35 Burst results for "Susan Davis"

"susan davis" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

04:18 min | 3 months ago

"susan davis" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Investigation, the House select committee examining the January 6th attack on the capitol voted today to subpoena former president Donald Trump as NPR Susan Davis tells us the panel is trying to show that Trump was the key figure in the events leading up to the deadly riot and remains a clear and present danger to democracy. Well, this hearing so far has largely been a collection of greatest hits, right? In there trying to sort of broadly tell the story of what I think at this point has been fairly established facts around the events of January 6th. But the intent of today seems very clearly to be the role of the former president played, that at every point he is the central figure in the events leading up to January 6th, the events that happen that day, and in ongoing efforts that continue not only to deny the outcome of the 2020 election, but as congresswoman Liz Cheney said, that this is still remains a threat to democracy. That's NPR, Susan Davis. Mortgage rates have hit a 20 year high in the U.S. of just about 7% for a 30 year fixed rate loan in Paris Chris Arnold tells us that's putting home ownership out of reach for millions of Americans. Mortgage rates this week are averaging 6.9%, according to the government sponsored firm Freddie Mac, you have to go all the way back to April of 2002 to see rates that high. And it's been more than 40 years since rates rose by this much. They started the year at 3%, so if you buy a house with a $400,000 loan and look at the monthly payment, the higher rates now add nearly a $1000 a month more to buy the same house. That's throwing cold water on the housing market. The pace of home sales has dropped for the past 7 months. Most economists think though that a shortage of homes for sale will stop prices from falling very dramatically. Chris Arnold and Pierre news. Meanwhile, stocks finished broadly higher today on Wall Street, the Dow was up nearly 3%. This is NPR. From WAB E. News in Atlanta, good afternoon. I'm Jim burris or time now is four 32. A new survey of professors at Georgia's public colleges and university show most respondents are unhappy with recent changes to the ten year process. Martha Dalton has more. The university system says the changes are meant to strengthen tenure by holding faculty accountable, but professors say the changes make it easier to remove tenured faculty, and 57% of those surveyed said it would affect whether they want to stay. Some said they'd already started looking for new jobs. UNG professor Matthew bode says that's a bad sign. I think that that shows that many, many people are thinking about it. They might all do it, might not all find jobs, it's a terrible job market, but yes, if you're even thinking about it, you show the impact of these tenure changes. Bodhi heads the Georgia conference of the American association of university professors, which conducted the survey. The survey results also revealed almost 70% of respondents wouldn't recommend George's university system to peers in other states. Martha Dalton, WAB news. Advocates are urging military veterans exposed to burn pits and other toxic chemicals to sign up for newly expanded VA health and disability benefits. That was the message from Georgia U.S. senator John ossoff and U.S. secretary of veterans affairs Dennis McDonough at the Atlanta VA medical center yesterday. Just made or reports. The new benefits are available after Congress passed the $280 billion packed act this summer. It's designed to help veterans exposed to burn pits where the military's burned trash and hazardous waste in the open air. Senator John ossoff calls the packed act at the biggest boost to veterans care in decades. And it's particularly passed to serve those veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan who were exposed to toxins and burn pits who will now be able to get the care that they deserve and need because of its legislation. Expanded benefits are also open to veterans sickened by exposure to radiation and agent orange. Just made or W ABE news. And there's more local news on our website that's dot

Chris Arnold Susan Davis NPR House select committee Liz Cheney Martha Dalton WAB E. News Jim burris Donald Trump Trump UNG professor Matthew bode Georgia Freddie Mac U.S.
"susan davis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:38 min | 6 months ago

"susan davis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Nation deals with excessive heat drought and fires, it appears unlikely he'll declare a national emergency, though The White House insists it hasn't ruled out forever. Everything is on the table. It's just not going to be this week on that decision. I'm Michael Hilton's morning edition from NPR and WNYC. Afternoon highs of a 106 are likely in some parts of the country in the New York region heat advisories and air pollution alerts. The heatwave affecting Europe has caused dangerous infrastructure damage in the UK, and the trial of an off duty New York City police officer accused of shooting an unarmed man 6 years ago finally draws near close. It's Wednesday, July 20th, the news is next. Live from NPR news in Washington on corps of a Coleman, President Biden will give a major speech on climate change today in Massachusetts. He's expected to announce several executive actions intended to lower greenhouse gas emissions. Last week, West Virginia democratic senator Joe Manchin foiled Democrats chance for climate legislation in Congress. The house has passed a bill that codifies the right to interracial and same sex marriages, 47 Republicans joined Democrats to pass it. Democrats say the legislation is urgent and PR Susan Davis reports, that's because the issue came up and the Supreme Court's recent decision overturning the federal right to abortion. Democrats fear the conservative majority court could overturn other constitutional rights on the same legal basis, the court used to repeal federal protection of the right to terminate a pregnancy. The bill would establish by law the right to marry anyone regardless of sexual orientation and it would prohibit denying rights to married individuals on the basis of sex, race, ethnicity, or national origin. Republicans largely opposed the legislation, citing procedural concerns that the bill bypass committee and was fast tracked for a vote. Democrats also plan to bring up a bill later this week to protect the right to access contraception. It's unclear if either measure will be taken up by the Senate. Susan Davis and Pierre news Washington. The House judiciary committee has released internal documents from big tech companies lawmakers say these show Silicon Valley giants abused their power and be our Shannon Bond reports, the documents are part of a committee investigation. Nearly two years ago, the House judiciary committee put out a sweeping report accusing the tech giants of acting like illegal monopolies. Now it's publishing internal memos, emails, and other documents, from Amazon, Google, and

Michael Hilton NPR news President Biden senator Joe Manchin WNYC Susan Davis NPR White House Coleman New York City bill bypass committee Washington West Virginia House judiciary committee Massachusetts Europe New York UK Congress Supreme Court
"susan davis" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

01:37 min | 8 months ago

"susan davis" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Where the January 6th committee has been working to lay out how Donald Trump's efforts to overturn the 2020 election led to the violence on January 6th It's unclear what the impact of the hearings will be on Trump's future leading the Republican Party Christian conservatives in the GOP tend to back the former president thousands are gathered in Nashville with the faith and freedom coalition and Trump addressed them with a lengthy attack against the January 6th committee Remember in the end they are not after me they are after you That's true They're after you They're after everything we stand for And Pierre Susan Davis joins us now from Nashville hey Sue They are Have the hearings made any impression on the voters who are attending this event Almost none I mean they are not watching the hearings the hearings have almost no credibility It's been really notable to me I've been here for two days and every person that I've spoken to who's attending the conference said that they believe that the election was stolen from Trump or that they believe there was fraud in the election So they have fully bought into the former president's claims Trump is none of that statement Correct Trump focused heavily on the January 6th committee today And again repeated his election claims that he won the election which he did not He also attacked former vice president Mike Pence for his actions to uphold the results which the committee examined this week which is also kind of remarkable to gathering like this because Pence you know for his whole career had really aligned himself with this wing of the party Jeff these used to be pence's people He was really popular there So how did the attacks on him go over with the folks attending this event Yeah I talked to a lot of people about that I spoke to one guy whose name is bishop W J Coleman He's a pastor from Lewisville Mississippi and I asked him if he thought Pence did the right thing.

Trump Pierre Susan Davis Nashville Donald Trump Republican Party GOP Mike Pence pence Jeff bishop W J Coleman Lewisville Mississippi
"susan davis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:26 min | 8 months ago

"susan davis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You know to buy or even rent a home Because wages hasn't really gone up I mean we're struggling every day just to make them meet For me the biggest thing is how do I retain my staff And how do I pay them What they need to be paid or what they expect to be paid I can not raise my prices by 2030% We're sitting a short drive from the site of a 2017 mass shooting at a music festival that left 60 people dead I asked how that experience and the recent school shooting and you've all the Texas had impacted their views on guns There was a clear gender divide so guns I think that is belonged to war not belonged to the street They shouldn't allow 18 years old to have credit card and purchase guns without background check Remember about you I am a supporter of guns I mean I am a gun owner myself Because we have the right to bear arms here I mean but I do agree with the MC about having some thorough background checks Do you think it should be harder to buy AR-15s If it's something to where it's assault rifles I would say you have to have a stricter background checks on it But not limit the purchase of that Exactly not limit the purchase of it What do you think gosh I think common sense gun legislation background check is one way It registry is the other way Taking out the gun is not the answer But by taking away guns you're going to empower the bad guys We've been listening to Susan Davis talk with AAPI voters in Nevada So sue I mean clearly like many Americans to think about the economy and they're thinking about guns did they tell you how those opinions are shaping their vote this year Well I asked if their minds were already made up and three of the 5 of them said they were but MC and Brian said they were not I kind of wanted to do my own research for all the candidates first before I really make my decision What about UMC Whatever my onion go for it I'll do it That is the culinary workers union It's a 60,000 member powerhouse in Nevada politics I checked with the union and they told me that 15% of their membership is now AAPI NPR correspondent Susan Davis Sue thanks for this We appreciate it You're welcome This.

Susan Davis Texas AAPI Nevada culinary workers union UMC Brian Susan Davis Sue NPR
"susan davis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:17 min | 8 months ago

"susan davis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Edition from NPR news I'm Rachel Martin And I'm a Martinez After decades of inaction Congress could soon take action on gun safety legislation On Sunday a bipartisan group of senators announced that they had reached a deal on a possible bill that has support from ten Republicans which of course is the critical number needed to get any major Bill through the 50 50 democratic controlled Senate So this is actually not a done deal yet though President Biden praised the early agreement though as quote important steps in the right direction Here to tell us about the next steps NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis Susan and I know assault weapons ban in 18 year old can still buy an assault weapon and there's no expanded background checks for all firearm sales So what exactly did they agree to Yeah I mean this is definitely not as far as gun safety advocates would like to see but it really is about as good as it can get in an evenly divided Senate This is still a major breakthrough It's been a generation since Congress has even come close to passing laws that affect gun ownership The most significant part of this proposal based on the outline that was provided by the senators is that it would make it harder by requiring a more thorough background check for someone under the age of 21 to buy any gun including high capacity weapons like AR-15s They couldn't get them fast Senators say it would also incentivize states to pass things called red flag laws that allow members of your family or law enforcement to take away a weapon from someone who could be a danger to themselves or other people It would also increase penalties for gun traffickers excuse me and it would include more money for mental health services but to be very clear there is nothing in this bill that would affect how in otherwise law abiding citizen can get a gun All right now even if all the details still need to get worked out what are you making the reaction It's a big deal I mean all of the major gun safety groups came out really quickly in favor of this bill Any progress is good progress is how they see it Shannon watts is the founder of moms demand action in a statement she said the bill would break the logjam in Congress on the gun issue This is a group that has been lobbying for action on this for more than a decade and she said they are prepared to quote fight like hell to get this historic deal over the finish line Even Senate minority leader Mitch McConnell praised the senators who negotiated the deal but he did stop short of endorsing it until it's all put into writing All right so tell us about that because there's this framework what has to happen now to turn that into law Well they actually have to write the bill and that can take several weeks to work out The lead Democrat Chris Murphy he's from Connecticut He told Reuters last night that aides are going to start working on that today Senate majority leader Chuck Schumer has already said he will bring it up for a vote as soon as it's ready One thing to watch is how gun rights groups react the NRA put out a statement last night basically saying they weren't going to weigh in on it until they see the full Bill But there's a lot of gun rights groups now And one of them the gun owners of America attacked Republicans for signing on to this deal yesterday so watching to see if the groups like this can slow down or try to block this bill before it reaches the Senate floor This is also a lot less than the house supports They just passed a far more sweeping gun control bill But if the Senate can pass this it's going to be really hard for the House to reject it especially with President Biden saying he will sign it even if it's not everything he wanted either NPR Susan Davis Susan thanks a lot You're welcome Hi.

NPR news Rachel Martin President Biden Susan Davis Susan Senate Congress Martinez Shannon watts NPR Bill Mitch McConnell Chris Murphy Chuck Schumer Reuters Connecticut NRA America house House
"susan davis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"susan davis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Right thing to do Plus regret simply was in his style Susan Davis NPR news the capital Support for NPR comes from member stations and from indeed an integrated hiring platform for businesses of any size to schedule virtual interviews and connect to candidates directly on the employer dashboard More at indeed dot com slash NPR and duck duck committed to making privacy online simple used by tens of millions they offer Internet privacy with one download Duck duck Privacy simplified adductor go dot com You're listening to listener supporter NYC during our one day yearend fundraiser Michael Wilhelm with me today is WNYC's program director Jacqueline Singh This week and specifically Friday is your last chance to make your attacks deductible contribution for 2021 And here's why you should donate now Two double NYC two day We will send you a four ounce bag of winter spice hot chocolate from Raqqa This is with any contribution today only and you compare the hot chocolate with any other thank you gift so give now at WNYC dot org are called 888-376-9692 that's 8 8 8 three 7 6 double NYC and Jack and we've had a lot of people who respond to this today I think they'd love not just double the NYC but the idea of that hot chocolate Hot chocolate is a good thing WNYC is a good thing We're pairing both of those things and asking for your yearend contribution this morning during our one day end of year pledge drive That's right folks we're here today and today only just reminding you that WNYC is listeners supported that the single largest source of our funding comes from you And if you'd like to make a charitable gift for the 2021 tax season those days are dwindling as we all know New Year's Eve is Friday December 31st So just a couple of days left to make your charitable contributions for 2021 and we hope that WNYC is one of the organizations you're considering supporting Our number is.

Senate Starts Debate on Biden's $3.5 Trillion Infrastructure Plan

BBC World Service

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

Senate Starts Debate on Biden's $3.5 Trillion Infrastructure Plan

"To combat climate change, expand health care and education, access and overhaul immigration laws. Senate Budget Chairman Bernie Sanders says Democrats plan will improve the lives of Children, working families and the elderly. He described the goal of their plan this way. Restore the faith. Of the American people in the belief That we can have a government that works for all of us. Once the Senate approves a budget resolution outlining those goals, Senate committees will get to work drafting legislation. Susan Davis NPR NEWS Washington New York Governor Andrew Cuomo says he'll leave office in 14 days amid allegations of sexual misconduct involving Nearly a dozen women as NPR's Brian Mann reports. The move came as Cuomo's political support continued to crumble. In a televised address. Cuomo maintain that the

Senate Bernie Sanders Governor Andrew Cuomo Susan Davis Brian Mann Washington New York NPR Cuomo
Republicans Work to Rebrand GOP as Party of Working Class

NPR's Business Story of the Day

02:04 min | 1 year ago

Republicans Work to Rebrand GOP as Party of Working Class

"Donald trump brought more working class voters into the republican party than any other president since ronald reagan now. Republicans are trying to figure out how to keep them. The working class vote will be crucial in next year's midterms. Here's npr congressional correspondent. Susan davis in the last decade. The biggest growth in the republican coalition has been white voters without a college degree along with some growth with similarly educated black and hispanic voters. that's why republicans. Like indiana congressman. Jim banks believe the only winning path forward for the gop is to fully reimagined itself as the party of the working class and if republicans want to be successful as a party when the majority in twenty twenty two win back the white house and twenty twenty four. I think we have to learn lessons that donald trump taught us now to appeal to these voters. Banks is the chairman of the republican study committee but conservative faction in the house. long rooted. in small government low taxes and social conservatism. He recently sent a six page memo to house. Minority leader kevin mccarthy making the case that republicans need to refocus their agenda. Almost entirely on working class appeals for banks. This means tougher immigration laws cracking down on china big tech and perhaps most provocatively for republicans corporate america for too long the republican party said into the narratives that republican party was party of business or the party of wall street. Republicans are increasingly comfortable attacking corporations these days. That's a lot easier for them. After wall street donors gave more to joe biden. Major companies halted political donations to republicans who objected to electoral college results on january six and is companies take more liberal positions on controversial issues like georgia's new voting law senate minority leader mitch. Mcconnell last week issued a rare verbal rebuke of companies that oppose the law. Warning if you will to corporate america's to stay out of politics. It's not what you're designed for.

Republican Party Republican Coalition Donald Trump Jim Banks Susan Davis Ronald Reagan NPR Republican Study Committee Kevin Mccarthy Indiana White House China Joe Biden America Mcconnell Mitch Georgia Senate
Senate passes $1.9 trillion Covid relief bill

Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

01:07 min | 2 years ago

Senate passes $1.9 trillion Covid relief bill

"The Senate has approved a $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package after a strictly party line vote. It's been modified from the House version, so it's being sent back there for approval before heading to President Biden's desk as NPR's Susan Davis reports. Democrats change the House passed bill to make government benefits less generous. They reduced the income thresholds to receive $1400 stimulus checks to $75,000 for individuals and 100 and $50,000 for families. Also reduced extended unemployment benefits from $400 a week to $300 a week and ended the program a month earlier. Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders said Americans will soon feel the impact of this legislation. We're going to help restore faith in the United States government among the people of our country. The bill is the largest standalone economic stimulus package in American history. Congress has now approved $6 trillion in the last year to confront the Corona virus pandemic. Susan Davis. NPR NEWS Washington

President Biden Susan Davis Senator Bernie Sanders House Senate NPR Vermont United States Congress Washington
White House narrows income limits for stimulus checks

Here & Now

04:30 min | 2 years ago

White House narrows income limits for stimulus checks

"Of a threat from far right groups, including followers of the Cuban on conspiracy. Those extremists claim Donald Trump will retake the presidency today. This is not stopping the Senate from carrying on the House adjourned, but not before Democrats passed two major bills last night. One on voting rights, the other on police reform for more. We're joined by NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis. And so Democrats have railed against bills passed in state houses across the country that would make it harder to vote curbing things like mail in voting and early voting that work expanded last year during the pandemic. So what would this federal voting rights bill do about that? Well, this legislation has been a top priority for the party. It's not new. It was introduced in passed in the house in the last Congress. So this vote this week was a bit of a do over. They've called it the most sweeping government reform bill since the post Watergate era. And what wouldn't do it would do things like allow for automatic voter registration, it would make Election day of federal holiday. It would restore voting rights to people with past felony convictions. It would also expand early voting that we saw you so much in the 2020 elections. It would also do things like create more independent redistricting commissions to sort of end party controlled drawing of congressional district. On campaign finance. It would require more disclosure of big donors. It would require transparency about those ads you see in your social media feeds, and it would create a new public financing system for congressional candidates. Would also do things like expand conflict of interest laws that would ban members of Congress from serving on corporate boards and require presidents by law to disclose their taxes. Okay, sweeping to say the least. Thea other bill passed last night is the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act. Police reform has been a democratic priority for a long time. What's in this one? This is another bill that passed in the previous congress. So they're doing it again. This'll legislation would do things that would ban choke holds, it would change so called qualified immunity protection so it would make it easier to pursue claims of misconduct against police officers. It would put restrictions on no knock warrants, and it would require new data collection on a police encounters. It would also direct more money to community based policing programs. This one is not. I mean, it's not as controversial as the voting reforms Bill, which has very strong Republican opposition. No Republicans supported it. There is a bit more support among Republicans for police reform, especially in the Senate. There's competing measure by Tim Scott, who's a Republican of South Carolina. So there's maybe a chance there could be more bipartisan effort to move that bill forward, But the other measure is purely a symbolic one of the stage. It's still a tall order in the House Democrats know based on previous failures that these bills don't have much hope of getting to 60 votes in the Senate, which, of course, is the magic number to break a filibuster, they would need 10 Republicans to vote with Democrats. So why are they so determined to pass them if the prospects looked in Part of this is just elections are making good on their promises. These issues are very important to the Democratic base, and I think it's about keeping that promise. But you're right. I mean, I think that's going to be one of the cork tensions, if not the court tension of this Congress. I think Democrats really sensitive this fact that they control Washington. Now they have Congress and the White House and they want to be able to run in 20 to 2022 on accomplishments. But they have these really narrow majorities in the House and Senate, which really limits what they're going to be able to do. You know, it's not just the filibuster to the parties are really divided right now. There's not much that they agree on. The bigger picture, though, is Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer just doesn't have the votes to change the filibuster, and it's not clear that he ever will in this Congress. One of the biggest opponents, a centrist Democrat, Joe Manchin, of West Virginia. He was asked last week if he could ever see changing his mind. And he literally yelled never at the reporters who asked him the question, Okay, digging in on the filibuster, So just in the moment we have left we have the Senate is still in session. They're debating that Cove in 19 relief package. What's the latest? You know they're making some tweaks to the bill. They've done things like reduced the income limits for people to get those $1400 stimulus checks. There was concerns among Senate Senate Democrats that too much money was going to people who didn't need it. Otherwise, The bill seems to be on a glide path. They don't expect to get any Republican support. But Democrats seem pretty unified behind it. If it passes this week, they gotta send it back over to the house to pass it back over there, but Right now. They're on track to meet a march 14th deadline that they've set, which is when current extended unemployment benefits run out, and they don't want to see those benefits lapsed. So there's a real pressure campaign to get it done by then. OK, that's NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis with the latest thanks to your right welcome. Well, every

Senate Congress George Floyd Susan Davis Donald Trump House Democrats NPR Thea Tim Scott House South Carolina Bill Chuck Schumer Joe Manchin White House Washington West Virginia
The Senate Considers Covid-19 Relief This Week

Up First

02:48 min | 2 years ago

The Senate Considers Covid-19 Relief This Week

"Senate considers covert relief this week. That's right accounts is the first big legislation of joe biden's presidency. It passed the house this weekend although with no republican support. We have no time to waste if we act now decisively quickly emboli we can finally get ahead of this virus. Democrats want it signed before the latest round unemployment benefits expires in two weeks so now moves to the senate under procedure that would allow it to pass their if necessary with zero republican votes but that procedure does not allow passage of the entire bill which is a higher minimum. Wage is out of it. Npr white house correspondent. Isha roscoe joins us this morning. Hey good morning good morning. What happened to the minimum wage increase. So the bill has been labeled as a budget bill And the reason why democrats went with that is so that they don't need sixty votes to get it passed And so they don't have to worry about a filibuster But the senate parliamentarian says. The minimum wage doesn't count as part of a budget bill. A biden did say. He was disappointed at the parliamentarians ruling. But the white house signalled that it didn't want to go against that ruling of vermont. Vermont senator bernie. Sanders had proposed imposing tax penalties on big companies. That don't raise their minimum wage but our colleague. Susan davis is reporting that senate democrats are abandoning that effort after facing some resistance a stripping out that fifteen dollars minimum wage may actually make the rescue package easier to pass. Given how slim the majority is because some more conservative. Democrats have voiced opposition to that level of hike in the minimum wage of course up progressive democrats have said that raising the minimum wage should be a top priority and that arcane senate rules should not stand in the way okay in any case they are going to stand in the way but the rest of the measure is there one point nine trillion dollars in aid to americans help with covert. How important is this to the president. It's totally an important. Be has really centered. His whole first one hundred days around it. The white house has been pushing hard to get something done What they're stressing that even though it doesn't have republican support in congress polling has found it to be very popular including among republicans. You know biden celebrated the house passage on sunday and urged the senate to act quickly saying if we act quickly and boldly we can finally get ahead of this virus. There is a deadline extended. Federal unemployment benefits expire mid march and senate democrats have pledged to get this done before that so they have two weeks

Senate Isha Roscoe White House Senator Bernie Joe Biden Biden Susan Davis Sanders Vermont Congress
"susan davis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:26 min | 2 years ago

"susan davis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You're listening to a live special coverage from NPR news of the impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump. I'm Susan Davis and I'm Scott time and we're listening. Torto were recounting the arguments we heard earlier today, and here is part of the message that was from Eric Swalwell. He's a Democrat from California, one of the nine impeachment managers throughout this presentation. We have been very careful to not share Where members of Congress were taken on the paths. They followed. Get out and off the floors. But that very issue was under discussion by the insurrectionists themselves. One example comes from an FBI affidavit. Which stated that a leader of a militia group known as the Oath Keepers received messages while he was at the Capitol. Leader was given directions to where representatives were thought to be sheltering and instructions to quote turn on gas. A message that the impeachment managers continue to drive home to these lawmakers is how their own lives were very much at threat that day. We're going to be joined now by another round table of our NPR colleague's legal legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg. Ron Elving, editor and correspondent and NPR White House correspondent. Tamara Keith. Nina, Let's start with you. You've been listening to these arguments all day. Very emotional arguments we've heard in the past hour, so your thoughts We'll have a few thoughts. One is that when you see all of this put together superimposed with the tweets in the set in the appropriate time line. You have a better idea of how long? How bloody long? This went on How many hours this pitched battle was going on and at the same time? What Then President Trump was tweeting in a times when The mob had already breached part of the capital. In addition to the fact we had some new information, so what we now know, according to the managers, Is that The First permit for this rally was on Lee for the rally where it took place. And that on Lee afterwards after White House officials intervened. Did they get a permit to go up to the capital to march to the capital? Given what transpired on that day that intervention turns out to be rather important, not to mention that The allegation at least, is that people at the White House were monitoring what was going on for weeks, even months before, but especially in the weeks leading up to this rally. So that It would be very hard to believe that anybody who was looking Did not see That there was trouble brewing, especially when novices if you went online and you looked you saw That this was a pretty dangerous Alchemy that was being made here. This is obviously not a criminal trial. We've said that repeatedly. The standards for impeachment are very different there. It's a political standard. But I wonder what you make of the case that the House impeachment managers have outlined which, in many ways you know, just relies on the public domain public things. The president has said things he's tweeted the video shot by the riders themselves. Well, as as you said, this is not a criminal trial. Even if Trump were convicted. There's no prison sentence here. The standard here is one of political accountability. And Have to say that I keep getting ass is by people who are not reporters and it strikes me. They say to me, how do you think the Senate would vote if it were a secret ballot? And in some ways, so I would defer to you. How do you think they'd vote? If this were a secret ballot? That's a great question. You know, I would think I would point to something like the secret ballot vote they had in the house over Liz Cheney, who's the top three Republican who was challenged for her leadership role because of her support for impeachment and vote in favor of it, and when it came to a secret ballot She over resoundingly won that the conference sided with her. Now I can't say exactly what a secret ballot be in the Senate. But it does. You know, there is a lot of indication that Senate Republicans and Republicans in the House have privately had much bigger issues and concerns with the behavior of the president than they were ever willing to acknowledge publicly during during the four years of the Trump administration. His tweets have been they've been in Supreme Court briefs We in the press. People who cover the capital are always running up to members of Congress and saying, Look what the president tweeted today. Do you associate yourself with that, and increasingly, senators would just walk and House members, which is walk past Reporters asking tweeting questions. But in the case of this Impeachment trial. Those tweets are being used to incredible effect when paired up with the timeline of what's going on leading up to this rally, and At the rally and after the rally Those tweets air pretty damning thing. Left her now to NPR. White House correspondent Tamara Keith Tam. Thanks so much for joining us. Mike Pence. His name was mentioned, Um more than I've heard Nathan Hale's on on the floor of Congress recently, and then he was acclaimed as a hero by by Democrats. Um, per certifying the vote for following through for not being intimidated. Um, does Does he provide a bridge? At this point? Can Republicans possibly change their votes, saying that now we understand How close it came to losing Mike Pence, and he's the one who Really stood the line and upholds our party They knew on the day they knew on January 6 that Pence was choosing loyalty to the Constitution over loyalty to President Trump, and that that was a Both very difficult choice but also one that Really? There was no choice. President Trump was asking vice President Pence to do something that he simply couldn't do to make it so the votes weren't counted and send it back to the states..

President Trump president NPR President Pence White House correspondent Congress Senate Lee White House Nina Totenberg Tamara Keith California Torto FBI Eric Swalwell Susan Davis Oath Keepers House
"susan davis" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:27 min | 2 years ago

"susan davis" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Scott Simon, along with my colleague Susan Davis in Washington, D C and the issue. Roscoe, NPR's White House correspondent is joining us Now you should We have learned pretty openly that President Trump wasn't happy with his defense on day one. But is there any indication S so far that he won't have the votes. No, not not at all. And and that's a dis point. I don't think a real concern at all. They know that Republicans by and large are sticking with them on that. The outcome of the trial is basically known that they're they're not gonna be enough votes. For conviction and for him to be barred from holding federal office again. But, you know, as was said earlier, our colleague Tamara Keith does talk to a source who did say that President Trump was unhappy with his defense that there was an idea that they did not have enough time to get prepared because his original defense team ended up walking away from the case or not taking it up, so they'd had a short amount of time to get ready. They're also not used to doing this in a Senate trial s o, you have s O they? The argument was that they were unfamiliar with the process of it on DeSoto you so that is where they stand there. Not going. They're not going to be changes necessarily to the defense team. But they are regrouping and they're going to try to when it comes their term to make their case to do a job that would presumably make the president more please. And he was on the first day. Mr. Raskin made such a emotional and personal appeal yesterday that Trump's lawyers had to had to acknowledge how effective it was. Uh, he talked about another case today. In a way that was very moving. Um, Mr Raskin, describing the interaction of one black Capitol police officer had with another After the events of January 6 he broke down in the rotunda. And he cried for 15 minutes. And he shouted out. Got called Nn Word 15 times today. Many recorded I sat down with one of my buddies. Another black guy in tears to started streaming down my face, and I said What the F man Is this America? That's the question they're trying to pose, Isn't it? Isha that that is the question in and we should be clear that although Republicans don't seem to be are thought to be changing their their votes on this, that there they won't be votes to convict. There is a larger thing at play here, and that is a message. That these impeachment managers on Democrats are sending to the public at large. I mean, even in them, bringing up tweets and the president's tweets and some of these videos, Ah, lot of these things. Even with some, you know me having covered this, and I didn't remember all of the president's tweets. And yet here you are there bringing them back to the surface and they're bringing them to a public. Which we've seen in polls and we've seen in action. We're not happy with the way the president behaved. A majority of Americans have raised concerns about these actions. And so you have a message that's also being brought to the public. Is this the country that they want to see such turned a work colleague Susan Davis to Carrie Johnson. I want to go back to the conversation we were having about Trump's role in all of this. Obviously, the impeachment trial. Underway this week. But there's also a question of potential legal liability for the former president in the role he played in undermining the of the election. There is some news this morning, courtesy of our colleague Stephen Fowler, Georgia Public Broadcasting that the Fulton County District attorney in Georgia has opened a criminal investigation into attempts to influence the administration of the 2020 general election in Georgia. You know, we know already has mentioned in the articles of impeachment here. That the House managers have talked about a president former President Trump's attempts don't lean on the Georgia secretary of state to find him the votes to win. And so now there's a potential criminal inquiry into that in Fulton County, Georgia, raising the stakes further for president, former President Trump One of the stakes for the people that storm the capital. We know that the Justice Department and law enforcement officials have cast a very wide net. What is the status of those investigations and how many people have been arrested about 200 people have been charged so far, But the Justice Department in the FBI says that is not nearly close to the end. They are still looking for the person or persons who plays pipe bombs near the Democratic National Committee and the Republican National Committee the day before January 6th. They're also building cases against people who really harassed and attacked 140 law enforcement officers, causing injuries, some very serious injuries and death, And they're also pursuing cases against rioters who attacked members of the media that day. So we are looking as well and broader conspiracies involving planning. And foresight and especially among the proud boys and the other extremist militia groups there. Mara, Where does this all come down on how Republicans, not the country at large, but where Republicans View Donald Trump right now as the leader of their party. Well, that's that is an ongoing debate in the Republican Party, which is really being torn apart by this. They're trying to kind of Straddled, but be the biggest tent that I could ever imagine, which is a tent that includes people like Marjorie Taylor Greene and Liz Cheney. I mean, you saw that in the house, Kevin McCarthy, deciding that he was just going to try to keep everyone in the same boat because otherwise they become a minority party immediately, But I think that The big question about how Republicans air hearing this case we know is I you should said it's a foregone conclusion. They're not going to get the 17 Republicans that they would need to convict Trump and then move on to the question of whether he can run again. But so much of what you heard today was an argument for the history books and for public opinion. I think the Democrats goal is to tie Donald Trump to that mob and make them indivisible and then make Republicans defend his action or not, and try to make Republicans the party that thinks It's okay to incite a violent mob to go up and try to forcibly change..

President Trump president Susan Davis Republican Party Scott Simon Washington NPR Tamara Keith Mr. Raskin Senate White House correspondent Georgia Public Broadcasting Roscoe Georgia Justice Department Fulton County America Democratic National Committee Mara
"susan davis" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:47 min | 2 years ago

"susan davis" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Oprah Turns 67 Today News is next. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Dave Mattingly. The White House is continuing to negotiate another congressional coronavirus relief package with a bipartisan group of lawmakers. One of them is Republican Senator Ron Portman of Ohio, He warns it would be a mistake for President Biden to try to get a bill done without GOP support. As NPR's Susan Davis Biden's asking Congress for a $1.9 trillion package that includes stimulus checks and a minimum wage increase. That's a nonstarter for Republicans who say it should be more narrowly targeted to things like vaccine distribution and reopening schools. Democrats are considering using a special budget process that would allow a bill to get through the Senate without GOP support, Portman told NPR that could have long term consequences for the president. I think you you said, a really bad tone, at least for For months and maybe for the first term the first two years. At least, Democrats could move forward without Republicans as early as next week. Susan Davis NPR NEWS Washington pharmaceutical maker, Novavax says Early results from a British study suggest it's coded 19 vaccine is effective and preventing disease. Stanley ERK is the company's CEO. In the UK trial. I should point out that we got 89.3% efficacy against the combination of the code, 19 strain and the UK variant. The Novaks study involves 15,000 participants in Britain. It's still underway. The UK variant has been detected in more than 20 states in the U. S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says Congress needs to fund long term security measures at the U. S. Capitol in the aftermath of the deadly assault of January 6 without naming anyone, Pelosi is alleging some lawmakers are a security threat. Speaking yesterday, Pelosi referred to the enemy within the House of Representatives later, Pelosi said she was referring to lawmakers who want to carry guns on the house floor and have threatened violence. The annual march for Life rally is being held today in Washington, D C. NPR's Tom Chilton says this year's march will be mostly a virtual event. The merch for life rally held each year since 1974 typically brings thousands of anti abortion activists to Washington. President Trump addressed the rally last year. The first president to do so in person this year will be different. President Biden is a strong supporter of abortion rights. This week, he rescinded a rule that banned the use of federal funds for foreign groups that provide abortion services or even information. March for life organizers are nevertheless pushing ahead. Some prominent religious leaders will address the arm line rally, including Southern Baptist leader JD Greer and Kansas City Archbishop Joseph Namen, who chairs the U. S. Catholic Bishops Pro Life Committee. Tom Dalton. NPR NEWS This is NPR news from Washington. U. S Army says nearly A dozen soldiers have been injured during a field training exercise at Fort Bliss in Texas. In a statement, the Army's first Armored Division says two of the soldiers are in critical condition after ingesting an unknown substance. The army has not released further details. American Airlines canceled about 200 flights yesterday to carry out emergency nose gear. Inspections on planes operated by its regional carrier. P. ECE operates flights under the American Eagle name. MPR's David Schaper has more The problem, according to a statement from American Airlines is with the nose gear door on P ECE is Bombarda regional jets. The FAA says it was an issue that required immediate attention. So P ECE removed most of its planes from service so it could conduct inspections. There's no word on how long the aircraft may be grounded. American says it is working with passengers to re book them on other flights. Yes, A fly's American flights under the American Eagle brand name. The bulk of its flights go into an out of Americans hub in Charlotte, North Carolina. The FAA says PS voluntarily disclosed the matter. And that the regulatory agency is working with the airline to address the situation. David Schaper NPR News stock markets in Asia ended lower today. Despite yesterday's rebound on Wall Street when the Dow gained 1% Analysts say investors remain concerned about emerging variants of the Corona virus and what they might mean for the effectiveness of covert 19 vaccines. Right now, Dow futures are down 270 points. I'm Dave Mattingly. NPR News in.

NPR Susan Davis Biden Washington Nancy Pelosi Dave Mattingly UK Senator Ron Portman president American Airlines David Schaper FAA American Eagle Congress U. S Army P. ECE GOP White House President Trump Tom Dalton
"susan davis" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

04:55 min | 2 years ago

"susan davis" Discussed on KPCC

"And whether the president, appetite is matched by those who voted for him. It's your time to weigh in to tweet us at one end. Live from NPR news. I'm Jack Spear. President Biden as part of his effort to hit the ground running announced a number of executive actions aimed at tackling the Corona virus pandemic, the president saying today he's implementing a national covert 19 strategy to reopen schools and businesses increase the wearing of bass and ramp up vaccinations and testing. Also tasked the Department of Health and Human Services to prepare and expand the pool of medical professionals who can administer through the vaccine Bind, signed 10 virus related executive actions today, including a requirement Americans mask up for travel, and he urged everyone to wear a mask for the next 100 days. One is found to take more aggressive measures than his predecessors, saying his goal is to see 100 million people vaccinated in this 1st 100 days in office. Seven Democratic senators have formally found a complaint with the Senate ethics Committee requesting an investigation into Republic or two Republican colleagues whether they helped incite the January 6 attack on the U. S. Capitol. As NPR's Susan Davis. The complaint focuses on Republican senators, Ted Cruz of Texas and Josh Holly of Missouri. The two men lead the objections in the Senate to the electoral counts in Arizona and Pennsylvania. In the hours after the assault on the capital. They also raised questions about the integrity of the election. In the complaint. Democrats do not argue that cruise in Holly had the right to object. But they're asking the ethics panel to investigate whether in doing so they violated the code of conduct that broadly calls on senators to act with high moral principles. Both men condemned the violence and have brushed off calls for the resignation. Susan Davis NPR NEWS Washington A federal judge is signing with Amazon in the tech Giants fight with the right wing alternative social media site parlor. Judge ruling Amazon acted legally when it kicked parlor off its Cloud service site more from NPR's Bobby Allyn. Parlor Isn't anything goes social media site popular with Trump supporters when Amazon stopped hosting Parlors website over post glorifying violence parlor sued, saying Amazons decision was anti competitive and a breach of contract. But now a federal judge has ruled that it was parlor that violated a contract by failing to police. Its sight parlor was a staging site for the rights on the Capitol, and many took to the platform to share videos of violence. Federal Judge Barbara Rothstein ruled that Amazon's choice to not host incendiary speech is well within. The company's legal rights parlor, meanwhile, says it is still trying to figure out a way to come back online. Bobby Allen NPR NEWS SAN Francisco continued signs the coronavirus ravaged economy is causing employers to hand out pink slips. Labor Department reporting Today the number of people seeking first time jobless claims fell slightly, but still totaled 900,000. Historically high level makes close on Wall Street Today, the Dow dropped 12 points. The NASDAQ was up 73 points the S and P 500 closed up a point today you're listening to NPR. And from KPCC news. I'm Nick Roman with stories. We're covering it seven and four. We just got the L. A county coronavirus numbers for today, County Public Health says last week, the Daily average of new cases Was above 15,000. This week, The Daily average is down to about 10,500 covert 19 patients in L. A county. Well, that in the hospital that is Number is down 7% In the past week, you thought a baseball game and daughter Stadium takes a long time way to get in line for a Corona virus vaccine shot at the ballpark. It took five hours yesterday. One problem was that lots of people 65 older showed up without appointments. Obviously there was some confusion. We try toe accommodate as many of these elderly people as we could, and it just became a hindrance today. We're trying to streamline our efforts abiding by appointments on Lee David Ortiz with L. A city fire he's helping with the vaccinations at the stadium. KPCC is Larry Mantle today asked air talk listeners who had been to Dodger Stadium for a shot. Call in and talk about what it was like Bob in Echo Park called in. He was in line today. Been there for an hour still couldn't see the front of the line. I'm not sure how long I have more to wait. But a lot of cars here and Moving slowly but moving. Surely this evening L America said. He said. It'll take until June to vaccinate all health care workers and everyone is over 65 or older but He also says more vaccines are coming, so the pace will speed up fresh air at eight o'clock. It's time for 1876. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, committed to supporting.

NPR Amazon Bob KPCC Josh Holly Susan Davis President Biden executive president daughter Stadium Department of Health and Human William and Flora Hewlett Foun Jack Spear Lee David Ortiz Senate ethics Committee Senate Bobby Allen
Trump faces Senate trial after historic second impeachment

Forum

01:01 min | 2 years ago

Trump faces Senate trial after historic second impeachment

"From NPR NEWS. I'm Laxmi saying President elect Joe Biden's first days in office will witness a historic second impeachment trial of by then former President Donald Trump. His fate will rest in the hands of a Senate that will be under Democratic control, though, is NPR's Susan Davis explains, the Democrats will still need enough Republican support to convict Outgoing Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell blocked a request from incoming majority leader Chuck Schumer to return to Washington early to start the trial. The Senate's out of session until January 19th and binds inauguration is the next day. Impeachment trials require senators to be in their seats and must meet six days a week until the trial concludes, making it difficult to approve any legislation or nomination while the trials ongoing If all 50 Democrats vote to convict they'd need a minimum of 17 Republicans to join them to get a conviction If Trump were convicted, which appears unlikely the Senate could then vote to bar him from ever holding public office

Npr News President Elect Joe Biden Senate Laxmi Susan Davis Donald Trump Mitch Mcconnell Chuck Schumer NPR Washington
"susan davis" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:25 min | 2 years ago

"susan davis" Discussed on KCRW

"Or for Alex Trebek is hired. Since Trebek's final episodes aired last week. Jeopardy champion Ken Jennings has been hosting the show. But soon jeopardy will trot out a Syriza guest host. In addition to Couric, Bialik and Roger's journalist Bill Whitaker will also get a shot behind the podium Now on, sand lit and morning becomes eclectic. Good morning in Morning, Cherry. That is the most random list of best stuff ever heard. You think somebody threw a dart at the ball and said, Hey, yeah, pretty much pretty much they should call you Cherry going next. Oh, so jeopardy! I would stink at the pop culture part I have slept through 25 years of TV and movies. I love it. Thanks, Jerry. Have a great day morning becomes eclectic is up after news from NPR. Life from NPR NEWS. I'm Laxmi saying President elect Joe Biden's first days in office will witness a historic second impeachment trial of by then former President Donald Trump. His fate will rest in the hands of a Senate that will be under Democratic control, though, is NPR's Susan Davis explains, the Democrats will still need enough Republican support to convict Outgoing Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell blocked a request from incoming majority leader Chuck Schumer to return to Washington early to start the trial. The Senate's out of session until January 19th and binds inauguration is the next day. Impeachment trials require senators to be in their seats and must meet six days a week until the trial concludes, making it difficult to approve any legislation or nomination while the trials ongoing If all 50 Democrats vote to convict they'd need a minimum of 17 Republicans to join them to get a conviction If Trump were convicted, which appears unlikely the Senate could then vote to bar him from ever holding public office again. Susan Davis NPR NEWS Washington Security has been ramped up in downtown D. C following last week's insurrection at the U. S. Capitol. Mismanagement of a water contamination crisis in the predominantly black Michigan city of Flint. Good land. Former Governor Rick Snyder in jail If convicted today, the Republican pleaded not guilty to misdemeanor charges that carry up to a year behind bars in a $1000 fine, more serious charges have been leveled against former health director Nick Line. He's charged with involuntary manslaughter. The deaths of nine people who got Legionnaire's disease line is also pleaded not guilty. Here's Michigan Solicitor General Fatwa Hamoud The Flint water crisis is not some relic of the past. At this very moment, The people of Flint continue to suffer. From the category from the categorical failure of public officials. At all levels of government. Who trampled upon their trust and evaded accountability for far too long. The Labor Department is reporting a sharp increase in the number of people filing for unemployment benefits. NPR's Scott Horsley has details. New unemployment claims rose sharply as the new year began. Claims for state benefits jumped 23% last week while claims under a newly reinstated federal programs, swords 75%. Altogether more than 1.2 million people applied for jobless aid last week as a surgeon Corona virus infections continues to weigh on big parts of the U. S economy. President Joe Biden is set to deliver a speech tonight on his plans to address the pandemic as well as the.

NPR President Joe Biden Senate Donald Trump Flint Alex Trebek Cherry Susan Davis Michigan Ken Jennings Rick Snyder President Syriza Chuck Schumer Mitch McConnell involuntary manslaughter U. S. Capitol Jerry
Trump to be the First President Twice Impeached

NPR News Now

00:57 sec | 2 years ago

Trump to be the First President Twice Impeached

"To hold president. Trump accountable for incendiary remarks led last week's attack on the capital. The house is moving on a resolution for vice president. Mike pence to invoke the twenty-fifth amendment to remove trump from office. Here's npr's susan davis maryland. Democratic congressman jamie raskin authored. The non-binding resolution. It's expected to pass the house but has no force of law. Democrats will then turn to an impeachment resolution which includes one article of impeachment against president trump for incitement of insurrection for his role in the january. Six attack on the us capitol. Democrats say they already have the votes to pass it and some republicans are expected to join them. It's unclear when the senate will begin an impeachment trial. But there's no indication that two thirds of the senate would vote to convict passage of the resolution will make trump the first president in american history to be impeached twice. Susan davis npr news. Washington

Jamie Raskin Mike Pence Susan Davis Donald Trump NPR Maryland Senate United States Washington
House To Vote On 25th Amendment Resolution Against Trump

Morning Edition

00:39 sec | 2 years ago

House To Vote On 25th Amendment Resolution Against Trump

"The House of Representatives will vote on a resolution today urging vice president Pence to force President Trump from office. NPR's Susan Davis says lawmakers will vote on this resolution later today. Importantly to know here is it's non binding, but it essentially expresses the sense of Congress. The vice president Mike Pence, and the Trump Cabinet should invoke the 25th amendment, in which there's a provision that would essentially allow Pence to assume the office through Inauguration Day if he and a majority of the Cabinet where to send a letter to say to Congress to say that the president couldn't fulfill the duties of office. We have zero indication that that's actively under consideration in the White House, but it is expected to pass the House tonight. NPR's Susan Davis.

President Trump Trump Cabinet Susan Davis House Of Representatives NPR Mike Pence Congress Cabinet White House House
Trump may face 2nd impeachment after deadly Capitol riot

Reveal

00:37 sec | 2 years ago

Trump may face 2nd impeachment after deadly Capitol riot

"Are moving forward with efforts to remove President Trump from office after his supporters rioted at the U. S Capitol last week. They say the president encouraged the mob to storm the building An article impeachment may be filed today. NPR's Susan Davis has more. It's just one article of impeachment and it's just four pages and I would encourage anyone to go online and read it for themselves. But It accuses the president of quote, willfully inciting violence against the government of the United States and quote and specifically cites the comments he made at that rally on January 6 that then encourage these extremists to then go storm the Capitol, NPR's Susan Davis. The

President Trump U. S Capitol Susan Davis NPR United States
"susan davis" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"susan davis" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Comes from European sleep works. Forum starts this morning at nine o'clock, and in the first half hour we'll discuss the aftermath of this week's insurrection of the capital and who should be held accountable at 9 30. We break down the latest problems besetting the state agency that processes unemployment claims as a record number of Californians await much needed financial relief. And at 10 40. Atlantic magazine writer Caitlin Tiffany joins form to discuss her recent article. Trump's Internet is celebrating, She writes that the insurrections did exactly what they promised to do for months and our gleeful over this week's riots. It's for him coming up this morning, starting at nine. Here on KQED Public radio some morning. Scattered showers mostly clear today and temperatures in the upper fifties toe low sixties. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm no. Well, King. Good morning. What is the appropriate response to a president who incited a violent mob and who is taking no responsibility for it? Yesterday, Trump condemned the attack on the Capitol, but he never mentioned the role that he played. To those who engaged in the acts of violence and destruction. You do not represent our country and to those who broke the law you will pay. Police have arrested dozens of people. But what about the president who lied to them about who won the election and told them to fight for him? Some lawmakers want to invoke the Constitution's 25th amendment and remove the president from office. Congressional correspondent Susan Davis is covering this story. Good morning suit pain Well, what are the discussions among lawmakers about removing President Trump like at this point? Well, the top two Democrats in Congress House Speaker Nancy Pelosi in incoming Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer yesterday. Hold on Vice President Mike Pence to invoke the 25th amendment. They called him to deliver That message personally waited on the line for 25 minutes, but he would not get on the phone with them because, he said, they won't wait long. If he does not respond or does not do it. She is willing and ready to move forward in the house with articles of impeachment. Let's talk about how this would work. The 25th amendment, not one. We're necessarily familiar with what has to happen to invoke that there is a provision in the 25th amendment that has never been invoked before that gives the authority to the vice president, along with a majority of the president's Cabinet. To send a letter to Congress to see the president is not even capable of fulfilling his duties in office, and it would allow the vice president to become acting president. The president can challenge it and put the question to Congress, but it's a longer process. Supporters of the strategy. Say what effectively type President Trump's hands in his remaining I guess now 12 days in office and prevent him from taking any further official actions and are any Republican supportive of this idea. There are a couple but overwhelmingly Republicans on the hill remain at least publicly and privately behind the president. Okay, Fair enough. So here's what we have. We have Republicans not supporting the idea. We have vice president Pence, reportedly, not it all supporting the idea. We have a cabinet that's unlikely to agree to this. What else could Democrats do? What hands could they play? They already have an impeachment resolution that's being circulated for with co sponsors, Pelosi said. It is the overwhelming sentiment of Democrats that they want to vote on this. Congress is technically out of session until inauguration day. Democrats are going to talk this afternoon, they would have to come back into session next week and essentially hotline an impeachment resolution to the floor, bypassing committees. It would require almost nearly unanimous party unity to get it through with no Republicans joined them. Obviously, it's not gonna have time to lead to a Senate trial on to convict President Trump. But a lot of Democrats. I talked to say that it would least have the political impact of making him the first president impeached twice, and that's a punishment they'd like to see delivered for what happened this week. NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis. Thank you. So you're welcome..

Vice President President Trump Mike Pence president Nancy Pelosi Trump acting president Congress Susan Davis Atlantic magazine NPR News Steve Inskeep Cabinet Caitlin Tiffany Senate Congress House NPR KQED Public Chuck Schumer writer
"susan davis" Discussed on Emma & Tom's PGCE Podcast

Emma & Tom's PGCE Podcast

05:31 min | 2 years ago

"susan davis" Discussed on Emma & Tom's PGCE Podcast

"The bias will demand particularly in terms of medicine so she took a lot about when we go to the doctor for ailments and we're prescribed dose medicine very often that's only been trialled men and women of the generally a lot smaller have smaller frames and different a different way. But we all have to take that medicine. Dosage that has just been trialed are men. That's one example. She talks about other examples in terms of cod design in particular and how call caused tested on a typical male body. And so if we were to have a crash as a female is is likely to impact us in detail way. So it's a fascinating book. I you know. I really enjoyed reading it so i recommend you if my memory serves me correctly. Tell them you're not the first person to recommend today storm to the top of the most recommended book list is that three times must read that is. I don't know it comes up a lot confess. I haven't read it yet. But he's very topical. Isn't it because. I remember around the time that p p it started of kofi there was a lot of criticism about the sizing of the p p that was being provided standard stuff that was going to h s and not being designed with women in mind. Well she talks about at least women and so they have to wear like body vest. They are only designed the men and there was a lady that A lady police officer who the body vested not fit sir. I'm so she actually brought her own because it didn't go to his stomach area. So if you get shot ossete to be shot anywhere so she bought a s specifically made body fast. actually catheter. her stomach caveat is well. I'm lost a job because she wasn't wearing galatian police swear it's just astounding some beatty. This good stories. And i recommend this could go. Thank you for that ranan. Anything from you sue and you al. My my book doesn't have as much gravitas. I'm reaching over the top by jonathan queen by which is an excellent book. Actually really good. So i'm not reading it. I tend to read. I read an architect book in the daytime. But when i go for my bedtime reading i like to read a book which is war room. The will frothy my but they awesome. Actually are some quite interesting issues. Jonathan discusses in the book but very book. Actually we welcome all recommendations on this jessica. I recommend that when then. Highly jonathan fundus over the top and finally we allen how to look after your wellbeing reding moeny did say new york i am. I listening skills a lot and i. I like to do yoga. But i haven't been able to do so much during the lockdown. I'm not very good at doing on my own. I need to be in a class. I have recently started running down the block. My goal is not to stop at the moment. I'm stopping so yeah. I feel so much better just having a quick then in the morning before i start work it it just changes your mind frame completely. So that's my wellbeing tip of the moments definitely. I'm i'm i run and i love running. It's really really keeps me so many so much head space. And that's where. I get all my pastor ideas when i'm running. You'll be down there is. I have a fantastic idea. And i'm reading a pen to write..

jonathan queen kofi jonathan fundus beatty al Jonathan jessica allen new york
"susan davis" Discussed on Emma & Tom's PGCE Podcast

Emma & Tom's PGCE Podcast

05:07 min | 2 years ago

"susan davis" Discussed on Emma & Tom's PGCE Podcast

"You've mentioned a few authors there any sort of clear texts that it's worth pointing out to them yet. Definitely everybody should read this book. Quiet by susan cain Also done tedtalk as well yet to be honest there. Also i would have a look at the work of rake rosier who is a professor at cardiff university. Because he is the guru of writing about the shy child and he's written many academic papers about that. And i also have a look at at rod gilbert. Actually because he's got a e hats some great stuff and it's on youtube because he's a shy person and he actually worked with ray crociere on his on his documentary about being shy. So and he's got some so can a little bit more lighthearted. Don't don't quote him. In academic i that documents and i saw that. And he's he's perfect example isn't he here you could. You could see you as completely confident in is not its giant all but actually he he kind of hides behind his comedy doesn't hey in a way yes sir. Is there anything kind of coming up with the direction that you research is going in that you're getting some interesting findings all all where you see your research going to next. What's next avenue of investigation on this front am soon. I just started another project. So we're recruiting. Participants from primary schools across. Wales is beyond. Sue and i've developed an intervention program or support program. Sue started to the idiots and we've developed it for key stage two so we're looking for participants. They're passionate about speaking welsh and being a welsh. Because so it's all available in washington english so we got an mba of schools on boards at the moment. But we're still looking for at the schools if they're interested in taking pot so it's a six week intervention With activities that take place on a weekly basis. I'm we've fast practitioners to baseline that students according to a social emotional baseline that sewage created so to do that the beginning of the support program online and to reflect on that as you're going through a nine at the end so you use the baseline against any improvements to be made so we've got a number of schools on board already but we're also looking for any other participants and yet the schools like take pods. Interestingly when i did some research a little while ago i found that the special meantime program which ran on his just explained about was very beneficial to boys and especially boys who had english additional language which was a finding that i hadn't set out to look at and it was really interesting that the research did actually highlight on the baseline.

susan cain rod gilbert ray crociere cardiff university youtube Wales Sue washington
"susan davis" Discussed on Emma & Tom's PGCE Podcast

Emma & Tom's PGCE Podcast

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"susan davis" Discussed on Emma & Tom's PGCE Podcast

"So i'm not subscribing that as a strategy tool but it's really important to do that and just just him back to your previous point hammer about about learners. I must say that. The kovic situation is thrown thrown at lots and lots of different challenges. Lots of different negatives but a positive. I found from some of miami students last week. Two of the quiet students said to me. I really really really appreciated learning on teams. Because i was able to put my comments into the chat and i'm sure the people on and noted that is a real positive for quiet people because they're getting their voices heard whereas in the normal classroom situation. She probably that lose. Two people were just sat back and said nothing. So we've got to look as teachers how we engage all of our learners. We celebrate our more vocal children. 'cause they've obviously got a voice in some into say but we also celebrate our quiet children and we look at how we give them strategies and tools to get into conversations to get into classrooms situations. And it's that it's like a little any little bridge sometimes to dot. Perhaps you could tell us a bit more about what you find. That bridge. looks like if we're going to build a bridge for these children. Because i guess i'm just thinking about training my own teaches now and so much emphasis about assessment for learning. It's about getting our children to verbalize their understanding or to demonstrate their in standing because we can't see what's going on in their heads so what strategies are going to be useful in checking their understanding but not creating circumstances where they feel that. They can't think i think initially is about developing good relationships with pupils. And i know it said a key theme at the moment particularly in terms of additional learning needs. I think it applies to children is that we adopt pass incentive practices in the way that we begin to get to know our leonidas know them as people rather than as a classroom and i think if you know you learn you know the peoples in your classroom..

miami
"susan davis" Discussed on Emma & Tom's PGCE Podcast

Emma & Tom's PGCE Podcast

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"susan davis" Discussed on Emma & Tom's PGCE Podcast

"To questions etcetera and the quite militant to participate verbally in the classroom. I'm just looking at those children because that overlooked by practitioners in sometimes said not Seem all that skill sets is not seen by practitioners. Because they're so quiet so it's about providing an opportunity folders. Linda's may be to develop some confidence in that own ability to actually express themselves in the classroom. And as an estimation by james al to save that there's about between two point six and five point two percents of children who experienced in the classroom. So i was thinking was that if we provided some sort of intervention eddie on that might mitigate any longer term consequences of having done society so that would provide did not support before it may be gets to become something a bit more. Savvy thanks ron. This is absolutely fascinating so i want to take a few steps back before we get into the kind of findings if your research or where you're at with that at this stage. You mentioned that often practitioners overlook these learners. So i guess maybe a bit of a paradoxical question. How do we as practitioners identify them and make sure that they're not overlooked. And you also mentioned that its practitioners who identified as quiet shy anxiously. How how might they identify themselves as two parts that questions. How do they should be like going here. Okay so basically looking at how to spot them in the classroom. It's looking at the fact that these children are by their very nature quiet and understanding the description of them. They've been called invisible children. Which i don't mind that label but tim and that comes from teachers so i think if you're a teacher or student teacher it's those children that if you're asked to name your thirty children in the classroom they're probably the ones you think about joshua talk about so it's not. Is that sort of thing. They also don't mind if they don't receive it immediate attention and they'll sit for long periods of time in the classroom waiting for it. There are also often and comfortable with open ended questions. We've found in our research that quite often the you're more able ghouls supplies to because they over think things and also they have often have strategies to avoid teachers gays and they kind of basically in the back of the classroom. Just getting on with things quietly. I think also the other thing that that is important. I mean we don't want to be labeling children. But i think we do tend to do this as teachers and make up online quickly children and i think it's important not not to do that. In this case and i think the other thing is looking weiss and children are quiet. Anxious this research rubin in essen dorthe view. Shyness is a choice. They say that children choose to be shy and they actively withdrawal from social situations now. I don't think that's the case. I kind of subscribe more to the idea of cake. And who says society of an inhibition to the end familiar so they are and if they if they're in an unfamiliar situation obviously very very very difficult times at the moment with covert. Stow one of the things. I'm thinking is they're going to be a lot more lot more children displaying. These quiet shanks just behaviors. Now and also. It's this idea of china's and cake in saying that shyness is an inherited trait which i subscribe to a little bit more and i think the other thing that we need to look at is the fact that shy children are often have shy parents and in my own experience of working with these parents. They're the ones themselves that will won't catch your eye on the playground. And so. I think that we don't not need..

james al Linda eddie ron joshua tim essen weiss rubin china
"susan davis" Discussed on Emma & Tom's PGCE Podcast

Emma & Tom's PGCE Podcast

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"susan davis" Discussed on Emma & Tom's PGCE Podcast

"Episode for each day. We've got to podcast guest with us tom. We have to colleagues from cardiff met. Who joining us down the line. We've got dr davis and dr william packer. Hello and welcome. Thanks and we should probably tell the listeners that again we are not all in the same room because we are still in the throes of the covid nineteen pandemic so we've got sue and we've got on teams at the moment but i think it's probably best to hand over to you. Tell us a little bit about what you do so susan. Let me to you. I talk to us about what you do. Okay well thank you tom. Thank you so much for inviting us here today. Basically i'm senior lecturer in the school of education social policy. I work on the pc primary program where i teach primary humanity so hello to all my pg students out there. I also work on the ma program. Wear i'm a tutor and dissertation supervisor. And i'm also the pathway leader for the profit doc the fd within the school so hello to all my students hello tool by students. Actually hello everyone. You wear many hats. I do indeed. Yes i do gene. I'm very fortunate to do that. And also we'll talk to about the restrictions in the in the moment working on the pitch with fianna wonderful. Welcome to you. Thanks for being on our podcast today and over tyrian. Tell us about what you do on a data and thank you for the invitation. I work on the graduate program. Education psychology an asean teaching mainly the additional dating. These modules. and i also led the national letting these pathway so if there's any students who are thinking about doing additional learning needs. I'm the person to contact. Brilliant okay so you've come to talk to us today by some research that you've been doing together on a very specific and very important topic so which be wants to tell us a bit about what you're going to talk about today. Okay shall i start. Yes okay yeah yet okay. Well i started this research at followed following on from my at the doctorate research myself and in twenty twelve and i worked with some students that i worked with school colleagues and then a little further down the line items very lucky to solve bump into ron and more or less in the in the coffee bar. We started talking our shared interest in this subject and then ran on came on board with research which is very very pleased to have her expertise and we kind of went from there really and you're looking very specific group of learners. Tell us about those learners raanan. So we're looking at learn as he walked considered by practitioners to be quiet anxious. Children often children. You maybe don't notice in your classroom. Because they'll with i wit clavier quietly if abby maddie offer any answers.

dr davis dr william packer school of education social pol tom cardiff fianna susan raanan ron abby maddie
Millions of Americans may receive $600 pandemic stimulus relief money as soon as next week

Morning Edition

00:54 sec | 2 years ago

Millions of Americans may receive $600 pandemic stimulus relief money as soon as next week

"The Senate has passed a $2.3 trillion spending package, averting a government shutdown. The package includes roughly $900 billion in additional coronavirus relief Aid and 1.4 Trillion to fund a federal agencies through next September. NPR's Susan Davis reports. The bill now goes to President Trump for his signature. Relief is coming to millions of Americans affected by the pandemic. The legislation extends enhanced unemployment benefits of $300 a week through early spring. Another round of $600 stimulus checks will start going out as early as next week. As well as another round of funding for the Paycheck protection program, which will have provided in total nearly one trillion in aid to businesses in the past nine months. It also includes money to distribute the covert vaccine as well as money to help schools get back up and running. Congress is working to get it to President Trump's desk. By Christmas.

President Trump Susan Davis Senate NPR Congress
Congress Passes Two-Day Stopgap Spending Bill, Narrowly Avoiding a Shutdown

All Things Considered

01:08 min | 2 years ago

Congress Passes Two-Day Stopgap Spending Bill, Narrowly Avoiding a Shutdown

"In Washington Congress has passed and the president signed a two day stopgap spending bill to avert a partial government shutdown this weekend. The next deadline is at 12 01 Monday morning on Capitol Hill. Today, though the Senate is in session, and House members are on standby as lawmakers are still working on a nearly $1 trillion covert relief package. Millions of people who are out of work, face eviction and food insecurity in the pandemic. NPR's Susan Davis has more house and Senate leaders say they're close to a final agreement. But last minute hurdles remain. Republican Senator Pat Toomey is trying to insert a provision in the bill to ensure emergency lending programs created earlier this year for the Federal Reserve expire at the end of the year, as initially intended. Biden team and congressional Democrats are pushing back. They see it as an attempt by Republicans to tie the hands of the incoming administration to address ongoing economic threats posed by the pandemic. Overall, congressional leaders say they're close to a deal on a bill that will provide additional relief to millions of Americans, including more money for unemployment benefits and another round of stimulus

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Chuck Grassley, second oldest senator, exposed to COVID-19

The World

00:41 sec | 2 years ago

Chuck Grassley, second oldest senator, exposed to COVID-19

"Was Senator Chuck Grassley has been exposed to the Corona virus and is in quarantine. Grassley, the oldest Republican senator, which puts him in third line to succession to the presidency, since he's president, Pro TEM more from NPR's Susan Davis. In a statement, Grassley said he had been exposed to the Corona virus, but did not say how or when he's under quarantine at home Until he gets test results back, he said he's not experiencing any symptoms. You will, however, be forced to break his 27 year streak of never missing a Senate vote. The Senate has experienced waves of positive test cases or self enforce quarantines in recent months. Republican Senator Rick Scott of Florida is also currently under quarantine because of an exposure

Senator Chuck Grassley Grassley Susan Davis NPR Senate Senator Rick Scott Florida
Chuck Grassley, second oldest senator, exposed to COVID-19

All of It

00:53 sec | 2 years ago

Chuck Grassley, second oldest senator, exposed to COVID-19

"Iowa Senator Chuck Grassley has been exposed to the Corona virus and is now in quarantine. Grassley is the oldest Republican senator and the president protest which puts him third in line and succession to the presidency. NPR's Susan Davis has details. In a statement, Grassley said he had been exposed to the Corona virus, but did not say how or when he's under quarantine at home until he gets test results back, He said he's not experiencing any symptoms. He will, however, be forced to break his 27 year streak of never missing a Senate vote. The Senate has experienced waves of positive test cases or self enforce quarantines in recent months. Republican Senator Rick Scott of Florida is also currently under quarantine because of an exposure to the virus. Despite calls mostly from Democrats to institute a testing and tracing program for senators. No such system exists. Susan Davis NPR NEWS Washington

Senator Chuck Grassley Grassley Susan Davis Iowa NPR Senate Senator Rick Scott Florida Washington
Democrats are now unlikely to win a majority in the Senate: Here's where things stand

All Things Considered

03:28 min | 2 years ago

Democrats are now unlikely to win a majority in the Senate: Here's where things stand

"Republicans are enjoying a much better election than anticipated. Republicans are now poised to maintain their majority in the Senate. I just received a very gracious call from Sara Gideon conceding the raise voice of Republican Senator Susan Collins, speaking earlier today in Maine, a state that Democrats had considered a must win to have a chance at flipping the Senate. No. In the House Republicans are expected to pick up seats shrinking the Democrats majority down to single digits for more on this NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis is here. Hey there, Sue what went wrong, so to speak for Democrats? Yeah, I mean, it's been a complete reversal of fortune for Republicans down the ballot. There had been this widespread confidence that Democrats were going to take over the Senate that they could gain as many as six or seven seats. And that Democrats were poised to grow their majority in the House by as many as 10 to 20 seats. Obviously, not if that happened. I think the one thing everyone is pointing to right now is just how wrong the Poles were. I think in that main Senate race that's a great example. The Democrats Sara Gideon, she led in public polls all year long and yet still fell far behind in the race. I talked to election analyst Sean Trendy this morning, and he told me that polling simply did not account for Trump's support that a significant number of Trump voters just were never accounted for. Those are the exact people that when you hear a phone call in the person says Hi, I'm from the New York Times. Would you take it all? Just go click. I think it is that straightforward. I also talked to Democratic Congressman Ami Bera of California today, and he said that the polling was way off from where it was in the 2018 midterms. And that's when Democrats won. He basically told me he just thinks Democrats couldn't account for the effect that Trump has when he himself is on the ballot. While it looks like Republicans will hold their majority in the Senate, Not all races have been called. Can you tell us what still outstanding? Yeah, There's still five races that haven't been called 47 have been called for Democrats 48 for Republicans won were watching really closely Is Michigan. There's a Democratic incumbent there. Gary Peters. He's running narrowly behind a Republican John James. Obviously, what could be a pickup opportunity for Republicans. North Carolina remains really tight, but incumbent Republican Senator Tom Tillis is leading. You know, that was always seen as a state that was critical to the majority. So if Republicans hold it, I think that's one of the reasons why they seem to feel pretty secure. Right now. Alaska hasn't been called, but I don't really see any reason there to think it's going to be a Democratic pick up and Last one's Georgia. There's two Senate races there. One of them is going to go to a January runoff, and it's quite possible. The other one where it's held by incumbent Republican David per two, might be able to hold it off and win it out, right. Given that there are some races that are going to be uncertain, at least for the next few days does that What does that mean for the Senate majority? It does, and you know, depending on how Georgia goes, it could take quite some time. North Carolina in particular, could be tight and could be subject to court challenge. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell spoke to that reality earlier today in Kentucky. You can anticipate in close elections, Both sides will be lawyered up and we'll end up in court. It's happened over and over and over again. Nothing unusual, and I do want to see her. I think McConnell has a point, and it's worth focusing on that. I think a lot of people are really nervous about what's gonna be happening with Balan challenges. It's really not uncommon, especially in Senate races to go through court challenges. Before they're certified. It happens almost every election year. That's NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis. Thank you. You're welcome.

Sara Gideon Senate Senator Susan Collins Sean Trendy Congressman Ami Bera Susan Davis Democrats NPR House Senator Tom Tillis Maine Gary Peters Donald Trump David Per John James The New York Times North Carolina Georgia California
Democrats are expected to retain control of the House, but there are still races to watch tonight

New Sounds

04:15 min | 2 years ago

Democrats are expected to retain control of the House, but there are still races to watch tonight

"At this point, there has been no net change in the balance of the US Senate and to talk about that. We're joined by NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis. I su Hey, Ari. Let's take a broad look at the Senate map. Tonight. Republicans have held a few key seats. The Democrats are still hoping to win back in some cases, in some cases that has escaped their grasp tonight. What's the landscape is you see it now? Well, I think it looks like the path to the Democrats. Flipping control of the Senate is getting narrower. And now as the night goes on, Republicans holding onto seats in Texas and Kansas and Lindsey Graham winning reelection in South Carolina. These were always sort of reacher Democratic seats, But we were looking to them a signs of, you know, maybe this would be a big blue wave night. I think we're seeing enough results coming in that We do not believe this is going to be a big blue wave night. Certainly not down the ballots, so The path for Democrats to win a majority is just getting more difficult. We're still looking and waiting for results in Arizona, where Democrats expect to flip a seat there, and in Maine, where incumbent Senator Susan Collins has had probably her toughest reelection yet, but again, even with those two seats, that might not be enough to get Democrats where they need to be at also know we've been watching North Carolina really closely all night. Largely seen as a bellwether state for how the Senate would go Republican incumbent Thom Tillis is leading there. The Associated Press has not called the race. But Republicans I'm talking to tonight feel pretty good at their chances of holding on to a Senate majority, albeit with fewer seats and explain why that matters what the difference is between if we imagine that Biden wins the presidency, which we certainly don't know, But what is the difference between A Democratic president with a democratically controlled Congress and a Democratic president with a Republican controlled Congress. Well, I think what's interesting is if Republicans do retain control of the Senate. In some ways, it will be a status quo on Capitol Hill. We're looking at still split control of Congress. Democrats are still heavily favored toe hold their majority in the house. There's no reason to doubt that will happen, so whoever the next president is, but whether it be Donald Trump or Joe Biden They're likely to be facing a divided Congress. And what is the lesson? Bin of the past decade of divided government is that it's a recipe for gridlock and for a confrontation, and if that is the outcome of this election, I think the idea that we're going to see big sweeping legislative change becomes less and less likely, and on the House side. I interviewed Speaker Nancy Pelosi yesterday and she was optimistic about Democrats picking up seats tonight so far. Republicans have won a couple of seats they have and they have, and I think that's one of the things I'm looking at. That suggests that this sort of down ballot activity we're seeing is evidence that we're not going to see a big, dramatic Democratic wave tonight. Democrats still forecast to pick up digits seats in the single digits. But you know forecasters, we're going into the night saying they could pick up a CZ. Many is 15 to 20. That seems really unlikely. And we are seeing Democrats losing in some places to Democratic incumbents have already lost in Florida and South Florida, where the party took a bit of a weapon. Tonight. There's Democrats in New York. Max Rose, who was a freshman Democrat who won in the 2018 Democratic wave in a Staten Island district, a district very friendly to Donald Trump. He's down in the polls right now, but That race hasn't been officially called yet either Bellwether races in Virginia, you know, Republican incumbents have been winning their Arkansas so it is definitely not the terrible night that a lot of house Republicans were braced for. And if anything, I think I hear much more optimism coming from Republican strategist and Democrats at this hour, one race that is getting national attention, not because it was competitive, but because of the person who wanted Marjorie Taylor Greene. Somebody who has Made racist statements supported the conspiracy theory Q and on and is now headed to Congress. She is, and I would also note that in one of the Georgia Senate races tonight, Kelly Leffler Well, we can't say she won the runoff because it hasn't been declared. But her conservative opponent, Doug Collins, could seated the race to her, which means she will be the Republican likely going to a runoff in January, and she courted Marjorie Greens endorsement in the Senate race, and I think that speaks to sort of The influence the rising influence that someone like Marjorie Green and her views have inside the Republican Party to The Associated Press is actually just called the Georgia Senate going to run off with you as you were speaking.

Senate Congress Senator Susan Collins Thom Tillis Susan Davis Lindsey Graham NPR Donald Trump South Carolina The Associated Press Kansas Biden Maine Max Rose Arizona Joe Biden Texas North Carolina Speaker Nancy Pelosi Marjorie Taylor Greene
House passes government-wide temporary funding bill in sweeping bipartisan vote, averting shutdown threat

BBC World Service

00:54 sec | 2 years ago

House passes government-wide temporary funding bill in sweeping bipartisan vote, averting shutdown threat

"Lawmakers have approved a stop Gap funding bill to keep the government running through December 11th. The legislation must still be approved by the US Senate and signed by President Trump. To avert a shutdown in just eight days more from NPR, Susan Davis. The legislation will keep the government funded through December 11th. It passed with overwhelming bipartisan support, but only after a partisan dust up over farm and nutrition eight. Initial bill lacked more than 20 billion, requested by the Trump Administration for the Commodity Credit Corporation, which provides aid to American Farmer's House Speaker Nancy Pelosi accused the president of using it as a political slush fund. But there was pushback from House Democrats in farm states who advocated for including the funds. That position ultimately prevailed. The bill also expands nutrition assistance for school Children to continue to receive meals while learning remotely.

President Trump Trump Administration Us Senate Commodity Credit Corporation Susan Davis Nancy Pelosi NPR
House Passes Stopgap Funding Measure to Keep Government Open

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

00:59 min | 2 years ago

House Passes Stopgap Funding Measure to Keep Government Open

"Jack Spear a stopgap funding bill to keep the government running through December. 11th passed the house late this evening. The legislation must still be approved by the Senate and signed by President Trump, where the government would face another shutdown threat in eight days more from NPR, Susan Davis The legislation will keep the government funded through December 11th. It passed with overwhelming bipartisan support, but only after a partisan dust up over farm and nutrition eight. The initial bill lacked more than 20 billion, requested by the Trump Administration for the Commodity Credit Corporation, which provides aid to American Farmer's House Speaker Nancy Pelosi accused the president of using it as a political slush fund. But there was pushback from House Democrats in farm states who advocated for including the funds. That position ultimately prevailed. The bill also expands nutrition assistance for school Children to continue to receive meals while learning remotely. Susan Davis. NPR NEWS Washington Even

Susan Davis President Trump Trump Administration NPR Jack Spear Commodity Credit Corporation Senate Nancy Pelosi Washington
House passes funding bill with GOP support to avert looming government shutdown

Q

00:55 sec | 2 years ago

House passes funding bill with GOP support to avert looming government shutdown

"Bill to keep the government running through December. 11th passed the house late this evening. The legislation must still be approved by the Senate and signed by President Trump Or the government would face another shutdown threat in eight days more from NPR, Susan Davis The legislation will keep the government funded through December 11th. It passed with overwhelming bipartisan support, but only after a partisan dust up over farm and nutrition eight. The initial bill lacked more than 20 billion, requested by the Trump Administration for the Commodity Credit Corporation, which provides aid to American Farmer's House Speaker Nancy Pelosi accused the president of using it as a political slush fund. But there was pushback from House Democrats in farm states who advocated for including the funds. That position ultimately prevailed. The bill also expands nutrition assistance for school Children to continue to receive meals while learning remotely. Susan Davis. NPR

Bill Susan Davis NPR President Trump Trump Administration Commodity Credit Corporation Nancy Pelosi Senate