35 Burst results for "Sundar"

Google axing 12,000 jobs, as tech industry layoffs widen

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | Last week

Google axing 12,000 jobs, as tech industry layoffs widen

"Google says it's laying off 12,000 workers. Google is the latest company to cut staff following rapid expansion during the COVID-19 epidemic, CEO Sundar Pichai delivered the news today in an email to staff. In his email pitch I said, over the past two years we've seen periods of dramatic growth to match in fuel that growth we hired for a different economic reality than the one we face today, which I says the jobs being cut are across alphabet, product areas, functions, levels, and regions earlier this week Microsoft announced 10,000 job cuts, Amazon is cutting 18,000 jobs and Facebook parent meta is cutting 11,000 positions. I'm Donna warder

Ceo Sundar Pichai Google Microsoft Amazon Facebook Donna Warder
"sundar" Discussed on The Secret History of the Future

The Secret History of the Future

05:26 min | Last month

"sundar" Discussed on The Secret History of the Future

"Is Google's search business under threat because of this. Not really. It's not going to replace search. But even if it takes 5% of Google's market share, that's a huge number. So there's a reason there's a reason why Google has been everything you hear from Google these days when it comes to search is about conversational interaction. And more human like interaction with the computer. They have Google Assistant Sundar Pichai. That's Google CEO. As compared the advances in artificial intelligence to humanity's discovery of fire, like this is all happening for a reason. They see where this is going. And I think that what we're seeing right now with chat GPT is going to light a fire inside that company and I don't think they're going to be a laggard for too long here. With all the resources and money thrown at AI from big tech, it might be somewhat of a surprise that the company behind chat GPT is OpenAI, a small kind of mysterious AI focused tech startup that was founded in 2015. They're the ones behind the other splashy AI thingy this year. Sal E two, an image generator. The company is backed by big names like Peter Thiel and Elon Musk. Polarizing figures out of the big tech space to be sure, but the company itself is not a big tech player. In the chatbot space, small tech has the upper hand. Google can't just release stuff like this. It has a reputation. Advertisers don't like improv, just ask Twitter's new CEO. Releasing beta AI to the public could have drastic consequences for Google's business. Google has this type of technology in research mode inside the company.

Google Sundar Pichai OpenAI Peter Thiel Elon Musk Twitter
"sundar" Discussed on Slate's If Then

Slate's If Then

05:26 min | Last month

"sundar" Discussed on Slate's If Then

"Is Google's search business under threat because of this. Not really. It's not going to replace search. But even if it takes 5% of Google's market share, that's a huge number. So there's a reason there's a reason why Google has been everything you hear from Google these days when it comes to search is about conversational interaction. And more human like interaction with the computer. They have Google Assistant Sundar Pichai. That's Google CEO. As compared the advances in artificial intelligence to humanity's discovery of fire, like this is all happening for a reason. They see where this is going. And I think that what we're seeing right now with chat GPT is going to light a fire inside that company and I don't think they're going to be a laggard for too long here. With all the resources and money thrown at AI from big tech, it might be somewhat of a surprise that the company behind chat GPT is OpenAI, a small kind of mysterious AI focused tech startup that was founded in 2015. They're the ones behind the other splashy AI thingy this year. Sal E two, an image generator. The company is backed by big names like Peter Thiel and Elon Musk. Polarizing figures out of the big tech space to be sure, but the company itself is not a big tech player. In the chatbot space, small tech has the upper hand. Google can't just release stuff like this. It has a reputation. Advertisers don't like improv, just ask Twitter's new CEO. Releasing beta AI to the public could have drastic consequences for Google's business. Google has this type of technology in research mode inside the company.

Google Sundar Pichai OpenAI Peter Thiel Elon Musk Twitter
"sundar" Discussed on This Week In Google

This Week In Google

04:21 min | 5 months ago

"sundar" Discussed on This Week In Google

"Faster phone. Holy moly, U turns on this trip, huh? Well, fuck this show. You turned, but a lot of crazy turds. I can only imagine how amazing it's going to be for you to get a new phone if you've been living with that phone. 8 years. It's 7 or 8 years. You're going to get this new phone, and it's going to man, it's going to blow your mind. So worth not getting a new phone for 8 years. Yes. So refreshing after all that time. Did you have your hands on the 6 a? Yeah, I did. I ended up using, so I reviewed the 6 a on all of that Android. I think a week ago it was last week's episode. And I used a total of, I don't know, three, three and a half weeks. And I'd say all things considered, I love the a series. I think the a series is a great category or variant of the pixel phones because price to what you get is just really high. You get a lot of value out of the a series. And I think in that price range, it's hard to beat it for a number of reasons. But this time I definitely experienced some strangeness with the battery that I haven't experienced with pixel phones to that degree before. It wasn't a total deal breaker, but I think probably it comes down to 5G my 5G was active and they say, well, if you turn off 5G, you get better battery and I'm just kind of in this camp of like, yeah, but I shouldn't have to do that to get big, good battery. If it's a feature that's on by default, design for that for that to be a good experience. It's a great experience if you turn off this major feature. But there are other people that don't have that experience. So your mileage may vary, but more often than not, I hit 7 o'clock and my battery was, it had lit up red because it was down to like 14%. And I'm just not used to that. In this day and age, I'm not used to my battery being that low that early in the evening. This sounds exactly like your discussion you had several years ago about the thunderbolt. Good memory. When was the HTC thunderbolt? That had to be like 2011. A long time ago, but I remember you talking about that on all about Android all those years ago and this battery is horrible. Right. So it's kind of the same thing, right? This next generation network, great the phone supports it, but it comes with a very large tradeoff. And yeah, it was right. HTC thunderbolt, January 2011, was the release date on that. Oh, that phone, horrible. But it was the first four G phones. So the 6 a great phone, it's just understand that you might have issues with the battery. We had the Fourier until we traded it up for whatever she's got now. The foray was totally fine. And I'm like, this thing was wrong. Well, I liked the forks. Yeah, I think we're only $300 forward. It's just works. You know? Absolutely. Be a series. It's a solid series. But with the 6 a now, you don't get the headphone Jack, which was that was the last pixel remnant in the pixel lineup that had the headphone Jack if you care about that. So it has some tradeoffs, but there you go. Sorry, I didn't mean to derail you. That's okay. That's okay. I talk about this stuff all day. And this is kind of along those lines. And speaking of regulation, which was kind of part of what Sundar Pichai was talking about. EU lawmakers want other Android phone makers to mirror in many ways, what Google is doing with its pixel update cadence. There's draft regulation that would establish quote eco design requirements for mobile phones, cordless phones, cordless phones that makes me chuckle. Why even call that out anymore? But I joke here. I guess they still exist. There you go. Drop the cord.

HTC Jack Sundar Pichai EU Google
"sundar" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

01:56 min | 8 months ago

"sundar" Discussed on How I Built This

"I'm guy <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Roz, <SpeakerChange> and you've been <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> listening to how <Music> I built this. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Male> Hey <Speech_Male> everyone, so I want to make <Speech_Male> sure you know all <Speech_Male> of the different ways you <Speech_Male> can listen to how I <Speech_Male> built this. As <Speech_Male> you probably know, you <Speech_Male> can follow the show <Speech_Male> on Amazon music, <Speech_Male> Apple podcasts, <Speech_Male> or <Speech_Male> wherever you're listening <Speech_Male> right now. <Speech_Male> But I want to let you know <Speech_Male> that you can actually <Speech_Male> listen to the <Speech_Male> next episode of how I <Speech_Male> built this today. <Speech_Male> One <Speech_Male> week early on Amazon <Speech_Male> music. <Speech_Male> You can also listen <Speech_Male> to it early and <Speech_Male> ad free by <Speech_Male> subscribing to wondery <Speech_Male> plus and <Speech_Male> Apple podcasts <Speech_Male> or on the <Speech_Male> app. Please <Speech_Male> do follow us on <Speech_Male> your podcast app so <Speech_Male> you always have the <Speech_Male> latest episode <Speech_Male> downloaded and <Speech_Male> another way to support <Speech_Male> the show is by filling <Speech_Male> out a survey at <Speech_Male> wondery dot <Speech_Male> com slash <SpeakerChange> survey. <Silence> And thanks. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> In business, competition <Speech_Male> is the key <Speech_Male> to success. <Speech_Male> Every product <Speech_Male> you own from the <Speech_Male> shoes on your feet <Speech_Male> to the phone <Speech_Male> in your hands <Speech_Male> got there because <Speech_Male> of cut throat <Speech_Male> business decisions <Speech_Male> and wonders <Speech_Male> podcast business <Speech_Male> wars brings <Speech_Male> you stories about the <Speech_Male> most well-known in the <Speech_Male> world and how the <Speech_Male> decisions they make <Speech_Male> shape what you buy <Speech_Male> and how you <Speech_Male> live. With over <Speech_Male> 50 seasons to <Speech_Male> choose from, you'll hear about <Speech_Male> the fight for your <Speech_Male> feet with Nike <Speech_Male> versus Adidas. <Speech_Male> The battle to control <Speech_Male> the smartphone market <Speech_Male> with iPhone versus <Speech_Male> BlackBerry, <Speech_Male> or their new season <Speech_Male> that's covering the <Speech_Male> world of ice cream. <Speech_Male> Haagen dazs <Speech_Male> versus Ben and Jerry's <Speech_Male> tells the story <Speech_Male> of these two legendary <Speech_Male> American <Speech_Male> brands that have spent <Speech_Male> decades trying to conquer <Speech_Male> the global ice <Speech_Male> cream market, <Speech_Male> each season of business <Speech_Male> wars is entertaining, <Speech_Male> fun, <Speech_Male> eye opening, and will help <Speech_Male> you understand a little bit <Speech_Male> more about the world <Speech_Male> around you. Listen <Speech_Male> to business wars on <Speech_Male> Amazon music, <Speech_Male> Apple podcasts <Speech_Male> or wherever <Speech_Male> you get your podcasts. <Speech_Male> Listen <Speech_Male> one week early and ad free by joining wondery plus in Apple podcasts or the wondery app

"sundar" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

04:57 min | 8 months ago

"sundar" Discussed on How I Built This

"Can navigate through this. How do you manage stress? Look at the most basic level, I feel I genuinely feel it's a privilege to be doing what I do. I feel incredibly lucky and I get a chance to work on always wanted to work on cutting edge technologies. So the fact that I can go talk to our quantum team in Santa Barbara and there are hundred people working on literally some of the more state of the art technology that humanity has ever worked on. I feel it's a rare privilege. And so that gives me a lot of perspective. The second thing is I'm very optimistic about the benefits the technology will bring. I feel it when I travel around the world and I meet people who are not yet part of the train and they are hungry for that opportunity and recalls back to my younger days and I realize how powerful that is. And so that gives me a lot of excitement at what I do. So a combination of all that gives me a perspective and the third I would say is a lot of stress comes from feeling every decision you have to make a lot of decisions as a leader, but over time you realize most of those decisions are not consequential. And there are a few consequential decisions, but most of the times it's more important to make a decision, you have really good people you're working with, and so having faith in the system, the people and the processes around you. I think it's actually a lot less stressful once you internalize it that way. Final question for you is how do you, in a big, Google was started in a garage, right? We know the story. And this famously has been a famously innovative company, but it's massive. You've got, I don't know, tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands of maybe employees around the world. How do you compete again? I mean, you've got a lot of money to finance projects and research, but how do you make sure that people are doing radical things and really pushing the limits? Without being afraid to screw it up. One of the counterintuitive things is organizations typically tend to become more conservative when they get larger, which is ironic because they have more resources than when they were a smaller company. And so you have to fight that and the great thing about technology is constantly new things coming around. So constantly wake up and there's a whole new app, which I see people around me using, which they weren't using last year, right? And that's true every year. And so you know things can come out of nowhere. And so honestly, if you sat in my leadership meetings on Monday, you won't feel that we are large company or you see us thinking hard about newer problems. So worried about areas where we are in doing well or thinking hard about how we can innovate more in a new area. And so I think you have to have that. And also to innovate well, it has to be a priority as a company and it's easier said than done. And to me a key point I would say is you have to reward efforts, not always outcomes. And I think most companies only reward successful outcomes, which means everyone becomes more conservative in their attempts. And so at Google, we've always had this feeling of setting ambitious goals and we do fail in our goals, but you reward people for taking that moonshot, if you will, and aiming, and you reward the effort and how they approach their work regardless of outcome. And I personally have long held that belief. And so I think that's an important process to make sure people feel supported to innovate. And so you have to work hard at creating that culture. Sundar, thanks so much for coming on the show. Thanks so much. It's a real pleasure. That Sundar Pichai, CEO of Google and its parent company, alphabet. Hey, thanks so much for listening to how I built this lab. Please do follow us on your podcast app so you always have the latest episode downloaded. If you want to follow us on Twitter, our account is at how I built this in mind is at guy raz, and on Instagram, I'm pat guy dot Roz. If you want to contact the team, our email address is HIV T and ID dot com. This episode was produced by Carla estevez with editing by John Isabella. Our music was composed by routine Arab Louis. Our audio engineer was Neil rauch. Our production team at how I built this includes Alex Chung, Chris messini, Elaine Coates, JC Howard, Liz metzger, Josh lash, Sam Paulson, Catherine cipher, and Carrie Thompson. Neva grant is our supervising editor, Beth Donovan, is our executive producer..

Santa Barbara Google Sundar Pichai Sundar Carla estevez John Isabella Arab Louis Roz Neil rauch Alex Chung Chris messini Twitter Elaine Coates JC Howard Liz metzger Josh lash Sam Paulson Catherine cipher Carrie Thompson Neva grant
"sundar" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:20 min | 8 months ago

"sundar" Discussed on How I Built This

"Complex your world is. I mean, in part because you have to be obviously careful about what you say because it can move a stock and you can shareholders and you've got to do quarterly calls. All these parts of your job in addition to overseeing all the technologies and so on. But, you know, Google is seen as a leader. And people look at Google for lots of different things. So let me ask you about one important one, which is the future of work. Tell me about how you're kind of thinking about that because this is complicated. There are a lot of different views on what the future of work should look like, that there are people who believe that you can only do innovative work in person that people have to exchange ideas and be around each other. Others say, no, you can do it all remotely. But at the same time, the remote work environment over the past two years has also created a lot of strife because people are not around each other and there's a little bit of a lot of miscommunication and challenges. And so I wonder what you think of in ten years time will people be coming into the office every day or do you think that it's now permanently in a new kind of work environment at least with technology work and the work that you guys do? I think the future of work will definitely be way more flexible than what it's been in the past. And I think that's here to stay and ten years out from now. You will definitely see employees having a lot more flexibility. So at least speaking for technology companies in a company like ours, we as a company have internalized that. And I think, you know, and we are embracing it as an opportunity to think about how that future looks. To be very clear, we see a lot of value in people coming together, fostering that community, a sense of a place where a creative environment so that people come together and can solve problems and build on each other. So the way I think about the future is we will have purpose built times and spaces where people will be able to come together and do all that. But people who have a lot more agency and flexibility in their lives. And just like 20 years ago, I think Google challenged a lot of notions of what a workplace could be. The fact that you could mix fun and work together in the same space. The fact that you could have child care close to campus and that would actually make everyone happier. You could have slides in the middle of the office that would make people any less productive. And so we challenged a lot of the notions, and it worked out well. Similarly, I feel the same sense of excitement now, and so challenging some of the past notions. Now allows us to think about, how do we improve representation in the tech industry? Well, we can now go to where people are and hire them, then still we don't need to be as sensitive to location as before. So that to me is an opportunity. If you're a working mother and the transition back, which is an important time, if you have a newborn, adding that flexibility, I think, is a powerful tool to have. So everywhere I look at, I see opportunities. And when I look at how painful commuters become for many, many people and the fact a lot of our people were spending two hours each way some times. So it gives us a chance to rethink all that. But what do you do with all of that infrastructure? I mean, the slides in the, you know, in the huge spaces and I've been to the Google campus, amazing public areas. I mean, there's a risk that parts of it become like an abandoned amusement park. You know, like I did amusement park that just shuttered, right? Because there's all of this infrastructure, but when it's not full of people, don't ship to kind of reevaluate how you think about real estate. You know, if I think about through the pandemic to particularly over the last 12 months, when the conditions have improved, in our urban offices like New York or London, very quickly, we get back to 65, 70% occupancy right away. So it's a strong sense of people wanting to come in. So it depends on the space and place, I think, and you are right. We will have to adapt and rethink today everything is designed around people being all 5 days a week. And so in the future flexible world where people spend part of their time working from office, part of the time working from home, we need to reconfigure spaces. We need to evolve technology tools because today it's very hard to participate in this hybrid setups. So all that are problems to be solved. Obviously, if we create vast empty buildings, then we are not achieving our goal of creating that sense of community and collaboration. So I think thinking about the future of work both in the context of reimagining all the physical spaces. As well as reimagining the technology that allows people to connect and collaborate is going to be an integral part of what we need to do. And I'm excited because when we do it and solve it for us, we also provide these products to other companies as well. So it's actually makes a lot of business sense for us, not just to solve for us, but for others as well. Some excited about it. Google, like other big companies, Disney and others are at the center of culture wars over corporate policies around issues that employees care about the employees are demanding that companies take a stand on things roe versus wade abortion rights transgender rights racial justice, a foreign policies, it's a lot. And I'm not saying whether it's right or wrong. I just think it's so complicated to be a corporate leader today when your employees are saying, look, you've got to come out and speak about these things. I mean, I know you have in the past and you've addressed some of these things, but how do you know when to weigh in and to say nothing? It's a good question. I think you're right in the sense that the job of a CEO today, I think it's gotten more complex. And I think one of the reasons, as you think about leadership, empathy and being able to lead with empathy, I think in increasingly important scale, I think people want to know you care and I think companies need to be values driven, but I think you need to be focused and you need to have a set of values you passionately care about and you're very clear in what those values are and you build a track record over time. So if you've done the hard work, I think no single moment becomes as magnified, but if you haven't done that, I think a single moment can play out in a much bigger way. So there's no easy answer as much as I think as a company, we deeply care about our employees. There are certain things we deeply care about as a company as well, be it. Making technology more accessible or sustainability, making sure we have a diverse and representative workforce. So you have a set of values which you are very clear about. And I think supporting free speech around the world. So you choose the issues, which are more core to who you are as a company. And what matters to your employees and with that framework, I think if you're a purposeful, I think that's probably one way by which you.

Google center of culture wars London New York Disney
"sundar" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:16 min | 8 months ago

"sundar" Discussed on How I Built This

"Into our products. So if you talk to Google and ask a question and we give you an answer back, there's a lot of AI underneath all those layers. And I think you'll see it more in the fabric of what we do every day in countless things. In the future, do you see AI being a greater source of revenue for a company like Google over say advertising? As I became CEO, I wanted the company to think of its technology approach as AI first is because I see that long-term opportunity. And so when you look at our business, for example, like Google Cloud through which we are offering technology to other companies, we will give them AI capabilities as well. So I think that will be a big business opportunity. But above all, I think AI is a foundational technology which equally will make search better. To maybe one day make self-driving cars work safer and much better. And so it kind of cuts across everything we do. And so I think these are two different dimensions. How we make money over time will be different than the fact that AI will power a lot of what we do as a company, but it will help us both diversify and create new businesses and that's part of our long-term view on it, which is why I'm excited about both the amount of work we do there, but also the fact that we lead the way in many of the foundational areas there. You know, I wonder about the ethical side of this because the question is, if you could take Mark Zuckerberg or Jack Dorsey, 15 years ago and say, this is one of the things that could happen with this amazing thing that you're about to put into the world. What do you want to do now to prevent those things from happening? Now, Google, the most powerful company in the world, or one of two or three, has that opportunity to ask those questions, knowing what we know about the promise and peril of technology that we use today. So help me understand how you think about that and how you can preempt and anticipate the downsides of the darker parts of AI because it is also potentially an inevitable result. That's a great question and obviously technology always says do well use and a lot of our journey is all about harnessing technology to benefit society. What gives me great comfort is if anything, I think for AI from very early days or at least for the past, many years, people rightfully have worried about the consequences and so compared to many things you mentioned the Internet earlier. I genuinely don't recall much conversations in the early days of the Internet, about some of the negative externalities that could come with it, right? And it was much more of a positive view, and I think Internet has been extraordinary force for good, but as you mentioned, we've all had to learn process and work through some of the issues it creates as well. AI on the other hand, I think from its earliest days I think people have recognized both how profound it can be, as well as the fact that you have to work extra hard to harness it. And coming back to us, this is why very early, I think, compared to other areas of technology we have worked on, we both have articulated a clear set of AI principles, publicly. We do a lot of our AI research. If you look at it compared to other foundational technologies, there is a lot of research which also goes into looking at ethical pillars of AI and how to make progress there. And more importantly, not just at Google, but I think there are many, many places around the world, universities, nonprofits, over time in there needs to be laws and regulations. So this is an area where I think we are, I'm optimistic that we are thinking about it earlier than we have typically done with other areas. And so I see that we are approaching it better overall. But there's a lot of work left ahead. And also, for better or worse, because Google is such a powerful company, right? Such a powerful global force, you can't help but not understand why people would hold you accountable to be responsible around this, right? Absolutely, it makes a lot of sense to me. I think that we feel deep sense of responsibility here. And I think it is perfectly correct and right that there is a lot of accountability and we need to be accountable to society as well as we perceive this work. Yes, that makes sense to me. We're going to take a quick break. We're going to be back in a moment with more from Sundar Pichai of Google and Alphabet. Stay with us. You're listening to how I built this lab. Time and place is everything, especially in marketing, but in today's age of a million messages per minute and not enough hours in the day, how do you really catch your target audience's attention? Well, fortunately, there's a simple way. LinkedIn can help you speak to the right people at the right time. LinkedIn's targeting tools allow you to reach your precise audience, which means your ads are being seen by those who matter. So it's no wonder companies of all sizes and sectors are using it. In fact, we here at built a productions used LinkedIn to market the how I built this book and it was incredible how helpful that was. For book sales. Scale your marketing and grow your business with LinkedIn advertising as a thank you to their customers for helping them grow three times faster than the competition, LinkedIn is offering a $100 credit on your next campaign. Go to LinkedIn dot com slash built this to claim your credit. That's LinkedIn dot com slash built this. With my crazy schedule, I am always on the go. And I don't have a ton of time to do the things that I want to do, like reading novels, which is why I love audible. Audible offers an incredible selection of audiobooks across every genre from bestsellers and new releases, to memoirs, mysteries, and more. And as an audible member, you can choose one title a month to keep from their entire catalog. All audible members get access to a growing selection of audiobooks, audible originals, and podcasts that are included with membership. I love listening to audible when I'm working out or I'm cooking dinner for my family, which I do every night. Let audible help you discover new ways to laugh, be inspired or be entertained, new members can try it for free for 30 days. Visit audible dot com slash built or text built to 505 hundred. That's audible dot com slash built or text built to 505 hundred to try audible free for 30 days. Audible dot com slash built. Hey, welcome back to how I built this lab, a guy raz, my guest today is Sundar Pichai, CEO of Google and Alphabet. Sundar, I can only begin to.

Google LinkedIn Jack Dorsey Mark Zuckerberg Sundar Pichai Sundar
"sundar" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

08:01 min | 8 months ago

"sundar" Discussed on How I Built This

"On retail prescription prices. Here in that sound, that is the sound of another sale on Shopify. The all in one commerce platform to start run and grow your business. Shopify is more than a store. It helps you connect with your customers, drive sales, and manage your day today. Shopify powers millions of businesses from first sale to full scale. In fact, many of the companies you've heard on this show power their businesses through Shopify. And many of the people who listen to this show do the same thing. Shopify unlocks the opportunity of your business to more people every day. In fact, every 28 seconds an entrepreneur like you makes their first sale on Shopify. Go to Shopify dot com slash built that's all lower case for a free 14 day trial and get full access to Shopify's entire suite of features. Grow your business with Shopify today. Go to Shopify dot com slash build right now. Shopify dot com slash built. Hey, welcome back to how I built this lab. I'm guy Roz, and I'm talking with Sundar Pichai, CEO of Google and Alphabet. At what point did you start to see yourself as somebody who could be the CEO of Google? And alphabet. I mean, based on your description of your early days, that would never have crossed your mind, but at some point you must have at least mentally had to become prepared to do that. Do you remember what enabled you to prepare to actually see yourself in that role? I think there was some point at which Larry Page who was a CEO at a time and one of our cofounders asked me to manage our entire product portfolio so to be the head of products. In the technology company in a product focused company like Google, it is the essence of the job and so in some ways, when I started working on it, I naturally felt that accountability for the company, if you will. So now that I thought of myself as a CEO, but the natural role demanded you end to and think about everything. And so I actually started working that way. So that's where it began. But I never thought much about being a CEO as much as given I loved building products, the chance to do it at scale, and to build products for the entire company. It was more than what I wanted and would have been happy doing that part. But I think that's probably what's the beginning of the transition and when both Larry and I started thinking about it. When you joined Google in 2004, it was just a few years after Jack Welch retired from GE and he was like the sort of iconic CEO who sort of represented in the minds of people what a CEO should be sort of fist pounding the table and that's been reassessed now and it's definitely not a model. I think a lot of CEOs would adopt, but you had and have a reputation for being a quiet leader. Before I get to that, I want to understand how you kind of learned to become a leader because you are running a company that's much bigger than GE ever was. Today, and much bigger than what Jack Welch had to do. And you had to become that person over time. So tell me, when you started to think of yourself as a leader. You know, one of my mentors was someone called Bill Campbell. He was a football coach at Columbia and later mentored a lot of CEOs. He was a CEO himself. And he had this famous saying, he called it wrong we now, but it's basically you don't become a leader of people. It's your people who make your leader. I think for me that I always resonated. So I didn't focus much on how I'm going to be a leader as much as whatever I was doing. It was a fully committed to making it successful, including the people who work for me. So always approach it as trying to help make what we are working on, be more successful, including particularly the people I worked with. So being really vested in their success and their outcomes and going the distance to do that. And so I guess that's the process. By which it unfolded. And so maybe somewhere along the line, I realized and was making this transition, but it was more natural for me, and the second thing was I realized being a leader also allowed you to scale and work on more than one problem at a time. And so that appeal a lot to me as well. So it's probably a combination of both of those things. I want to focus on what was kind of your north star, I guess, really a central focus of your ambitions for Google and that's artificial intelligence. We've been hearing about artificial intelligence for a long time. It goes back to Alan Turing or two and before and even over the past ten years, anybody who's seen ted-talks or, you know, you hear about AI is going to change medicine, AI is going to change the way we consume energy and AI is going to solve climate change. It's going to make government smarter, more efficient. That hasn't happened quite yet those things have happened. And I'm talking about things I heard 8 and 9 years ago. Tell me where you see now glimmers of light coming through that are within grasp. Because I know Google is investing so much money into this technology and it encompasses so many different things. So give me sort of the 35,000 foot view of what AI will do. What's it going to mean to us? Look, always thought the company should be and that's how the founders started to be should be focused on deep computer science and technology to help solve problems. And AI just happens to be one of the most important technological advances. So hence the focus on AI. When I look at the journey, one of the great things about AI is, in some ways, it's an abstract concept. And the more AI starts doing things, we kind of take it for granted. And so it kind of bakes into the system and the expectations keep shifting. And we recently had an event called Google IO, where as a company we talk about all the things we do, leading up to the event I was reflecting on how AI is impacting all our products, right? Countless ways. And if you're in Gmail and you're typing something and we give all these suggestions for you to complete or to send quick reply back, but actually works on machine learning and AI, we now translate across many, many languages and it is seamless and in fact now we are going deep and adding some of the rarer languages in the world, but very, very important for the people who speak it. And the fact now you can seamlessly translate it into hundreds of languages is an example of progress. If you use YouTube, we automatically generate chapters now based on a creator's video and also short transcripts of the video to people. So that's all AI kind of working and it's automatic and it just works. If you're a small, medium business and you come to Google and say, look, I want to grow my business, but I only have a few $100 to spend, you can go through the process and custom design create everything, or you can give your budget and our AI systems can optimize and run a campaign for you. We are mapping buildings in Africa, and these are hard to do. And we are using AI to really scale up the number of buildings for mapping. And we are sharing the data with the World Bank and the United Nations to use for nonprofit purposes. You mentioned areas like healthcare, it's obviously a very regulated industry rightfully. So and things take time, but just the fact that AI system will help triage images for radiologists to scan and maybe reprioritize in the right order that I see companies beginning to do that and something we will take for granted ten years from now is how it will all work. And so you see the progress and it's baked.

Shopify Google Sundar Pichai Jack Welch GE Roz Larry Page Bill Campbell Larry Alan Turing Columbia football ted YouTube World Bank Africa United Nations
"sundar" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

02:48 min | 8 months ago

"sundar" Discussed on How I Built This

"That kind.

"sundar" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

08:24 min | 8 months ago

"sundar" Discussed on How I Built This

"I built this lab. I'm guy Roz. So depending on the day, Google is either the third or fourth most valuable company in the world. Now just to add some perspective, even with the recent slide in the stock market, if Google were a separate country, it would be among the ten biggest economies in the world. Google's value is roughly similar to the economic output of countries like Brazil, Australia, or South Korea. So to call Google powerful, well, that's an understatement. Its products and services touch billions of humans on the planet. Email systems we use are cloud storage servers, even the platform I'm typing this introduction on right now. It's a Google Doc. A part of me and I hope a part of you is kind of terrified about that. And I believe that a part of Google is also terrified about that. Because what started as a project famously in a Palo Alto garage is now one of the most dominant corporate forces in the world. And yet, it is led by an unlikely leader. Sundar Pichai, the company's CEO, had never left India until age 21. In fact, he'd never flown on an airplane until 1993. The year he made the long journey from his home in Chennai, India, to the Silicon Valley, to attend Stanford on a full scholarship. And even after a successful run as a product manager overseeing everything from Google Chrome to Google Drive, Sundar never saw himself as a future CEO of the company. He was happy digging into the hard, technical problems he faced. But in 2015, he was appointed CEO, and today it's not just technical challenges he faces, but the challenges of trying to lead one of the biggest, most visible brands on earth at a time of culture wars, employee revolts, and greater scrutiny of tech companies. A few weeks ago, Google held its annual IO conference where it unveils new products and technology. And one of the main topics this year, artificial intelligence. It is, according to Sundar Pichai, one of the single most important areas of focus for Google and its future. Sundar is here to talk about AI, the future of work, how to encourage innovation by allowing for failure, and how he's learning to lead at a very front moment in our history. Sundar Pichai, welcome to the show. Thanks so much. So sinner, let's start with your life before Google before you came to the U.S.. You grew up in mainly in what is now Chennai in India. And I know you were a student at the Indian institute of technology, and this was in the early days of what we now call web one. In sort of the late 80s, early 90s, you were a promising engineering student, and I read that already as a student, you were sort of focused on microchips and on how computers work. That's right. That's right. And literally fascinated by it. And I was fascinated by the PC revolution, was studying material science, but I was interested in semiconductors as a material. So I was definitely interested in computers and how semiconductors make computers happen, chip, technology, chip fabrication, and so those were my areas of interest, but I definitely didn't see working on consumer Internet as well where I would end up. I had envisioned, you know, you could think of something like Intel as more along the lines of what I was thinking about. Was there any part of you thinking my next step is coming to the United States? Was it even on your radar? It was by the time I was in college given my where my interests were shaping up to be in my junior and senior year at started doing some research on semiconductors and so literally being in Silicon Valley working on silicon wanting to come to Silicon Valley was something naturally I was fascinated about. And so it was definitely invited our by that time. Had you ever been to the United States before 1993? No, in fact, my first flight ever in my life was to come to the U.S. so no, I had never been on a plane before the first journey which took me to the U.S.. I went to Pittsburgh first. It's where my uncle was and he was faculty at Carnegie Mellon. He was the first person in my family to kind of make it there and so that played a part in me thinking about coming to the U.S. and hearing from him about the opportunities how world class the university where. But I first came to Pittsburgh and I stayed there for two to three weeks before I headed down to California. Right to California to Stanford where you got a scholarship to study. That's right. I know that you did not have access to a computer growing up. So really your first exposure to a personal computer was not until you got to Stanford in 1993. In the Indian technology IIT as we call it, there was definitely a lab, I didn't have full access to it, but I had maybe used it. I would say I can count the number of hours, maybe in one or two hands. So that's how much I've seen it. I used it for a few hours. But only when I came to Stanford, there were these labs in which I could go and work and have unlimited access and program and so it was like an entire new world opened up for me. I was so enamored with it. I didn't quite realize at the time the Internet was fully underway. I was just fascinated by just having access to so many computers. What was that? 1993 is like God, just seems like a millimeter. I mean, it's just such a long time ago. I remember being overseas in the mid 90s, and it was different, you know, calling my parents in Los Angeles, for example, was a big deal. You know, you'd quickly get on the phone, have a quick chat and maybe they would pick up and that was you write letters. This was your first time in the United States. You were away from your family in India. What do you remember about being in the United States at Stanford at the time? Was it was it lonely? Were you homesick? Yeah, I was definitely lonely. My girlfriend was back in India and you mentioned what it is to communicate and it was about in Stanford from within campus at that time to call back to India was around $2 and 50 cents. Approximately a minute. And so within about a week of every month, I'd probably was broke mostly calling my girlfriend at the time now my wife and a lot of letters, et cetera but definitely it was tough to communicate what we take for granted what's probably impossible to explain to the current generation, but communication was really hard and so I definitely fell only, but it was an extraordinary place and I made a lot of friends and soon I settled in, but it was a definite transition coming in and settling down into the country. It would stay on for an MBA program at the University of Pennsylvania, Wharton, by the time you got here and started studying here, was it clear to you that you were going to make your future in the United States that this was where you were going to establish your life. Or did you think maybe you'd go back to India? I think for me, academically coming to a place like Stanford and seeing the access and I wanted to be cutting edge in terms of the research I wanted to pursue. So for me, there was naturally a part of me, which is like, this was my dream and I wanted to continue doing it here. But I wasn't fully sure as to where things would end up. So I didn't think too far ahead. When you started at Google, it says 2004 Google was a completely different company. It was a fraction of what it is now. Obviously growing and becoming more influential was still tiny compared to what it is now. I mean, you were involved in some of the biggest product rollouts and Google Chrome, right? Google Drive. Things that are now almost indispensable for so many people, how did you kind of see your place in the company at that time? Did it feel like you were part of something really big? Was it hard to have.

Google Sundar Pichai United States Stanford India Sundar Silicon Valley Chennai Roz Carnegie Mellon Palo Alto South Korea Indian institute of technology Pittsburgh Brazil Australia AI California Intel
"sundar" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

07:13 min | 9 months ago

"sundar" Discussed on The Vergecast

"Yeah. And it's going to be running wear OS three, which is currently only available on Samsung watches. They also announced on stage at a bunch of watches from the usual Android watchmakers from fossil and all the brands associated with that. Are going to be releasing wear OS three watches, but so far we've only had it on the Samsung watch and it's been very much a Samsung driven experience. So when the pixel watch comes out, ideally, we would be getting what is a Google driven experience for an Android smartwatch. Is there any news on the processor battery life front? I mean, this is like the thing that has held this entire category back. Yeah, so for many years, Android wear watches have been relying on many of the Android wear watches have been relying on Qualcomm processors, which Qualcomm has not really put a lot of development into its processors for wearables. And they've been slower and way behind what apple's doing. The only reason that the Samsung watch runs wear OS three is because it's using a Samsung processor inside of it. Qualcomm processors that are available thus far apparently can't run all the features of wear OS three. So it'll be interesting to see what processor they do put in this pixel watch they did not speak to that at all. They didn't speak to anything in terms of battery life or features like always on display. It would assume that it would have the Google Assistant and you could talk to it. Like you can talk to Siri on the Apple watch. They did say that you can control Google Home stuff through it so you can control smart home stuff. It's like all the typical smartwatch stuff we've seen for like years now. They're just like putting it all together in one product that will hopefully work well and not die at like 5 p.m., which is like a thing that they haven't been able to do in the past. So there's a lot of unknowns here. We don't know exactly what it's going to cost. I think it's going to be more on the premium side. I would be surprised if this thing's under $300. They're using stainless steel with it, which is generally going to push the price up. And if they put a tensor chip in there, we have no idea. I think the main thing for me is they went with a circular display, which they've been doing across where for a while. It does not seem like they have really rethought the UI. There's still a lot of scrolling of rectangular objects in their demos. And it's like you guys, all right, we've just been at smart watches for a while. Yeah. You know, it's like this isn't a first generation product kind of problem. But here we are. And it's still like, well, I guess the edges of that list item will be cut off as I scroll. That reminds me of what pebble did with their circular smartwatch many years ago. They would just scroll the whole page. So it perfectly fit each circle. So you couldn't scroll line by line. They would just do an entire page. And each page was rendered to hit the circle. Yeah. I mean, I don't think there's any great solution except for square watches. And then you're stuck with a direct Apple comparison. So I kind of get it, but we'll see. I think the Fitbit stuff is really interesting that we've been waiting, but I think the main thing we're going to battery life, and then obviously it can only, this is like the pixel buds pro too, right? They're starting to make hardware devices that only really work well with their hardware. Or at least at least Android hardware. I'm sure that the pixel watch will work with other Android phones not made by Google and the pixel buds pro, which they also announced will probably work with non Google phones. Maybe there might be a feature or two that you get with a pixel that you don't get on a Samsung phone. But they really are not designed to work with iPhones at all. So you probably won't be able to pair the watch with an iPhone. You might be able to pair the pixel buds with an iPhone, but then have no access to any feature control or anything like that. They will just be very basic Bluetooth headphones. Just wait until the Europeans hear about this. Well, and on that same level, what do we know about how Fitbit gets integrated into things? Because one thing that is true is there are a lot of people out there in the world who love fitbits and have used them for a long time who might theoretically want a device like this, but what I can't get a sense of is Fitbit going to be a separate service like Google fit that others can use is it going to be part of Android? Is it just going to be for the pixel watch? Did they spend all this money on this company just for the pixel watch? Do we have any idea how this is going to shake out? Yeah, it's hard to say, I know that James park, who is Fitbit's CEO, or he was a CEO before the acquisition. I don't know what his current title is now. But he's basically the leader of Fitbit. He did say that when the pixel watch launches, Google fit is still going to exist. For whatever reason. They're going to run concurrently. Fitbit is going to be making other hardware. They've got trackers. They've got their other smartwatch lines. But apparently it was his team that drove the development of the pixel watch. So there's a lot of Fitbit expertise built into this, maybe in the way that the watch wears, the way it fits you, the way it kind of works as a functional watch. It seemed like they leveraged a lot of that Fitbit experience. But as far as like what the platforms do, it's still up in the air. How that's going to shake out. And are you going to have two fitness apps on your watch? If you have a Samsung watch you do, you've got Google fit, and you've got Samsung health and you could install any others, but and I'm sure there's a team at Google working on Android fitness pro and that'll come to and it'll just be really delightful. Sundar told us they were focusing Manny. Ecosystems all the way down. All right, last thing real quick. I feel like we can actually get through it real quick. They tease the pixel 7 and 7 pro. They also announced the pixel 6 a, but fine. It's 450 bucks. It has a millimeter wave, which is 450 bucks. I think it might be one of the only phones. Well, oh no, did they tell us something wrong? A little bit, yes. Shocker that Google had their specs wrong on their wireless radios. The unlocked $450 version does not have millimeter wave. The version that Verizon is selling is $500. And it does have millimeter wave. So you get to pay a 10% 10%. Yeah, 10% tax to get millimeter wave of horizon. Very good. Just what everybody wants. Who hasn't wanted to stand it or one street corner and download pirate movies at blazing fast speeds on their $450 phone. Yeah. The other interesting thing about the pixel 6 a real quick is that it is aggressively priced and but it runs the same tensor processor as the pixel 6 and 6 pro, but it does not have the same camera system as the 6 and 6 pro instead, it appears to have the same camera system as the 5 and 5 a from before it. And this is the first time that the a line Alison Johnson on our team pointed this out that this is the first time that the a line has a different camera system than the flagship pixels. So Google traded a better processor for an inferior camera. It made that trade this year, which is interesting. That's obviously what Apple does with the SE line on its budget phones. It's got the latest a 15 processor, but it's got an inferior camera compared to the rest of the iPhone. So it's interesting that Google made that transition this year. Well, I think they're all focused on tensor, right? They said nothing about these cameras at all. No, other than their 12 megapixels. And then they tease the 7 and 7 pro, which are still ugly. I don't know what else to say. They carry on that design language, right? And either you like it or you don't. And the one thing that they're changing with the 7 pro is interesting is on the 6 and 6 pro, the camera bar, or as dieter used to call it the shelf. Was glass..

Samsung Google Qualcomm Apple Fitbit James park Sundar Manny Alison Johnson Verizon dieter
"sundar" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

05:27 min | 9 months ago

"sundar" Discussed on The Vergecast

"Back. Dan seifert, welcome. Hello. So obviously David and I just talked to Sundar, he's great. By the way, I keep saying this. It takes real guts for a product CEO to come on the verge. Decoder is like, that's where you do your thinkful and saying. On the verge cast, we're like, let's go ahead and break tax. So that was great. Big picture conversation. But there's some stuff at IO that we should talk about with Dan. Actual products, let's Dan, you have some real feelings about this tablet. I was going to say, we got to start with the tablet. Yeah. I don't know why they announced it. I haven't been able to figure out why they announced it. So they pre announced a tablet that's coming out in 2023. What we know about it is that it will have a tensor chip. And that's what we know about it. Well, we know it will have a bigger screen than a phone. It will be rectangular. It apparently has big white bezels. The camera is in the middle of the screen and landscape. They did that right. So big improvement over your iPads. Credit where credit's due. The back looks like plastic. There's a camera on the back as well. It does. They showed us something they did show us some Android tablet software stuff. And yeah, and it runs Android. But they showed us, you know, here's some apps running side by side. I will say, if you just go watch the event again, watch the tablet UI presentation, just like rewatch it closely, and it is almost as though they're inventing computers. Oh yeah, the number of things that they have not even heard of before, that it's like, what if you had an app? And then you want another app. But at the same point, at one point they're like, I love using two apps at once. It's like, yeah. That's pretty good. It's a great actually. I've been doing it for years. Welcome to the party. Which is funny because you can already do that on many Android tablets. And Android phones. You can just split screen them very easily. Okay, so then we've started asking them, what do you think they're trying to do with the tablet? It's really hard to say, you know, David talked to rigo, I had a chance to talk to reconstruct briefly. And every time he mentioned this tablet, he positioned it as a quote perfect companion to the pixel phone. He called it the pixel tablet on stage. He said it's a premium large screen device. They are like filling this gap in their lineup so that they have a full ecosystem ranging all the way from the watch that will ensure we'll talk about through the phones, the tablets out to laptops with Chromebooks. They've got the device portfolio in this thing. By the time this thing launches. And so that all makes sense. They could just say, we're going to launch a tablet next year, and tell that same story. But for some reason, they decided, we're going to also show this hyper real of this tablet, which looks like it was designed in 2014 and is the combination of 2014 era Samsung tablet and an Amazon fire HD. Like if you just mash those together, that's what you got the concept of this tablet. And it's really weird to use that kind of product look to build hype for a product that's not coming for 7 months a year, whatever. Not this calendar year. So I really don't understand this announcement at all. Well, I think there's sort of two separate things there, right? If the tablet had been beautiful and cool and exciting, and even just like what it was, but with no bezels, that would have been something. And at least strategically, strategically, it makes sense, right? Because the thing Google desperately needs is for people to build tablet apps because the reason Android tablet suck is because Android tablet apps suck. No, I disagree. Really? Oh, I have a much wilder conspiracy theory about this whole thing. Oh, okay, let's do it. They're doing this. This is all just a front run because they said this thing, which makes no sense. They're like, there's so much developer interest in Android tablets. Oh yeah, I don't believe that for a second. So they said this on stage, and that's when I started doing my own research. Developing this conspiracy. I'm so sorry. No, okay. The future, the only way they're going to get people to switch off the iPhone is that they beat Apple to foldables and they create the moment, the hardware form factor moment that rules, right? So yep, you've got your galaxy folds and whatnot, but those are still early. You got to make the mainstream folding phone. And if you unfold the phone and then it's a garbage tablet, your hooped. So the developer interest is not in tablet apps. It's not in this thing. It's in what can I do when the phone unfolds? And so they're building a tablet ecosystem because they know that they're big upcoming shot to recapture market share from Apple is beating Apple to folding. So okay, I hate to burst your bubble on this. That's not a conspiracy theory. That's just true. Like Google told me this. Because we were talking about it, and you look at the multitasking and it's like, that's a foldable phone. And so it's like if you just take the tablet with the two apps and fold it in half, like, oh my God, what is that? And that is like Google considers foldable phones and tablets to be functionally identical software systems. And whether or not that turns out to be a good idea, I think, really remains to be seen because I'm not sure that what works well on one unfolded screen is the same as two folding screens, but we will see, but I think you're absolutely right that the bigger possible wind here for Google solving larger screen Android is on foldable phones than it is on tablets..

Dan seifert rigo Sundar David Dan Samsung Apple Google Amazon
"sundar" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

06:43 min | 9 months ago

"sundar" Discussed on The Vergecast

"That come out a year from now. I'm your friend, Eli. We've got a huge show today. Google CEO Sundar Pichai is on the verge cast today. David and I talked to him about everything announced at Google IO and kind of future of Google. It's a really good conversation. Then Dan see for it joins the show. We talk about all the rest of IO and Alex kranz comes on at the end. A little gadget lightning around it. It's a really fun one. Let's start here's David and I talking to Google and Alphabet CEO Sundar Pichai. Sooner for chai, you are the CEO of Google. You are the CEO and chairman of Alphabet. The verge cast. A lot of pleasure to be here. Good to see any line they were. Yeah. It's great to see you again. It's been a while since we've talked. Also, I appreciate that you're on the verge. Real ones are on the verge cast to talk product. This is where it gets serious about products. True that. So it's Google IO. We obviously came off the keynote, the keynote was two hours long. Lots of products, lots of really hardcore AI, tech, lambda, big language models. Here's my question for you, just kind of a big picture, and then I want to dive into some of the products themselves. Google does a lot of things. It has a lot of research projects, a lot of far out ideas, a lot of things on the ground like maps and recommendations and obviously search. You run YouTube, then you've got Android. It's a lot of things. Kind of the theme of IO this year was you're bringing it all together and it's going to become a very focused set of products and experiences for people across the whole ecosystem. So just from the baseline, how real is that? How much are you actually bringing Google into focus versus you're just lining up the pieces and making sure they make sense together? Well, you know, I do think a few things which have tried to do with the company. One is are the underlying more foundational layer that focus on the AI. So when you say research is a real deep focus on AI, in some ways, the big bet is AI is transformational across all the products and services we do. So for sure, that's been a big focus back. And our focus on knowledge and computing, right? And both PCs core aspects of our mission. And so to me, it is the same AI, which makes that change in search. Because we are able to do things in a more multimodal way. And it's that same multimodal model which in YouTube can create auto chapters and so on. So it's an underlying themes, so with which we are doing it across our key products and services. But there is a set of products which are users use multiple times per day these are big active user bases. And so there's a lot of focus on beach search or Gmail or maps or YouTube, making sure those products are evolving in a way that makes sense. And so I think both are important. So on the AI front though, there's a piece of that that's really interesting to me, because one of the things I noticed in the keynote was that things like lambda and translate and poem kept coming up kind of in different contexts. And I think one of the things that's been tricky for us to figure out is when you say we're focused on AI that can mean lots of things, right? AI is this huge sprawling thing that can mean a lot of things. Within that space, it feels like maybe Google is picking its spots a little more instead of trying to do lots of things you have a few big bets even just within AI. Is that fair? Yeah. It's a great question. You can think about it this way, right? We're all making progress in state of the art, ML and AI. Then there's symptoms of what we are deploying in production, which is the latest version of Peter's speech models, vision models, et cetera, or multimodal models, right? And then there is the future of AI, which is not in production yet. And that is large language models. And I think we are talking about that. And that's where lambda and palm and everything comes in. And some of that will keep flowing back into cutting edge production and that's what keeps the innovation going. And we are talking about both of them. And I think part of that, it seems like my sense would be then that your job as CEO is in part to sort of make sure all of those things are moving at the correct speed because the idea of sort of living deep in the future and two years from now and also right now. It's just, it seems impossible. You know, I think something which is probably there are two sides to the coin, right? So for example, when we build something like chrome, we unveil the end to end product one day. Well, the comic book leaked two days ago, but at least it's a product in which you come out and unveil it. When it comes to things like AI, both a lot of it we publish research. So you're not quite, can do that. And B, because in a technology like that transparency is important to, I think. And so we are talking about it ahead of time, which is what gives a sense of well, is this too futuristic, one of this will apply to the products. And I think it's a fair question. But I'm trying to explain why we are doing it the way we are doing it. And so that's what I think makes it a bit different. I think the kind of the classic story of IO has been a demo of a really impressive AI tool. I can't help but think of the one that took the fence out of the picture in the image editor. And it turns out that's actually a really hard problem. It's going to take a long time to actually ship that to consumers. But at the same time, you're demoing things in actual products like translation that are real for people or could be real today. And it's just really hard to calibrate what are we looking at that's real right now or that is a vision of what I could accomplish versus Google is one of the few companies that still demos really impressive software every time you have an event, most other companies are going to stream some baseball games to you. There's a really very hardcore engineering component to what you showed at IO. But it's just hard to know which of it is going to come into focus and turn into a product. And which of it is Google has an intense set of capabilities and part of Google's culture is chasing them down wherever they might. If you go back, let me give a couple of examples. We showed Google lens many years ago, right? The promise of what Google lenses. It's a real product, right? And people query it, you can access it, and we are taking S lens matures. We are bringing those capabilities into search. And that's what helps you from a multi search standpoint. Even the fence, you can see magic arrays in pixel, and I would argue, gets at some of that promise in the context of a product. So the goal of everything we are showing is to actually build it into a product. That's what we are trying to do. So I have no interest in being an R&D lap. We actually genuinely believe we've been doing cutting edge R&D. We are one of the world's largest R&D investors, probably over a $100 billion in the past 5 years..

Google Sundar Pichai Alex kranz YouTube David Eli Alphabet Dan Peter baseball
"sundar" Discussed on This Week In Google

This Week In Google

07:24 min | 11 months ago

"sundar" Discussed on This Week In Google

"Boy, that sounds mighty good. You didn't even pick your own ringtone. It's not heavy either. It's not heavy. Actually. You still like it? Is it okay? I do. I'll send you. Do you want it back? No. I'm just teasing. Invoice coming. You can? No, no, I'm just teasing. I'll pay you whatever it goes for on swap on. No, no, no, no, no, no, no, no, it's yours. It's a gift. But I'm just glad you like it. I was just curious if you liked it. Now, don't ask me about the kobo because I haven't charged that yet. I'm sorry. The kobo was not a gift. I think technically it's called a dump run. Solicited E reader. It was almost as bad as it was an unsolicited E reader. I drive by you read it to you. I was curious for y'all's take maybe because you might be well versed in corporate malfeasance, but shady tactics. The Justice Department asking about how Google employees Google has basically told its employees that if they're going to put anything weird in an email, they should loop in an attorney to keep it. They're in trouble for that. Yeah. Well, it's both clever, but also super shady. Well, I'm sure they thought it was clever, but apparently it's illegal. So the Justice Department is, in fact, investigating, they're accusing Google of and this makes sense, in fact, if you were kind of naive, you might say, good, this is our policy from now on. The Justice Department said that Google teaches employees to before when they're sending a sensitive business communication, like we got to shut that Facebook down, they should also see the House counsel because they shield the documents from discovery. It is suddenly protected under attorney client privilege just by virtue of seeing them. Now the DoJ says they're using false requests for legal advice that they feel. If you're actually asking for the advice that is legit, I used to have to do that in advance all the time because it was kind of a shadow management of the company and I had to figure this clear for the lawyers. And before I sent something out, I had a check with the lawyers. And that was, I think the government might lose on this one. The government is asking the judge to sanction Google and compel disclosure of more documents documents that are hidden from them due to this attorney client privilege. But I think if I'm the judge, I'm going to say, well, you have to show intent with each and every one of these. And I don't think you can. So the DoJ was saying, look, they had training sessions. They trained people just, CC the attorney. It doesn't matter. What they need is a smoking gun. They need an email from Sundar Pichai saying whatever you do, make sure you see an attorney. I was told every time I did something so advanced as a fascinating company as a family owned, the new houses, and they didn't have a corporate, I was the only corporate employee for a while there. They didn't have corporate. And because of the family, and then they had the law firm and the accountancy firm. And if you did anything that had the slightest kind of controversy, not even legally, but just business sense, the bosses, the owners would say, did you check with the lawyers? That was a means of management and a means of checking and making sure that things were going to be passable. And so most everything I did went through the lawyers. I mean, it's clear that probably Google was using this, but it's also very difficult to show, because there's a reasonable business practice. The DoJ lawyers cited an email from Sundar Pichai to Susan wojcicki, the CEO of YouTube, he was telling her how to respond to a press inquiry, but he put up at the top attorney client privileged and copied chief legal officer Kent walker on it. So, but you have to then that might be right. Would have to prove that Sundar Pichai was doing this intentionally to hide it as opposed to a legitimately saying. Was it from Sundar to whom? And would just be. So it was internal. Susan. I mean, if you do that at an external, I said, oh, we're going to get around antitrust here because if I met my email to zuck, I'm going to CC, that'd be a no no. But internally, checking things out? That seems normal. Right? Google spokesperson said, just like other American companies, we educate our employees about legal privilege and when to seek legal advice. And she pointed out, we've produced over 4 million documents to the DoJ in this case alone, including many that employees have considered potentially privileged. I think the government is going to lose on this one. It's worth a try. What they wanted to use as a litmus test is if it's an email chain where attorneys were copied but never responded to, or they could have phoned, you know, this is going to be a hard one to prove. We'll see if the judge the judge may say, no, you're right. But we'll see. I have a feeling it's a hard thing to prove. If this were any other company, would this even have come up? Well, in any other antitrust suit maybe, yes, I think the DHA probably looks for this all the time. I swear this just looks like some targeting that Google to me. It depends. If anything, but that just seems a little too odd. Well, you could also say X person, like 80% of the things that we have encountered are protected by attorney client privilege. But in Microsoft, our prior case only 60% were this looks really suspicious. Or actually, let me make it more egregious. Only 20% were. So this seems to be usually high. I mean, I don't know. I'm not in the Department of Justice. Well, except Spacey, what if what if this case is just more clearly legally sensitive? And so you do want more lawyer advice. Yeah, but if you're saying of all the discovery things that they're pulling for a greater percentage of general discovery is protected compared to another company in that position, that might set off alarm bills. I don't know if it's default practice or not. I'm all speculation. President of the company depends on the company. But this is also why lawyers often rise to senior VP and that's right. Because they really know the company. Yeah. Although, my wife often says that she doesn't want to consult attorneys because they're not business people, that they understand the law, but they're so exposure adverse their advice is always to protect themselves as much as to protect you, to not do things just because it's risky. And she says, they need don't temper their legal judgment with business judgment. So I've had good lawyers and companies that I make especially where they said my job is to help you do what you want to do. Right. I'm going to help you find the way you can do that or tell you you can't and here's why. Right. But the same can be said for HR too. Yeah, well, HR is there to protect the company..

Sundar Pichai Google Justice Department DoJ Susan wojcicki Kent walker zuck Sundar government Facebook House YouTube Susan Spacey Department of Justice Microsoft
"sundar" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

06:35 min | 1 year ago

"sundar" Discussed on The Vergecast

"That's a huge thing to say, especially when epic is suing Google over in app purchases, which is where that revenue comes from. South Korea just told Google and Apple to cut it out within app purchase taxes. They've got to figure out what a new way is, but more importantly, we always thought that the way that Google monetize Android was search and ads across the web and owning that operating. It's the most popular mobile operating system in the world. It's amazing that it has turned out that just like iOS that purchases and mobile games turn out to be the most lucrative thing about the whole business. So it kind of doesn't matter what phone you have. If you're clicking the buttons and buying stuff, Google is making money. And I think that's a real, that's a real disconnect for them from the phone business versus the Android business. Yeah, well, again, it's completely different. It's from different from how Android started. The reason Android exists is because Eric Schmidt former CEO of Google was terrified that Windows mobile was going to win and they would lose all of their search revenue to Bing. That was a genuine fear in 2007. There was a different world. And so to learn that they cut out getting money from carriers on your Bill or whatever, and they're making most of their money off of Google Play, presumably that also includes like Google mobile services and some other stuff. But yeah, that's a wildly different way to think about Android than most of us usually do. Yeah, and I think again, all of the controversy with various developers and governments has brought to light how all of these mobile operating systems make money and where the taxes are. But for Google in particular, when we're like, we want them to make a pixel phone and have it be the version of Android that we like the best. If there's not a huge financial incentive to do it, and we can't know, they don't report those results. Another thing you asked about. Then the financial incentive is to keep making money in Android, which doesn't matter who sells the Android phone as long as they're using Google services. So that, to me, over the next few years, as they build on these new flagship pixel devices, it will always be the disconnect. But they have invested in the ship. They are trying to compete at the flagship level. They are paying the NBA a lot of money to be their official camera. Sure. They're doing a bunch of stuff to prove that they're doing it. We don't even consider that disconnect with Apple. To get the money from in app purchases, they have to sell iPhones. There's only one company that sells iPhones. They have a lot of incentive to make and compete with the iPhone. Google makes all the money Android from software buttons. The software buttons can be anywhere. You know, it's funny, we don't have these such extra sexual conversations about the Microsoft surface. It's like a very similar idea, but everyone sort of knows that it's not, I don't know what Microsoft is anymore. It's not essential to their future. But it just feels like what the pixel, there's that chance that Samsung could say screw it we're going tizen or something could happen. So they need this thing as a hedge. And it's also, it seems like it's more fundamental to what Android is that it gets developed on a pixel than surface exists in Windows land. And so it's this weird thing where it's like, well, we could just think of the pixel like we think of the surface as like a side hustle for a company. But Google doesn't talk about it that way. And there do seem to be certain elements of its existence in the ecosystem that give it more weight and importance to the surfaces from Microsoft. And so the reason we keep coming back to, why does a pixel exist, let's have emotions about the pixel is it has some kind of important resonance to the entire Android ecosystem. But nailing down exactly what it is and exactly what Google thinks it is. It's difficult. And you ask them and I did and they told us you just listened to it. Their answers make sense, but once you start really scratching at it, it's like, is that the whole story or not? It's really hard to know. Yeah. You know, I would give the pixel over time a lot of credit for a few things. One, the pixel team straight up revolutionized mobile photography. Yeah. No small thing. They shipped HDR first. They got it right. They were the benchmark for a long time. That is a very Google thing to have done. They thought about the data off the camera sensor differently than everyone else did. Maybe all the trains reported the same direction but Google got there first. And for a long time best. So that is just a unique I think Google because of the way Google thinks of the pixel in what it's for a unique accomplishment. Second, I think this relates to what the surface is for Microsoft. They've set at least a benchmark for mid range phones for a long time. And Microsoft has been very honest with us. Their executives have been very direct with us that if they don't make the surface, the windows OEM ecosystem is motivated to erase to the bottom, and they will just make the cheapest possible windows laptops and seed the high ground to apple. Above a $1000. So Microsoft makes the surface devices, they actually license a bunch of surface hardware stuff out or they give it away, they've been honest about that too. I don't see Google doing that with the pixel. They were really what I asked about that. It was very unclear what exactly. It seemed like the answer was nah. Yeah, I think the answer is no. I think they're like much more competitive, but that market is much more competitive overall. And there's not the race to the bottom. There's always apple at the top and all the phone vendors want the expensive people who buy a lot of things in their. But I think at least the surface stories clarified for me in that way. I know why it's there. It's to keep Dell and HP for making ever cheaper laptops. The pixel story is it a bunch of tech demos that then force everyone to compete. So they don't have to hear about the pixel and reviews. Maybe. Maybe that's all you need. But I think to their credit to Sundar and Rick's credit. We've been asking these questions about the pixel for a long time. You have, I have the answers have been consistent. I think the clock might be running out. Well, the answer has been consistent, but like the proof of Microsoft being successful with the surface is we made a nice surface and some people bought it and that's it. The proof of the pixel, given the way they talk about it is we are a competitor that matters in the smartphone market and you have to get above two, three, 4% market share to keep making that argument. And you have to do it in a reasonable time frame and that you're right. That clock is running out. Yeah. We'll see. We can't talk about the software. But look, if Google would just say, yeah, we want to make a nice phone that's really nice Google phone. If they talk about the pixel like they used to talk about the nexus, it's a thing that exists as an example, and then our biggest fans can buy it. We're happy to sell it to them. That would be the end. But they talk about it in a much grander terms. And so we think about it in grander terms just to hold them to their own claims. Well, here's a question that is a very, very trust question. Do you think that carriers and United States want more than two smartphone vendors to exist? Yeah, man..

Google Microsoft apple Eric Schmidt South Korea NBA Samsung Sundar Dell HP Rick United States
"sundar" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"sundar" Discussed on The Vergecast

"And I'm very excited about this week's episode. It's all about the pixel. But more importantly, I got to go to Google's campus and speak to Google CEO Sundar Pichai and hardware chief Rick australo. I was there to talk them about this big pixel launch because it's a big moment for the pixel. Maybe the biggest since the very first one. It's important because it's the first time that Google is making its own processor. It's a system on a chip called tensor. It's also the first time Google is saying unapologetically that it's made a flagship phone. It wants this to be a real hockey stick moment for the pixel where it actually matters in the market instead of just being sort of a thing that we have existential questions about all of the time. So when I went to speak to them, what I wanted to find out and what I think you should listen for here is how they intend to make this the moment the pixel goes from a sideshow to the center stage, both within Google and for the phone itself, how are they making this phone, the best possible pixel that there could be? How are they making this a special phone? But also in the phone market itself because just because the phone is good, doesn't mean that it's successful, especially here in the U.S., you have to make deals with carriers. I also didn't want to let sort of a chai get away without talking about the rest of the Android ecosystem because the pixel obviously exists in the Android ecosystem and the Android ecosystem is facing some pretty big questions, especially surrounding antitrust. Google has faced some decisions in South Korea, for example, about payments in the Google Play ecosystem. They have to allow third party payments. They've also faced some questions about whether or not they have to allow Android forks. One of the stories here is that when a manufacturer signs up to make an Android phone with Google services, they are not allowed to make a fork of Android on the side and South Korea just told them they're.

Google Sundar Pichai Rick australo hockey U.S. South Korea
"sundar" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

WSJ Tech News Briefing

08:29 min | 1 year ago

"sundar" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

"Among the many conversations featured on the first day of The Wall Street Journal's tech live conference was a discussion between WSJ editor in chief Matt Murray, and Sundar Pichai, the CEO of Google parent Alphabet. They touched on some hot button issues facing the tech sector, including cybersecurity and tech innovation. Here are highlights from their talk, starting with Matt. So doper chai, great to see you. Thanks for taking the time to sit down with us today. We really appreciate it. Pleasure to be here Matt. Thanks for having me. Alphabets perform very well in your watch, the stock is done well. The financial performance has been strong. The criticism that you've gotten at times is that alphabet isn't innovative force that it once was that it's a more mature company. It's a bigger company. It's a more slow moving company. I know you've heard the criticism. Is it fair? A innovation is something I think you have to and you have to prove it. You have to earn it. One of the biggest areas of deep innovation I believed in. You know, always believe in deep, deeper technology work and then applying it to make a difference in day to today lives. And I viewed AI as one of a foundational one of the most profound investments we are making. And the challenge I had given the company was to use that investment to just build helpful features. And I see evidence of it every day. If you're in Gmail and you're typing and smart composed saves you time. You know, when you have ten products with billions of users using them, to me, we don't want to add complexity to users. Innovation for me is about people are relying on these products all the time, just making life easier for them in micro moments across. So that's how I think about it. There'll be bigger leaps, but those happen over time. And we are working on those as well. And so it's a combination of both. Let me ask you about the privacy debate, of course, it never really goes away. And you're facing a lawsuit now, of course, involving incognito mode from some users claiming that there's unlawful tracking. And using people's data has been central to the success, Google has had. But there is a big debate as you know going on about privacy. A lot of concerns, a lot of challenges about it right now. As the debate involves how at odds are changing notions of privacy with Google's business model and does the business model need to change itself here? Because of that. We have built products like take a product like Gmail for now 16 years, and we deal with people's most sensitive information. And people trust us when I look at the queries coming in through search and stuff, it's a trust we work hard to gain. And privacy and security because one of the biggest risks to privacy is the data getting compromised too. So those two have been foundational investments for us. I think people's privacy expectations are constantly evolving. We work hard to stay ahead. Most of the data today we keep is for the benefit of the user and to give it back. We support our products through advertising, but even in advertising, we need very limited information to make sure that the artist is relevant to you. And that enough people find the ad effective. We have clear road maps to do all of that in a privacy safe way too. So AI counterintuitively will help us do more with less data over time. One of the biggest changes we announced is by default, order deleting your activity data. Now it's on by default. So if you over 2 billion accounts I think, by default, we automatically delete the data after a period of 18 months. We have to make sure we are giving people benefits and people need to feel they have choice and control and transparency. And that's the foundational principles. What's changed that made security, it is a big issue. Lots of CEOs and executives talk about in the face that the attacks I take at the kind of cyber hacking attacks and other things are worse than ever right now. And what's causing that? Look, I mean, there's a lot of financial incentives for many people. You know, if you think about it, the world of cyber doesn't have norms and conventions we have established in the real world. You don't have the Geneva convention equivalent on the cyber world. So over time, I think we need to internalize that and governments in a multilateral basis. The G 20 et cetera need to put it up higher on that agenda. The calling for your calling for regulation on that front. I'm calling for global frameworks. You're going to need it for areas like cybersecurity. Just like we have it in the real world, you know? And if not, you're just going to see more of it because countries would resort to those things. And so I do think you're going to need more frameworks like this for time. Obviously you've been grappling with different regulatory concerns for a long time on different parts of the world, Europe has their approach. You've got the U.S. periodically you've been testified to Congress and I know worked on this issue pretty much. Is there should there be one privacy standard everywhere and if there is what should it look like? It's a great question. I don't want to say there should be one privacy standard because at the end of the day it gets to the sovereignty of each country. But I think having a common framework, the more commonality there exists it helps part of the reason I have thought the digital single market in Europe was a good idea, was because if we were European companies starting up somewhere in Europe, you had to deal with 25 different regulations. Unlike in the U.S., you could scale up much better. So I think having common frameworks help, I think the GDPR has been a great foundation. I would really like to see a federal privacy standard in the U.S. and worried about a patchwork of regulations and states. That adds a lot of complexity. And I actually think it's counterintuitive, larger companies can cope with more regulations and entrench stem cells. And whereas for a smaller company to start it can be a real tax. So I do think the Internet works well because it's interoperable. It's open. It works across borders, promotes trade across borders. And so as we evolve and regulate the Internet, I think it's important to preserve those attributes. You've heard both administrations of the last two in the U.S. talk about ways of working more closely with a company's R and D money or closer collaboration. Are you seeing it? Is that a good idea? Should the government be supporting certain kinds of tech research either with money or more deeply in a closer public private partnership than perhaps has been the norm in recent history here? I think I'd be careful about the government that's limited resources and it needs to focus. But there are all of us are benefiting from foundational investments from 2030 years ago, which is what a lot of the modern tech innovation is based on and we take it for granted a bit. So when I look at semiconductor supply chain quantum, which will take a decade to do that, government can play a key role, both in terms of policies allowing us to bring in the best talent from anywhere in the world or participating with universities and creating some of the longer term research areas. Which private companies may not focus on on day one, but plays out over ten to 20 years. So I see a role and I do think public private partnerships here can be a good template. And so I've advocated for it. I'm heartened by the fact that in a bipartisan way, I talked to senators on both sides. This is an area there's bipartisan interest in making sure we are thinking about it for the long term. So the patrol, thank you very much for the time today and the conversation really enjoyed the chances of town with you. Thanks, Matt, pleasure to be here. And that's it for today's tech news briefing. Tech live continues today Tuesday at 11 a.m. eastern. You can catch all the speakers by heading over to tech live WSJ dot com slash TL podcast. I'm Zoe Thomas.

Matt Murray Sundar Pichai Google Matt WSJ The Wall Street Journal U.S. Europe GDPR Geneva Congress Zoe Thomas
Google, Facebook and Twitter face off with Washington, DC Again

The 3:59

01:57 min | 2 years ago

Google, Facebook and Twitter face off with Washington, DC Again

"Facebook ceo mark zuckerberg google ceo sundar pichai and twitter ceo. Jack dorsey will appear before a house subcommittee meeting later today to discuss the role in fomented misinformation. The what are we actually expect to hear. Roger chang and this is your daily charge with us offer preview the proceedings is google reporter rich. Never welcome rich eight each before we get into today's session. You you just give us a quick review of all the times that big tech has appeared before congress and why they've been called in because it's been a number of times at this point over even the last year they've they've showed up to dc or at least virtually with increased frequency right. Yes so it seems like this is a regular occurrence now. But they've been called in for a bunch of things in the past. The big thing was antitrust. Last time they've also been called for an anti gay bias. That republicans are alleging. It been called for election interference in the two thousand sixteen election as well as twenty twenty election and they've been called for data collection in. So it's a it's a pretty regular occurrence days. Yeah it's it's old hat but for this session which is about this information on. What what are we expecting to hear. And what are some of the central themes about misinformation We're going to be hearing about this. One is is about misinformation and disinformation in particular and congress has a lot to choose from. In terms of nate. They tech here The election misinformation. For this this past election we got the lead up to the storming of the capital in how misinformation and disinformation but to extremism. And we got kobe. Nineteen misinformation about the causes in the vaccine. And you know what that means for for everybody going forward. So there's there's a lot hughes from.

Sundar Pichai Roger Chang Jack Dorsey Mark Zuckerberg Google Congress Facebook Twitter Nate
Zuckerberg, Dorsey and Pichai testify about disinformation. Today before The House

WSJ What's News

00:20 sec | 2 years ago

Zuckerberg, Dorsey and Pichai testify about disinformation. Today before The House

"We're expecting to see facebook's mark zuckerberg google's sundar pichai and twitter's jack dorsey at a house committee hearing focusing on misinformation and disinformation on the internet. The proceeding will likely center on what's known as section two thirty the federal internet liability.

Sundar Pichai Mark Zuckerberg Jack Dorsey House Committee Facebook Google Twitter
Smartphones Can Hear the Shape of Your Door Keys

60-Second Science

01:08 min | 2 years ago

Smartphones Can Hear the Shape of Your Door Keys

"Someone who knows how can pick a lock using just a paper clip but how about with a smartphone. Researchers at the national university of singapore wondered if smartphone audio of a key turning inside a log could be used to figure out the shape of that key and spoiler under the right conditions. They could create a few very good candidate keys including the correct key. Sundar you ramesh student who led the work on the project which the researchers called spiky said that the work was inspired by some previous research where the movement of smartwatches on people's wrists was used to figure out the code combination locks essentially. What they did was the looking at smartwatches on your wrist. In order to influence the pin to the combination. Lock since i'm since they're able to measure though the angle rate. So we've got great. People are doing this combination locks. Maybe lake that are some similar sites that we're gonna play to other kinds of locks the most revealing kind of locks these kind of physical locks and keys.

National University Of Singapo Sundar Ramesh Spiky
Bank of England deploys more stimulus as lockdown begins

Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

01:01 min | 2 years ago

Bank of England deploys more stimulus as lockdown begins

"On the Bank of England decision that happened just a hour ago, bigger than expected £150 billion boost to their Curie program, but I think that they more eye catching thing will be around unemployment because it's got a peek at 7.75% next year, according To the bank on dawn that know the power that she rallying because of thie intervention over Andrew Bailey. So by attending upset now, 1 30 08, reversing on earlier slump in the pound. But when it comes to the U S presidential vote yesterday, of course, we saw the surgeon the NASDAQ Up 4.4% the 100 Gainey. 2.2% the best day after US presidential vote in data going back to 1932, according to Sundar Capital Research. So yes, that kind of worst case scenario of a contested election or indecision that does not seem to have stopped that rowdy. Although the rally is narrow, it has to be said is only certain stocks are doing well. Has to be 100 Day. Many futures there by 1% NASDAQ futures up by

Bank Of England Curie Andrew Bailey Sundar Capital Research Gainey United States
US tech giants accused of 'monopoly power'

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

01:56 min | 2 years ago

US tech giants accused of 'monopoly power'

"Giant companies were grilled before a congressional hearing. Twitter's Jack Dorsey, Google, Sundar Pichai and Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg took questions on how to best police the Internet. The central question dealt with federal law, known as section 2, 30, protect social media companies from liability for their users post Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, appearing virtually urged against any drastic changes section 2 30 helped create the Internet. As we know it has helped new ideas get built and our company's to spread American values around the world, and we should maintain this advantage. But the Internet has also evolved, and I think that Congress should update the law to make sure that it's working. As intended. Dorsey, along with Zuckerberg and pitch, I were pressed to the to the company's policies for content, moderation. And, of course, the three CEOs were accused by some senators of abusing their power over political speech six days before the presidential election. One more heated exchanges came between Dorsey and Senator Ted Cruz. So you're testifying to this committee right now that Twitter when its silences people when its sensors people wanted blocks political speech that has no impact on elections, people people have choice of other communication channels. Not if they don't hear information. If you don't think you have the power to influence elections, why do you block anything? Well, we have policies that are focused on making sure that more voices from possible we see a lot of abuse and harassment, which ends up silencing people in something on leave from the front. Well at on this question. I just mentioned of content moderation. All three of the CEOs were pressed, especially by Republicans, accusing them of having an anti conservative bias. The CEO's also pushback on that They did, however, concede on the need for more transparency around some of their decisions on content moderation. It has been a busy

Jack Dorsey Mark Zuckerberg Twitter Facebook CEO Sundar Pichai Senator Ted Cruz Congress Google Harassment
At Hearing, Republicans Accuse Zuckerberg and Dorsey of Censorship

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:48 sec | 2 years ago

At Hearing, Republicans Accuse Zuckerberg and Dorsey of Censorship

"Of Facebook. Google on Twitter as you heard on ABC, testifying in a Senate hearing today on how their companies treat the flow of speech and information. Lawmakers have been critical of the tech giant's when it comes to issues of monopoly, privacy and censorship. Republicans have accused social media of suppressing conservative views and Democrats raise concerns over providing a place for hate speech to thrive. Democrat Maria Cantwell of our state has issues with how she believes these companies affect local media. I am concerned about the vertical nature of news and information. Today. I expect to ask the witness is about the fact that I believe they create a chokepoint for local news, the Senate Commerce Committee authorizing subpoenas for Mark Zuckerberg of Facebook, Sundar Pichai of Google and Jack Dorsey of Twitter. Other companies have said they are appearing voluntarily.

Facebook Twitter Google Maria Cantwell Senate Commerce Committee Sundar Pichai Senate Jack Dorsey Mark Zuckerberg ABC
US big tech dominates stock market after monster rally

Wall Street Breakfast

01:28 min | 2 years ago

US big tech dominates stock market after monster rally

"Big Tech gets a big test next week as apple facebook Amazon and Google. Parent Alphabet all step up to the earnings plate after a sizzling run for the sector wedbush securities things the reports will fuel up another tech rally into the end of the year despite the general nervousness over stimulus and the election apple is the firm's favorite thing name Microsoft and salesforce are the top cloud software picks and Z scaler is called the cybersecurity standout. There will also be some focus next week a US Senate hearing on section two, thirty immunity with twitter's Jack Dorsey facebook's mark. Zuckerberg and Google's Sundar Pichai all in the firing line. The economic calendar includes updates on new home sales, durable goods and consumer sentiment as well as what will be an eye popping Q. Three GDP report a historic thirty three percent quarter over quarter surge in Q. Three, GDP is expected to be reported to follow on the over thirty one percent drop in Q. Two despite the strong bouncing Q. Three the feds official forecast for this year is for GDP, to decline three point seven percent, which would mark the biggest single year drop since at least World War Two. Also on the schedule in the week ahead, look for some ideas to be generated out of the Robin Hood Conference and Spat Creation. Boards Town Motors Corporation could burn some rubber when it starts trading.

Apple Google Big Tech Sundar Pichai Facebook Boards Town Motors Corporation Jack Dorsey Salesforce Senate Twitter United States Microsoft Amazon Zuckerberg Official
The Case Against Google

Weekend Edition Saturday

03:31 min | 2 years ago

The Case Against Google

"We're going to zoom in now on a detail in the lawsuit the Justice Department filed against Google this week. It alleges that Google paid Apple As much as $12 billion to be the default search engine for iPhones. Prosecutors say this proves that Google abused monopoly power to try to keep rivals down. We should mention Apple and Google are both financial supporters of NPR. NPR's Bobby Allen covers tech and joins us now, Bobby. Thanks so much for being with us, you gotta Scott. And what does the government contend the that this payment is evidence Google abuse power. To the heart of the government's case against Google is that it's grown so large it functions like a monopoly like an oil baron, or like a steel magnet. But instead of being an industrialist's, it has huge power over the Internet, which on its face is not illegal, but When a company gains this much power and throws its weight around to make sure nobody else can compete. That's when there are real legal questions, and the Justice Department says That's how Google behaves. One really vivid example of this, at least allegedly, is this $12 billion payment. Google paid that Apple to make sure Google would be the predetermined search engine on every single Apple device. Practical effect. A cz you notice every time somebody buys an iPhone or an iPad and they search for something on the Internet. It's a Google search. Some people might consider that good. Why is it a problem in short? Because if you're a search competitors say, being or duck duck, go or you pick one. You don't get any attention. I mean, how often Scott, are you googling things on your phone, right? I mean, we say right, exactly. So their dominance is baked into the verb. So and the Justice Department points this out and Inside Google Becoming the default search engine was a huge priority. The Justice Department says. Google insiders called the prospect of not getting the deal code red. Google CEO Sundar Finch. I met one on one with Apple's Tim Cook to hammer out the terms of the deal behind closed doors and, according to the court papers, and unidentified senior employees from Google wrote to an Apple counterpart. Quote Our vision is to work as if we are one company. And so I called up former Justice Department antitrust lawyer John Newman and asked Is this collusion? Don't say it's somewhere in the middle. It's not classic collusion, so it's not like to oil companies conspiring to raise the price of oil, for instance, it looks more like One monopolists, agreeing with another company to split the monopoly rent. So we have Google, Annapolis or technically, competitors working together to make each other stronger. What did the company say about it? Cos say, there's nothing stranger illegal about it that companies make deals all the time to get the best distribution for their products on DH. Apple just decided that Google simply was the best partner to work with. On Google says Look, people like Google, right. Its dominance and strength is the result of just how great it ISS On DH, former Justice Department lawyer Newman says. Yeah, you could be the best. But that is not an argument to not give others a fair shot. If it is true that Google will win out on a competitive playing field, and it may be Even in a competitive market. A lot of people would like to use Google. But even if that's true, that's not a reason to leave the competitive Plainfield uneven.

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Senate Commerce votes to issue subpoenas to CEOs of Facebook, Google and Twitter

Dana Loesch

00:22 sec | 2 years ago

Senate Commerce votes to issue subpoenas to CEOs of Facebook, Google and Twitter

"Committee is going to subpoena Facebook and Twitter there see, and Google CEO is not just those two, but all three CEOs to testify. Eso Sundar Ah Chi Jack Dorsey, Mark Zuckerberg. The Senate Commerce Committee voted unanimously this week to approve a plan to subpoena them and it's going to focus obviously on section 2 30.

Eso Sundar Ah Chi Jack Dorsey Senate Commerce Committee Facebook Twitter CEO Mark Zuckerberg Google
A Closer Look at Sundar Pichai: From Middle Class Indian Upbringing to Google's Head Honcho

WSJ Tech News Briefing

06:11 min | 2 years ago

A Closer Look at Sundar Pichai: From Middle Class Indian Upbringing to Google's Head Honcho

"Google and its parent company alphabet on the precipice of several major challenges regulators are expected to file antitrust lawsuits as early as this month and other example some faith company isn't as innovative as it used to be. A CEO of alphabet sooner Pechanga will play a key role in how the company navigates the headwinds, and while Pichai, is not nearly as in the spotlight as the other tech leaders. He's already had a long history Google, and by taking a look back, we can try and get some clues about how he might move the company forward a reporter Copeland joins us with an inside look rob. Thanks for joining me. Thank you. So, at the tech hearing before the House antitrust subcommittee earlier, this year Pichai himself as an immigrant sort of the picture of the American dream. And wonder if you could start by telling us more about the Chinese upbringing shore so Definitely outlier in many ways in Silicon Valley perhaps the most famous way that he stands out is that he was born in. India. So he grew up middle-class for India but not necessarily add western standards. He famously talks about growing up and getting in his first. Rotary phone. He is in such an older guy that the technology was just a lot less developed there. So he speaks frequently about the connection that he feels to technology and the knowledge that new technology can really change someone's life. So pettah eventually came to the US for Grad School. How do you find his Google? He worked relatively ordinary corp jobs until he joined Google right after its IPO google was not the Google that it is today it really was just a search engine. Quickly impresses people for his ability to one build consensus, which is true to this day, but also get the job done his first major job at Google. toolbar product. So before there was chrome there actually was an add on on your browser to search google. So his job was to convince companies like Dell when they sold you a laptop to have an automatic google search bar on there. So he's moved through the ranks since then becoming CEO of Google and then last year taking over as alphabet. CEO How did he make his way up the ladder? What's so remarkable is he's been at Google for sixteen years and we even though we're the Wall Street Journal have never done a full profile of him. So a big part of my task for the last few months was really unpacking who he is and how he got to this position and what really emerges is that Google was a place and still is a place with big personalities people who scream at each other people who say we should bet the farm on this or that and what sooner sort of did. was stay in the background, but he was also very careful that whatever he did it worked starting with toolbar but that extends to chrome the browser which he co lead and is now by far the most used web browser one of the big reveals of this reporting for me was that he's a very strategic person. It's not an accident that he stayed in the background for instance, someone who used to report to him. Told me early on in a meeting with with Larry? Page. who was CEO of Google before soon Dr Sooner made sure that they never disagreed in front of Larry. He really didn't want anyone to see any cracks and this also emerges in a lot of the people I spoke to some of whom sooner himself suggested that I speak to. But then when I got on the phone with them, they didn't seem to know him personally well. So he he keeps it very close to the vest. So it sounds like he's pretty deft at navigating the company politics now that he's in the top spot. What's he known for as a leader? So to a man to a woman ever and I spoke to said that sooner has a tendency in the middle of meetings to stand up and begin pacing in the middle of your presentation. He won't say anything necessarily sign that he likes or doesn't like it. It's just signed that he's thinking. So you can imagine people have spent weeks preparing for the CEO and he leaps up in the middle just starts pacing it can be quite disarming frankly this comes back to the criticism. Of Soon Dr to standing up in the middle of meeting and pacing as you think is not necessarily your traditional hey drive the car forward leadership. There's a big knock at Google today it's that and this comes from investors analysts even some executives of the company it's that the company is pretty much operating on autopilot. It makes almost all of its money from online advertising and you don't really have to do much besides sit there and the money comes in adding an extra add to youtube isn't exactly a high level. Decision. So the criticism is that sooner hasn't necessarily made the big move to position Google for the next decade on the other hand. When you have such a head start that Google has just not messing up is a billion dollar proposition. And what about as a coworker? What's he known for that? The best thing that's has going for him is that people genuinely like him in fact, one of his deputies Caesar. Gupta told me he loved sooner Pichai. He said the reason I stayed at Google this long as because of Dr He's someone that I trust. He moved to Jakarta because soon are asked him to. People. Say in this world where everyone is obsessed with Silicon Valley with what is happening in Menlo Park and Palo Alto and San Francisco that soon Dr a truly global outlook that he cares for instance, about Google pay in India where there are many multiples number of people using payment products in there are in the US. But tacitus surly had as much investment and one of the really fun things that is in the story is he's very much a creature of habit. You can imagine your CEO of of Alphabet you're traveling the world whenever he's in Korea he goes to the same burrito place an orders, the same Veggie Burrito. And in this world of he's hard-driving CEOS who appear in TMZ or go through high profile divorces. Everyone says that sooner Chai's legitimately just a kind nice guy.

Google CEO Pichai India Silicon Valley United States Larry Tacitus Jakarta Dell Wall Street Journal Copeland Reporter Caesar Grad School Korea Pettah
House Antitrust Subcommittee Takes Testimony From Big Tech CEOs

Talking Tech

03:34 min | 2 years ago

House Antitrust Subcommittee Takes Testimony From Big Tech CEOs

"As low as four dollars. Ninety nine cents a month stay tuned after the show to learn about their special offer just for talking tech listeners. So when you're asked to meet with elected officials via teleconference in Washington. DC along with your key competitors and you don't get too many questions. It's a given that you had a really really good week. And when you followed up the next day with a stunning earnings release that had one analysts say that his jaw dropped when he read the numbers while there's no question that apple CEO Tim, Cook clearly had the best week in Tech. His compatriots among the big tech CEOS like facebook's mark. Zuckerberg Google's Sundar Pichai, and Amazon's Jeff Bezos did not fare as well in DC. Now, in case you missed it. Let's breakdown for you what happened this week and begin by setting the scene facebook Google apple and Amazon CEOS recall to Capitol Hill for the first time in unison to defend themselves. Against antitrust charges and they followed it up the next day with earnings reports all on the same day or a mind boggling two hundred billion dollars combined worth of revenues in just one quarter. That's a little less than half of what America's largest company Walmart brought in for all of two thousand nineteen for the record that was five, hundred, twenty, four, billion. Now during a pandemic, when many people are forced to work or learn from home consumers responded by buying lots of new computers, ipads, and iphones from apple and a whole lot of everything from Amazon at a time when many retail stores were closed in this testimony to Congress bezos described it as like Christmas in March for the company which struggle to keep up with demand meanwhile. Google. Reported a two percent drop in revenues incidents. Advertising business was impacted too fragile economy. While facebook, which is also primarily in advertising business reported higher revenues but. With a lower increase than usual, which brings us back to cook. When you're asked to appear before Congress and defend your company, you're a loser when you walk into that environment says Jean Monster in investor analyst with Luke ventures a good day he adds is escaping from major blows like Tim Cook did cook was asked about how apple treats APP developers in place favorites at its APP store where the company clearly controls what consumers can see with ironclad enforcement. Apple gets to decide who can participate and can band people at will as it did recently with the alternative email service hey, which was initially rejected by apple cooks defense. It's all in keeping up with the quality of the store in that putting APPs in front of iphone users that invade their privacy and the like. But in the realm of antitrust government decreed that apple ditch the APP store, it's a tiny portion of its business worth less than five. And wouldn't impact apple says monster. What could happen to the other companies if they had to divest will you can see facebook ditching instagram and WHATSAPP apple ditching aws, which is its web services it was basically the backbone of many companies. It provides Internet services for many companies like Netflix men for Google maybe say goodbye YouTube. Google calendar. Google maps who knows meanwhile the chairman of the antitrust subcommittee said

Apple Google Facebook Tim Cook Amazon Jeff Bezos Congress DC Washington Sundar Pichai Walmart Jean Monster America Zuckerberg Netflix
Washington vs. Big Tech: Taking on the Trillion-Dollar Club

Squawk Pod

10:01 min | 2 years ago

Washington vs. Big Tech: Taking on the Trillion-Dollar Club

"Lawmakers came out swinging yesterday against Amazon Apple, Alphabet and facebook at an historic antitrust hearing held with CEOS, Jeff bezos, Tim Cook Sundar Pichai, and Mark Zuckerberg. Over remote Webcam, you swear or affirm under penalty of perjury that the testimony you out to give his show incorrect. The Best of your knowledge information and belief. So help you God. Yes. Let the record, show the witnesses answered informative. Thank you, and you may remain seated members of the House Judiciary Committee's antitrust subcommittee used charged language like too much power, Anti Competitive Acquisition and emperors as they aired their concerns about those four giant platforms. Here's the subcommittee chairman. Democrat, Peterson, Selene, a Rhode Island, our founders would not bow before king, nor should we bow before the emperor's of the online economy and ranking member? Wisconsin's Jensen. Brenner. Pointing out. Political concerns about size does big tech have a bias serves our consumers to? The need the protection of the antitrust laws. Both sides of the aisle had their opportunity to highlight this core conflict between Washington and Silicon Valley that antitrust enforcement can fix whatever is challenging or concerning about big tech. The CEO's for their part. Say We haven't squashed the competition. Here's Pichai Cook and Zuckerberg competition drives US team. needs to better products, Noah choices and more choices for every customers have a lot of choices in their products space fierce competition companies like Samsung, G. while way in Google has built successful businesses with different approaches. We okay with that. Our goal is the best, not the most I recognize that there are concerns about the size and power of tech companies. Now, we're services are about connection. Our business model is advertising and we face intense competition in both Amazon's ECOMMERCE dominance sparked a few intense moments after CEO Jeff bezos. The richest man in the world with a personal fortune of about one hundred and eighty billion dollars didn't get a question until nearly two hours into the hearing apparently due to a tech glitch. But then the pressure was on basis was asked about undercutting diapers, dot com before buying it Amazon's counterfeit problem whether Alexa favors Amazon's own products, many times. He didn't have the answer I. Don't remember that at all. I remember is that we we we'd match competitive. I believe we follow diapers cog, and this is eleven years ago I. Think we do is offer to get you information if you. Get it to your office for you read that article, but I didn't remember that piece of that I apologize for that I don't know the specifics of that situation, and I would be happy to give back to your office with more information about that. These questions for Basil's and Amazon strike at the heart of the antitrust that had been building for years as these four companies that we use every day every single day grow and grow larger with a combined market. Market cap of about five trillion dollars. If they were their own stock exchange, they'd be the fourth largest in the world. Here's vice chair. Joanna goose to facebook's mark. Zuckerberg strikes me over the course of the last several years. FACEBOOK has used. It's market power to either purchase or replicate the competition and facebook facebook. MESSENGER WHATSAPP instagram are the most now downloaded APPs of the last decade your company. Sir, owns them all and we have a word for that words monopoly. My Take Away I. Don't know I. Don't know if you guys watched I thought some of it was fascinating. A couple of questions, not not a lot of great questions thought. There's a lot of some good answers, some not good answers, but I didn't think that there was a major takeaway that all of a sudden. You know Washington was Gonna come down hard on these companies and there was evidence that was presented. That was gonna GonNa, create that challenge. I thought the most challenging piece of of news out there. But I think we've seen it before was instagram and facebook in some of the emails back and forth. Did you ever use this very similar facebook camera product to threaten instagram's founder Kevin side-stream? Congresswoman I'm I'm not sure what you mean by threatened I. Think it was public that we were building a camera up at the at the time in a chat. You told, MR, science that facebook was quote developing our own photos strategy. So how we engage now, we'll also determine how much were partners versus competitors down the line instagram's founders seem to think that was a threat he confided confided in an investor at the time that he feared you would go. That you would go into quote destroy mode if he didn't sell instagram to you, one of respectfully disagree with the characterization. Really dug into the emails and didn't take them out of context I. Thought, you'd have a hard case to make. Yeah, I, mean. I thought on on the point with facebook is easy Riley points to the quite a few different lawmakers went off the Mark Zuckerberg on on the topic of their competition practices whether he considered some of those companies they've taken over I, walk up and Instagram as competitors at that point which knowledge that they had been, which kind of course, a bit of a stir. Has Been Engaged in purchasing competition I, in some cases, replicating competition in some cases eliminating your competition, would that be a fair statement? The space of people connecting with other people is a very large space and I would agree that there were different approaches we took to to addressing different parts of of that space, but it's all in service of building the best services. Likewise said that they had tried to copy some of the particular tools that other rivals whether they bought them or not use including. Of course, the stories feature snap, which I thought was quite interesting, but Geo Point, Andrew as to whether we we conclude from yesterday that significant action from no makers is imminent. Even if we go to a sweep at the next election, the market didn't take that conclusion on those times. Talks hit session highs during the hearing, but the interesting dichotomy which goes to the question. Of, how much we managed to watch I watched as much as I could apart from when fed chair Jay Powell speaking and I watch that instead, and you had one side of Washington of goes up pressuring these tech stocks. The other part saying that we're hit as long as it takes, we're not even thinking about thinking about thinking about raising rates and not allowed old. Not just the textbooks. And close at a pretty strong session yesterday can I? Can I just ask whoever buys a company? That's not a competitor I mean. News the idea that you would buy a competitor when. Merger has ever taken place among a company that does an entirely different area that you wouldn't consider a competitor. Watching. This yesterday was complete theater just like it often is with the these congressional hearings. At. The beginning, they were asking questions and not even letting them answer. So this was really about giving Congress people their time to have their six minutes to talk and to go through with some of these things, I didn't feel like learned a lot under yesterday. I couldn't take my eyes off it when I was watching it, but it was theater. Classic, you'll take the time comments from lawmakers when they get me on. So they wanted to I, totally agree on that, but I would say compared to say twenty eighteen when Mark Zuckerberg had to go to face, they'll make on his own. Better prepared than they had even if it was then making arguments rather than letting. The answer, their questions, they made better arguments. They brought up more pertinent facts whether that was is Amazon. Abusing small sellers on this. Platform. In two, thousand, thirteen, it was reported that you instructed Amazon employees to approach discussions with certain business partners, and I quote the way a Cheetah would pursue a sickly gazelle is the gazelle projects still in place and as Amazon pursue similar predatory campaigns in other parts of its business. I cannot. comment on that because I don't remember it. Is. Apple misusing the margins, it takes on on the APP store. Apple from increasing its commission to fifty percents we serve. We have never increase commissions in the store since the first day at operated in two thousand eight. From doing so is it? No, Sir I disagree strongly with that, there is a competition for developers just like there's a competition for customers. So I think they were getting it the crux of some of the issues. But as we I think all concluding I, it didn't spell imminent danger for the tech stocks just because of that air. Just one note though on the competitor. Comment there or issue that you were just discussing Becky, which is an interesting one. We often talk on the show about how being a monopoly unto. itself is not illegal, and you just commented that you can't buy from everybody wants to buy competitor. Interestingly, if you're deemed a monopoly which is not illegal, but you have that market power, it actually is illegal to buy a competitor, and so if you really go back and read mark, Brooks emails even. Even about the instagram transaction, he actually even doubled back on one of his emails because I. Think he realized that given the power that having that industry depending on how you define it that he had to rewrite the email later to suggest no, I'm not trying to do this. He was by the way thinking about this, even to two, thousand, ten, you can. Almost, if you look through emails, you can sort of see how tracking in his mind. The Way He's thinking about it. So yes, everybody always wants to buy. But Inter stands at the size and scale that these companies are. Now, it's very hard to do that actually. Hit His. Answer. was that the FTC had all the same information that they had at that point in the FTC Peruta

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Congressman Louie Gohmert tests positive for coronavirus

Hard Factor

02:44 min | 2 years ago

Congressman Louie Gohmert tests positive for coronavirus

"Republican Louie Gohmert? Who sounds like? He's falling asleep while reading trump's twitter timeline when he talks found out on Wednesday morning that he couldn't fly to Texas with President trump because. He's got corona vox get tested whenever you go to the White House. If, you're getting in fifty feet of trump began testing. Who did he talk to were very welcoming people with coronavirus down here in Texas we the more the Merrier. Well I mean he is Texas rap he was trying to come home, but he had already caught that. DC. Corona before he could get on the flight. So not only does Louie Louie. Gohmert have have cove it. He also had previously refused to wear masks unless he got cova saying that was useless presumably, and that's a shame because the day before his positive test result when he was probably already positive with covid. And he still wasn't wearing a mask when he was talking with Ag bar in the hearing room. So Gomez smells just us just just trying to infect the attorney general right before you lob softball questions to bar is sleepy Texas draw while bar like vigorously rubbed his freshly Kuroda infected hands all over his face. Gohmert, pile just an all time bonehead. Taking it to the unreal Gohmert. Easily as the CREEPIEST press photo I've ever seen in my life I. Think he drew. Or Eight termer, your congressman and. East Texas, you might want to reconsider that taking it to the Internet Louie gohmert piles, doing zoom interviews Galore trying to blame his corona infection on the fact that he had caved and just recently started to wear a mask in the last ten days instead that that is probably what gave him the virus when he was touching his mask. So apparently. From being. Exactly like what a Gomer pyle. This guy should have been wearing a mask a long time ago. Yes. Gomer Pyle yeah. He He went from being a complete fucking imbecile the day before when he was trying to infect the G. to the world's foremost Dr overnight if discovering that, you can give yourself corona through your mascots pretty incredible stuff bill bar supposedly had a corona virus tests on Wednesday hopefully, he doesn't get it because the like half the combined I q of the gop would be mortal danger. But at the time of this recording, the DOJ had declined to say if bar tested positive or not or if he plans to quarantine, they just said that he had been tested so. Like just all time stupidity from Lower Gohmert pile representative from

Louie Gohmert Texas Corona Louie Louie Gomer Pyle Twitter Creepiest DOJ DC Cova GOP President Trump White House Congressman Softball Representative Gomez Kuroda Attorney
Jeff Bezos Touts Amazon's Job Creation Efforts in Congressional Testimony

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:36 sec | 2 years ago

Jeff Bezos Touts Amazon's Job Creation Efforts in Congressional Testimony

"Of Big Tech is under scrutiny on Capitol Hill with Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg, Amazon's Jeff Bezos, Sundar Pichai of Google and Tim Cook of Apple, all appearing before the House Judiciary Committee. Bezos says he's proud of the jobs that Amazon has created. The trust customers put in us every day has allowed Amazon to create more jobs in the United States over the past decade than any other company. Hundreds of thousands of jobs across 42 states. Lawmakers are looking at whether the companies have grown too big and powerful and whether that growth is stifling competition and innovation and raising prices for consumers.

Jeff Bezos Amazon Sundar Pichai House Judiciary Committee Big Tech Tim Cook Facebook Mark Zuckerberg United States Google Apple
Trump threatens to use executive orders against Big Tech

Rush Limbaugh

00:48 sec | 2 years ago

Trump threatens to use executive orders against Big Tech

"Of the four of the largest tech companies air testifying in front of House Judiciary Committee's antitrust subcommittee today. It's the first time all four execs Amazon's Jeff Bezos, Apple's Tim Cook, Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg UN's Google's Sundar Pichai have testified together. Antitrust subcommittee chairman Congressman David Cecil. Any of Rhode Island says they're a lot of questions that need to be answered. More than a year ago, this subcommittee launched an investigation into digital markets. Our two objectives have been to document competition problems in the digital economy into evaluate where the current antitrust framework is able to properly address them ahead of that hearing, the president tweeted. If Congress doesn't bring fairness to Big tech, which they should have done years ago, I'll do it myself with executive orders.

Sundar Pichai House Judiciary Committee Jeff Bezos Congressman David Cecil Tim Cook Facebook Mark Zuckerberg Rhode Island Amazon Chairman Google Apple President Trump Congress Executive
Big Tech's CEOs come to Capitol Hill

Morning Edition

00:47 sec | 2 years ago

Big Tech's CEOs come to Capitol Hill

"Chief executives of four big tech companies are scheduled to appear today before a House subcommittee As NPR's Bobby Allen reports, The CEOs of Apple, Amazon, Facebook and Google will be questioned about their market dominance and what it means for industry competitors. Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg, Amazon's Jeff Bezos, Google Sundar Pichai and Apple's Tim Cook will all be peppered with questions by members of the House antitrust subcommittee. All four will appear simultaneously and virtually the hearing is centered on whether there is too much power in too few hands Together. The four big tech companies have a market value of nearly $5 trillion their opening statements that have been released The CEO's defend their business practices and say they have plenty of competition. All four companies are financial supporters of NPR.

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Tech CEOs Defend Operations Ahead of Congressional Hearing

Morning Edition

00:54 sec | 2 years ago

Tech CEOs Defend Operations Ahead of Congressional Hearing

"Facebook and Google will testify before Congress today in a hearing over big text market dominance as NPR's Bobby Allen reports, the tech executives planned argued their companies are not like monopolies. Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg, Amazon's Jeff Bezos, Google Sundar Pichai, Apple's Tim Cook are all appearing for the first time together in front of House lawmakers. Virtually, of course and the CEO's opening statements. The executives will say that they have plenty of competition. But critics of big tech question whether any company can rival Silicon Valley's immense power. The four companies have a combined market value of nearly $5 trillion have grown up in a nearly regulation free environment. But there is now bipartisan support to clamp down as the companies have acquired wide ranging skepticism for reshaping American commerce, communication and political discourse. Bobby Allen NPR NEWS

Bobby Allen Facebook Google Sundar Pichai Jeff Bezos NPR Tim Cook Mark Zuckerberg Amazon Silicon Valley CEO Congress Apple House