was pushing us out the door for sure. Out the door to Montclair in late April, their offer on a colonial with black shutters and a big front porch beat out for other biz. Miriam says they paid almost 20% above the asking price. You think that would have cost even more if they waited, And so on June 1st, they moved in and officially became suburbanites. Everything came to the moment we could let the dog out in the yard. Similar stories are playing out throughout the Greater New York area since March, Around 10,000 New York residents applied to change their address with the Postal Service and moved to Connecticut. That's according to Hearst, Connecticut media and in the suburbs north of the city and further upstate Here's real estate agent Monica Schwarber in the month of April, where we typically would get Navy 75 increase in a month. We had over 400 enquiries, ditching the city and buying a quiet place away from the crowds takes money. Only the relatively well off can do it. It's not really an option for a low wage workers who take the subway and worry about getting sick. But for those who have the option of moving, it's not just anxiety over the virus. Glenn Kalman is the CEO of the national real estate brokerage Redfin. He says remote work has offered a new kind of freedom covered has changed what people want. They want that house in the hills, nearly that's far away from everyone else. Work from home is also liberated them people leaving congested cities for the suburbs. It's the story of America and has been for many generations. There was a period about a decade ago, when big cities like New York, Chicago and Los Angeles grew quite alive. That's unheard of William Fry is a demographer at the Brookings Institution since they invented the car. I don't think We saw a few years where cities as a group are growing faster than suburbs. All that got a lot of media attention, especially about millennials in Brooklyn, but the picture has shifted once again over the past few years, there was more movement to the suburbs. More movement to smaller size metropolitan areas. So does that mean that a superstar city like New York will wither away? Fry doesn't think so. He says. New York is resilient. Its appeal is timeless, and maybe members of Gen Z will flock there just like the Millennials did a decade ago. Worry. Berliner NPR news Willie Nelson has some new songs on a new album, so I really need to say anything more than that. It's called first rows of spring, the first time that he saw everything had changed overnight. Love started. First rule of Willie Nelson joins us now from his famous ranch outside of Austin. Mr Nelson, Thanks so much for being with us about I've read that this is the song that kind of got this album started. Yeah, but he can.

New York Montclair New York City Miriam Cantor Susan Horowitz Willie Nelson Steve William Fry NPR New Jersey Uri Berliner BJ Liederman Glenn Kalman front porch Connecticut Gen Z Brookings Institution Manhattan Postal Service
"susan horowitz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:33 min | 2 years ago

"susan horowitz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"But I mean, who's free? Eli Armel lives in California and is the vocalist for a metal band called Salto. He's thinking about July 4th a little differently this year. I mean, there is this black folks like me who are not three to just walk around in their own neighbourhood for fear that they might get. The police called on them. So I mean, I don't. I don't have much freedom. I feel like as everyone else does, Mr. Arnold says he's always felt like this. But this year that feeling has grown sharper and years passed. I used to go like hang out at a friend's party. I live down the street in Disneyland. So we've gone there and watch the fireworks before. But now I've realized that a lot of the friends that I used to hang out with don't think my life matters. So those aren't people I really want to hang out with anymore. I feel very isolated in that respect. I don't think I think differently about it. Perhaps it's even more accent it. There's more emphasis more impact on the meaning of July 4th on her lead to raises a professor emeritus at Arizona State University. Her father's family immigrated from Honduras and her mother's family was part of the great migration of African Americans in this country. And so there was always an idea of betterment of striving of improving. We knew where we came from. We had this wholeness and we celebrated. As family members. The fourth of July There were the barbecue, so I had all these good memories of what the fourth means, As I got older, Of course, I said, Well, maybe we Arm have not cashed in yet on this American dream his way says she started to think more critically about the holiday After she got to university, I was introduced to Langston Hughes in his famous signature poem I to Sing America. They tell me to go to the kitchen. That's where I eat. But I eat, but I am American. Frederick Douglas. What is the Fourth of July mean? To the Negro. All of these ideas. Thes metaphors are saying we are a part of the Fourth of July and we want Should be invested in that complete reality that complete acceptance and, she says, despite police brutality and decades of deeply rooted racism. She still feels her worth is an American. Today, the fourth of July his home I've traveled the world over and I always wanted to come back home, and so this is where we have to work to improve the situation. To be a part of this social movement. Apart of black lives matter apart of striving for racial unity. Honestly, I think I'm not thinking about July 4th differently just because of always had a thing about it differently. Joel Burrell is a second year medical student in Spokane, Washington. So much out of immigrants my parent from Ghana, West Africa, mostly black man. That's grown up in the United States. So because of that, July 4th has always kind of been a day of reflection for me, and I think a large segment of the US population has always grappled with the meaning of July 4th. Mr Pavel says he feels lucky to have grown up is the child of immigrants during these Pearson conversations these days about what the Fourth of July means to different people they feel gets giving me kind of that perspective to put myself in someone else's shoes to understand that the world isn't black or white, but there's so many different, diverse perspectives. Joel Bovell has plans to celebrate today and then To reflect thinking about what did July 4th mean 244 years ago for different types of people? What does it mean today for those different groups of people as well? So for people like an undocumented immigrant or mother of a black boy? What does freedom mean for them when people are literally trying to deport you or Kim, take away your son at any moment? Starting July 4th is the time to think about what independence means, but it has to be equal parts celebration of how far we've come, but also recognition of how far we stuff to go. But Eli Arnold The vocalist in California says that He's finding it hard to think about celebrating at all this year. I'm just going to let off some fireworks in the street and then go inside before someone calls the cops on me. I mean, sure, we're celebrating America's independence it, sire. What? 200 something birthday Cool. What else we got on the table, you know? We have 130,000 deaths from Corona virus. People are marching in the streets because of racial inequality. People think that my life mattering is a point of contention. So what are we celebrating Eli Arnold, Joel Burrell and unholy to raise Friends often start in New York, like BJ Liederman, who writes our theme music. People have been moving to the suburbs for decades. But now the Corona virus outbreak may have Haitian that movement, even in New York. That has a lot of people talking about the future of cities. NPR's Uri Berliner reports. Susan Horowitz has never seen anything like it. We're seeing 20 offers on houses. We're seeing things going 30% over the asking price. It's kind of insane. Horowitz is a veteran Realestate agent. And she's talking about the frantic, hyper competitive market in Montclair, New Jersey, a suburb about 12 miles from New York City. It is a blood sport. Montclair is the kind of suburb that even appeals to demanding New Yorkers. It has yoga studios restaurants, you can walk to art galleries, even a film festival. Horowitz says. It's always been popular. But now on a completely different scale, every last bit of it is Cove In related New Yorkers used to say, maybe we'll move there One day now. They've decided we don't have look e lose anymore. We don't have people coming out. A sort of test the market and see what's out there, Roo, it says. People are eager to buy like Miriam Cantor and Steve can a plume. They're expecting their first child in September. Miriam works in ad sales, Steve's and risk management. And.

Susan Horowitz Mr. Arnold Joel Burrell California America New York Eli Armel Miriam Cantor United States Montclair Eli Arnold Steve Joel Bovell Arizona State University Corona Langston Hughes Disneyland professor Mr Pavel
"susan horowitz" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:33 min | 2 years ago

"susan horowitz" Discussed on KCRW

"But I mean, who's free? Eli Armel lives in California and is the vocalist for a metal band called Salto. He's thinking about July 4th a little differently this year. I mean, there is this black folks like me who are not three to just walk around in their own neighbourhood for fear that they might get. The police called on them. So I mean, I don't. I don't have as much freedom. I feel like as everyone else does. Mr. Arnold says he'd always felt like this. But this year that feeling has grown sharper and here's pastor used to go like hang out at a friend's party. I live down the street from Disneyland. So we've got man watched fireworks before, But now I realize that a lot of the friends that I used to hang out with don't think my life matters so those aren't people I really want to hang out with anymore. I feel very isolated in that respect. I don't think I think differently about it. Perhaps it's even more accent it. There's more emphasis more impact on the meaning of July 4th on her lead two races, a professor emeritus at Arizona State University. Her father's family immigrated from Honduras and her mother's family was part of the great migration of African Americans in this country. And so there was always an idea of betterment of striving of improving. We knew where we came from. We had this wholeness, and we celebrated as family members. The fourth of July, There were the barbecue, so I had all these good memories of what the fourth means, As I got older, Of course, I said, Well, maybe we Arm have not cashed in yet on this American dream, Ms Wei Ai says she started to think more critically about the holiday after she got to university. I was introduced to Langston Hughes in his famous signature poem I to Sing America. They tell me to go to the kitchen. That's where I eat. But I eat, but I am American Frederick Douglas. What is the Fourth of July mean? To the Negro. All of these ideas. Thes metaphors are saying we are a part of the Fourth of July and we want Should be invested in that complete reality that complete acceptance and, she says, despite police brutality and decades of deeply rooted racism. She still feels her worth as an American. Today, the fourth of July his home I've traveled the world over and I always wanted to come back home, and so this is where we have to work to improve. The situation to be a part of this social movement. Apart of black lives matter apart of striving for racial unity. Honestly, I think I'm not thinking about July 4th differently just because of always had a thing about it differently. Joel Burrell is a second year medical student in Spokane, Washington. So I'm a child of immigrants. My parent from Ghana, West Africa, mostly black man that's grown up in the United States. So because of that, July 4th has always kind of been a day of reflection for me, and I think a large segment of the US population has always grappled with the meaning of July 4th. Mister Pavel says he feels lucky to have grown up is the child of immigrants during these Piercing conversations these days about what the Fourth of July means to different people I feel gets giving me kind of that perspective to put myself in someone else's shoes to understand up the world isn't black or white. But there's so many different, diverse perspectives. Joel Bovell has plans to celebrate today and then To reflect thinking about what did July 4th mean 244 years ago for different types of people? What does it mean today for those different groups of people as well? So for people like an undocumented immigrant or mother of a black boy? What does freedom mean for them when people are literally trying to deport you or Kim, take away your son at any moment? So I think, July 4th is the time to think about what independence means, But it has to be equal parts celebration of how far we've come, but also recognition of how far we stuff to go. But Eli Arnold The vocalist in California says that He's finding it hard to think about celebrating at all this year. I'm just going to let off some fireworks in the street and then go inside before someone calls the cops on me. I mean, sure, we're celebrating America's independence it, sire. What? 200 something birthday. Cool. What else we got on the table, you know? We have 130,000 deaths from Corona virus. People are marching in the streets because of racial inequality. People think that my life mattering is a point of contention. So what are we celebrating? Eli Arnold, Joel Brill and Anneli to raise Friends often start in New York, like BJ Liederman, who writes our theme music. People have been moving to the suburbs for decades. But now the Corona virus outbreak may of Haitian that movement even in New York. That has a lot of people talking about the future of cities. NPR's Uri Berliner reports. Susan Horowitz has never seen anything like it. We're seeing 20 offers on houses. We're seeing things going 30% over the asking price. It's kind of insane. Horowitz is a veteran Realestate agent. And she's talking about the frantic, hyper competitive market in Montclair, New Jersey, a suburb about 12 miles from New York City. It is a blood sport. Montclair is the kind of suburb that even appeals to demanding New Yorkers. It has yoga studios restaurants, you can walk to art galleries, even a film festival. Horowitz says. It's always been popular. But now on a completely different scale, every last bit of it is Cove In related New Yorkers used to say, maybe we'll move there One day now. They've decided we don't have look e lose anymore. We don't have people coming out. A sort of test the market and see what's out there, Roo it says. People are eager to buy like Miriam Cantor and Steve can a plume. They're expecting their first child in September. Miriam works in ad sales, Steve's and risk management, and.

Susan Horowitz Mr. Arnold California America New York Eli Armel Miriam Cantor United States Montclair Eli Arnold Langston Hughes Steve Arizona State University Joel Bovell Corona Joel Burrell Disneyland professor NPR