5 Burst results for "Susan Foister"

"susan foister" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

01:45 min | 5 months ago

"susan foister" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"We cannot be sponsored by christie's visit christie's to come to find out more about the world's leading auction house in seventeen sixty six action private sales online anytime. Hello it's the weekend. I'm ben lee this week. The world's greatest art heist as netflix documentary hits screens. Who stole gardner museum. Paintings by rembrandt vermeer and many and are we any closer to finding them. I talk to jeff. Ziegler producer of the netflix series. This is a robbery about the ninety. Nine hundred bella. Stewart gardner museum in boston massachusetts. Then a bit later. I talk to actual ruge of the royal academy in london about vaccine passports antonio cohen. Ucla of the tel aviv museum of art in israel where they have green pass scheme for which museums are exempt. And in this week's work of the week i speak to susan foister. Deputy director of the national gallery in london about yank asserts adoration of the kings the subject of a show at the gallery and now an online interactive guide before that you may know that we've launched book club at the.

"susan foister" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

04:51 min | 2 years ago

"susan foister" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Lorry-drivers blockade the yellow vest movement has could for a day of mobilisation tomorrow. So I think we'll be keeping an eye on how that unfolds. Absolutely. We will keep our eyes peeled page. We out of time. Sadly, we did want to get onto a third story. Which is in the guardian. If anyone's interested page two I believe petition to revoke article fifty has neared three million in the time that we're on air. It might have even surpassed about you just. Never know go and have a look at that page Reynolds. Thanks for joining us here on the briefing. Twenty six minutes past twelve finally today. This scream is one of the most famous paintings in the world, but an expert at the British Museum has told the telegraph newspaper here in London that we've been misinterpreting it all along. Let's get more on this now with the art critic is still love it still. It's called the scream and that appears to depict a man screaming. But apparently, it's not as simple as that. Exactly. And the man's not screaming tool. What it is is he's hearing the world around him screaming, which actually seems rather pertinent to today's political forum. But yeah, this is an image that MLK Edvard. Mo the Norwegian artists created actually there's more than one screen as full screams. But there's also a series of black and white prints that he did. And it shows a man walking along a bridge in Oslo. And he's on a walk to his friends background very small, and you can see the world around him echoing and vibrating through a series of circular marks that replicate the face and and the mouth of the figure in the front, but actually he is silent. And he's trying to block out the tormenting noise of the world around him. When you look at the paintings full name, be scream of nature that does sort of invite you into to take notice of you more hints as towards really perhaps being trying to be said here. But do you think the oddest monk was deliberately trying to invite observers to to look closer and beyond the face value? Always was the misinterpret the the ability for it to be misinterpreted with do you think that perhaps passed him buyer? Then I think you'll right on both counts. I think there was the there is the opportunity to look at work. Of art and go beyond the superficial pictorial plane to find another deeper narrative, and obviously the interpretation will vary on who looks at it. Because we all bring our own baggage to works of art. And there is no right to a wrong way of interpreting work of art because it's not like a science or maths where there is only one correct answer. In fact, there's more questions than onces. Well, you what you said earlier reminded me of something that I was discussing ones with the director of collections at the National Gallery. Susan Foister is her name. We were discussing on that occasion. The painting called BA fighting Tamara. And we were looking at the rather varied interpretations that people have of that work. It's often simplified as the old making way for the new the some people even think that it might represent Brexit. You referenced earlier that the the scream could could also be interpreted to represent the current political climate. In many parts of the world. Do you think it matters? How we interpret our is is the secret to good odd. Perhaps how it relates to any given point in time. Exactly. The secret to good art is that it's timeless and talking about the fighting Timur rare. I mean that was one of Turner's greatest pieces, and I've even had people talk to me about it. Particular man, who was a druid in pagan was convinced that actually Turner was trying to describe some sort of a pagan event, and which he wasn't, you know, so everybody has their own interpretation of great works of art and the more abstract. The work goes the more interpretations are available. Well, several versions of the screen will go on the show the British Museum here in London next month. So if you're interested in forming your own interpretation, you'll know exactly where to go is still loved a pleasure to be speaking with you. Thanks for joining us here on the briefing. That's all for today's edition of the program. It was produced by Reese, James and research by leeann go on and Nick money's studio manager was Christie Evans. Tell us how you're listening to our programs head over to monocle dot com slash m twenty four survey. The briefing is back on Monday at the very same time..

Turner British Museum London Susan Foister Reynolds Christie Evans Oslo director Brexit Reese National Gallery Nick money leeann James Twenty six minutes
"susan foister" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:59 min | 4 years ago

"susan foister" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Britain to stick squarely in the world of arts now and bring you a sample from episode nine of action it's a little brother of the cinemas show hosted by ben ryan and tom now you might wonder how the art world speaks to the cinema world but if you saw the on film sky fall has seen a dramatic seeing that took place it was shot in front of the fighting timor morad one of jw turn as most celebrated works and up in rhode island the cinema show maestro wondered over to the national gallery of course where that picture hangs to talk to his deputy director susan foister i think the immediate thing you see is an enormous expense of sky and this slowing sunset the sun is disappearing on the right hand side of the painting and you get a social vortex affect your eyes drawn into the distance by the reflection not just the song in the sky this fact of orange and yellow gloving sky but also across the water and then on the left hand side of the picture all two ships and there's a white house which is the timor air and then in front of it is a black tugboat with a long funnel and far is coming from the funnel which matches the fiery colors of the sunset on the right and the fact that we're actually watching a sunset in the background here that sort of a it hints at what else is being depicted in the picture doesn't it well what we know about the temer rare is tim this painting was made in 1830 eight turner was inspired by a real event the camera was a ship which had fought in the napoleonic wars the battle of trafalgar and is now reach the end of its useful life and was being broken up this is at the end of its life.

Britain ben ryan tom rhode island susan foister deputy director
"susan foister" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:12 min | 4 years ago

"susan foister" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Turn it was at the height of his powers in 1830 eight when he painted this this and amid away he had nothing more to prove he could do exactly what he wanted and this was a theme that really peel to him he had painted show before he painted scenes from the napoleonic wars but he was intensely interested in these sorts of miss america fat some painting could do and in a way what he combines in this painting is what you're able to do in an oil painting because you can see the sure the paint i mean the freedom with which he he painted both with his brush strokes and with his color was sometimes almost too much people at this period but he also combines with it what he'd learn to do in the water color medium if you look at the beautiful and delicate way that the reflections of the water or painted this sort of glasses surface and the very delicate moonlights that is contrasted with the sunset in the top left hand part of the painting he really shows won't what it's possible to do with with painting in the most extraordinary way was going graham known worshiping ominiously hauled away for scrap inevitablity of time don't you think what do you say bloody picture that was sky full that and before that we had susan foister deputy director of the national gallery hit in london be sure to catch his full thirty minutes addition of the cinema show this wednesday for special extended interview with the academy awardwinning director of moonlight by jenkins you're listening to the globalists' will live on monocle 20minute 754 hit in london and finally some familiar faces ought to return to america's nbc network the cost of willing grace ought to reunite what started as a special short video designed to promote hillary clinton's election campaign has no blossomed into a full series with nbc ordering a second season before the first is even started but unlike other tv reunions this one has a particularly politically charged message.

oil painting deputy director jenkins hillary clinton election campaign nbc america graham susan foister london thirty minutes 20minute
"susan foister" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Cinema Show

Monocle 24: The Cinema Show

02:16 min | 4 years ago

"susan foister" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Cinema Show

"And demean the way he had nothing more to prove he could do exactly what he wanted and this was a theme that really appeal to him he had painted ships before he painted scenes from the napoleonic wars but he was intensely interested in these sorts of atmospheric affect somewhat painting could do and in a way what he combines in this painting is what you're able to do in an oil painting because you can see the texture of the paint in the freedom with which he he painted both with his brush strokes and with his color was sometimes almost too much for people at this period but he also combines with it what he'd learned to do in the color medium if you look at the beautiful delicate way that the reflections of the water or painted this sort of glossy surface and the very delicate moonlight this is contrasted with the sunset in the top left hand part of the painting he really shows won't what it's possible to do with with painting in the most extraordinary way melancholy graham known worshiping ominiously holdovers grab and have it ability of time don't you think what do you say bloody picture 007 was in the grip off he's iron private anxiety during his first meeting with q as they sat opposite the fighting to moran with his body failing him and he's standing within mi six wilting bought of course bombs ability to pick up the pieces keep calm and carryon underpins his friendship with his boss heme who herself spent much of sky fall battling a prevailing view that hood days at the top may be of a commentary bat on britain's standing in the world while you be the judge my thanks to susan foister deputy director of the national gallery here in london be sure to catch the full of minute edition of the cinema show this wednesday for a special extended interview with the academy awardwinning director of moonlight barry jenkins you've been listening to action i'm ben ryland will catch you next time.

oil painting graham britain director barry jenkins ben ryland moran susan foister deputy director london