35 Burst results for "Susan Davis"

Senate Starts Debate on Biden's $3.5 Trillion Infrastructure Plan

BBC World Service

00:52 sec | 4 months ago

Senate Starts Debate on Biden's $3.5 Trillion Infrastructure Plan

"To combat climate change, expand health care and education, access and overhaul immigration laws. Senate Budget Chairman Bernie Sanders says Democrats plan will improve the lives of Children, working families and the elderly. He described the goal of their plan this way. Restore the faith. Of the American people in the belief That we can have a government that works for all of us. Once the Senate approves a budget resolution outlining those goals, Senate committees will get to work drafting legislation. Susan Davis NPR NEWS Washington New York Governor Andrew Cuomo says he'll leave office in 14 days amid allegations of sexual misconduct involving Nearly a dozen women as NPR's Brian Mann reports. The move came as Cuomo's political support continued to crumble. In a televised address. Cuomo maintain that the

Senate Bernie Sanders Governor Andrew Cuomo Susan Davis Brian Mann Washington New York NPR Cuomo
Republicans Work to Rebrand GOP as Party of Working Class

NPR's Business Story of the Day

02:04 min | 8 months ago

Republicans Work to Rebrand GOP as Party of Working Class

"Donald trump brought more working class voters into the republican party than any other president since ronald reagan now. Republicans are trying to figure out how to keep them. The working class vote will be crucial in next year's midterms. Here's npr congressional correspondent. Susan davis in the last decade. The biggest growth in the republican coalition has been white voters without a college degree along with some growth with similarly educated black and hispanic voters. that's why republicans. Like indiana congressman. Jim banks believe the only winning path forward for the gop is to fully reimagined itself as the party of the working class and if republicans want to be successful as a party when the majority in twenty twenty two win back the white house and twenty twenty four. I think we have to learn lessons that donald trump taught us now to appeal to these voters. Banks is the chairman of the republican study committee but conservative faction in the house. long rooted. in small government low taxes and social conservatism. He recently sent a six page memo to house. Minority leader kevin mccarthy making the case that republicans need to refocus their agenda. Almost entirely on working class appeals for banks. This means tougher immigration laws cracking down on china big tech and perhaps most provocatively for republicans corporate america for too long the republican party said into the narratives that republican party was party of business or the party of wall street. Republicans are increasingly comfortable attacking corporations these days. That's a lot easier for them. After wall street donors gave more to joe biden. Major companies halted political donations to republicans who objected to electoral college results on january six and is companies take more liberal positions on controversial issues like georgia's new voting law senate minority leader mitch. Mcconnell last week issued a rare verbal rebuke of companies that oppose the law. Warning if you will to corporate america's to stay out of politics. It's not what you're designed for.

Republican Party Republican Coalition Donald Trump Jim Banks Susan Davis Ronald Reagan NPR Republican Study Committee Kevin Mccarthy Indiana White House China Joe Biden America Mcconnell Mitch Georgia Senate
Senate passes $1.9 trillion Covid relief bill

Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

01:07 min | 9 months ago

Senate passes $1.9 trillion Covid relief bill

"The Senate has approved a $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package after a strictly party line vote. It's been modified from the House version, so it's being sent back there for approval before heading to President Biden's desk as NPR's Susan Davis reports. Democrats change the House passed bill to make government benefits less generous. They reduced the income thresholds to receive $1400 stimulus checks to $75,000 for individuals and 100 and $50,000 for families. Also reduced extended unemployment benefits from $400 a week to $300 a week and ended the program a month earlier. Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders said Americans will soon feel the impact of this legislation. We're going to help restore faith in the United States government among the people of our country. The bill is the largest standalone economic stimulus package in American history. Congress has now approved $6 trillion in the last year to confront the Corona virus pandemic. Susan Davis. NPR NEWS Washington

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White House narrows income limits for stimulus checks

Here & Now

04:30 min | 9 months ago

White House narrows income limits for stimulus checks

"Of a threat from far right groups, including followers of the Cuban on conspiracy. Those extremists claim Donald Trump will retake the presidency today. This is not stopping the Senate from carrying on the House adjourned, but not before Democrats passed two major bills last night. One on voting rights, the other on police reform for more. We're joined by NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis. And so Democrats have railed against bills passed in state houses across the country that would make it harder to vote curbing things like mail in voting and early voting that work expanded last year during the pandemic. So what would this federal voting rights bill do about that? Well, this legislation has been a top priority for the party. It's not new. It was introduced in passed in the house in the last Congress. So this vote this week was a bit of a do over. They've called it the most sweeping government reform bill since the post Watergate era. And what wouldn't do it would do things like allow for automatic voter registration, it would make Election day of federal holiday. It would restore voting rights to people with past felony convictions. It would also expand early voting that we saw you so much in the 2020 elections. It would also do things like create more independent redistricting commissions to sort of end party controlled drawing of congressional district. On campaign finance. It would require more disclosure of big donors. It would require transparency about those ads you see in your social media feeds, and it would create a new public financing system for congressional candidates. Would also do things like expand conflict of interest laws that would ban members of Congress from serving on corporate boards and require presidents by law to disclose their taxes. Okay, sweeping to say the least. Thea other bill passed last night is the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act. Police reform has been a democratic priority for a long time. What's in this one? This is another bill that passed in the previous congress. So they're doing it again. This'll legislation would do things that would ban choke holds, it would change so called qualified immunity protection so it would make it easier to pursue claims of misconduct against police officers. It would put restrictions on no knock warrants, and it would require new data collection on a police encounters. It would also direct more money to community based policing programs. This one is not. I mean, it's not as controversial as the voting reforms Bill, which has very strong Republican opposition. No Republicans supported it. There is a bit more support among Republicans for police reform, especially in the Senate. There's competing measure by Tim Scott, who's a Republican of South Carolina. So there's maybe a chance there could be more bipartisan effort to move that bill forward, But the other measure is purely a symbolic one of the stage. It's still a tall order in the House Democrats know based on previous failures that these bills don't have much hope of getting to 60 votes in the Senate, which, of course, is the magic number to break a filibuster, they would need 10 Republicans to vote with Democrats. So why are they so determined to pass them if the prospects looked in Part of this is just elections are making good on their promises. These issues are very important to the Democratic base, and I think it's about keeping that promise. But you're right. I mean, I think that's going to be one of the cork tensions, if not the court tension of this Congress. I think Democrats really sensitive this fact that they control Washington. Now they have Congress and the White House and they want to be able to run in 20 to 2022 on accomplishments. But they have these really narrow majorities in the House and Senate, which really limits what they're going to be able to do. You know, it's not just the filibuster to the parties are really divided right now. There's not much that they agree on. The bigger picture, though, is Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer just doesn't have the votes to change the filibuster, and it's not clear that he ever will in this Congress. One of the biggest opponents, a centrist Democrat, Joe Manchin, of West Virginia. He was asked last week if he could ever see changing his mind. And he literally yelled never at the reporters who asked him the question, Okay, digging in on the filibuster, So just in the moment we have left we have the Senate is still in session. They're debating that Cove in 19 relief package. What's the latest? You know they're making some tweaks to the bill. They've done things like reduced the income limits for people to get those $1400 stimulus checks. There was concerns among Senate Senate Democrats that too much money was going to people who didn't need it. Otherwise, The bill seems to be on a glide path. They don't expect to get any Republican support. But Democrats seem pretty unified behind it. If it passes this week, they gotta send it back over to the house to pass it back over there, but Right now. They're on track to meet a march 14th deadline that they've set, which is when current extended unemployment benefits run out, and they don't want to see those benefits lapsed. So there's a real pressure campaign to get it done by then. OK, that's NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis with the latest thanks to your right welcome. Well, every

Senate Congress George Floyd Susan Davis Donald Trump House Democrats NPR Thea Tim Scott House South Carolina Bill Chuck Schumer Joe Manchin White House Washington West Virginia
The Senate Considers Covid-19 Relief This Week

Up First

02:48 min | 10 months ago

The Senate Considers Covid-19 Relief This Week

"Senate considers covert relief this week. That's right accounts is the first big legislation of joe biden's presidency. It passed the house this weekend although with no republican support. We have no time to waste if we act now decisively quickly emboli we can finally get ahead of this virus. Democrats want it signed before the latest round unemployment benefits expires in two weeks so now moves to the senate under procedure that would allow it to pass their if necessary with zero republican votes but that procedure does not allow passage of the entire bill which is a higher minimum. Wage is out of it. Npr white house correspondent. Isha roscoe joins us this morning. Hey good morning good morning. What happened to the minimum wage increase. So the bill has been labeled as a budget bill And the reason why democrats went with that is so that they don't need sixty votes to get it passed And so they don't have to worry about a filibuster But the senate parliamentarian says. The minimum wage doesn't count as part of a budget bill. A biden did say. He was disappointed at the parliamentarians ruling. But the white house signalled that it didn't want to go against that ruling of vermont. Vermont senator bernie. Sanders had proposed imposing tax penalties on big companies. That don't raise their minimum wage but our colleague. Susan davis is reporting that senate democrats are abandoning that effort after facing some resistance a stripping out that fifteen dollars minimum wage may actually make the rescue package easier to pass. Given how slim the majority is because some more conservative. Democrats have voiced opposition to that level of hike in the minimum wage of course up progressive democrats have said that raising the minimum wage should be a top priority and that arcane senate rules should not stand in the way okay in any case they are going to stand in the way but the rest of the measure is there one point nine trillion dollars in aid to americans help with covert. How important is this to the president. It's totally an important. Be has really centered. His whole first one hundred days around it. The white house has been pushing hard to get something done What they're stressing that even though it doesn't have republican support in congress polling has found it to be very popular including among republicans. You know biden celebrated the house passage on sunday and urged the senate to act quickly saying if we act quickly and boldly we can finally get ahead of this virus. There is a deadline extended. Federal unemployment benefits expire mid march and senate democrats have pledged to get this done before that so they have two weeks

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Trump faces Senate trial after historic second impeachment

Forum

01:01 min | 11 months ago

Trump faces Senate trial after historic second impeachment

"From NPR NEWS. I'm Laxmi saying President elect Joe Biden's first days in office will witness a historic second impeachment trial of by then former President Donald Trump. His fate will rest in the hands of a Senate that will be under Democratic control, though, is NPR's Susan Davis explains, the Democrats will still need enough Republican support to convict Outgoing Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell blocked a request from incoming majority leader Chuck Schumer to return to Washington early to start the trial. The Senate's out of session until January 19th and binds inauguration is the next day. Impeachment trials require senators to be in their seats and must meet six days a week until the trial concludes, making it difficult to approve any legislation or nomination while the trials ongoing If all 50 Democrats vote to convict they'd need a minimum of 17 Republicans to join them to get a conviction If Trump were convicted, which appears unlikely the Senate could then vote to bar him from ever holding public office

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"susan davis" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:33 min | 11 months ago

"susan davis" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Bur. I'm Peter O'Dowd. I'm Callum Borchers. It's here And now, with just over a week left in President Trump's term House Democrats are pushing a resolution that calls for stripping his power by the 25th amendment. The vice president. Pence has shown no sign. He's planning to invoke that amendment with the Cabinet and if he doesn't proceedings for a single article of Impeachment, which was formally introduced in the House yesterday are set for tomorrow. NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis is here with the latest. Hi, Sue. Hey, there. So what can we expect to unfold in the next 24 hours? Well. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is called the House back into session and already there's debate underway in committee on a resolution by Congressman Jamie Raskin. He's a Democrat from Maryland, and he's also a constitutional lawyer. Resolution is nonbinding. It's symbolic, but it's essentially expressing the will of the House and the resolution calls on Vice President Mike Pence and a majority of the Cabinet to invoke a provision in the 25th amendment. That would allow them to send a letter to Congress declaring the president unfit for office. And when that happens, the vice president becomes the acting president. Now there's a process for the president to contest that, but it would go to the Congress and it would basically run out the clock, leaving Mike Pence as acting president until inauguration day. Nancy Pelosi, another Democrats have said, And it's in the resolution that Mike Pence has 24 hours to do that. If he does not, and we have zero indication that he will, In fact, quite the opposite. Then the House will move forward with an article of impeachment against the president. And so in that article of impeachment, they point specifically to language the president used when he was addressing some of his supporters before the insurrection, he said. In part, we fight like hell. And if you don't fight like hell, you're not gonna have AH, country anymore. I mean, is that convincing for Republicans Sue? I mean how many in the house are expected to side with Democrats on this Well more than they did in the first impeachment, and when none of them broke party ranks and what with Democrats. We've seen significantly more criticism of the president not only for his actions before his words, then how he handled the assault after it was underway. We know that some Republicans Adam Kinzinger is a Republican from Illinois, said he supports invoking the 25th amendment. You've had other members. Tom Reed of New York, said he didn't necessarily support impeachment, but he would support censure on what also, maybe look at legislation that would bar the president from running from office ever again. So there is a you know a significant especially if you compared to the past four years push back against the president within his own party, But I would caution here that Overwhelming signal from Capitol Hill is that there is still significant loyalty to the president, and I think Democrats are prepared for these two still be mostly party line votes. So you mentioned that speaker Pelosi called the House back in two session that Senate is not in session right now. Is there any way that it would be called back into session to vote on impeachment? There's a lot of complicating factors here, one of which is that Democrats just took control of the Senate. But the two senators that will deliver that majority of the two new senators from Georgia, their elections still need to be certified, and they need to be sworn in for that Democratic majority to take place. Incoming Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer has said that he's looking at invoking a post 9 11 security measure that would allow the majority leader in the minority leader alone to call the Senate back into session under certain circumstances. Course he would need Senator Mitch McConnell, the Republican from Kentucky to go along with it, And we don't necessarily believe that that's likely to happen. Otherwise, you would need unanimous consent among all senators come back before Inauguration Day. That's definitely not gonna happen. But once an impeachment resolution passes the house, there has to be a Senate trial. Once they informed the Senate, there's no way around it. So it is a complicating factor for Democrats of how are they going to balance? The likelihood of a Senate trial and the 1st 100 days of the incoming Biden administration in which they have a very ambitious agenda. They want to get started on, and they really need to get Joe Biden, his Cabinet nominees confirmed and through the Senate. So there's a lot of moving parts in Washington here, but I think the bigger picture is that Democrats mainly believe that they just cannot let the events that played out last week go without significant punishment, and if in resolution passes, we believe it will pass because Democrats say they already have the vote. It will leave President Trump as the only president in history to ever be impeached twice and that is a political punishment that many Democrats say is necessary to be paid for what happened. In the moment that we have left to, um, mindful that it's not just President Trump that house Democrats are trying to hold accountable. They're also trying to hold accountable some of their own colleagues within Congress. So so where do things stand on that effort to hold some other members of Congress accountable for supporting the president's claims of voter fraud? Well, The biggest impact we've seen right now is in fundraising. Many major American companies American Express Marriott 18 T have put out statements saying that they will withhold political donations to any lawmaker who voted to object to the electoral College counts. That's it could have a potentially really big impact in politics. When you think about how important donations are Especially corporate donations. Too many senior members. There's also talk of potential ethics investigations potential center for lawmakers who supported it and pet late He's the top Democrat on the Judiciary Committee, suggested that he did not believe that Ted Cruz and Josh Holly, two Republican senators who supported these efforts should continue to serve on that committee. All right. NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis. Thanks for joining us, You're welcome. Amid all this political turmoil, one of the most powerful men in the Republican Party has died. Sheldon Adelson was a prominent businessman whose casino empire from Las Vegas to China. Made him incredibly rich. Over the years..

president vice president Senate President Trump Mike Pence Congress Nancy Pelosi acting president Cabinet NPR Susan Davis Peter O'Dowd Callum Borchers Republican Party Congressman Jamie Raskin Senator Mitch McConnell
Trump to be the First President Twice Impeached

NPR News Now

00:57 sec | 11 months ago

Trump to be the First President Twice Impeached

"To hold president. Trump accountable for incendiary remarks led last week's attack on the capital. The house is moving on a resolution for vice president. Mike pence to invoke the twenty-fifth amendment to remove trump from office. Here's npr's susan davis maryland. Democratic congressman jamie raskin authored. The non-binding resolution. It's expected to pass the house but has no force of law. Democrats will then turn to an impeachment resolution which includes one article of impeachment against president trump for incitement of insurrection for his role in the january. Six attack on the us capitol. Democrats say they already have the votes to pass it and some republicans are expected to join them. It's unclear when the senate will begin an impeachment trial. But there's no indication that two thirds of the senate would vote to convict passage of the resolution will make trump the first president in american history to be impeached twice. Susan davis npr news. Washington

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House To Vote On 25th Amendment Resolution Against Trump

Morning Edition

00:39 sec | 11 months ago

House To Vote On 25th Amendment Resolution Against Trump

"The House of Representatives will vote on a resolution today urging vice president Pence to force President Trump from office. NPR's Susan Davis says lawmakers will vote on this resolution later today. Importantly to know here is it's non binding, but it essentially expresses the sense of Congress. The vice president Mike Pence, and the Trump Cabinet should invoke the 25th amendment, in which there's a provision that would essentially allow Pence to assume the office through Inauguration Day if he and a majority of the Cabinet where to send a letter to say to Congress to say that the president couldn't fulfill the duties of office. We have zero indication that that's actively under consideration in the White House, but it is expected to pass the House tonight. NPR's Susan Davis.

President Trump Trump Cabinet Susan Davis House Of Representatives NPR Mike Pence Congress Cabinet White House House
Trump may face 2nd impeachment after deadly Capitol riot

Reveal

00:37 sec | 11 months ago

Trump may face 2nd impeachment after deadly Capitol riot

"Are moving forward with efforts to remove President Trump from office after his supporters rioted at the U. S Capitol last week. They say the president encouraged the mob to storm the building An article impeachment may be filed today. NPR's Susan Davis has more. It's just one article of impeachment and it's just four pages and I would encourage anyone to go online and read it for themselves. But It accuses the president of quote, willfully inciting violence against the government of the United States and quote and specifically cites the comments he made at that rally on January 6 that then encourage these extremists to then go storm the Capitol, NPR's Susan Davis. The

President Trump U. S Capitol Susan Davis NPR United States
Millions of Americans may receive $600 pandemic stimulus relief money as soon as next week

Morning Edition

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Millions of Americans may receive $600 pandemic stimulus relief money as soon as next week

"The Senate has passed a $2.3 trillion spending package, averting a government shutdown. The package includes roughly $900 billion in additional coronavirus relief Aid and 1.4 Trillion to fund a federal agencies through next September. NPR's Susan Davis reports. The bill now goes to President Trump for his signature. Relief is coming to millions of Americans affected by the pandemic. The legislation extends enhanced unemployment benefits of $300 a week through early spring. Another round of $600 stimulus checks will start going out as early as next week. As well as another round of funding for the Paycheck protection program, which will have provided in total nearly one trillion in aid to businesses in the past nine months. It also includes money to distribute the covert vaccine as well as money to help schools get back up and running. Congress is working to get it to President Trump's desk. By Christmas.

President Trump Susan Davis Senate NPR Congress
Congress Passes Two-Day Stopgap Spending Bill, Narrowly Avoiding a Shutdown

All Things Considered

01:08 min | 1 year ago

Congress Passes Two-Day Stopgap Spending Bill, Narrowly Avoiding a Shutdown

"In Washington Congress has passed and the president signed a two day stopgap spending bill to avert a partial government shutdown this weekend. The next deadline is at 12 01 Monday morning on Capitol Hill. Today, though the Senate is in session, and House members are on standby as lawmakers are still working on a nearly $1 trillion covert relief package. Millions of people who are out of work, face eviction and food insecurity in the pandemic. NPR's Susan Davis has more house and Senate leaders say they're close to a final agreement. But last minute hurdles remain. Republican Senator Pat Toomey is trying to insert a provision in the bill to ensure emergency lending programs created earlier this year for the Federal Reserve expire at the end of the year, as initially intended. Biden team and congressional Democrats are pushing back. They see it as an attempt by Republicans to tie the hands of the incoming administration to address ongoing economic threats posed by the pandemic. Overall, congressional leaders say they're close to a deal on a bill that will provide additional relief to millions of Americans, including more money for unemployment benefits and another round of stimulus

Senator Pat Toomey Senate Susan Davis Capitol Hill Congress Washington NPR House Federal Reserve Biden
"susan davis" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:52 min | 1 year ago

"susan davis" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Maura at y p t c dot com And the listeners of KQED centered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Ari Shapiro. Many people are counting down to the end of 2020 some with anticipation because they are just done with this garbage year, many others with trepidation because it could get worse December 31st is when several key support programs from the government expire. Congressional leaders and the White House have failed for months to reach a deal on a new round of coronavirus relief. But today there were signs of progress on Capitol Hill. NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis joins us for the latest on the talks. I sue. Hey, Ari. So tell us about these signs of progress. This bipartisan group of House and Senate lawmakers released a framework on a bill that they hope can break the logjam on relief. What's in the draft bill? Well, this is an effort being driven by centrists in the House and Senate, including Democratic Senator Joe Manchin of Virginia, West Virginia. Excuse me, and Republican Senator Susan Collins of Maine. Put forward and $908 billion bill and a good portion of it would extend to really popular existing government programs. It would extend additional federal unemployment insurance by $300 a week for 18 weeks that would carry them through March. And it would provide another big influx of cash to a popular small business lending program. That's kept a lot of employers. Ah float these past few months. This is, of course, unlikely to be the final bill. But the effort today certainly speaks to the frustration, money or feeling at party leaders in the White House for continually failing to be able to reach an agreement here. Have party leaders responded today. It's been pretty lukewarm. They've all been briefed on it. No one's embraced it. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer sort of padded it on the head and called it a good effort. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said it was not likely to be the last word because he's not going to bring anything to the floor. That doesn't have President Trump's support the issue this you want to get a result. And I'd like to remind everybody is where you get a result, Geoff, ever presidential signatory, So I felt the first thing we needed to do is to find out what The president would in fact shine. The upside here for negotiations is the White House has repeatedly indicated they'd be willing to sign off on Maura than a trillion dollars in relief measures. It's really been Senate Republicans and McConnell, who have been resistant to spending that much money. So Treasury Secretary Mnuchin has to thread a needle here, you know, he needs to spend as much as the White House thinks is necessary to actually address the needs of the pandemic and not alienate too many Senate Republicans because they need their votes. What is the state of talks between congressional leaders in the White House Well, Speaker Nancy Pelosi Ammunition spoke on the phone today. She and Schumer have also sent a letter to Mitch McConnell last night with the latest offering it Humor, declined to tell reporters today. What was in that offer, Which is, you know is maybe one indication that they're actually trying to advance talks. If they're not talking about it. McConnell's working on his own proposal, he briefed Senate Republicans on it today. It's probably not going to be everything Democrats want. But he told reporters that the Biden administration will have another chance next year, and Biden today told reporters that his transition team is doing working on something exactly like that. And he encouraged Congress to do something robust in the lame duck. McConnell also made it clear that if there is a deal, he intensive attached to a must pass spending bill to avoid a government shutdown. And that deadline is next week December 11th. So it should be pretty clear by the end of next week, which which way this is going Okay, So, with all that is the wind up. What's the bottom line? How likely is it that there will be something passed and signed before the end of the year? Well, a lot of these programs expire at the end of the year of Congress does nothing. So it means that millions and millions of Americans could lose unemployment benefits and have literally zero support at a time where we're expecting more business closures. Also, programs that protect people from housing evictions into first student loan payments will expire so I think all of that is feeling hope that Congress can cut some kind of deal to ease that pain before they all go home to toast the holidays with their families. That's NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis. Thank you. You're welcome. Like much of the response to the Corona virus across the U. S. For housing. It has been uneven, very much a patchwork. The CDC has an order to stop evictions. Meanwhile, each state has taken a different approach and thousands of people are being affected despite the order. Still, the federal order has been protecting many, and it is expiring at the end of this month, which leaves millions of people vulnerable to losing their homes. Now a new U C l A paper out this week directly links evictions to the spread of covert 19. Katherine Life fight is one of the lead researchers on that study. She joins us Now. Welcome. Thank you. Is what is happening here. Just the obvious that if someone gets evicted, they might well move in with family or friends and then the number of people that they're in contact with an exposed to his growing. Yep, it's as intuitive is that it's difficult, socially distance and shelter in place if you don't have a shelter. Were you able to control for things like, stay at home orders, mask orders. How were you able to identify that This was specifically linked to an eviction. So we look at the state level. There were 44 states that ever had moratoriums and 27 of them lifted their moratoriums. We did our best to account for the factors that we know are important in covert transmissions such as mass mandates. Testing rates stay at home orders and school closures. Did what you found surprise you. Yeah, I think Whenever you see numbers like 430,000 cases, 10,000 deaths It's surprising and it's troubling. These are deaths that could have been prevented had the state's maintained their moratoriums. Did you find any interesting data where the situation's varied in interesting ways from state to state s O. The biggest driver of cases and deaths are the state's population and Lifting the moratorium earlier was associated with more cases and deaths. So Texas really stands out as a state with a lot of cases and deaths, Associate ID with lifting their moratorium. I believe it's in the neighborhood of 150,000 cases on day 4500. Death that could have been prevented by maintaining their moratorium. Did your research look at whether different groups of people might be affected differently if this ban expires, so we weren't able to look directly at that. But we know that black and white next families are more likely to be evicted. We also know that these are the same communities that are bearing the brunt Cove. It So moratoriums can help. These families remain housed and stay safe during the pandemic, and they might also keep covert disparities from growing larger. No, I need to know that your study has not been peer reviewed yet..

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnel White House Congress Chuck Schumer Susan Davis Maura NPR Senator Susan Collins Mary Louise Kelly Ari Shapiro KQED Senator Joe Manchin brunt Cove President Trump
Chuck Grassley, second oldest senator, exposed to COVID-19

The World

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Chuck Grassley, second oldest senator, exposed to COVID-19

"Was Senator Chuck Grassley has been exposed to the Corona virus and is in quarantine. Grassley, the oldest Republican senator, which puts him in third line to succession to the presidency, since he's president, Pro TEM more from NPR's Susan Davis. In a statement, Grassley said he had been exposed to the Corona virus, but did not say how or when he's under quarantine at home Until he gets test results back, he said he's not experiencing any symptoms. You will, however, be forced to break his 27 year streak of never missing a Senate vote. The Senate has experienced waves of positive test cases or self enforce quarantines in recent months. Republican Senator Rick Scott of Florida is also currently under quarantine because of an exposure

Senator Chuck Grassley Grassley Susan Davis NPR Senate Senator Rick Scott Florida
Chuck Grassley, second oldest senator, exposed to COVID-19

All of It

00:53 sec | 1 year ago

Chuck Grassley, second oldest senator, exposed to COVID-19

"Iowa Senator Chuck Grassley has been exposed to the Corona virus and is now in quarantine. Grassley is the oldest Republican senator and the president protest which puts him third in line and succession to the presidency. NPR's Susan Davis has details. In a statement, Grassley said he had been exposed to the Corona virus, but did not say how or when he's under quarantine at home until he gets test results back, He said he's not experiencing any symptoms. He will, however, be forced to break his 27 year streak of never missing a Senate vote. The Senate has experienced waves of positive test cases or self enforce quarantines in recent months. Republican Senator Rick Scott of Florida is also currently under quarantine because of an exposure to the virus. Despite calls mostly from Democrats to institute a testing and tracing program for senators. No such system exists. Susan Davis NPR NEWS Washington

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Democrats are now unlikely to win a majority in the Senate: Here's where things stand

All Things Considered

03:28 min | 1 year ago

Democrats are now unlikely to win a majority in the Senate: Here's where things stand

"Republicans are enjoying a much better election than anticipated. Republicans are now poised to maintain their majority in the Senate. I just received a very gracious call from Sara Gideon conceding the raise voice of Republican Senator Susan Collins, speaking earlier today in Maine, a state that Democrats had considered a must win to have a chance at flipping the Senate. No. In the House Republicans are expected to pick up seats shrinking the Democrats majority down to single digits for more on this NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis is here. Hey there, Sue what went wrong, so to speak for Democrats? Yeah, I mean, it's been a complete reversal of fortune for Republicans down the ballot. There had been this widespread confidence that Democrats were going to take over the Senate that they could gain as many as six or seven seats. And that Democrats were poised to grow their majority in the House by as many as 10 to 20 seats. Obviously, not if that happened. I think the one thing everyone is pointing to right now is just how wrong the Poles were. I think in that main Senate race that's a great example. The Democrats Sara Gideon, she led in public polls all year long and yet still fell far behind in the race. I talked to election analyst Sean Trendy this morning, and he told me that polling simply did not account for Trump's support that a significant number of Trump voters just were never accounted for. Those are the exact people that when you hear a phone call in the person says Hi, I'm from the New York Times. Would you take it all? Just go click. I think it is that straightforward. I also talked to Democratic Congressman Ami Bera of California today, and he said that the polling was way off from where it was in the 2018 midterms. And that's when Democrats won. He basically told me he just thinks Democrats couldn't account for the effect that Trump has when he himself is on the ballot. While it looks like Republicans will hold their majority in the Senate, Not all races have been called. Can you tell us what still outstanding? Yeah, There's still five races that haven't been called 47 have been called for Democrats 48 for Republicans won were watching really closely Is Michigan. There's a Democratic incumbent there. Gary Peters. He's running narrowly behind a Republican John James. Obviously, what could be a pickup opportunity for Republicans. North Carolina remains really tight, but incumbent Republican Senator Tom Tillis is leading. You know, that was always seen as a state that was critical to the majority. So if Republicans hold it, I think that's one of the reasons why they seem to feel pretty secure. Right now. Alaska hasn't been called, but I don't really see any reason there to think it's going to be a Democratic pick up and Last one's Georgia. There's two Senate races there. One of them is going to go to a January runoff, and it's quite possible. The other one where it's held by incumbent Republican David per two, might be able to hold it off and win it out, right. Given that there are some races that are going to be uncertain, at least for the next few days does that What does that mean for the Senate majority? It does, and you know, depending on how Georgia goes, it could take quite some time. North Carolina in particular, could be tight and could be subject to court challenge. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell spoke to that reality earlier today in Kentucky. You can anticipate in close elections, Both sides will be lawyered up and we'll end up in court. It's happened over and over and over again. Nothing unusual, and I do want to see her. I think McConnell has a point, and it's worth focusing on that. I think a lot of people are really nervous about what's gonna be happening with Balan challenges. It's really not uncommon, especially in Senate races to go through court challenges. Before they're certified. It happens almost every election year. That's NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis. Thank you. You're welcome.

Sara Gideon Senate Senator Susan Collins Sean Trendy Congressman Ami Bera Susan Davis Democrats NPR House Senator Tom Tillis Maine Gary Peters Donald Trump David Per John James The New York Times North Carolina Georgia California
Democrats are expected to retain control of the House, but there are still races to watch tonight

New Sounds

04:15 min | 1 year ago

Democrats are expected to retain control of the House, but there are still races to watch tonight

"At this point, there has been no net change in the balance of the US Senate and to talk about that. We're joined by NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis. I su Hey, Ari. Let's take a broad look at the Senate map. Tonight. Republicans have held a few key seats. The Democrats are still hoping to win back in some cases, in some cases that has escaped their grasp tonight. What's the landscape is you see it now? Well, I think it looks like the path to the Democrats. Flipping control of the Senate is getting narrower. And now as the night goes on, Republicans holding onto seats in Texas and Kansas and Lindsey Graham winning reelection in South Carolina. These were always sort of reacher Democratic seats, But we were looking to them a signs of, you know, maybe this would be a big blue wave night. I think we're seeing enough results coming in that We do not believe this is going to be a big blue wave night. Certainly not down the ballots, so The path for Democrats to win a majority is just getting more difficult. We're still looking and waiting for results in Arizona, where Democrats expect to flip a seat there, and in Maine, where incumbent Senator Susan Collins has had probably her toughest reelection yet, but again, even with those two seats, that might not be enough to get Democrats where they need to be at also know we've been watching North Carolina really closely all night. Largely seen as a bellwether state for how the Senate would go Republican incumbent Thom Tillis is leading there. The Associated Press has not called the race. But Republicans I'm talking to tonight feel pretty good at their chances of holding on to a Senate majority, albeit with fewer seats and explain why that matters what the difference is between if we imagine that Biden wins the presidency, which we certainly don't know, But what is the difference between A Democratic president with a democratically controlled Congress and a Democratic president with a Republican controlled Congress. Well, I think what's interesting is if Republicans do retain control of the Senate. In some ways, it will be a status quo on Capitol Hill. We're looking at still split control of Congress. Democrats are still heavily favored toe hold their majority in the house. There's no reason to doubt that will happen, so whoever the next president is, but whether it be Donald Trump or Joe Biden They're likely to be facing a divided Congress. And what is the lesson? Bin of the past decade of divided government is that it's a recipe for gridlock and for a confrontation, and if that is the outcome of this election, I think the idea that we're going to see big sweeping legislative change becomes less and less likely, and on the House side. I interviewed Speaker Nancy Pelosi yesterday and she was optimistic about Democrats picking up seats tonight so far. Republicans have won a couple of seats they have and they have, and I think that's one of the things I'm looking at. That suggests that this sort of down ballot activity we're seeing is evidence that we're not going to see a big, dramatic Democratic wave tonight. Democrats still forecast to pick up digits seats in the single digits. But you know forecasters, we're going into the night saying they could pick up a CZ. Many is 15 to 20. That seems really unlikely. And we are seeing Democrats losing in some places to Democratic incumbents have already lost in Florida and South Florida, where the party took a bit of a weapon. Tonight. There's Democrats in New York. Max Rose, who was a freshman Democrat who won in the 2018 Democratic wave in a Staten Island district, a district very friendly to Donald Trump. He's down in the polls right now, but That race hasn't been officially called yet either Bellwether races in Virginia, you know, Republican incumbents have been winning their Arkansas so it is definitely not the terrible night that a lot of house Republicans were braced for. And if anything, I think I hear much more optimism coming from Republican strategist and Democrats at this hour, one race that is getting national attention, not because it was competitive, but because of the person who wanted Marjorie Taylor Greene. Somebody who has Made racist statements supported the conspiracy theory Q and on and is now headed to Congress. She is, and I would also note that in one of the Georgia Senate races tonight, Kelly Leffler Well, we can't say she won the runoff because it hasn't been declared. But her conservative opponent, Doug Collins, could seated the race to her, which means she will be the Republican likely going to a runoff in January, and she courted Marjorie Greens endorsement in the Senate race, and I think that speaks to sort of The influence the rising influence that someone like Marjorie Green and her views have inside the Republican Party to The Associated Press is actually just called the Georgia Senate going to run off with you as you were speaking.

Senate Congress Senator Susan Collins Thom Tillis Susan Davis Lindsey Graham NPR Donald Trump South Carolina The Associated Press Kansas Biden Maine Max Rose Arizona Joe Biden Texas North Carolina Speaker Nancy Pelosi Marjorie Taylor Greene
"susan davis" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"susan davis" Discussed on KCRW

"Voting for Jamie Harrison. I asked her if she's ever voted for Senator Graham in the past a head I have voted for him every time but you know, I'm just not placed with what's happening now. And he seems too big trunk Dominion and I don't like that. Such former Graham supporters are why this race his clothes now that he's courting hardcore conservatives and the Trump base, its many longtime moderate backers, be they Republican or Democrat who are feeling snubbed. Don Gonyea. NPR NEWS, CHARLESTON. Okay, We're back with congressional correspondent Susan Davis. I have to ask are Republicans fearful of losing even South Carolina in the Senate? They are You know, President Trump is an anchor there like he is everywhere else, Although he's still expected to win the state and Republicans are hopeful that's enough to keep Graham alive there. But As Ben Sasse said 2020 could be a blue tsunami. And if it is, that's what it would take to defeat an incumbent like Graham and estate as conservative as South Carolina. Then we'll underline the other thing that Ben says said that who controls the Senate is an extremely important question. Especially if the presidency were to change hands. You better believe it, Susan. Thank you very much. You're welcome. NPR's Susan Davis. This is NPR news. It's 5 42 on K C R. W Jam Singer Darby Crash Dreamed of immortality Time had other questions. He died on December. 7th 1980 just passing might have made him a legend said the next day it was December. 8th John Lennon is dead, shot several times by young John Lennon Darby Crash on Lost 1918 KCR W with me on the subject. Find it wherever you get podcasts. It's the Battle of the town Hall's Donald Trump and Joe Biden appeared on two different networks last night. But in the same town hall format, you'll find out what they had to say in about 15 minutes. Hi, I'm.

Senator Graham Susan Davis President Trump NPR Ben Sasse South Carolina Senate Jamie Harrison John Lennon Don Gonyea Trump town Hall Joe Biden CHARLESTON
"susan davis" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:49 min | 1 year ago

"susan davis" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Oops. I'm Rachel Martin and I'm Steve Inskeep in Texas, a court back. The governor's moved too close drop off sons, California told Republicans to stop operating their own ballot boxes. Also, why to supporters of Judge Amy Cockney Barrett highlight her seven Children and days after the president talked of troops home by Christmas, fighting in Afghanistan intensified. It's Wednesday, October, 14th Day in 1960. For that Martin Luther King Jr received the Nobel Peace Prize News is next. Live from NPR news. I'm Korova Coleman. The Senate Judiciary Committee begins its third day of hearings in the confirmation process for President Trump's Supreme Court nominee. Judge Amy Cockney Barrett. NPR Susan Davis has more Barrett set for nearly 11 hours of questions on Tuesday. Today is the final day for Barrett and senators will have shorter 20 minute rounds to ask additional questions. Democrats have hyper focused on the possible stakes for the affordable care act and abortion rights because Barrett is a conservative who will shift the ideological balance to the right. Barrett repeatedly declined to indicate how she might rule on any one issue, But she defended herself against any suggestion of bias to the law. At one point, she told the committee that the caricature of her is wrong, but she never has or will impose her personal views on rulings. The committee is expected to approve her nomination next week. Susan Davis NPR NEWS Washington A federal court in Virginia is set to hear a lawsuit today requesting that the state extend its voter registration deadline. A statewide failures shut down voter registration on its last day Tuesday. And pay veer of member station V. P. M in Richmond has more Three advocacy groups are suing the state to reopen voter registration for another 48 hours. They alleged that Tuesday's outage infringed on Virginians fundamental right to vote. Their lawsuit is supported by Virginia's Democratic attorney general. It follows similar voter registration glitches in Florida last week Been pave Your reporting The California State Republican Party is defying an order from the California secretary of state and will continue putting out unofficial ballot boxes for voters to drop in there marked ballots. California GOP claims Democrats are trying to suppress votes. The secretary of state says the Republican boxes do not have security he may consider criminal charges against the state GOP. Texas began early voting Tuesday. Turnout was heavy as Texas Public Radio's Jack Morgan reports lines were long at Poles in San Antonio. Videos posted to Twitter showed lines nearly a quarter mile long at several locations in San Antonio. It was a big surprise for voter Laurie Haley. It's unlike anything I've ever seen.

Judge Amy Cockney Barrett Senate Judiciary Committee California Susan Davis NPR Martin Luther King Jr Texas Rachel Martin California State Republican Pa Steve Inskeep Supreme Court Korova Coleman Virginia Twitter Afghanistan president President Trump
House passes government-wide temporary funding bill in sweeping bipartisan vote, averting shutdown threat

BBC World Service

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

House passes government-wide temporary funding bill in sweeping bipartisan vote, averting shutdown threat

"Lawmakers have approved a stop Gap funding bill to keep the government running through December 11th. The legislation must still be approved by the US Senate and signed by President Trump. To avert a shutdown in just eight days more from NPR, Susan Davis. The legislation will keep the government funded through December 11th. It passed with overwhelming bipartisan support, but only after a partisan dust up over farm and nutrition eight. Initial bill lacked more than 20 billion, requested by the Trump Administration for the Commodity Credit Corporation, which provides aid to American Farmer's House Speaker Nancy Pelosi accused the president of using it as a political slush fund. But there was pushback from House Democrats in farm states who advocated for including the funds. That position ultimately prevailed. The bill also expands nutrition assistance for school Children to continue to receive meals while learning remotely.

President Trump Trump Administration Us Senate Commodity Credit Corporation Susan Davis Nancy Pelosi NPR
House Passes Stopgap Funding Measure to Keep Government Open

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

00:59 min | 1 year ago

House Passes Stopgap Funding Measure to Keep Government Open

"Jack Spear a stopgap funding bill to keep the government running through December. 11th passed the house late this evening. The legislation must still be approved by the Senate and signed by President Trump, where the government would face another shutdown threat in eight days more from NPR, Susan Davis The legislation will keep the government funded through December 11th. It passed with overwhelming bipartisan support, but only after a partisan dust up over farm and nutrition eight. The initial bill lacked more than 20 billion, requested by the Trump Administration for the Commodity Credit Corporation, which provides aid to American Farmer's House Speaker Nancy Pelosi accused the president of using it as a political slush fund. But there was pushback from House Democrats in farm states who advocated for including the funds. That position ultimately prevailed. The bill also expands nutrition assistance for school Children to continue to receive meals while learning remotely. Susan Davis. NPR NEWS Washington Even

Susan Davis President Trump Trump Administration NPR Jack Spear Commodity Credit Corporation Senate Nancy Pelosi Washington
House passes funding bill with GOP support to avert looming government shutdown

Q

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

House passes funding bill with GOP support to avert looming government shutdown

"Bill to keep the government running through December. 11th passed the house late this evening. The legislation must still be approved by the Senate and signed by President Trump Or the government would face another shutdown threat in eight days more from NPR, Susan Davis The legislation will keep the government funded through December 11th. It passed with overwhelming bipartisan support, but only after a partisan dust up over farm and nutrition eight. The initial bill lacked more than 20 billion, requested by the Trump Administration for the Commodity Credit Corporation, which provides aid to American Farmer's House Speaker Nancy Pelosi accused the president of using it as a political slush fund. But there was pushback from House Democrats in farm states who advocated for including the funds. That position ultimately prevailed. The bill also expands nutrition assistance for school Children to continue to receive meals while learning remotely. Susan Davis. NPR

Bill Susan Davis NPR President Trump Trump Administration Commodity Credit Corporation Nancy Pelosi Senate
"susan davis" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:35 min | 1 year ago

"susan davis" Discussed on KCRW

"You're welcome that's NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis one gram of marker of a crisis is the number of calls to suicide hotlines so far in this pandemic those calls have not gone up but history offers no cause for reassurance suicide rates often dropped in the immediate aftermath of disasters only to rise later NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports J. is a healthy thirty three year old wife and mother but a decade ago a rare hormonal disease ravaged her body she spent years without a diagnosis that almost broke her emotionally I have attempted suicide two times the pandemic brought back that trauma she came down with symptoms of cove it a few weeks ago once again treatment eluded her we're in rural Montana so there's basically one place I can go and they're on high precautions I don't know if I could get tested I don't know if they'll see me is actually good Friday so they were open when I called J. who wishes to only use her first name was already burdened with worry that her hours as a social worker might get cut better counseling patients might suffer I'm feeling really sick it's been a long week I'm dealing with all these new stressors and there it is for the first time in years now I'm feeling suicidal myself the ceiling was horrible but familiar so J. laid down slapped and let the panic receipt she eventually tested negative for cove it public health officials hope to surface the struggles and bolster the resilience of those like J. before suicide becomes a problem of epic proportion because the risk of a spike is potentially huge factors like joblessness addiction and profound isolation can feed into it suicide experts have studied the effects of trauma from hurricanes Katrina and Ike to the Great Recession but this pandemic with its global geographic and cycle social which has the potential to trumps them all Roger McIntyre researches psychiatry at the university of Toronto the two most replicated robust factors linked to suicide is economic change downturn and social disconnection both major hallmarks of this pandemic McIntyre's research on the pandemic in suicide published in the June edition of the journal world psychiatry different fact the unemployment rate is ten to twenty percent we came out at a staggering statistic of over eight thousand additional suicides over and above what would have been expected of covert never came into our lives and that's just in the US which is already seeing troubling increases so prevention advocates are doubling down but addressing suicide is no simple task it has complex roots often it's like the depression or mental illness but not always Joshua Gordon is director of the National Institute of mental health he points to suicide a dozen years ago during the housing crisis you can see that it's not just about the elections not just about the foreclosure most of them have a range of anywhere from five to ten other significant adverse events in their lives many of them financial but also personal and social that raise one's risk in other words outreach needs to address many sources of pain Gordon's agency recently launched a national campaign with other groups promoting distress hotlines and community support tele therapy which is seeing massive growth is promising but not everyone can access it Maria Oquendo says distraction is also effective you can do is chair of psychiatry at the university of Pennsylvania oftentimes people feel like but I have this problem I have to think about how I'm gonna solve it and when the individual is suicidal that's the last thing that they should be doing one of the most powerful distractions is social connection talking on your birth chart give as twenty five bi polar and lives in mobile Alabama she's stable she says in part because she leans on her online circle of friends many of whom have survived suicide attempts themselves people unite more I know physically we literally cannot do that but they might be calling up people that they haven't called in years so the pandemic can cut both ways she says it causes stress but people can also unite over it you can a Gucci NPR news if you or.

Susan Davis
"susan davis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"susan davis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Politics podcast that has endured racial correspondent Susan Davis thank you you're welcome and White House correspondent Tamera Keith thank you you're welcome you're listening to All Things Considered on W. N. Y. C. coming up next we speak with ambassador Nicholas burns a career diplomat about the testimony of Maria von of itch the former US ambassador to Ukraine and the public impeachment hearings also ahead Johnson and Johnson will now pay Oklahoma four hundred sixty five million dollars for its role in the states opioid crisis if we are watching closely you'll note that's one hundred seven million dollars less than the initial award we'll find out why the change coming up next stay tuned support for W. NYC comes from universal pictures and make ready with their new film queen and slam a thriller coming this fall starring Daniel colonia and Jody Turner Smith.

Susan Davis Tamera Keith W. N. Y. C. Ukraine Johnson Oklahoma W. NYC Daniel colonia Jody Turner Smith White House correspondent Nicholas burns Maria US four hundred sixty five millio one hundred seven million doll
"susan davis" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"susan davis" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Editor and correspondent Ron Elving and by congressional correspondent Susan Davis again it's seven special coverage on KQED public radio eighty eight point five FM increasing clouds today ahead of an incoming dry upper trough is going to bring a cooling trend into tomorrow by Friday temperatures start to rebound leading to another warming and drying trend this weekend the National Weather Service says no rain in the forecast the next several days support for NPR comes from indeed with its skills tests built for employers who want to see a deeper sense of the person behind the resume learn more at indeed dot com slash and PR zoom zoom offers cloud video conferencing online meetings and a video conference room solution in one platform featuring digital video and audio with screen sharing account registration and more Xoom dot U. S. and the listeners and members of KQED public radio eighty eight point five FM in San Francisco and eighty nine point three FM in Sacramento live online right now it cake you we D. dot org five thirty five this is morning edition from NPR news I'm David green and I'm Steve Inskeep good morning Turkey's president he's in Washington today rage of Thai appear to one meets president trump he gets that meeting despite notably ignoring an appeal by president trump the American president wrote a letter warning against a Turkish invasion of Syria including the words quote don't be a full Turkey invaded anyway now the two presidents meet face to face leaders of allies whose relations are under stress Turkey notably agreed to buy Russian missile defense systems awkward for a NATO nation we have reached Republican.

president NATO Steve Inskeep KQED Ron Elving Syria Washington Editor Turkey David green Sacramento San Francisco NPR National Weather Service Susan Davis
"susan davis" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:54 min | 2 years ago

"susan davis" Discussed on KCRW

"Live from NPR news. In Washington, I'm Lakshmi Singh tensions are surging between the United States and Iran, with the Trump administration accusing Tehran of being behind this week's attacks onto oil tankers in the Gulf of mon- reporting from Brussels, Teri, Schultz says the European Union is calling for calm on both sides. And Ron denies it had anything to do with the attacks that saw two tankers targeted near the strait of Hormuz, the US military has released video. It says shows Ron's revolutionary guard removing an unexploded mine from one of the ships and act. The US's characterizing, his trying to hide evidence in Brussels, the European Commission wouldn't take either side but says it's gathering information. Spokeswoman, my coach says one thing is clear, the region thousand this collation. It does need this Asian, doesn't it further tension. And therefore, we call for maximum restraint and to avoid vocations, you foreign ministers. Meet Monday in Luxembourg and are expected to. To discuss their response to the growing crisis for NPR news. I'm Teri Schultz in Brussels, while the Republican majority in the US Senate has blocked Bill, that would require campaigns to report attempted foreign interference and the US democratic process. Now the democratic controlled house will next try to take up similar legislation the summer and peers Susan Davis reports. This comes after President Donald Trump told ABC that he would not alert authorities of a foreign government offered him. Dirt on his election rivals in twenty twenty this is one of those norms that the president is challenging in some ways, and we saw that because the response on Capitol Hill from all makers Republicans alike were if I was approached, I would turn it over this is one of those things that seems like common sense in politics. But President Trump is challenging the way we think about it NPR. Susan Davis reporting retail sales in the US picked up last month and signed that American shoppers are still willing to spend money, NPR's Scott Horsely reports a new numbers from the commerce. -partment suggests better than expected growth in the second quarter of the year retail sales jumped by half a percentage point last month. And April sales figures were also revised upwards. The Commerce Department now says shoppers boosted their spending in April where an earlier report said, spending had slowed the gains in may were widespread with auto sales rising eight tenths of a point, and book, hobby and sporting goods sales climbing. One point one percent, the study growth in retail sales is consistent with consumers feel relatively confident paychecks had been growing at a modest pace and unemployment's near a fifty year, low consumer spending is a big driver of the broader US economy. So the improving picture of retail sales may lead forecasters to raise their estimates of second quarter GDP growth, Scott Horsely, NPR news, Washington US, stocks are trading lower this hour. The Dow Jones industrial average down fifty three points at twenty six thousand fifty three. This is NPR news. Support for NPR comes from. Fifth generation inC maker of Tito's, handmade, vodka, founder, Tito beverage discovered his passion by exploring what he loved to do and what he was good at eighty proof. Tito's handmade Vonk has distilled and bottled in Austin, Texas, from KCRW. I'm Cheri Glazer with a look at state and local headlines. Family friends, and law enforcement officers are remembering in LA county sheriff's deputy who died this week, a candlelight vigil was held for Joseph Salama last night at the fast food restaurant Hambro, where we shop Monday in, what's being called an unprovoked attack Solano died. Two days later. The suspect is a man named retina Elson who may have been involved in another killing just an hour before shooting Solano. He's also facing to robbery counts for ledge holding up a convenience store, and a gas station in Long Beach. A judge has given preliminary approval to two hundred fifteen million dollar settlement of federal lawsuit against USC in connection with sexual abuse allegations against a gun. College who worked there for decades. The settlement would create a fund to pay twenty five hundred to two hundred fifty thousand dollars per person to women who say they were abused by Dr George Tyndall. It would also require reforms including appointing a women's health advocate to handle misconduct. Complaints a pair of plastic man has filed a lawsuit alleging the Michael avenue, did not pay him. Millions of dollars. He was due in a settlement with ally county. Jeffrey Johnson accuses avenue in its former associates of neglected to pay him after the county, cut a four million dollar. Check in a settlement over injuries. He suffered while in custody. Johnson says he learned he was duped, when avenue was charged with Bank and wire fraud earlier this year. And have you ever taken a tour of Hearst castle on the central coast in the summer in wished? You could take a dip and while the historic mansions or Neethling tiled, swimming pools, well now you can, but it won't be cheap..

United States NPR Brussels President Donald Trump Teri Schultz Susan Davis Washington Ron Scott Horsely strait of Hormuz US Senate Lakshmi Singh Hearst castle European Union Jeffrey Johnson Gulf Commerce Department
"susan davis" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"susan davis" Discussed on KCRW

"From NPR news in Washington, I'm Dave Mattingly. President Trump is echoing secretary of state, Mike Pompeo accusing Iran of being behind yesterday's attacks onto oil tankers in the Gulf of Oman asked this morning by Fox News. Trump said, Iran, did it Iran denies any involvement US central command has released photos and video implicating, Iran's Revolutionary Guards Senate Republicans have blocked a Bill that would have required political campaigns to report attempted foreign interference. The vote follows comments by President Trump to ABC news about being open to listening to political dirt foreign government might have on his twenty twenty opponent. Here's NPR's Susan Davis. This is one of those norms that the president is challenging in some ways, and we saw that because the response on Capitol Hill from all all makers Republicans alike, were if I was approached, I would turn it over this is one of those things that seems like commonsense in politics. But president. Trump is challenging the way we think about it, Israel says it struck militants sites in Gaza today, after a rocket fired from their hit in his Rayleigh school. NPR's Daniel estrin is in Jerusalem, this flare up comes just a month after Israel reached a ceasefire with the Islamist group HAMAs that controls, Gaza to stop some of the most serious violence since two thousand fourteen war. It comes as HAMAs is pressuring Israel to ease and Israel Egypt. Sharon blockade on Gaza. This is NPR news from Washington and on this Friday, you are listening to KCRW. I'm Cheri Glazer be ACLU is suing the city of corona on behalf of a man who was deported after he was picked up during a traffic, stop the civil rights groups has corona police officers should not have asked Daniel Valenzuela about his immigration status as KCRW's, Daryl Sassaman reports the case is while the first tests of California's sanctuary state law Valenzuela had just dropped his daughter's at school when he was pulled over by corona police in January. For allegedly speeding, the officers called US customs and border, protection, which told them that Valenzuela had overstayed his visa by a couple of weeks. He was taken into custody in eventually deported. The ACLU says the case is a clear violation of the California values act. That's the sanctuary state law passed in two thousand seventeen the policy says police cannot interrogate detain or arrest anyone for immigration enforcement purposes. The ACLU is seeking one million dollars in damages for Valenzuela, who is now living in Sinoloa of Mexico separated from his wife and daughters. Corona police, call Valenzuela's case and isolated incident. But immigrant rights activists say there have been similar cases in the city and they want the police department to do a better job training officers to comply with the sanctuary law in nineteen ninety custodial workers in Los Angeles came out of the shadows and went on strike in a labor action known as Justice for janitors walkout included big street pros. Tests that helped the janitors when paying creases and better benefits yesterday, hundreds of janitors in LA gathered to honor the nineteen ninety Justice for janitors strike and prepare for upcoming contract talks with building owners KCRW salt Gonzales was at the LA rally and Matt up with David wear. Tom president of the union SEI you United service workers west where to talked about what the janitors many of whom are immigrants are calling for we're going into a contract.

Daniel Valenzuela President Trump president NPR Gaza Iran Corona police ACLU KCRW Israel US Washington Mike Pompeo Gulf of Oman California corona HAMAs Dave Mattingly
"susan davis" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:56 min | 2 years ago

"susan davis" Discussed on KCRW

"This is weekend edition from NPR news. I'm Susan Davis, Lulu. Garcia Navarro is a way is the tide turning towards impeachment for President Trump speaker Nancy Pelosi still says she's not ready to go there. I do think that impeachment is a very divisive place to go in our country. But cracks in party unity are beginning to show for Ginny democrat, Don. Byer broke with party leaders and his calling for impeachment proceedings to begin now. He joins us live from Virginia. Congressman welcome to the program. Thank you. You are the first member of congress from Virginia to call for impeachment. What made you change your mind? It's we were content to wait until the Mueller report came out and even content to let the process, play our leaders of the four committees that are investigating us all doing a lot of very constructive things. But in the last two weeks, number one Mnuchin refused of turn over the president's tax returns despite the fact that the law is incredibly simple and clear and then bar refuse to testify before the house was cited by the committee for contempt. And then just off the first Republican actually came out with a long really detailed piece of why he did. I've always felt impeachment shouldn't be partisan. We need to have Republicans and Democrats, and so it away, Justin really opened the door to for this to be bipartisan in the first. What do you believe opening impeachment proceedings will provide Democrats that you can't get through the regular oversight investigative subpoena? Thirty channels. Susan great question really would have hoped for. Is that Jamie? Raskin to our only is our constitutional scholar in the House, Democrat from Maryland. Thank you. He's a. The impeachment inquiry and the notion that the inquiry will give us tools investigative tool subpoena tools that we don't have in the regular committees committees are, are largely limited to things that affect our legislative function, whereas, an impeachment inquiry, actually says did did the president actually obstruct Justice, you know, Mueller cited ten instances where the president probably did may have obstructed Justice. And of course, he decided not to indict, because he helped the Justice department told me couldn't, but he left it off to make that investigation to make that determination. Don't you think that the speaker, however, has a point when she says this country is so divided that an impeachment proceeding could be just incredibly corrosive to the country. I totally agree. It's one of the reasons I've waited so long because I really do not want to do anything that's more divisive than we already are. And one of the tragedies of the Trump presidency is, is I can recall is the first president in my lifetime. Maybe the history whose take. Divisiveness as as his driving political strategy, but the, the, the comeback to the notion that why do we make the country more divided is if we don't impeach this president. When would we ever impeach oppressed? We just taking out of the books, and we do have. Well, we have a responsibility to heal the country and bring together all the stakes usually we also have responsibility to spend the constitution and this president well just over the weekend. The notion of selling arms sales Hughes. Shoddy Arabia against the will the Democrats and the Republicans in both houses. Patch, you represent a reliably democratic congressional district. You don't have to worry too much about reelection in general election. But what do you say to your colleagues in swing seats who helped win this democratic majority who look at impeachment and just see a total political loser? That could cost you your majority in the house. Well, I'm incredibly sympathetic to that. But I think rule number one is, we should be making the decision on payment based on the political consequences. That's just too cynical to profane. We should be made on the basis of what's the right thing to do. What's the legal thing to do the constitutional thing? I also I don't know that this is true. But I hope that those, my wonderful colleagues swing seats, even see that Trump won in two thousand sixteen we'll be both by the fact that we are trying to do the right thing for the country, and they shouldn't have to apologize for president who's da. Documented lied ten thousand times already the American people in the few seconds, we have left. You think more House Democrats are going to take your side in this in the coming weeks? Yeah. Also hope more House Republicans. I know many told me privately, they wish they could be there. Maybe they'll be there in Virginia. Democratic congressman Don Byer. Thank you for speaking with us. Thank you. President Trump is on an official state visit to Japan. He's there to meet the country's new emperor and top trade with Japanese Prime minister, Shinzo Albay. But today, the also got front row view of Japan's national sport. Sumo wrestling, the stop at the tournament was a part of the Japanese government's effort to impress Trump as NPR's Asia Roscoe reports. Wherever.

president President Trump congressman Don Byer Mueller Virginia NPR Susan Davis Ginny democrat Nancy Pelosi Garcia Navarro Congressman Japan congress Japanese government Justin Jamie Shoddy Arabia Maryland Raskin
"susan davis" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"susan davis" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The credit card gasoline tax some combination of the two I mean, there's a from Indus Ranga question. So I guess it least moves the discussion. But count me is somewhat skeptical still that they're going to be able to thrash all that out Colt did make one notable political point though, he did say Democrats here do have an incentive to cut a deal at the president. They want something to show for their house majority when they're running for re election in twenty twenty and infrastructure is always a really popular thing to go back home and say you did. Today was the first time speaker Pelosi and President Trump have met in months, and it was also their first meeting since special counsel. Robert Muller's report came out. It did not come up in today's meeting. I understand tend to you. What do, you know, the the Democrats came out of meeting and said that the president didn't mention the investigations now? This is pretty remarkable that they they were they're having a meeting about infrastructure with with all of this hanging over, you know, just in the last twenty four hours the president and his adult children sued congressional Democrats to try to stop some some financial institutions from complying with subpoenas related to democratic investigation. So all of this is going on at the same time it during his state of the union address way back, you know, a few months ago. President Trump said you can either have Warren investigations or peace and legislation. But it least today it looks like. They were trying to do both. You know? I would also add on the hill today. It was notable at the same time that House Democrats had their first meeting but coming back from a two week recess during that time the report came out and after the meeting house caucus, chairman Jeffries at democrat from New York told us that in his words, not one moment was spent on the mullahs report in that meeting. It is a reflection. I think the fact that Democrats Tom Cole's point one keep, you know, wanna be able to go home and campaign on things that they've actually gotten done. Although Democrats also said that they will continue to keep the heat on the White House. That's NPR's. Susan Davis on Capitol Hill and tamra Keith at the White House. Thank you, both them nearly one hundred thousand tons of nuclear waste are piling up around the country. It wasn't supposed to be this way. The federal government decided decades ago that it made sense to consolidate the waste at one permanent location. But no place seems to want it. So now nuclear regulators are considering proposals for temporary storage NPR's Nathan. Checked out one such site in southeast New Mexico when I asked for directions to the proposed interim nuclear storage facility. I got a few answers the private company that wants to build it sent me GPS coordinates a mayor in support of the project told me to drive to the county line and look north. Jason Shirley, a city councilman in Carlsbad told me to drive thirty five miles out of town pull off on a dirt road and from there. Third cactus from the left. I don't know what to tell you that. That he says is one of the draws. This is thirty five miles in the middle of nowhere. And after a drive, I can't confirm. Yeah..

president President Trump White House meeting house NPR Indus Ranga Nathan Robert Muller Pelosi Jason Shirley federal government Tom Cole New Mexico Carlsbad special counsel tamra Keith Susan Davis Warren mullahs
"susan davis" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"susan davis" Discussed on KPCC

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm jim. House Judiciary chairman Jerry Nadler says the committee will call Torney general William bar to testify in the near future. He'll be questioned about his four page summary of the Miller report released on Sunday Barr says the investigation did not find sufficient evidence to establish that President Trump committed obstruction of Justice. But it also does not exonerate him. NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis has more House Judiciary, chairman has made clear that he wants to continue his lines of inquiry. He has said in a statement that he intends to ask attorney general William bar to come up and testify. You know, he does have some six five six dozen Inc. Lines of inquiry out to members of the Trump administration. And Trump associates that he's looking into. I do think there's a question that's raised over whether these people who had been cooperating to some degree step up, and maybe one play hardball a little bit more on what Jerry Nadler wants from them NPR. Susan Davis reporting. Meanwhile, Senate Democrats Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer, say attorney general William. Bar is quote, not a neutral observer, and they urge full release of Muller's report. President Trump, meanwhile, proclaiming complete and total exoneration. As now arrived back in Washington after a weekend in Florida. Seems just about everyone has an opinion about the four page summary of the Muller report. Georgia public broadcasting. Stephen Fowler has reactions from Atlanta. It's just after a Kamla Harris for president rally, but the California Senator isn't on everyone's mind pockets of people are discussing the four page summary that found no evidence of conspiracy with Russia, but did not take a stance on whether President Trump obstructed the investigation. Rhonda hall is one of them. She considers herself a political independent and says the letter just wasn't enough information. It did not go far enough to me. It was just a waste of time and energy. Meanwhile, President Trump tweeted the reports summary showed quote, no collusion. No, obstruction complete and total exoneration for NPR news. I'm Stephen Fowler, Atlanta. New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft is making his first public comments since he was charged with soliciting prostitution at a day spa and Jupiter Florida as Hanish naturally from member station. W B you are reports craft is awaiting trial after pleading not guilty to the two misdemeanor charges. Robert Kraft is apologizing to his family. Friends co workers and patriots fans an statement craft says he remained silent. Until now indifference to the judicial process. He goes on to say he has quote extraordinary respect for women referencing his late wife of fifty years craft was charged along with twenty four other men who prosecutors accused of soliciting prostitution at a spa under investigation for human trafficking last week craft rejected a plea deal. A hearing on his case is expected to be held on Thursday for NPR news. I'm Hanash naturally in Boston. This is NPR. Some US border patrol inland. Highway checkpoints in west, Texas and New Mexico have closed recently for Martha.

President Trump William bar NPR Jerry Nadler President Trump Robert Kraft House Judiciary Stephen Fowler Susan Davis Rhonda hall Washington chairman Muller Atlanta attorney patriots
"susan davis" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:21 min | 2 years ago

"susan davis" Discussed on KCRW

"Math the mass shootings at New Zealand mosques, including reaction for Muslims here in the US. If this day stop me from coming to the mosque, then the people who did this work. There will be winners. Also, what's next for Boeing after the grounding of the seven thirty seven max plane, what better or work is hearing from voters as he campaigns in Iowa, and what writer lorry halts Anderson has learned from young survivors of sexual assault. If there is a way for every victim of sexual violence to come forward on one day. I think the world would stop spinning for a day. I our newscast at Saturday March sixteenth twenty nineteen. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Barbara Klein new Zealand, Prime Minister, just cinder Ardo. Earn says her country's gun laws will change NPR's. Rob Schmitz reports. Today's announcement is in response to yesterday's terror attack that killed forty nine people at two mosques in Christ Church addressing our nation. During said, the primary perpetrator of the attack how the licensed to possess two semiautomatic weapons into shotguns. She also said many of the dead were breadwinners in their families. And she promised the government would help those without income earlier in the day. A twenty eight year old man from Australia appeared in Christ Church courtroom and was charged with murder in a phone. Call President Trump asked prime minister adjourn how he could help. She says she replied, sympathy and love for all Muslim communities. NPR's rob Schmitz reporting from Christ Church. The national weather service warns major and historic river flooding will continue throughout this weekend along. Parts of the Missouri and Mississippi River basins much of it. A result of heavy rain this week following on deep snowpack that caused quiz quick melting the governors of Wisconsin and Nebraska have declared states of emergency house. Speaker Nancy Pelosi says the house will vote March twenty six on overriding. President Trump's veto of a resolution that terminates his national emergency declaration NPR. Susan Davis reports Pelosi isn't expected to succeed. In a statement. The speaker accuses the president of a quote, lawless power grab, but congress is running out of options. Only thirteen House Republicans voted with Democrats to pass the resolution and only twelve Republican side with Democrats in the Senate two thirds majorities are needed to override a presidential veto and Democrats don't have the votes to get there. The resolution approved by congress would have overturned President Trump's February fifteenth national emergency declaration and blocked the administration from redirecting more than six Bill. Alien in federal funds to build a wall along the southern border. Susan Davis NPR news, Washington. The supreme court is broadening its consideration next month of a question. The Trump administration wants to add to the twenty twenty census as NPR's Hans. He lo Wong reports. The administration wants to ask all individuals about their citizenship. These supreme court already agreed last month to review a lower court's ruling that including a citizenship question violated administrative law. Now, the justices are adding another legal issue. Whether adding the question, violates the constitution because it harms the government's ability to count every person living in the US as the constitution requires once a decade earlier this month US district. Judge Richard Seaborg of San Francisco concluded that it was unconstitutional. The judge said it sent Speer research that suggests in the current political climate asking is this person a citizen of the United States is likely to discourage non-citizens and some citizens from participating in the head count. The supreme court is hearing arguments on April twenty third Kanzi Luang NPR news. Washington. This is NPR. Las vegas. Police have arrested a suspect in an attempted robbery at the Bellagio hotel and casino last night. The suspect is hospitalized in critical condition after exchanging gunfire with police the United Methodist Church is investigating last month's vote to strengthen the church's ban on LGBTQ clergy and same sex, weddings, Saint Louis public radio. Shayla Farzin reports church leaders say some votes Somme have been fraudulent. The United Methodist Church says a quote, very limited number of ineligible. People voted during the conference, but declined to say exactly how many the church hired an outside consulting firm that identified the fraudulent voters during an audit. According to the audit several people who had been denied voting credentials were later able to obtain them because voting is by secret ballot conference. Organizers say they're not able to determine which proposals the fragile. Voters supported by a relatively slim margin of fifty four votes church leaders had rejected the inclusion of gay clergy and same sex marriage. A commission of top Methodist leaders now says it will convene to discuss possible action for NPR news. I'm shayla Farzin in Saint Louis Italian. Prosecutors say they're investigating what they call. The mysterious death of a model who testified at the twenty twelve trial of former prime minister Silvio Berlusconi. Prosecutors say thirty three year old Iman Fadzil may have been poisoned. I'm Barbara Klein NPR news.

NPR President Trump Christ Church United States prime minister rob Schmitz Kanzi Luang NPR Barbara Klein Washington Susan Davis Shayla Farzin United Methodist Church New Zealand mosques congress Boeing Nancy Pelosi Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi Senate
"susan davis" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:06 min | 3 years ago

"susan davis" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Dave Freeman at six thirty. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Dave Mattingly in about a half hour. President Trump is expected to sign a border security Bill passed yesterday by congress. It prevents another partial government shutdown, but it falls well short of funding. What the president wants for a wall along the US Mexico border. The president is expected to declare a national emergency in an effort to secure more money for a wall NPR. Susan Davis says democratic leaders in congress and some Republicans don't like that idea. The Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell supports it, which came as some surprise because we do know from our own reporting that he had expressed private concerns to the White House about. This course of action not all Republicans are on board. Republicans like Susan Collins of Maine have said publicly they do not support the president going in this path. Marco Rubio of Florida said that he believed that this could set a precedent legal challenges to the emergency declaration are expected. The Pentagon's top official says the withdrawal of US troops. From Syria is a shift in tactics. Only the United States remains committed to our coalitions 'cause the permanent defeat ISIS both in the Middle East and beyond. That's acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan speaking today in Germany in Brussels yesterday Shanahan told NATO defense chiefs the US won't reduce its troop presence in Afghanistan unilaterally. He says it would be coordinated. This is NPR news from Washington from D news in San Francisco. I'm Brian watt the methamphetamine epidemic. We've been hearing about this week is colliding with another epidemic. Syphilis a new report from the CDC shows the rise in Mathews has led to the rise of a disease that was all but a radical twenty years ago, April Dembosky explains public health officials started seeing the return of syphilis around two thousand one mainly among men who have sex with men but in recent years. Syphilis has spiked among women in all men. The CDC's Dr Sarah kid says the rise is driven by drug use. And by math in particular. So methamphetamine is a stimulant so one of the reported effects is increased sex drive, but also stimulants increased risk behaviors including sexual risk behaviors. Well, syphilis rates are rising nationwide. Dr kid says the trend is more pronounced in the west where meth is more prominent thirty five percent of female cases in the west reported methamphetamine use compared to one percent in the northeast California has the second highest syphilis rates in the country in two thousand seventeen there were two hundred and seventy eight babies born with syphilis here. Dr Karen Smith is director of the State Department of public health. She says women who are using drugs often don't realize they're pregnant until very late or they don't want help. They're very concerned about what's going to happen when they're found to be pregnant and using drugs. And what that means for them and their infant left untreated babies with syphilis can.

Syphilis president US methamphetamine NPR congress Patrick Shanahan Dr kid CDC Washington Dave Mattingly President Trump Marco Rubio Dr Karen Smith Dave Freeman Mitch McConnell Susan Collins Susan Davis Brian watt
"susan davis" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:08 min | 3 years ago

"susan davis" Discussed on KCRW

"Towel Senate leaders reached an agreement to hold votes later this week on competing proposals to end the partial government shutdown NPR's. Susan Davis reports it's unclear if either proposal has the support to pass the Senate on Thursday, the Senate will take up competing Republican and democratic bills to reopen government. The Republican plan includes President Trump's five point seven billion dollar requests for border wall money in exchange for temporary changes to immigration laws. The democratic proposal is a stopgap funding Bill to reopen the government until February eighth that will allow border security talks to continue without continuing to tie up unrelated government agencies and workers affected by the impasse. I'd your proposal needs sixty votes to advance in the Senate, and it's unclear either Bill can get a super majority in narrowly divided chamber the agreement at least forces senators to take the first shutdown related votes since it started thirty two days ago. Susan Davis NPR news, the capitol US finan-. Markets sagged today after a slew of discouraging economic reports that have investors worried about trade and economic growth globally. The Dow fell over three hundred points or about one and a quarter percent while the NASDAQ closed down nearly two percent NPR's. Emily Sullivan has more U S, China trade warring Zaidi is continuing to weigh on investors. Markets dropped following reports that the White House declined to meet with Chinese trade representatives in meetings that were scheduled later this week investors also reacted to new weak economic data after markets were closed on Monday home sales fell nearly six and a half percent last month. According to the national association of realtors China reported that last year, it's a Konami grew at its slowest pace and almost three decades and in Davos over the weekend. The International Monetary Fund noted that trade wars threatened to bring slowing economic growth to an even slower pace. Emily sullivan. NPR news, Washington. This is NPR in this. KCRW at four thirty two. Good afternoon. I'm Steve Chia takes. Here's what's happening. More. Details are still forthcoming but a more than one week long strike of union. Teachers at LA USDA is expected to come to an end voting is happening today in the evening among the district's thirty thousand teachers who have been on the picket lines now for six days, if they vote to approve a negotiated deal between the district and those and the union I should say they're likely to be back in the classroom tomorrow now without going into further detail LA mayor Eric Garcetti speaking from city hall today said that it is an historic agreement. It gets to lower class sizes, according to the mayor and gets to proper support staff. L A USD superintendent Austin Butin are in United teachers LA president, Alex Caputo Pearl. Joined the mayor to make that announcement earlier today, again, the strike could be off it could be finished. And that voting is happening right now winds are expected to subside for the most part in the coming hours and days, but those gusts some upwards of seventy and eighty miles an hour cost problems across L A in. Orange County's those winds toppled huge trees neighborhoods crushing cars and littering yards and scattering debris. It was worse. In San Diego were pine tree. Crashed onto a rental house killing two people. A couple from North Dakota who were on vacation Troy and Jessica Nelson of Grand Forks were sleeping upstairs in the home. When that seventy five foot tree fell again, those Wednesday down in the coming hours and days musical conductor. Gustavo Duda Mel received a star on the Hollywood walk of fame actress, Helen hunt was on hand to introduce you to mail and spoke of their decade long friendship. What I saw was someone with a passion to help us. See that America is north central South America that we are all America, which I learned from you know, this is the tenth year is the music and artistic director of the L A fill in the philharmonic centennial do wanna Grammy in two thousand twelve and twenty sixteen was also the first classical musician to participate in the Super Bowl halftime show as a first. To receive these great honor star also belongs to the people of swell as a child doing a Mel attended Venezuela's acclaimed youth program of immersive musical training called El Sistema. It's worth thirty four KCRW sponsors include the.

Senate NPR Susan Davis Emily sullivan Bill Gustavo Duda Mel President Trump KCRW US International Monetary Fund Steve Chia America El Sistema China Davos Eric Garcetti national association of realto Helen hunt
"susan davis" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:59 min | 3 years ago

"susan davis" Discussed on KCRW

"All right. We have our congressional correspondent Susan Davis in the studio with us. Good morning. Good morning. Okay. So it seems like a stalemate not much action. But there's been some action on Capitol Hill to try and reopen the government rights of what is happening in wire there, the hopes pretty dim that it will mean anything. There had been a flurry of activity this week, particularly in the Senate among senators who thought they might be able to come up with a compromise to put forward to the president and to Democrats they've kind of abandoned ship on that one of the senators involved in that effort is Lindsey Graham Republican from South Carolina, and he essentially came out publicly yesterday and said, I do not see any path forward for a deal. The only way out of this is for President Trump to declare a national emergency and essentially encouraged him to do so. Okay. So this national emergency. And I have so much to ask you here. I mean, the questions about whether the president has legal authority to do this. But this may actually be an opening to get government workers back to work. Right. It could in theory if the president declares an emergency. And says he's going to marshal resources to build the wall and sidestep congress it could allow them to reopen government because it would take the wall issue out of the budget debate. It does create however, an entirely separate legal question of would it be challenged in the courts. Would it be held up in the courts? Would it be would they have to pause until the court way on this? And also this question of executive overreach, which has been for most Republicans on Capitol Hill, a really big concern in recent years, particularly as something that they accused President Obama of doing essentially sidestepping the legislative branch to enact policy, the congress simply hasn't approved. So interesting so Republicans could be in a weird spot. Where Democrats would you're saying you complained about this with Obama for eight years look at what your prisoners doing. And they would likely stand by President Trump on this as they have on most issues, even when they feel uncomfortable about it. But so if he goes ahead, and declares his -mergency, you're saying this could become like, a prolonged legal battle. And it's not clear if an actual emergency could go into place in tier until the courts, actually, addressed it. That's right. And it's weird because I don't think there is a. Dispute that the president has broad powers when he declares a national emergency. They gave he has this power for reasons, but often when the president has invoked these powers at has been after nine eleven or after Hurricane Katrina moments when I think the country as a whole recognize we were in a state of emergency. And there was no dispute to invoking. Those powers we've been talking about our current state of politics, the tribalism, the anger the partisanship the gridlock. I mean, this feels like it's a new moment to sort of take stock of that. If the only way out of a debate over how to open the government is to have a president declaring an emergency. I also think it goes to the symbolism of the wall. There's so much about this debate that isn't really a policy fight. It's really a political fight. And it's a political knife fight, increasingly and the White House and his advisors. See the wall if he gives up on the wall, if he walks away from that, it will so dispirit his base that it could cripple his presidency. Senator Lindsey Graham has said as much on the other end Democrats. I just wanna big election in which the president weaponized immigration and the border in the closing weeks of the campaign and Democrats won big and they took control of the house, and they see the public on their side. And they see no reason to compromise at the president knowing what it could mean for him. If he loses on the wall and one of the things that note in news out of congress. We have the president's former learn Michael Cohen is going to be testifying on Capitol Hill next month. It's only like now that could be interesting. I it will be the first in what is expected to be a year of high profile intense hearings from Capitol Hill. Now, the Democrats are in control. They have oversight authority. They have subpoena power. They intend to use it. We know much of what Michael Cohen has said. But most of it we it has been red was into the courts, and then it was not on television. He will have a chance to testify publicly and he issued a statement noting yesterday. He is coming up voluntarily and he is looking eager to talk to congress NPR. Susan davis. Sue, thanks. You're welcome. The partial government shutdown is taking its toll on national parks. There have been reports of overflowing trash can. Cans and vandalism. So the interior department announced it's taking what it calls. The extraordinary step of dipping into money from park entrance fees to pay for cleanup in the midst of the shut down. The Trump administration is making sure some interior employee's continue work on one of its most controversial priorities opening up. More Arctic lands to oil drilling from Alaska public media in Anchorage. Elizabeth Harbaugh reports Suzanne little had been planning to fly hundreds of miles north from Anchorage to to Arctic communities last week to go to schedule public meetings run by the interior department, but with the shutdown. She wasn't sure if the meetings were still happening little who's with the pew charitable trusts is on an advisory council under interior. So she asked the agency about the meetings. She called emailed texted number response. So I waited as long as I could and the day before Thursday, I canceled. My ticket hours later interior sent an Email saying they were going forward after all it was. Very frustrating that there was nobody to answer phones in the office yet. The meetings are going to continue the meetings that happened despite the shutdown whereabout interiors effort to open up more land to oil development in the twenty two million acre national petroleum reserve Alaska. Another meeting about those plans went ahead this week, and that's not the only work to expand oil drilling in the Arctic interior has pressed ahead with emails obtained by Alaska public media show that on January third two weeks into the shutdown and interior employee was contacting Alaska community leaders trying to schedule public meetings about oily sales in the Arctic national wildlife refuge, congress legalized drilling in the refuge about a year ago after decades of opposition from conservation groups, but following public outcry and a letter from a democratic congressman after Alaska public media's report interior announced this week. It was postponing the Arctic refuge related meetings. The letter came from the new chairman of the house natural resources committee row, GRA hulda. A fierce opponent of oil development in the refuge. Trump is trying to have his wall and eat.

president President Trump President Obama congress Senator Lindsey Graham Alaska Susan Davis Michael Cohen Arctic White House South Carolina Senate Anchorage Hurricane Katrina vandalism NPR
"susan davis" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:47 min | 3 years ago

"susan davis" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The time is five twenty one. It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Audie Cornish. While many federal buildings in Washington DC remained closed due to the shutdown. One government facility will be open for the first time tomorrow. It's a new day care for the house of representatives that will cut the weightless for new parents from three years down to one lawmakers say they want to make the house a more competitive employer with the private sector. NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis has this report in the shadow of the US capitol dome. A new dome is set to open its on the playground of new daycare facility, which is designed to look like a mini National Mall with kids size landmarks like the US capitol and the Washington Monument and house majority leader Kevin McCarthy is pretty stoked about it. This is the only Washington Monument in DC that you can climb up the California Republican becomes minority leader when the new congress begins Thursday, but during his time in the majority he helps secure the office space in a building Ajay. To the capitol and more than twelve million dollars to build this state of the art daycare facility that use of taxpayer funds could open up congress to criticism. But McCarthy says the goal here is to keep highly qualified staff on the hill. If somebody is working for you and wants to continue to serve government says, I don't have daycare. So I can't stay here. The wait list is too long. The quality is not there. But then you're disadvantage in who could actually serve and work in government at the same time in recent years, the weightless for the house daycare became so long that staffers were signing up before they were even pregnant I've had friends who the minute. They got engaged. They're putting themselves on the list. That's Melissa Murphy. She's chief-of-staff to North Carolina. Republican congressman Dave rouser. Her two kids are currently in the house. Daycare Murphy says it's common for staffers to make a reluctant decision to leave the hill for more lucrative jobs in the private sector when they decide to start a family. It's really upsetting. To see because they make the decision to leave the hill, and and leave public service because the cost of private daycare is difficult to maintain on some of the congressional salaries the house daycare costs between eleven hundred and seventeen hundred dollars a month, a fraction of the cost of comparable private daycare in the DC area. This modern twenty six thousand square foot facility will be able to care for up to one hundred and twenty infants and toddlers it's only a benefit for house, employees and members of congress, but lawmakers get no special treatment over staff just asks Washington, Republican congresswoman Jaime Herrera Butler, I never made it off the list. Career Butler is one.

Washington Monument congress Kevin McCarthy DC Melissa Murphy Audie Cornish NPR Jaime Herrera Butler US Washington congressman Susan Davis Dave rouser National Mall North Carolina California Ajay