37 Burst results for "Sundance"

Fresh update on "sundance" discussed on KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

00:57 sec | 12 hrs ago

Fresh update on "sundance" discussed on KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

"A new dad to Factor David Duke Avni. From the X Files. He is 60 years old today way Knight has a birthday today. Oh, Newman Gif Newman on Seinfeld 65 years old. Today, he actually saw him in a play on Broadway Broadway with George Segal. He was he was. He's a great actor, and and he was a really bad guy that play a bad one. OK, Garrison Keillor spend a quiet weekend like well begun my hometown former host of the Perry home. Companion until he got ensnared in the meat to movement. He is 78 years old. Today, as is reined up, fallen on my head, Great B. J. Thomas, just like the guy who's feet are too big for his bed number one movie that was surrounding such Cassidy and the Sundance kids Right and born August 7, but no longer with us. Billy Burke, who.

George Segal David Duke Avni Newman Garrison Keillor Billy Burke Sundance Perry Home B. J. Thomas Cassidy Knight
Fresh update on "sundance" discussed on Movie Crush

Movie Crush

07:32 min | 14 hrs ago

Fresh update on "sundance" discussed on Movie Crush

"When you find someone. That you. Can Act with creatively like that that also brings something different to the table. That's IT'S A it's a special bank and you want to hold onto that and I think that's what you know. Totally we definitely found and that's again to. Onto the positive of going to a school like a F-, I is We found that there and and you're able to. Practice and and Also learn how many classes that are like talk about learning how to. Really find your story but like access these deeper emotions like shame and fear and whatnot, and and. Palm Springs, like kind of when we were trying to come up with the idea and whatnot for it. So much of that was just us to in a room. Kind of acting as each other's therapist in a way like. Nothing what we didn't hold anything back and I think that's and I we were able to. Sound. Super pretentious. But like we we're able to access that part of our, our subconscious, I don't know. Like this is not pretentious I mean, that's that's the the deal you know I mean that's where the great art comes from not superficial, and that's one of the things I loved about Palm Springs in. If I had not like the movie I would just said, hey, buddy. So proud of you good job. I wouldn't have gotten specific with my with what I liked about it, but I really did like it and I. Think it was. A really fresh spin on a concept that people have seen in love which is sort of the repeating of the day the groundhog day thing. But you you took you got an angle. That we hadn't seen before and it was managed to be sweet and romantic and funny but also. Had A little bit of philosophical underpinnings and there was this sort of heady subs subtext and I think he wove it in just the right amount you know and it was it was more than just this sort of silly fun movie but it was also that which I think is for first movie is like. Like congratulations man was so proud. So proud of you. Thank you. and. Part of that is yours because again, you wrote that first letter that first letter of REC and. You know you you own a piece of Palm Springs. Did. Your are your parents freaking out or they dislike over the moon about all this? Yeah. Part of me thinks that they've been contacted. More by. By more friends than I really. I think it's made them pretty feel pretty cool. It was. After The Wall Street Journal. Reviewed it, and that's where all of their friends are Big Wall Street Journal people, and that's where like a short gave. It adds added some points. To their their cool mist I think in A. In that review, they refer to me as Mr Ciara. So I think that that was I. think that definitely makes my dad like. The. The the tiers of fatherly pride. Man. I'm. Pretty I got a text two nights ago. From my dad saying we couldn't agree on what to wash night so. So this heels a picture of of palm. Springs. On the screen yet again I think I'm pretty sure they ended about eight or nine times now. that's adorable it's been very well reviewed too. That's got to feel good. I was I was a little nervous Someone close to you make something like this big. It's always a little nerve racking and it's like Oh, God and his first movie I'm so nervous and then I I did a little peek at a couple of pre reviews but I didn't want to really read read but I just would scan them and I was like, Hey, told him like this is getting good reviews and that made me feel a little bit better and then I watched it and then read a lot of the reviews. And it's it's like everyone seems to really like it. It's A. Feel very lucky 'cause. I don't know. Yeah. I I feel I. Feel Lucky. It's I I always I. I keep going back to the moment when we premiered at Sundance that it's kind of like burned into my mine. and. In, our it was the first screening. Max and I were sitting in the back corner in like I knew where Joey and my parents nerve wrecking it all. I I knew where Joey and my parents and Amanda. We're sitting newer his his family was sitting cast and crew, and it was it was Mike Buzzed leading into the the premier but no one had seen the movie. And Buzz, usually like buzz can often go the other way. And Remember when like lights went down and the Sundance little. Preview thing came up and I got a little emotional because like. Grab Max and Could flashed into my mind US meeting seven year almost exactly seven years earlier and yeah to. So. We never once expected any of this Yeah. We we when we So many of those years. Before it even got lonely island, which is like no one cared about US A. Wanting to try to make. Their had this dream of making some kind of. Dumb movie. Yeah. And then to get to that, point it it just it was just a lot of feelings and then and then when the lonely island classics Card came up that little like. Everyone in the theatre started laughing and it was like this. This cya relief, it's great. But but I kept on thinking about that moment like this was the last moment where the movie was like. It was no longer ours after that in eighty five minutes. Is Out into the and people might hate it, and that could be the end of our interview journey as like a young filmmakers so. I don't know. Let's it. Will people love it man I was I was a little sad at first because the pandemic happened in a new that you're movie was teed up. And I was like I'll shit man I wonder if they're gonNA delay it or whatever, and I wasn't sure about just the overall release plan before this but. It seems like it's kind of work to your advantage. Because a lot of tension. Has Come your way and there's not a lot out there. So it's sort of. It sort of has stood alone as a new movie that you can watch and it seems to have like in a weird way kind of benefited from this whole thing. Yeah and I don't know how I feel about that. I'm not saying that it's the only thing out there. So people like it because it could be the only thing out there and it stinks but I. It's weird. I think it's gotten a lot of attention because of the unique you guys release schedule like you guys did Hulu and then this big drive in. Drive ins all around the country, which was so super. SMART. Like. We we lucked out with very. Forward Thinking.

Palm Springs Sundance Joey Big Wall Street Journal United States The Wall Street Journal Mr Ciara Hulu Mike Buzzed MAX Amanda
Summer Movies 2020: What to Stream, What's Delayed

Nerdette

17:57 min | 2 weeks ago

Summer Movies 2020: What to Stream, What's Delayed

"Pandemic has totally thrown summer movie season for a loop. Lots of movies are going straight to streaming. Judd apoptosis and our Shirley's the roads and our welfare, but which streaming movies are really worth your time. And what will the pandemic mean for the film industry, and are we ever actually going to see tenant? The Big Budget Christopher Nolan Sci fi flick scheduled to come out in August. Will we ever see that on the big screen where it is meant to be seen? Well the answer to that question may actually be never. We just found out. That film has been delayed indefinitely, but there's still a lot more to discuss and here to talk us through it. Is Eliana Dr Men? She writes about movies and pop culture and Feminism for time Eliana. Hi, hi, how's it going good? How are you? Good holding up. So I think my first question just has to be like. Is there a summer blockbuster season this year? What happened? Yeah, I feel like saying. There's no summer blockbuster. Season is a little road to the movies that have come out on Vod vod meaning video demand, because a lot of stuff is just going straight to streaming racked. Yes, the things that are going straight to streaming which there have been some good things. But this certainly has not had the momentous feel of a usual summer where I convince my closest friends to go spend a ridiculous money to go see a movie in amax because it's summer and that's what you do. That is not happening. Hollywood has been a little circumspect about that. Keep moving movies that they insist have to count in theaters with good reason for some of 'em a movie like ten it would be much less fun to watch for the first time at home, but they keep sort of delaying it by two week increments, and delaying delaying delaying and I suspect that those delays will go into twenty twenty want, but we'll see. Yet kind of reminds me of early on in pandemic times it was probably like late maybe mid late February, when I found out that the the new James Bond movie was being delayed. Because that was supposed to come out in April. And they decided they moved it to like November. But I remember it was one of the first moment sitting at work when I saw the news where I was like. Oh. This pandemic is real. Yeah that was at the time I remember. Having discussions internally at time and just thinking personally. It's crazy that they're big to November. Why would they be November now? They look like geniuses because they sort of as this has continued to happen. All of these movies are rushing to find different dates, and I've sort of compared. You know finding the right movie release date to picking perfect wedding date. You don't want overlap with another big release that would. Not all the guests are going to come. And you also want to find a weekend when you know. A lot of people are free, so holiday weekends are always big Christmas thanksgiving Labor Day that sort of thing, so there's been just this total crush of movies. Where right now if things go the way that they are currently planned? We're just going to have a million movies released in November and December I. Don't think that that will actually happen, but they sort of James Bond beat everyone to the punch by claiming that date early. Right naming you know here. We are coming up on August. August like who knows what November's even GonNa. Look like yeah, exactly so I do think that most of those movies will probably move to twenty twenty one as well who knows, but it's sort of worst on such an ad hoc basis with all of this right now that I think the studios are also concerned and confused of course, so yeah, obviously you can't tell the future, but I do wonder like. Do you have a sense? You know you say? Probably? A million movies are gonNA drop in November December early. That's kind of the planet this point. is they're then going to be just like a huge drop off because of the stuff that should have been produced over the course of this year. That wasn't able to be because of the pandemic. I don't think we'll actually see that. Drop off until twenty twenty two because a lot of big movies that were supposed to come out this year like I remember another big kind of moment of this pandemic was real is when fast and furious nine moved from a spring of twenty, trying to spring of two thousand, twenty one, which also it doesn't the one that's taking place on Mars or something I think that the rumor is that they. I think that the actual poll of this. Is that this character Han? Who is very unjustly killed off a few movies ago, Mac so there's a whole justice for Han. A whole separate on my fast furious. Good to know. Just in case you're looking for. You on the list. So a lot of those movies have waited a full year. The top gun movie was delayed till Christmas. I think actually, but there are few other movies that have been delay pushed it back a full year. Yeah, push back a full year, so I think we will still get a crowded summer twenty twenty. One I think that we're really going to see the impact. In Twenty, twenty two where the delays in filming movies are are actually going to sort of manifest and that will be very strange. That's really interesting. So you say you don't want to do a disservice to the movies that have come out this summer that have gone straight to streaming services. What do you think are some the standouts that people shouldn't miss so I? Think that a few things have come out that have been great and entertaining, one big standout and profit by saying a lot of these movies are going to be on Netflix. Because Netflix was just more prepared for this than anybody else. WHO Like match? A four site that a pandemic was going to happen, but just by virtue of they drop a new movie every week at this point and write them have to be good. I think. The five bloods, which is Spike Lee movie that dropped on that flicks on June twelfth, and is h front runner in the very weird Oscar season. We're GONNA. Have a mom so far is definitely a standout. I think that that's one that is well worth people's time especially because there are going to be so few kind of prestige, Oscar movies that I think come out the series. Well that if you want to turn Oscar Susan that that is the way to go, okay so that one stands out I mean Hamilton. I watched as soon as dropped and APPS as. Everyone else I talked to did and I think they did a really good job of translating that to screen. Obviously, there's some reconsideration of Hamilton right now and rate. How good of a job it does! reckoning with the racism of the time. But I do think that unlike a lot of sort of problematic properties that were dealing with the summer lamelo Miranda has sort of owned up in participated in that conversations would say watch it with a grain of salt, and then go right you an internet deep dive. Researcher Slavery. And Google Hamilton slavery and just set aside a few hours for that So I think that stands out, I also really loved Palm Springs I'll too I just saw over the weekend, and I thought it was delightful. It felt like. Again try not to shade net flicks too much, but palm springs is one of the first movies released in quarantine that felt like an actual movie to me. and this came on Hulu. It came out on Hulu. It was the biggest purchase out of Sundance ever how it was supposed to be released in theaters. It was very much treated as an indie movie, but a big indie movie randy's hamburger than most people know about these days right and lonely island Andy. Sandberg's group produced it There's some Hollywood power behind it, but it felt like a fully finished movie with. With, the quirks of actual writers, directors incorporated in there and character development whereas I dunno some of the net flicks movies can feel a little bit empty to me like there was a concept and not a lot of follow through So this palm springs stood out to me. Is One a good rom com, which are hard to come by these days in to like. It felt like I would go to theater and pay money to see this movie. Yeah, totally so those are those are sort of a few that have come out so far that definitely stand out to me. As being people's time one that I've been hearing a lot about speaking of net flicks. is the old guard. I haven't watched it yet. What do you recommend it? So I do I mean? The old guard is sorta falls into that category of doesn't feel quite like a complete would be released in theaters film. And I don't. I can put my finger quite on. Why except that? I think that you know the premise of the movie is that these immortal beings are basically you know. superheroes that are constantly saving the world. I would watch that. Yeah, it's definitely entertaining, and like it's Shirley stare on shortly surrounds Great Gina Prince would who directed love and basketball won't have the greatest films of all time. Directed this and I think she does a good job. I do wish that these immortal beings were a little more interesting like if they've lived for thousands of if they had lived for thousands of years, I wish they had. More interesting quirks more things to say about the state of the world. That's a fair critique. Nothing can be perfect. It's definitely a diverted way to spend a couple of hours, and you know well worth people's time if they are looking for bad action, movies, and and kind of not even bad like. This is terrible action movie, but just like not A. Junk food. Yes, junk food. That is the perfect word for it which I mean like. Maybe the bar is really low now. Anyway. Right because it's like if I'm not leaving my house. If I got nothing to do then why not eat some junk food? You know exactly and I think that the I think that Hollywood is scared that we're going to get so used to junk food that we're not going to want to spend a little extra money on not junk food. After this is all over and that will sort of accepts. This is movies now. The netflix version of movies that feels a little bad for me and lacking in a little substance is just going to be the state of the world, and we're not going to spend the extra money to for example, see Palm Springs in theaters or see you know the Irishman in theaters vs on Netflix. To use another sort of direct networks parallel right so. What you're saying, is that essentially like if we are getting used to a lower quality than than what is our incentive to WanNa like go to the theater and spend a bunch of money. An let alone the fact that we're also like sitting. You know theoretically at least shoulder to shoulder with strangers, which is not a thing that people are super interested in doing right now during a pandemic. What do you think is sort of like the future of the movie theater industry? Like are they just doomed? Yeah, it's really hard. I mean as someone who watches a lot of movies, both in my personal life, and for work I cannot wait to get back to the movie theater. Going experience and I do think that there is that sort of feeling that once it is safe. I would happily walk several miles to go. Sit in a big theater next to some co workers or friends. Friends and watch a movie like Ted I. Wait for that to happen I am not comfortable doing right now. Though I do think that it's going to be a question of timing, and how long movie theaters can survive financially until moment where we do feel comfortable all coming back and I think that there's this fantasy that a movie like tenant or a movie like move on. It's just GonNa stuff movie theaters right off the Bat and there's going to be a moment where we all decide. Yes, this is the weekend where it's safe again. where I'm excited about going to the movies and I WANNA. Go sit next to a bunch of strangers and have them. You know spill popcorn on me. I don't think that that I. think that. That's sort of this illusive fantasy I. Don't think that that's going to be the case I. Think it's going to be a very slow trickle. I don't think people are chomping at the bit to go to the movie theaters I do think that that is why studios have been holding back the. Most expensive contents for kind of lack of a better categorization. Is because they don't want to give us Moulana streaming at home, and then have us come to expect okay I'll just wait for Milan's come onstream. I think that they want to create the incentive to go to the movie theater because it is so essential to their business. Surviving I just think that you know that means we might have many more months of not so great content. So, you're saying that it's not only like AMC theaters who need movie theaters to exist, but also Hollywood itself. Yes Hollywood definitely need movie theater to exist I mean the reason that you can make a movie like tenant for hundreds of millions of dollars is because you make. Hundreds of millions of dollars back by selling movie theater tickets. There's just no way that they can make that on Vod. It's not possible, so we'll see how they strategize it going forward, but I think sort of takeaway from this is that Netflix was already fighting it into the Hollywood. Business an Hollywood was not prepared for it, and this is just accelerating the process. So you've mentioned tenant a couple times, this is the newest is it's Sifi right from Christopher Nolan. Yes, it's a new Christopher Nolan movie. The reason I keep mentioning Tenet is because Christopher Nolan. Or Warner brothers have styled tenant as sort of the movie that is going to save the summer blockbuster season. They keep talking about is the first big movie that's going to open the movie. That's going to draw people back to theaters movie. That's GonNa save movie theaters the movie that's going to save the concept of summer blockbuster the movie that's GonNa. Make us feel better again and. I mean that sounds great i. does sound great I mean in fairness them. It's a good movie to pick to pin that on. Because Christopher Nolan is one of if not the only director left who can drop a totally original film that has nothing to do with comic book series. A book is not marble is not DC, NI, and, but this is still one of those like big loud movies. That's like perfect for a movie like a theater going experience that right, yes, yeah heart of the appeal of a movie like ten is that you see it with a big group of people rate, and then will gasp at the same reveal exactly like some of my favorite summer. Summer movie moments are the moments where you know. Something crazy happens in everybody screams. Everybody laughs I think of I. Guess is two summers ago. When the last mission impossible became out and spoiler alert for the first half hour of the mission impossible movie, there's a moment where they are jumping out of an airplane. A character gets struck by lightning and funny in this amass the lost bear market. And as well as the greatest movie memories ever had because it was just this collaborative woman just happened. And those are the best. That's amazing. That's so good well, even though we have just learned that the ten release has been delayed indefinitely, I hope cautiously optimistic that that will. That will have that again someday soon, ish. I hope so too. And in the meantime there are things to watch at home They might not be the things that we were excited about several months ago. but there are things to watch at home, and after this kind of summer movie season is over frankly studios graft figure out what to do with their Oscar contents, and I would not be surprised if a lot of them just get released straight to streaming so that they can qualify for the Oscars this year. Wow, the Oscars, which have officially been postponed right, yes, the Oscars have officially been postponed, and they've also changed their rules, so that movies that are released to streaming can qualify which is a. Huge concession on their part Isis County will change the back afterwards, but it's been a big fight in Hollywood as to whether streaming movies can count for the Oscars in hopes of saving the movie theater, going experience, and so now streaming movies will qualify and I think that's going to change the calculus for a lot of studios that aren't necessarily trying to make big money movies that they are trying to win awards. Interesting

Hollywood Christopher Nolan Netflix Oscars James Bond Eliana Dr Men Palm Springs Shirley MAC Judd Spike Lee Sundance Google Oscar Susan Basketball Amax
'Palm Springs' Romantic Comedy Is A Total Winner For The Lockdown Era

Fresh Air

05:30 min | 3 weeks ago

'Palm Springs' Romantic Comedy Is A Total Winner For The Lockdown Era

"Are film critic Justin. Chang says it could be an especially good time to watch palm springs, a romantic comedy about two people forced to repeat the same day. Over and over again it stars Andy Sandberg, and Kristen, Milly Odi it streaming on Hulu and playing in some drive in theaters around the country. Palm Springs a hot ticket at this year's Sundance Film Festival one of the last public events to take place before the movie industry shutdown. I didn't see it there, but having caught up with it months later at home I can't help but feel as though this breezily entertaining movie. Please a little differently in the era of covid nineteen. It's a comedy. About is the LATIAN repetition which might not sound too appealing at a time when many of us are also leading lives of isolation and repetition. But don't let that dissuade you. This first feature directed by Max barbeque cow, and written by Andy Sierra turns out to be a total winner, Sharp, funny, and even profound in a sneakily offhand way. The story is a riff on that Herald Ramos Classic Groundhog Day in which Bill Murray had to keep replaying the same day until he learned to become a selfless person, but palm springs is trying to push that message. It knows that just getting through life with your dignity intact can be hard enough. That's certainly true for Sarah played by Kristen me not who's serving as maid of honor in her sister's wedding in the California desert town of Palm Springs. S Sarah Drinks too much and stumbles her way through the reception. She finds herself intrigued by one of the Guests Niles played by Andy, Sandberg. Niles is kind of a goofball, but also manages to work the room with disarming ease. It's almost as if he's been through this event before and knows everything that's going to happen. Sarah finds out why when she follows him that night into a mysterious cave out in the desert. Within seconds she's waking up the next morning only to find that. It's actually the same morning as before the morning of the wedding. Time has reset itself. In a panic Sarah Trucks Down Niles at the hotel where they're staying. He explains that when she entered the cave, she made a big mistake because he followed me. What's going on? I tried to stop. But, what is this? When is this? Yeah. About that so. This is today. Today is yesterday and tomorrow is also today. It's one of. Infinite time loop situations you might have heard about. That I might have heard about. There's been a lot of those infinite time loop situations in recent movies and TV. Some of them excellent like the Tom. Cruise Action Thriller Edge of tomorrow in the NETFLIX's mystery series. Russian doll. The pop savvy makers of Palm Springs clearly no those stories and suspect that you might know them to. As a result, they're able to jettison a lot of the usual exposition about how this world works and simply cut to the chase. Sarah is eager to bust out of the time loop but Niles. WHO's been stuck here for ages tries to dissuade her. Virtuous acts won't work. Suicide won't work although that doesn't Stop Sarah driving straight into the path of an oncoming truck just to see what happens. Eventually Niles persuades her to stop fighting the space time continuum, and just enjoy their time together, and so she does with the threat of permanent removed. These two misfits are suddenly free to embrace the craziness of every moment. Sometimes, they blow off the wedding to go on long desert drives and hang out in bars. Sometimes they stick around for the wedding, so they can play tricks on the guests. WHO WON'T REMEMBER ANYTHING ANYWAY? The guests are played by fine actors. Including Peter Gallagher June squibb and Meredith Hagner. J. K. Simmons also gives a terrific wildcard performance as a guy who POPs up at the wedding on Sundays, but not others for reasons that the story will soon make amusingly clear. As fiendishly clever, as it is on the surface, palm springs has a pretty straightforward takeaway, since life can sometimes be pointless and tedious whether you're stuck in a time loop or not, you might as well spend it with someone you love. It's pretty good advice. Even Still Sarah doesn't know how much longer she can stand being trapped in this desert purgatory, especially since Niles seem so lazily resigned as fate. I won't give away whether they succeed in escaping or not I will say that the movie doesn't entirely avoid a tired gender dynamic in which a smart determined woman has to expend a lot of emotional and mental energy, and just to get her boyfriend to WanNa move forward. But I love the way the actors conspired subvert that Dynamic Sandberg isn't that's Hilarious as he was in the Music Biz? Satire pop star never stopped never stopping, but he does have the whole. Doofus slacker routine down Pat. But, he's eclipsed by Milly Ot, a versatile performer who won a grammy for the Broadway musical once, and who can turn from madcap comedy to breathtaking emotion on a dime. I'd watch her. Any Day. Justin Chang is a film critic at the L. A. Times.

Sarah Drinks Palm Springs Niles Dynamic Sandberg Justin Chang Andy Sierra Kristen Hulu Netflix Grammy Bill Murray J. K. Simmons California Herald Ramos L. A. Times PAT Sharp Peter Gallagher June Squibb
Documentarian Cristina Costantini

Latina to Latina

05:18 min | Last month

Documentarian Cristina Costantini

"Your, First Film Science Fair at Sundance Wins Big award. The audience loves it. What did you learn from that first foray into directing? It's a lot more fun than investigative journalism I would say No, but I think I learned kind of the power of a hopeful story. I think hope and love. Are you know in short supply right now? And these kinds of stories can really change the way people think of the world and think of themselves, and so Walter came out of that in a way. I was looking for another story. That was also from my childhood. You know I started thinking what other worlds do I know really well. Not Everybody knows what other worlds made me feel warm and fuzzy as a kid and I think Walter Metadata was part of that. World for me, I grew up watching him every day as a kid with my grandmother and you know, he reminds me of my grandmother in many ways. He's the same age as my grandma there they have the same Hairdo, and so I started to wonder whatever happened to him, and you know in many ways he was he is. He was one hundred years ahead of his time. The first person I've ever seen that was gender queer. What we'd call now. It's just inspirational looking back. It's like. Could you were doing that at that time? You know nineteen forty in Puerto, Rico. You were being Walter McCullough. It's it's. Really. Inspirational so that's when I set out to find him. You set out to find out. What does that mean? So I started asking around univision and fusion and. Nano actually told me not Avila told me that there's a producer new. Who's also obsessed with Walter? Who you should talk to about this? Maybe he knows something so I called Alex, and he's like this is the weirdest thing I have. Another director who I'm supposed to talk to in ten minutes about doing a documentary about Alternate Telo, and I was like who is this person and his name is creamy taps, and he directed a film called. Dolphin, lover, which was a big fan of it's about a man who falls in love with Dolphin in the Florida like seaworld. And I had loved that film and I was like Oh amazing. I can't I mean I would love to talk to him. And we decided basically a ten minutes later on a phone call that we would all do the project together and yeah. It's been incredible experience Kareem track down. The niece of Walter through an estate sale, and then set up a phone call with Walter and it was. Yeah it was after the suit was. It was really insane to talk to. Walter Mark on the phone for the first time, and he said yes. Well that unprecedented access is notable because he is an has always been intensely private. So, how did you three persuade him to allow you to make the film? We rehearsed for that first conversation for hours and hours. What are the possible questions you could ask us? How would we answer it? You know what is what? What's the best angle on all of his questions? And we got on the phone, and he said Okay I. Have One question for you and we were like Mrs it. It's GonNa be really hard, and he's like. What are your astrological signs and so he went around. And like I'm a libra careens libra and Alex's deteriorates, and he said okay. That's great sounds good. I would love to do this film with you, so he was. He was in like in in from day one. He was psyched, but his idea of a documentary realized very quickly was very different from our idea he wanted. He was in front of a lens for fifty years. He was the most cameras trained person you can imagine. It's truly insane, and he has fifty years of rehearsed answers. He knows what he's going to say. To every question, you could ask him, and so it was really a process of spending a lot of time with him. At first, he thought this was going to. Just you know he was going. Going to be in full makeup and just telling the stories he always tells and I think it took a lot of time to explain to him that this might be different that this is you know we wanna see who you actually are without your makeup. What you do in your normal life and talking about bad stuff, particularly offensive to him. He did not want to talk about anything bad. You and that is the story of his life. You know he a lot goes wrong. He loses everything and even to get him to talk about. That was very difficult, so that was a big stumbling block for us in the first. Twenty interviews that we did with them so We've probably chat with him for like thirty five or forty days, and whenever we the cameras on kind of turned into an interview I remember. We told him once that we just wanted to. What he? What would he be doing if we weren't here? And he said reading a book, so he opened a book, and he started reading it, but he it was like onstage. He's A. He's a strained theater. Actor says like stage reading, or he was like having a conversation with a bunch was reading with his is.

Walter Alex Walter Mark Walter Mccullough Walter Metadata Univision Kareem Florida Director Nano Producer Avila
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The Indy Mogul Podcast

00:30 sec | Last month

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"But I was able to live on that and wait for the next right project, and that will end up being fishing without nets, which won the directing award at Sundance, Somali pirates maybe And That was that felt like the next right step for me? That felt like something was GonNa Really Push me take. The things are learn with Michelle. an an would go the filmmaker who really was.

Sundance Michelle.
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The Indy Mogul Podcast

00:28 sec | Last month

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"I was able to live on that and wait for the next right project, and that will end up being fishing without nets, which won the directing award at Sundance, Somali pirates maybe And That was that felt like the next right step for me? That felt like something was GonNa Really Push me take. The things are learn with Michelle. an an would go the filmmaker who really was.

Sundance Michelle.
'First petri dish': Sundance film festival may have been Covid-19 incubator

Coronavirus Daily Briefing

01:30 min | 3 months ago

'First petri dish': Sundance film festival may have been Covid-19 incubator

"Was the Sundance Film Festival. A First Petri dish of corona virus in the states a swath of one hundred twenty thousand attendees apparently suffered harsh flu like symptoms during the festival in January. This is from the Hollywood reporter. Two days after patient. Zero was identified in Washington. The festival kicked off few. If any in park city were thinking of the corona virus. The Hollywood reporter spoke with more than a dozen people with similar stories. Some asked to remain anonymous including one writer in three of his friends. Who all quote got the same mysterious sickness a little different for each of us but always quite intense nearly all new of others whose cases were comparable to. There's one actor best known for his role in a major studio tentpole was gravely ill and members of his team also succumbed. He declined to speak on the record. The blacklist founder Franklin Leonard. A Sundance regular says. He began feeling sick on Tuesday January. Twenty eighth the day. He flew from Salt Lake City back to Los Angeles quote with a sore throat and by Wednesday. I was barely functional. He says I was sick. As I've ever been for two weeks only really felt one hundred percent by the weekend of the Oscars. He knew of at least two people who left the festival early because they were sick including a lawyer Dean. Heart a microbiologist and expert in virus transmission says. There's a good chance. Corona virus did indeed sweep through park city during the run of the festival. Given that the Wuhan locked down began January twenty third the same day. Sundance

Franklin Leonard Sundance Reporter Hollywood Salt Lake City Wuhan Washington Writer Founder Los Angeles
They Call Us Andrew Ahn

They Call Us Bruce

06:58 min | 3 months ago

They Call Us Andrew Ahn

"We talk a little bit about what I heard that? Your Dad said in response to you coming out. Which was as I understand it. Something along the lines of okay. We get it but keep an open mind. Yeah it's it's a thing you know like I have to say like my dad has really My Dad's really Like grown and you know he said that which you know again like I kind of as as good as I could have hoped for but You know now. Like he's he's he's really you know like proud of me and happy for me and my career you know. I will say that like I wonder what this would have been like had. I not gotten into Sundance. You know with that film like know if the film sucks you know. Maybe like this wouldn't have gone over as well But you know it's they I think they were just kind of Shocked and I think they were also just like shocked by like how I did it. You know that I didn't just say like I'm gay like that. I made this fill like you know at one point during that conversation my mom said like. Did you make this film just to like do this to say that you're gay and I said Yeah. And my mom was like she just shook her head and she said. You really didn't have to do that. And you know I think Yeah I I just I think they were kind of just so in shock that it. It took them a a moment. But I will say like now like You know it's been a little bit up and down but You know I really feel their support and their excitement for me In my career the other story I really like is Is You explaining to Your Jeff? You'll appreciate this. The the explain to your dad. The how the odds of getting into Sundance. How like like a big deal. It was. Yeah so I I called my parents like immediately after I found out that I got into Sundance and And like my dad had kind of heard about it but he didn't really know what met in the way that like. I know what like what that meant for me in my career And so I. I told my parents I was like It's easier to get into Harvard than it is to get into sundance and suddenly they're like. Oh my God like like. My mom had reached out to the Korean newspaper. You know it's it's things like that Yeah you know it's so funny it's like Like I think they were probably still a little bit like worried about like me coming out in you know being so public about my sexuality but You know the fact that it was like an achievement. You know like like a good grade like getting into a good school like that. I think that made it a little bit easier. Which is terrible but like I'll take it like you know I I needed. I needed that win at that time in my life. It's like basically like getting into Super Harvard. It's movie Harvard. Exactly that's that's the only way they could get you know so that was your your first short and kind of your first taste of People being aware of you as a filmmaker and then from there did you. Did you immediately do spun? I was it? Was it the the next big project you did or was there was something between that. Yeah I mean you know after I I graduated from From Film School You know and a couple months later like played my thesis film at Sundance It really took me You know a couple years to to get a feature going to get spun it going and You know in the in the meantime I was a you. Know a applying to labs and workshops and you know fellowships things like that But I had a day job. You know like I was working as an admissions counselor for college You know I I ended up Like working at a Like a private Like Sat Academy in San Gabriel Like torturing these high school students you know like with the same torture that I had in high school and so I just you know you do have credentials of getting into the Harvard filibuster. It was just like you know it. Was this time in my life. Where I you know it's like I. I had to to pay the bills and films weren't going to do that and so You know I I had a day job. Had A desk job and and doing that was you. Know like actually like really Helpful for me and I feel like I learned a lot about myself about you. Know my just kind of my interpersonal skills. but You know I wanted to make films. I wanted to be a filmmaker and so I I had my i. You know On on the prize the all time and and Made Spun I. Finally you know four years after graduating from film school and then I just was like I gotta get this thing into the best film festival that I can you know. Let's let's go for the Harvard to film. Schools are a of Peissel's again and see if I can get into Sundance and you know we we. We got in and And I quit my job because I felt like if there were ever a moment to to do this. You know to really commit to being a filmmaker who's going to be now I. I often think about spun night because It was I remember I was at the premiere at Sundance. It was such a moving experience It really hit close to home in a lot of ways as a korean-american is the son of Immigrants Green immigrants but I also I also think about what a minor miracle it was. That film even exists on every level in terms of like it being like almost entirely in Korean. It's it's an American story but like it you know it's it's also coming of age gay drama and then also it's about like these sort of illicit hookups in you know in these Korean spas and you're like okay. The marketing for this is going to be very very delicate.

Sundance Like Sat Academy Harvard From Film School Jeff Peissel San Gabriel
World's biggest film festivals unite for 10-day global streaming event

Red Eye Radio

00:22 sec | 3 months ago

World's biggest film festivals unite for 10-day global streaming event

"To the moon festivals worldwide are teaming up to launch we are one a global Film Festival which will play out over ten days and be available free on YouTube readers include the tribeca Film Festival Cannes Film Festival and Sundance festivals have experimented with virtual additions meanwhile Amazon prime is currently hosting a modest online version of south by

Cannes Youtube Amazon
Nolan #3 - Insomnia / Blow the Man Down / True History of the Kelly Gang

Filmspotting

09:42 min | 3 months ago

Nolan #3 - Insomnia / Blow the Man Down / True History of the Kelly Gang

"From Chicago. This is film spotting. I'm Adam Kanner and I'm Josh. Larsen can't be easy to keep working after three days. No sleep to keep focus. You're seeing things yet. Cause little flashes tricks alight that's Robin Williams with Al Pacino in Christopher Nolan's insomnia from two thousand and two as the follow up to his mind. Bending breakout hit. Memento insomnia struck some at the time as a frustratingly straightforward thriller. This week we continue our Nolan who've review with a fresh look plus we'll have thoughts on three new releases all available online more. Can I get up Pacino ahead? Unfilled SPOTTING Welcome to film spotting Josh. The theaters are closed. But the movies keep coming at least if you know where to look this week. We've got reviews of three new releases. Include ONE. That's definitely a golden brick. Were the debut. That's the cozy noir thriller. Blow the man down a feature debut set in Downey's main and the down under set the true history of the Kelly gang from director. Justin Kurt Sel and the high school set Sela and the spades one. You caught up with Josh Ross. Going to continue our Christopher Nolan who've review with two thousand? Two's insomnia the black sheep. Maybe of the Nolan filmography. We'll see if it does deserve that reputation later in the show first though let's talk some new movies for a change including that Australian import true history of the Kelly gang mother soldier pan. You cost me you. Can that back a child? It is already traveling. Full tilt toward the men are would become. That's from the trailer for True History of the Kelly gang which is available to rent ondemand this weekend. The director is Justin Kerr. Zal who previously made twenty eleven the snow town murders than in two thousand fifteen. He did Macbeth. Which starred Michael Faster and Marion Cotillard? All three of them re teamed for two thousand sixteen assassin's creed now. Kelly gang is set in colonial Australia. Where Kelly and his group of anarchists violently rebel against their British rulers nineteen. Seventeen George MCI plays Ned Kelly. The film also stars Russell. Crowe Nicholas Holt Thomasson. Mackenzie and Charlie Hunnam so strong. Cast their Adam. You're able to get an early look at this one before. It's on demand release. Did the cast live up to. Its Promise House the film in general some of it definitely did in terms of the cast. This is actually my first. Kerr Zal film. Haven't seen any of the other three that you mentioned despite the fact that Michael Fast Bender has been in those two that you mentioned and I'm always down for Good Shakespeare Adaptation. I can't compare obviously this film the Kelly Gang to his adaptation of Macbeth specifically but there is a lot of the Scottish play in his telling of Ned Kelly. Se Davis from our beloved. The Baba Duke plays his mother in this film and she is not someone to cross. She's domineering she's vengeful. It's born from years of oppression as a woman and as an Irish woman living under English rule in Australia. You hear her in the trailer. Seda a young Ned. You're a man. Now you go out and show the world. This isn't a gentle mother's encouragement. It's an order and like Macbeth himself. As ned gets closer to his fate the matter he gets and that unhinged hallucinatory spirit is. What colonel taps into visually think about the late nineteenth century? We get in. John Hill coats the proposition as a counterpoint. This is not that at all. This is realism clashing with fantasy to the point where there are times in certain sequences and shots. Josh especially a recurring motif of a man riding a horse. That feels more like more door than the Bush way outside Melbourne. And so I've dropped Macbeth. I've dropped Lord of the rings throw in the assassination of Jesse James by the Coward. Robert Ford and the pop aesthetic of Sofia Coppola's Marie Antoinette. Except with punk instead and you get some sense of what watching the true history of the Kelly. Gang is really like which may sound really amazing to you and other people. Yeah I'm I'm hooked so far. Yeah it's definitely a lot and honestly it was a little bit too much for me. Wants so much to be this fiery sneer. That doesn't conform do conventional biography and it's full of these big ideas about colonialism and storytelling and masculinity and challenging gender and sexual norms. The gang the Kelly gang actually wears dresses for me. It's just all too much of a performance of assault to really embrace and actually MCI is part of it. He's a really intriguing presence and has an unsettling physicality that he definitely brings to this role. A presence was kind of all he was in nineteen seventeen. That's kind of by the design of that film and I haven't read anything about his performance but I wouldn't be shocked to learn that he went really method here that he he went so deep. And as I said there's there's an intensity to it there's a real physicality to it but he's burrowed so deep into it. So deep into Ned Kelly psyche that he never emerges for me and I can appreciate the audacity of what Kerr's doing here and his. I our first shot of young. Ned actually is him peering through a slit in his makeshift home while his mother is engaged in a sex act with a paying customer. That's a British officer played by Hunnam and then later at the end it is big showdown with authorities. He's wearing iron over his head for protection. With the sliver is is that matches that exact same point of view so crucial knows what he's doing absolutely and he does have a really game cast Russell. Crowe shows up for a little bit in this movie. And there's a lot of fun as outlaw. Who Basically pays for? He buys a young Ned as an indentured servant to teach him the trade. And I really like Nicholas Holt. In this movie. He shows up maybe about midway through as a really charming despicable and entitled English constable. Who BEFRIENDS NED in the family? Until the family decides that they're not going to subjugate themselves to him like he expects everyone to do so some juicy fund performances here and crystals definitely doing allot as I said in terms of the filmmaking sounds like there might even be a little bit of animal kingdom in there too with the mother son Dynamic and of course the Australians setting so I. I'm intrigued by those comparisons. We'll we'll have to see if the catch up with if it works a little bit better for me. The True History of the Kelly gang is available to rent on demand right. Now the new one you caught up with Josh is called Sela and the spades the directing debut of Theresa Poh. It had its debut back in January at Sundance and it came to Amazon prime. This past weekend in your letterbox review you wrote any movie that mixes the DNA of mean girls. Brick and schooldays has my attention. We're all over the place with our references in this show so far. Tell me more. Yeah this this could be a lazy short and in some ways doing this exercise. But I think it's it is really helpful in this case because those are great films with distinct styles each trying to do something that maybe you hadn't quite seen before done in that way and mixing it all together is really exciting. That also puts a ton of pressure on a relatively small film like Sela and the spades and so I don't know if it's the sort of pressure this movie can entirely bare but I like that. All of these elements are in here that the basic scenario is selling. The speights takes place at an elite boarding school and we follow the illicit dealings and also the the relationships among various student factions there called and each of these factions. They're essentially like criminal gangs. So Sela played by Lovey Simone. She runs the drug-dealing spades. And you know there are maybe some Macbeth Lady Macbeth specifically comparisons to make here in her ambition and the way she holds grip on power. She does take an underclassmen under her wing. But as we come to learn you know it may not be the most altruistic reasons that underclassmen played by Celeste O'Connor now both of those performances are really strong by Simone and O'Connor There are some good supporting turns to. I could see this being one of those smaller. First films where two or three of the actors in them and this happened with mean girls as well right pop up in later films and you really see what what great talents. They have their There's also the whole criminal element calls on brick of course that this is going on among high schoolers beneath the adults is. It's kind of amazing. How little the adults have to play in in this world And then there are some really striking flourishes by PLO as director. And here's where some of the the school days Spike Lee school days comparisons come in because Sela is also the head of the spirit squad for the school and they have a direct address to the camera routine just about what. It's like to be a seventeen year old

Kelly Gang NED Josh Ross Christopher Nolan Macbeth Sela Director Kerr Zal Adam Kanner Crowe Nicholas Holt Thomasson Australia Justin Kerr Insomnia Charlie Hunnam Al Pacino Larsen Robin Williams Chicago Justin Kurt Sel Jesse James
Making of a CRISPR Film: Behind the Scenes with Producers of Human Nature

CRISPR Cuts

09:19 min | 3 months ago

Making of a CRISPR Film: Behind the Scenes with Producers of Human Nature

"Highly one. Welcome to crisper cuts. I'm super excited about today's episode because today via celebrities on our show yesterday said I goodwin Elliott Kirschner their producers of the human nature. Movie for those of you. Who Don't know what this movie is about. It basically covers jody of crispell onto joining us today on. This show is given Holden head of science at San Diego. So this is GonNa be a great episode all adjoining Menu Today on the Chris Cast so as me as well food we get started. Can you just introduce yourself and give your background before you became producers of this movie? My name is Sara Goodwin producer at Pfizer. My background action is in Science. I teach the UCS and the I turned into a science communicator. Joining and leading an organization about project called I biology which has an initiative area cocoa butter collaborates at produced. This felt and so that's how I got. Involved Elliott leaks elected project to it which is great blog. Si- thank you. I'm Elliot Kirschner. So I came to this project after many years working in news and documentary film back shake round side poverty the scientists but I really sort of more general reporting but it was always interested in telling the stories of science while find ways those little bobble and interesting ways that could challenge conventional wisdom's sites. Could be and so. We were looking for a topic to really make a big film to just tell an important story in ways that we would be different end. Hopefully engage audiences in new ways. And so I've secret spurs such huge story touches almost every aspect of the biomedical sciences but also exchanging meaning Dmitri society all that so when we decided on this topic we really washed and built a team of filmmakers and scientists together to make a documentary. That sounds great. So basically you kind of briefly mentioned how the idea of doing a film on crisper about but still there seems to be a lot that needs to be figured out. Even you know what basic topic you're going far. So can you tell us a little bit about behind the scenes of how you decided you know right right makes off researchers and patients and how the story would flow and not just make it like a scientific presentation but more like a movie by itself that we knew going in we want it to be so and we know it to be a story that would appeal to a general audience so that was the directive from the very beginning. We didn't WANNA make quote unquote educational video. We also wanted to make something that felt cinematic. I mean there's a wonderful rich history. A science explainer television that kind of stuff that people any think tank stock entries the short length of one hour television affair with a heavy raider voice. That kind of thing as well. That wanted to do something that would play on a big screen. That would make the decision. We didn't want it narrator. We wanted to let the scientists speak for themselves. Who wanted to film this with a cinematic spoke? Mind musical score all that we WANNA make a film so that was sort of the original directive that we give to ourselves once we got there. The question was okay. What is a science film there if you go to sundance or we premiered at South by southwest or the major some festivals. It's not like there's a lot of science programming a lot of science documentary and so we sort of had a lot of leeway. What is modern science stone-built look like but that's when the decision making came in about what the style would be. But as for the substance we also knew we wanted to work with the very beginning to sort of develop a story line or story lines that were true to the Science. Not only the facts of the science but the ethos of science idea. What is scientific discovery? How how did serendipity and the search for knowledge or basic research play into the story and then what are. These are more broader societal issues so those are all pieces together but I think one of the key things early on we had a meeting at woods hole. Report the film team. And we brought in George Church George Staley Jennifer Dowd Or All your own rights leaders in this field and we just had the two days of brainstorming about what they thought the story was and where they thought the scientists building and that really sort of helped direct the editorial in obviously Sarah being trained scientists being on this very beginning really helped shape bet as iterative throughout the process and this this film many many different forms over the course of its production as we try to tease out what science metric would be. And I'd say one thing that was really. It's worked to us from the beginning to make sure we told the story of the discovery of crisper and turning crisper to technology which is a story. That's off the told when crisper is talked about because it's actually a fascinating basic science research story of we really wanted to show. Elliot said you know how the process of sites works. How knowledge is created. And so as a scientist you know is able to really go back to the literature. I read you know as much primary literature as I could around the crisper discovery. And he's together as best they could also used reviews that were out there. This summit really helped a lot but it really helped us kind of have a deep understanding of the steps that it took to really understand what crisper was and decide who we wanted to interview might actually ended up interviewing or people than even made it into the cell because they were hardest story. But you know at the end of the day we wanted to have a film that was around ninety minutes of you. Just can't include everything that you want to. And so that was interesting viewpoint. Make us a kind of behind the scenes. Look when we were editing as to what should be in on should be out especially for me coming more from the science side of things which dirt's look really vital to have Sarah's voice project I think that was one of the real unique elements that we we built into the production framework in that throughout the discussion of who'd interview with talk about what's the balanced bill. There was constant discussion between still making team and science group that were just challenging our own assumptions pushing in different ways and I think that dynamic process really led to its own that is it relates that scientists in a way that it's not just about what we say on exerts absolutely right. We tried to all the Discovery Story. But just the way the scientists are allowed to speak the decisions made about what to include what not to include. I mean this was really dictated throughout by I think very nuanced understanding of how science works and I think that that hopefully shines through that when scientists watch at the dotted understand world and. I think that that is is really important to try to convey in film the impression of Palestine Science work as well as the actual facts over trying to convey right. Yeah absolutely does shine through. I love the myself so they can thank you. I just wanted to ask you guys. So I'm sorry. You mentioned some of the people that you interviewed for the film curious. Do you have any particular anecdotes funny or like most surprising moments came out through so making process in the interviews. People talk about a great question. I mean I'd say the first thing that comes to mind is actually what a treat it was to be Cisco he goes. Who's early crisper researcher at the University Valid? Kante got to go to Spain and meet him and be in his lab and he showed us a lot of Israeli shells. Found THE REPEATS. A very special time to be serving. Someone who usually isn't spoken about when Christopher is talked about but in general like say what was a real treat for me as a scientist is a lot of the people he's interviewed. I L about their science at baby. Give a research talk. But I've never really got to hear them talk about kind of the more ethical. Societal implications of the crisper work and Atta did most interviewing I think did a wonderful job really probing people trying to get you know. They're on his thoughts on something as science discovery. That is really going to have an impact in so many different ways throughout the world to end the scientists were really wonderful in be sharing their thoughts with us. I think you know included a lot of that on. I think makes a lot richer because it shows how scientists are people to beat other families. They have a lot of thoughts about how science works and technology is used and it was really nice to be able to hear a lot of that and then of course you know getting these really wonderful. I mean so make it of course offered was a key researcher for comment DNA. Which is the topic we cut off. But you were going to go much forgotten. Just cut it Due to time and really trying to make the story as clear as possible but he's just just a wonderful person and getting to meet him was just a really special

Scientist Goodwin Elliott Kirschner Elliot Kirschner Palestine Science Researcher San Diego Sarah Sara Goodwin Pfizer Chris Cast Holden Producer Woods Hole George Staley Jennifer Dowd Dmitri Atta Spain Kante Cisco Christopher
Movie Theaters Are Still (Mostly) Open, But That Won’t Last

The Frame

06:03 min | 5 months ago

Movie Theaters Are Still (Mostly) Open, But That Won’t Last

"It's been a devastating week for the entertainment industry as Kovic Nineteen forces to cancellation of public gatherings. All over the world. Movie theaters are struggling to cope with two major factors declining attendance and delayed film releases from Motion Picture Studios theaters around the globe have closed but major change like AMC and cinemark have not yet decided to close up shop here in the US. Here's John Horns discussion with senior film writer at Variety Matt. Donnelly one that we've been reporting on depicted but theaters will close regionally not a blanket. You know all the movie theaters in the country represented by trade group called NATO But we imagined that they'll they'll try to close out in pockets of the slow wave to get as much you know revenue as they can. Nato is the National Association of Theatre Owners and just a couple of days ago. They cancelled their annual convention which was scheduled for the end of the month in Las Vegas. The other factor is that a lot of major releases are being pulled from the calendar. Disney has pulled. Moulin the new James Bond Movies. Nocco come out the next fast and furious sequel. Fast Nine has moved to next year. There are a number of other movies that have been placed on hold. What kind of problems does that create for those theaters that remain open because it seems like a lot of the tentpole movies aren't going to get released? Yes the great question. I mean it doesn't incentivize an audience to brave public faces when you don't have really premium and exciting new films to show them and also let's talk about just the agrees Spending on marketing studios have already completed to promote rely on and stuff nine. They're looking at hundreds and millions of and across the board for movies that aren't going to hit theaters for another year or so. If movie theaters are considered dangerous or if they're actually closed might companies like Disney and. Maybe it's not move on. Maybe it's another movie down the line just get released on Disney plus or an equivalent streaming service. Do you think that is part of the potential conversation going forward I can tell you confidently that over the past month or so of all been you know? They won't dare speak out loud The strategy of going directly to digital. But don't forget that a lot of companies are publicly traded so they have an onus to create value for general that. They can't get their movie theaters. They might be obliged to release them through streaming for higher price point or just to incentivize customers to stay but yeah. I think absolutely this is the reason to To look at sort of Shattering will be called the traditional theatrical window. Which is where movie theaters get ninety days or exclusivity with all the movies that come out and then they moved down two places like streaming and on demand. I think he could absolutely see some of the mid range films. You take something like marbled new mutants which is Sort of young adults giving property. I don't think that anyone to expand that to blow minds in the movie theater. They could easily put that directly on Hulu wish neons and and see up taking subscribers just before we got on the phone. I looked at the stock of cinema world which runs Regal United Artists and Edwards Theatres. Its stock is down. Almost eighty percent in the last month compared to the overall market dropping about twenty-five percent cinemark another major chain has seen its stock dropped almost sixty percent and at the same time. Netflix is down just seventeen percent which is better than the overall market so it feels like Wall Street sentiment on the at least short term potential for exhibition is really grim and at the same time. A lot of movies in production are shutting down as well and that won't be felt for months if not a year down the line. Is that going to be a factor as well not just for exhibition but for streaming services? Yeah I mean we. We've been having conversations about e even take the last round of of film festivals that went up. Jones going distribution all the time to to places like Toronto telluride Sundance. I think the OC a spike in sales of those finished movies But they can put up on services today but in terms of original production places like netflix. Amazon impact will be dramatic. Episodes opened a brand new six down stage facility in New Mexico where they intended to shoot the stranger things that will be delayed. You're talking about like theory of Marquis Properties in the stream or so. I think there will be a bit of a shock to either licensed beloved prize old content to put on or a scramble to fine finish work. They can put up in the near term. It does feel like some smaller exhibition chains are trying to come up with creative solutions. Alamo Draft House said that it in its San Francisco Theatre. It's doing something where no more than two hundred people can be in the theater and it's GonNa ask people to kind of separate themselves from one another. It feels like an interesting idea. I don't know how sustainable it is. Are you hearing other things like that where people can buy seats and maybe block off the seats around them or is it just whatever you find when you get into the auditorium? I think you'll find a lot of people finding creative solutions to enjoy the game. But I think at the end of the day there's so much option And there's just such a volume of content. You can watch at home so I think it's just more about separating the the brave from those would rather stop by Saly and you and I cover the movie business. I haven't been in a theatre at least a week and a half. How are people who cover movies? Seen movies are a lot of people now watching films on their laptops as opposed to going to screenings or theaters absolutely You know I went to a screening of a short film that one of the talent agency last week and of Savonarola Laura dern who just gave everybody an elbow bump to say hello and handshake so I think people are increasingly quite. Get us about Coming together so they do a lot more digital screeners for for industry professionals. Another interesting note As of last night The South by Southwest Film Festival organized. A last minute of sort of virtual festival with an online screening library to try to give some of those Indians. That didn't get to play a chance to get in front of accredited president. Chris I think is really cool and also what kind of solution that keeps everybody

Nato Disney Cinemark Netflix United States Donnelly Motion Picture Studios Las Vegas John Horns AMC Writer Savonarola Laura Nocco New Mexico Hulu Moulin Regal United Artists Marquis Properties President Trump
Overconfidence: The Icarus Paradox

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

09:49 min | 5 months ago

Overconfidence: The Icarus Paradox

"Hey welcome to stuff to blow your mind. My name is Robert Lamb. And I'm Joe McCormick and we're back with part two of our discussion of overconfidence. That's right If you did not listen to the previous episode do go back and listen to that episode. Because we're GONNA lay the groundwork we're going to discuss overconfidence. Hubris and mythology in human histories. And then get into the psychology of it and what various psychological studies have revealed and continue to reveal about the nature of overconfidence. And how we can. Divide this sort of amorphous concept of overconfidence out into categories that can be more easily studied and understood. That's right now in the last episode one of the main things we talked about was this huge new review of the scientific literature on something known as the better than average effect. Which is the tendency for people to rate themselves as better than average with respect to their peers on all kinds of stuff One classic example is that something like ninety. Three percent of people think they are a better than average driver. And so if you're if you're listening to this as you drive is back on the road and make sure you use the turn signals principle. Stay save lives turn signals. Let other drivers and the districts. No what you intend to do. Even if you think you're a great driver drive like your less good than you are and it will make you a better driver drive like you can't see all the other cars and around you because sometimes you cannot drive like you're driving a murder weapon because potentially you are. It's quite true. Are Now one of the things we talked about it in the last episode was A paper from two thousand seventeen by dawn Amorin Derek. Shots called the three faces of overconfidence which Which actually broke. Overconfidence down into three distinct categories of of bias or misperception and And we talked about those a little bit last time. We're going to be exploring more of what that paper had to say. And it's critiques of overconfidence. Research specifically with reference. To these three types of overconfidence and has a brief refresher. The three types are overestimation over placement and over precision overestimation is thinking that you're better than you are and this would be with reference to some kind of You know objective measure out in the world so if you think you are taller than you are if you think that you can jump higher than you can if you think that you would get a better score on a test than you actually could. That's overestimation the next one over placement is similar but instead it's comparing yourself with other people so the better than average effect would be an example of over placement. It's you know thinking you are better than average compared to your peers at some task or it would be thinking that you know that you work harder than other people or thinking that you are smarter than other people of course with the. If it's overconfidence. Meaning that those are not actually accurate assessments and then finally the other one would be over precision which is being too sure that you know the truth Again this this might be called EPIs- stomach over-confidence it's just being too certain that your beliefs are correct now to get into more and chances paper from two thousand seventeen one of the questions that they address. What actually drives some of these different Effects as as they are manifested so they they start with overestimation what causes us to say think we would get a better score on a test to than we do or to think we have more money in the bank than we do a common answer that people give to this is the idea of wishful thinking. It would feel good if this were true. Therefore I believe it right the authors don't think that this Explanation is very plausible and they offer several problems with it and we can interrogate these. Maybe disagree with them as we go on but first of all they say you know self delusion is demonstrably maladaptive for example a tendency toward wishful thinking about the safety of kissing sharks. So with tongue is is not a trait that the environment will tend to select for people overconfident about their academic abilities. We'll tend not to study and actually do worse people who believe themselves invulnerable. We'll take risks that sometimes get them killed. This might seem obvious but there is actually plenty of research on this. I mean people who are over confident about their abilities. Do face a lot of downsides when those abilities are put to the test right. Yeah I mean one example from literature that comes to mind is that of Macbeth who believes himself protected by prophecy? And of course snuffs it exactly but then again I think okay so it is true that these people will face a Lotta downside but then again people do engage in self destructive self deluded behavior all the time. This is a common feature of human life. Yeah I mean for instance. We were just recently talking about Sepo Affect Our our movie episode. We're talking about the fly and a about the possibility that the placebo effect is is basically due to You know this innate tendency toward self delusion that may very. Well be adaptive in at least in this scenario where yeah we we benefit from being able to believe something is going to work and And experiencing at least a small physical benefit from it like a small cured of benefit from it. And then you know I also can't help but think that you know self-delusion entails far more than just over-confidence it also entails. All manner of paranoia and there is a strong case for the adaptive nature of say making type one error in cognition a false positive the belief that the Russell in the tall grass is that of a tiger. When it's not because of you make the type to air. You're more likely to be eaten by the Tiger. Right right yeah. Having accurate information about the world is actually very useful and having inaccurate information can kill you. Yeah but but I'm not so much you know trying to disagree with the maladaptive Self-delusion argument That we mentioned earlier but but rather you know to point out. The human experiences is rife with self delusion. So might a dash of overconfidence. Even in the form of overestimation serve do balance out this alchemy of of our perception of reality for example. Have a singer in granted cariocas very low stakes right but it could involve social embarrassment which you could fear would lead to ostracism. And that's actually one of the most powerful negative motivators human behavior right but again curiosity is also one of these things. Where like sometimes? It's cool to do it badly. So this is a perfect example. But so you have a carrier. Karaoke singer then imbibe in a little liquid courage before taking the microphone as most Kariuki participants are are want to do but yeah they they get a little liquid courage because they know they don't have the greatest voice in the world and then they feel a little awkward getting up there but but they they know that a little bit of booze induced. Overconfidence might help matters. I think you're exactly right there and this is funny to start here because I think while the authors make tons of good points this is one of the ones they make that I might disagree with the most. I think that there are antagonist adaptations in human behavior. One pressure might favor having an accurate picture of the world. Assessing things in a clear and accurate way while across pressure favor self-deception especially self-deception in the form of overconfidence. For example. You might be more likely to survive if you have accurate assessments of your own abilities but you might be more likely to take big risks with potentially big rewards if you overestimate your abilities Or Self Delusional. Overconfidence could be adaptive. Because it helps us persuade or even deceive other people about are worth. Yeah old ultimately you have to believe in yourself you know other people are not going to believe in you for you right. I mean we. We talked in the last episode about how. It's probably not a coincidence that you really often notice overconfidence in people who occupy high status leadership roles. Right how did they get there? I mean it's not hard to imagine. The overconfidence helped them get to that point. Yeah it's Something it's a fine sometimes terrifying exercise to like if you if you engage with people like this and then when you realize Oh. They're just really overconfident. They don't they're they're not to say they're not skilled but when you realize here is they're not sometimes they're not but sometimes you realize. Oh there. There is this gap between ability. And and and what? They're they're saying they're going to deliver on what they are. Estimating the future will consist of. Yeah I mean I. It is kind of shocking. How often in life? You will suddenly come to a realization that you know the boss. Or the leader whatever's main skill is B. S. ing. Yeah like that they can just go out there and wing it in a way that you would be too timid in reserve to do right now this idea of the accurate assessments playing into our. You know our own abilities i. I couldn't help but think of the film Butch Cassidy and the Sundance kid scenario because really as it relates to two specific points in the film one is the the whole. Would you make that jump if you didn't have to scenario where they're being tracked? They're being hunted and they've come to this cliff overlooking this river and they realized that if they jump if they jump off this cliff may land in that river and they don't die they'll get away because the stakes are such that those pursuing them will not follow them. They will not make that jump if they don't need to. So so there's there's that and then at the very end there's kind of a going out the old fashioned way. Guns a blazing scenario where corner. They're going to slowly be killed and they decided to just go for it to just bust out shooting and just

Joe Mccormick Robert Lamb Butch Cassidy Amorin Derek Murder Macbeth Russell
Julia Louis-Dreyfus Takes The Lift For 'Downhill'

The Frame

10:38 min | 6 months ago

Julia Louis-Dreyfus Takes The Lift For 'Downhill'

"To the fray mom John Horn for Valentine's Day weekend. Here's an idea a new movie. That might leave you contemplating the meaning of marriage. The film is called Downhill. And it's dramatic and dark comedy adapted from the Swedish movie for Moore. The Film Stars Julia Louis Dreyfuss and Will Ferrell as a couple whose family is on a European ski vacation when the resort sets off. What's supposed to be controlled? Avalanche that threatens them and their kids. Each parents reaction reveals deeper divisions in the marriage. Julia Louis Dreyfuss is also a producer of downhill. We got together at the Sundance Film Festival. A couple of weeks ago. Where the movie premiered. She said she. I discussed the idea of an American remake of force majeure with Fox searchlight back in two thousand fourteen but I had just finished making this movie enough said with them and we were talking about further projects and I said believe it or not. I said you know I'm really intrigued. By stories in which reality is seen one way and then a lens is taken off and you look at reality a completely different way within the story and they said well we just came back from con. We saw this movie. You should see this movie. Because we're trying to get the rights to it to rebuild force majeure. Yeah so I said your love to see it and so they screened it and I was utterly hooked. I remember watching force majeure on my laptop and there's a scene in which there's an avalanche and the father without giving too much way doesn't exactly do the right thing that kind of and remember when I watched it. I backed up and watch like ziprecruiter film. I went frame by frame. Like what is he really do? How does he really react? And in the original movie. It's a little vague in your version. It's not I guess. It's a little more clear in your adaptation. I'M GONNA ask about that moment and in your adaptation why that was key to amplify that choice. Well we wanted to be clear what he did but unclear as to the fallout from it. So in other words The wife in this situation play by myself is in utter shock and we wanted to unravel the sweater from that point. From a storytelling point of view. This movie is certainly about the repression of Truth and truth and denial of truth. Which is I think an interesting theme particularly right now. And denial of facts But on both ends because you know initially the couple that you know. It's a stunning moment and then rather than a direct confrontation or conversation. Even about what had happened. They don't have that because I think what happened feels unmentionable because it's so shameful and so They they begin. This is a credit to Jesse Armstrong. Who did the adaptation they begin By attacking an outside source that is to say these safety. The mountains safety guy played by Christopher Hindu and on the enforce measure who is also enforced measure and wonderful in that movie as well as in our movie. Here's what I think you're not picking up on. This was a huge event for our family. Okay and Sir. I don't WanNa make this a legal matter between us. I don't know I don't I but I'm saying that I don't want nothing lyrica. Were you sue. Because your coffee's hot madame school you I'm an attorney okay. You've heard our complaints. Yeah will someone needs to hear it. Thank you for your time. And no. Thank you for your time for me. That is for certain. I thought that was such a great idea to put it away from themselves. Put that anxiety in that tension Onto somebody else before they turn on one pretty cool. We're talking with Julia. Louis Dreyfuss producer and actor in downhill on as about castain and are talking about the kids the couple because they're older than the original film and that changes something because they understand what's happening in the marriage. The kids in the other movie. I think are too young to really appreciate it. These kids are older and they know what's happening and was at written. Was that just something where you start thanking us our producer. What does it mean if these kids are twelve as opposed to seven? We totally discussed that at great length. I mean look both will and I are old right and I'm really old. No no no I am and so and when we first started doing this I was like we gotta get this done soon because pretty soon it's going to be implausible for me to have two young children and in fact they needed to be young because they had to you needed to feel as if they were vulnerable in the situation of the avalanche Had they been in their teens? You might have felt that they were possibly less vulnerable. Not that teenagers can't be vulnerable. But somehow being younger sir heightens the the the the sense of danger I think And then additionally we sort of wrote it into the script or pretty subtly implied that we were an older couple who decided to have children late in life Wills character refers to fertility treatments that we went through and whether or not it was going to work so this was a sort of a later in life choice for this couple which is sort of an interesting idea to what about. Well how did you end up? Casting him He read the script and he was super interested in it and I had seen stranger than fiction and was a very big fan of his work in that I mean I'm a fan of his work period. I mean the guys have stone cold genius but he was able in stranger than to embrace a dramatic tone and therefore he would be able to sort of tackled this material and then we met believe it or not. We never met before not some random. Hollywood party and we have these parallel lives you know because of SNL and Etcetera Etcetera. But no. We have lots of friends in common but we never met. We met four this project and we had a long coffee and talked at great length about the material and He hadn't seen force majeure he'd only read the script of downhill so and he was like I really want to do it and I said well before you sign on make sure you really want to watch the original you know and make sure you WanNa step. Put your toe into this water. There's a expression that a friend of mine who worked in marketing uses an. It's an overcome as like a marketing. Obstacle that a film has. This is a serious movie about marriage and it stars people who are generally known for doing comedies. You think that's an issue in terms of either people come in thinking it's GonNa be funny or people who WanNa see a dramatic film and being unsure of. Comedians can do it completely. It's been a challenge from a marketing point of view. I mean the trailer was very Intentionally I if you watch the trailer you'll see. That's not chock full of That's by design. It looked like it was going to kill us full moment. The kids were screaming because it felt like we were gonNA dot keet and he had grabbed his phone. Keep left us nice. I didn't leave you to bear. Even though there are plenty of jokes within the film I mean there are comedic beats but I would say more dramatic beats than comedic beats when I watch downhill. I went back and rewatch force majeure because I wanted to see how that movie ended and I'm not going to talk about what specifically happens in the ending of your film. There's a scene in both films ski run and there's a scene in your film that is new. That is I. Think my favorite scene in the movie where there's a conversation about what will Ferrell's character can do and it feels like a really interesting way to end the movie. I'm wondering about that scene about its importance in how you try to figure out how the movie should end totally without talking about what she says to her husband. Well I think that we wanted. We did not want the movie to end up with a neat little bow. We wanted to have ambiguity at the end of this film. I think it's safe to say that people might leave the theater thinking either. This couple is gonNA work it out or maybe this couple Is got a real problem on their hands and I think. Both truths are acceptable It's up for. She makes a decision and I think it's questionable decision. Okay I mean you know as a standing outside of it. I can understand why she did it but I'm not sure it's exactly the right thing to do in that moment but that's okay because They're trying to crawl their way out of this mess and this is their kind of muddy messy way of doing it. And you know it's up for discussion as to whether or not it's the right. The right move. I really liked playing that scene because I understood why she would come to that conclusion. But it was very important to me in this in the film that we made that this character that I played was flawed Because I we didn't want it to be a movie about you. Know sort of cowardice and masculinity and just that it needed to be a little more balanced and that was important to me and the wife character in our film makes a couple of pretty miserable decisions.

Julia Louis Dreyfuss Producer Will Ferrell Fox Searchlight John Horn Moore Louis Dreyfuss Jesse Armstrong Christopher Hindu Attorney Hollywood SKI SNL
Obama-backed documentary on Ohio factory wins Academy Award

The Sunday Show

12:10 min | 6 months ago

Obama-backed documentary on Ohio factory wins Academy Award

"The documentary American factory which is nominated for an Oscar for best feature length documentary was produced and directed by my guests Julia Reichardt and Stephen bogan are it was the first film acquired by the Obamas new production company higher ground which is distributing it in partnership with Netflix last year American factory when the Sundance directing award in the documentary category the movie is about what happened when a Chinese company opened a new automotive glass factory in Dayton Ohio in the same spot where a GM company close just a few years earlier the new Chinese factory foo yell glass America was greeted is great news by Dayton and by men and women in need of jobs but as time went on it became apparent there was a considerable culture clash between how the Chinese treat workers and have the American workers expected to be treated especially those workers who are used to having the United auto workers union behind them and no longer did some of the workers are making half as much in our IT Fujio than they did at GM by focusing on this one factory the film is a case study of what the global economy means for some American workers and how hard it's become to find work that pays enough to have a home and support children right guard and bogan are with the perfect people to make American factory they live twenty five minutes away from the factory and their previous film the last track documented the closing of Dayton's GM factory the last track was also nominated for an Oscar your record Steve Bognor welcome to fresh air congradulations on your Oscar nomination and on the film thank you Terry so what were the expectations in your hometown Dayton won a Chinese billionaire announced that he would open a new automotive glass factory there on the site of the GM plant that close you know people were very hopeful we had lost the GM plant almost eight years before when chairman Chow who's the you know Chinese billionaire who bought that old rusting General Motors plant when he came to town it just everybody was really very excited yeah after that GM plant closed things were so hard for so long I mean people lost their homes the job you could get were like at the Cole's distribution center or payless shoes warehouse distribution center or fast food people making nine Bucks an hour and and imagine your middle aged you gotta cater to your mortgage and you're making nine dollars an hour it's just like it was so hard and there was such hope went went through yeah now yeah so what were the incentives for the billionaire the Chinese billionaire the chairman who opened this factory in Dayton well one thing is if you make glass in the Midwest right on interstate seventy five right if you think about it goes from Detroit all the way down through the south all the auto makers are all along there so heavy glass no longer has to be shipped from China to reach the big three and all the other automakers and you know labor costs and China have been going up over many years and labor costs you know what people make per hour in the US have been going down and so the chairman and his team the free out team we're doing a lot of calculations about the cost of shipping the cost of energy labor costs and at some point it made sense for them to come to the US and and actually chairman shall told us he was also asked by General Motors by some of the other automakers to set up shop in the Midwest because they needed more Cassidy more more reliable glass delivery you know the chairman is seventy three years old now he's exactly my age as it happens he I think wanted a kind of capstone project to his life and he wanted to create a big huge plant in the United States this was a huge challenge his family was against him a lot of the Chinese other businessmen were against him it was kind of a personal decision on his part to go ahead and do it despite the opposition from people close to him it's such an interesting clash of cultures that we see in American factory expectations regarding everything about work from pay and benefits to what workers are expected to sacrifice for the privilege of working for the corporation let's start by comparing what automakers made at the GM plant when they were unionized and they were in the United auto workers to what they were making at Fujio which is not unionized well in in the film shown a Rosser who worked at the old GM plant and now works of Frida she says it varies directly she says that GM she was making twenty nine dollars and some cents per hour and if we out she makes twelve eighty four so that's less than half of what she used to make and you know she has several children she's got she has a house that they actually lost they lost their houses they couldn't they couldn't make the mortgage payments after GM closed it's a very different world and you know here here's the crazy thing it's like in China it's been a remarkable trajectory like China is on the rise and people in the film like Wong he once he is the furnace engineer who has been sent from China to the U. S. he's here for at least two years is not going to see his children for two years but he's been working a full house and she was like nineteen years old she is so dedicated to food out and it's offering him a path to the middle class he told us he's going to be able to build a build a house for his for his family for his kids back in China because he's making such good money meanwhile in the states people like Shimei who once had a blue collar middle class life modest but but secure they they have no security anymore and it's it's just very different landscape I want to get back to the culture clash between the Chinese and the Americans at the Chinese on factory in Dayton the American workers there thought they were working just like too hard for too little pay and the Chinese supervisors and the chairman that is the CEO of the company thought American workers that they're they're just lazy they don't appreciate what we're giving them and they want to much praise they need to be praised all the time where is the American workers felt like they were not being respected you know you're really putting your finger on something that I wish the management had recognized way earlier in that plant and I will I hope all foreign companies coming here begin to recognize that in our work culture workers expect to be respected expect to be not told do you just do this American worker will respond well why and maybe I have a better idea we'll look them look the supervisor right in the eye and question them this is not really happen in China very much it's just a different work culture where people do what the boss says boss says you have to work six days a week or seven days a week you just do it but in the United States we are we are expected we've what fought to have an eight hour day and the have weekends off that's pretty much unheard of in industrial work in China people expect to work twelve hour days six days a week the Chinese workers we spoke with we spoke with a lot of them they're not happy about it they don't like being away from their kids for most of the year or only seeing them on Sunday partly it's because that's what the culture has brought them to you know they've they've lifted millions and millions of people out of poverty in one and a half more last generations right but that has resulted in this really intense work life and people are proud you know Chinese workers are proud of their country they're proud of their company they're really proud how China is flourishing in the world I would say the American workers we now I can't say that they're proud of their company or they feel like really behind America like Americans really helping them rice in the world I think we're on a trajectory of less hope less possibilities we here in the US as far as working class people where is in China I think there's tremendous hope a tremendous sense that what our country is really has a huge place in the world to play there's a sequence that I I find so fascinating where the Chinese company bring some of the American supervisors to China to to see how this plan this kind of plan operates in China because the CEO of this company you know has one or more glass factories in in China so they bring them there and you see what it's like in China for the workers there first of all all the workers are in the union it's the communist union and seems like the branch of this union is headed by the CEOs brother in law true true yeah so what is the what I know strike one what is the union do for the workers there what is what is the meaning of the union well it's more like a social club either the union there because the the the Chinese Communist Party is so integrated and aligned with the management of food yeah now the traditional concept of the union that we would have here as an advocate for the workers in opposition to the company or to take on the company that that really doesn't exist the union that we saw and at Foochow in China is more like an HR department that helps build camaraderie esprit de corps you know that the kind of team building stuff and it's it's yeah it just felt different something else that really struck me and the Chinese segment of the film is that the supervisors talk to the workers in an almost military kind of way like to learn the workers would like line up information and the supervisor would kind of give them commands and then they'd have to like chance things at the end and they're chanting slogans like long as long as it's in praise of the company slogans they probably know really really well and don't really need to chance yeah it's this is just about their cultural difference it's funny because when one of the American supervisors when he got home he tried to get the Americans to line up in that kind of military formation and it just did not go that well you know it's like the people who signed up to work in this hot intense glass factory and the United States they're making twelve eighty four an hour and they're not getting paid enough to line up and be regimented like that there's a slogan that is said which I think so in kind of in capsules capitalism which is to stand still is to fall back wasn't that it's Steve yeah that's one of things a chance the morning on a day to stand still is to fall back and that's that's true of capitalism it is weird that the this communist country seems like the best capitalists in the world right now you know that they're sold they've been so driven my guess Sir Julia Reichardt and Stephen bogan are they produced and directed the documentary American factory which is nominated for an Oscar for best feature length

Oscar Julia Reichardt Netflix Stephen Bogan Sundance
'Minari,' 'Boys State' win top honors at Sundance

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 6 months ago

'Minari,' 'Boys State' win top honors at Sundance

"When are you had arguably been the biggest critical sensation at Sundance earning rates for the immigrant drama set in nineteen eighties Arkansas red it is an executive producer Lee Isaac Chung's the filmmaker this is been just an amazing journey for us and I just want to first say I'm so honored to be in the company of all U. filmmakers atop documentary rise wanted Jesse moss and Amanda make babies boys state a portrait of the annual mock government competition held in Texas the film reportedly fetched a record acquisition price for a dock at Sundance with a twenty four an apple picking it up for twelve million dollars I'm Julie Walker

Arkansas Lee Isaac Chung Jesse Moss Amanda Texas Sundance Julie Walker Executive Producer
Director Kitty Green On Her New Film, 'The Assistant'

Amanpour

03:57 min | 6 months ago

Director Kitty Green On Her New Film, 'The Assistant'

"Yes definitely a lot of people went to. Hi in order to voice their concerns and realized that the HR is really see that affect the company and not the employees so a quickly kind of spit out the other end not taken seriously and and it's it's an example of gas sliding as well. He really makes her doubt herself. I self and her intentions and what she's seen but yeah we were looking for all these kind of concrete examples of this system that is structured against women. So tell me about why you decided sided to do this. What was this sort of trigger point that you feel what I could make a feature film because most of your work has been very feminist orientated but but in the documentary entry of field so far most of the work this well known why did you decide? And how did you side to make this leap into feature on on this issue. I feel like there's a lot there's been a lot of coverage in the media. There's been a lot of facts written up and there's a lot of a lot of stuff out there about assistance in what they're Judy's work love for these men but what I was interested in was getting an audience to emotionally identify with this character put really squarely putting them in her shoes. 'cause I think often the the the wedding neighbors gets thrown around this idea that oh she's she's such a horrible person and I wanted to kind of correct that and explain the kind of complexity of the situation. She's in she has no power and and she's stuck within kind of machinery so that became really important. That emotional identification describe a little bit of your own situation like you're on a film. Set your director urine charge. How do people treat you whether they're actors or or or whoever it might be who comes in doesn't quite know who's who and yeah I mean I've been on the film festival second for ten years? He is and I don't i. I guess people have never assume I'm the director why people always walk in and hand me the coach and assume I'm the assistant so I was getting very frustrated with that I was also. I'm getting like a lot of questions. Whenever I I went to Sundance a few years ago and immediately people ask me? Who gives me my ideas is it James Scott and then my two male produces and I thought you'd Never Never Oscar mail direct to that so I was there? It's really frustrating. And I think in order to change the system we conscious get rid of a few kind of bad apples we need to really kinda stupid APO- and try and get more women into the film industry and that hopefully will change things for the better. What is this film set? Is it set in the madman era. Is it set in the post. Harvey Weinstein Era Post Me To. What is the setting for your film your fictional film? It's pre- this all of the the rise rise of the METOO movement. I'd say it's before people really had an avenue or pathway or space chat about misconduct. I think things have changed a little. But there's still a lot of a lot of the behavior in the film you can still see exists today so. I think it's important to still have these compensations. How have you reacted to the reaction? What would you say has been the overwhelming reaction? Has Anything. Surprised you I mean I had a one woman in Salt Lake City. Who worked for a company and she said that she thought that character was her and really identified with it which is kind of amazing idea that it isn't just about the film industry but it's transferable to any workplace and anyone who's ever worked in an office or workplace with that didn't take them seriously Isley so that's been a really wonderful experience? I just be clear you did work in such workplace in terms of being an assistant. But you didn't necessarily have such negative experience. That's right yeah. I was at the ABC Straight in broadcasting company. And I was in the editor assistant so I press record on all the machines and I'm but I I I. It was a very safe and positive environment but I did you still there is a lot of. It's very scary to be the youngest person in the office. I guess it's very you do feel powerless in and yes I understand the character completely. Well Good luck to you as I say it's had a lot of good reviews. Everybody's talking about it very timely movie. Katie Green thank you very much

Director Harvey Weinstein Katie Green Judy Metoo Sundance Salt Lake City ABC James Scott Editor Isley
The Five Most Important Movies at Sundance

The Big Picture

09:36 min | 6 months ago

The Five Most Important Movies at Sundance

"The game we made up is essentially the five bio-pics you meet in heaven so we tried to find the five different kinds of stories that are told in the biopic format. Thought it was pretty fun. I think it's useful to play a game like that at Sundance because there are a lot of homes on not all of them are great in fact some of them are great but when one is good it can be a kind of transformative experience and they usually come in a in a particular kind of package. Now when you think of of a sundance movie what do you think of. I think of a quiet often heartwarming family or rip character-driven dramas with maybe a little bit of quirkiness added to them. That is definitely at least one of the Kennedy talking about this episode also documentaries that's the other one lots and lots of documentaries so she should we dive right in. Okay let's dive right in the first and the most classical example of the sundance movie is exactly what you're describing. It's essentially the family family drama. The sometimes lighthearted sometimes deadly serious as we go through these we'll talk about Some previous examples of films that have played at Sundance that fit this rubric. So when you think of this movie more severe example of it might be winter's bone or fruitvale station or affliction more lighthearted example might be big night a genre fight example might be like take shelter So these movies I think Are the most derided of the Sundance archetype. That's true I was trying not to be dismissive when I was describing off the top of my head but as soon as you say Sundance movie there is just a as soon as you're categorizing categorizing rising things in. You're being unfair to the things which I guess we're going to be unfair to every single move. We talked about to extend. This is a podcast and we need buckets. We need segments. We need to push the conversational says. I wasn't totally totally trying to be dismissive of the family drama. There are good ones. There are bad ones. That's a fact You and I had the good fortune. I think this year to see one of the best movies at the festival and one that falls pretty squarely into this framework. So the movie's called minority We just got out of our screening of minority. What was your takeaway from this film? This is a story about out a Korean American family who emigrates to Arkansas in the eighties and there is a little kid in this movie movie that just absolutely ripped my heart out and and all the performances did and I thought that it is. It's the best case version of this because it's definitely moves you but it's also funny as you said right before we started recording. It's beautifully shot. Well written it smart and not to truly if that makes any does it's an eight twenty four or movie written and directed by a man namely Chung and he has an interesting gracefulness with what what appears to be his own story. I actually don't know anything about where the story comes from but when we were discussing earlier we identified that. There is an incredible level of specificity in the story. In the setting in Arkansas in a family trying to create a new life for themselves a new state and a new country trying to figure out how to stay married trying to figure out how to be good parents trying to figure out how to be good. Children had to be good grandchildren. It's a very complex. WCHS portrait of a family living in close quarters. Not Totally. Sure if they're going to be able to go forward with their lives in the way that they wanted to and all that stuff I still. I'm kind of does a disservice to the movie because that just sounds like Sundance Hokum And I think the movies a little bit more special than that now. Are We experiencing the festival high on a movie perhaps. Perhaps it's possible but as I was watching it I think you'll probably see a lot of comparisons to the farewell about this movie as the year goes on and not just because it's from an Asian and filmmaker but because it's a particularly a story about three generations and how three generations interact with each other and some of the confusion that happens when one culture collides with another culture in place that they don't fully understand the farewell. It's obviously Luang main character. Visiting China Grandmother. This film is a Korean American family moving into a rural place. The thing I liked about it the most is that it doesn't apply the usual tricks that you would think a movie movie like this about a non white family. Moving into the south in the eighties. Might incorporate a little bit more subtle and sophisticated when I heard the word Reagan Reagan early on in the film. I got a little nervous. And there is a lot of thoughtfulness about the socioeconomic aspect of the story. But it's not there. No burning crosses in this movie there is no. You know vindictive vitriolic language about the family. It is really just a family story which I was kind of relieved about honestly it's really insular and it's explores the relationships between between all of the members of the family pretty specifically and individually and but and that's enough that kind of fills up the movie. Yes so since. We've you've never been here before. I kinda wanted to talk about a movie like this. I think this movie might fit into another category and other sort of bucket. We've created here but I've never been able to witness in real time. I am the life cycle of film. That May Be in the consciousness for the next twelve months and to be on the ground floor when that thing happens did you have that sense when you're watching this or did you just feel like well. I've been seeing a lot of movies this week and I'm doing my best to take stock of all of them. I think it was the ladder with their recognition that I thought this was a very good film in one of the best films. I've seen this week. I'm I'm trying to protect against festival buys. I don't I don't know. Do you feel like so. You need to to start some festival buzz right here. I don't think I'm capable of such a thing. I need to know my own power which is minimal nor do I and I think I'm more I have never been to sundance either and I'm treating it more as what you said. It's interesting to watch it happen. And I'll be curious to see how other people respond to it and what it is like to watch it in the screening leaning room whenever people get to see at. Were you know in a movie theater or at home. I don't have a sense. Totally of how those things translate yet and yeah I don't either. I mean it's the sort of film that You know on. Its face. It Star Steven Jahn who obviously had great success actually not utterly dissimilar story burning in two thousand eighteen. There are some kind of thematic and visual references. That kind of match interesting double feature. I just don't know a lot of the Casas. Very Unknown Hania replays his his wife. Stephen's wife who you know. They're the sort of the lead couple in the family. And we'll patent plays a minim. Paul who is is a local aid a spiritual man who works with the family. He's giving what I would describe it as a very sundance. He performance he's anti character is sundance character. Maybe ripped from real life hard to say but this movie is like sort of very quiet and subtle and Paul is not not the most subtle. You're in the world. I don't think Paul will be competing for any awards but Stephen. I don't know he's really turned himself into quite a quite great leading actor. I will say I already mentioned the kid at this is an all time great kid performance and we were talking about after seeing the movie like. How do you get six year old to do what the six year old does? And I don't have the answers to that. I hope to discover them at some point. But we'll say really good kid. Performance goes a long way. It's true in people really love to see a cute kid up on the screen. Uh Ribbon hearts out yeah. He's like a charm vector and an empathy machine. You know that every time he's not screen you're looking at that. I really just feel for that so we didn't attend this party. Apparently he was here at Sundance. Walking the carpets at cowboy outfit. Yes big big park city energy from seven year old Allen Kim. We look forward to more things from him in the future. Go to the next kind of category. Yes okay so I. I've described this as the adult oriented comedy. Now I think that also sounds a little bit dirty like like not not not scatalogical your sexually dirty but just sort of like corny. I'm not sure that adult oriented in comedy is something that you want go together like I said as soon as we're applying larger categories to these things that invokes branding evokes marketing. It invokes all of the things. That aren't a work of art so so I think that's why we feel the way we feel but also this is how the world works and it's definitely help I've gasworks keep going so I would say some of the movies that fall into this. Category are among our favorite movies so four four weddings and a funeral plate sundance many years ago. John Have you seen for weddings and a funeral. I've seen thirty eight minutes of it. What is why do you do this to me is well? It's just the film that I started to watch movies. I watched the whole movie well. This isn't Chris Ryan. I watched the Irishman on three consecutive nights. Nonsense think of it like this life life is one big screening okay more in a continuous stream viewership and happy with you. One day I'll get to the conclusion of four weddings and a few I wasn't going to post host. The picture of you tweeting on the shuttle earlier but now I'm going to is a threat. I want people to note that for the record. Another example of this is significantly different from four weddings and a funeral. The movie like in Bruges which you know well before Martin mcdonagh was being canceled for three billboards outside ebbing Missouri. He was writing really nasty. hilarious assassin in comedies. I hope he gets back to this style very soon because I love that movie very much the next two though I think are more closely associated with a kind of tree. Cly Sundance Story. Now these movies are both huge hits and are kind of emblematic of something and I will admit when I saw them for the first time I was like I liked this movie a lot. The two thousand wild different time very different time the two movies. I'm talking about our five hundred days of summer. But you may recall is the so additional Joseph Gordon Levitt Rom COM com.

Sundance Paul Arkansas Stephen Kennedy Joseph Gordon Levitt Reagan Reagan Steven Jahn Bruges China Chung Martin Mcdonagh Allen Kim Chris Ryan John Missouri
Palm Springs, Boys State Set Sundance Sales Records

AP 24 Hour News

00:47 sec | 6 months ago

Palm Springs, Boys State Set Sundance Sales Records

"A new records been set at the Sundance Film Festival to acquire a film beating the old record by sixty nine cents the groundhog day as calmly palm springs by Andy Samberg on the lonely island was bought by into distributor neon am streaming service Hulu for exactly seventeen million five hundred thousand dollars and sixty nine cents the previous record was seventeen and a half million dollars fox searchlight paid that Ford may Parker's the birth of a nation back in twenty sixteen Samberg is lonely island partners Joe to the financial terms of the deal or unfavorable saying they spend eighty five million dollars of their own money that they're taking a bath and they have a lot of explaining to do their families palm springs a star Samberg and Krista Millea ideas a pair of wedding guests who are trapped living the same day over and over again in the southern California

Andy Samberg Hulu Fox Searchlight Ford Parker Krista Millea California
"sundance" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

03:44 min | 7 months ago

"sundance" Discussed on The Frame

"He is basically saying you can make a choice. You can have a career in this business or you can walk out right now. You're making it sound a lot more dramatic. That's good I mean. It's it's incredible. I really just wanted to make sure I mean he has basically I didn't want him to be too evil over the top evil to the point where you know. He's just swearing at her. I kind of really wanted to make sure he's answers. Were clear and concise and made sense and they do I mean ah she it. He'd cheese rattled by this idea that he's questioning another woman's kind of reasons for being there and she is she jealous and she. I wanted wanted to really play play with all that and so it's great that it comes across those two by the way it's such an amazing job with at seeing. They're so good and they're such great actors and they did it again and again it's twelve pages and they knew it all and just over over and over and it was fabulous. Every time I have to say this movie has really stayed with me. I think what you created is such a realistic depiction of what what it feels like to be in that workplace. And I'm wondering what kind of conversations you hope. The film sparks about Workplace Gender Dynamics Dynamics about the metoo movement I I mean firstly. I want people to come away thinking about their own role in their own behavior. Because I feel like it isn't just about. The misconduct is also about kind of the culture in these work environments and how we can make our workplaces more safe and fair and equitable for everybody. So so I think if those conversations can be had and it was difficult to kind of analyze our own W- our own environments in our own complicity. But I think we are all part of this system and and so we. In order to change we really need to dissect it completely and strip it. Apart and rebuild it and get more women power that would be ideal. What can a narrative heretic films? Do especially on a subject like this that a documentary. Couldn't we know the facts like we've read. There's been a lot of coverage in the press. We know what's happened happens in those rooms. We know what was going on what I wanted to take do with. This film is give people kind of an emotional experience like be able to get them to to understand the gravity of the situation. Some of these young women were in and just how unfair and brutal. This system was for so many people so I mean for me. That's something that I think. A narrative film can do is really take you on a journey emotionally with the character and really get you to identify with somebody who often in your life I mean. A lot of people have assistance in ignore more than they seem invisible and I wanted to make sure she was scented in this narrative and that people could just look at this whole experience whole event from somebody's point of view. That's different different from there. It's probably not lost on you. You'RE GONNA show this film at the Sundance Film Festival where allegedly some sexual assaults by Harvey. Weinstein were committed. What is it showing lean in park city mean to you about what has happened there in the past Yeah this is I mean people ask me like should I be showing it here and there and I think this is the film that should be seen by many people as possible. And he's a compensation so that need to be had everywhere and the more we can have these compensations the better kind of hopefully the system system will get so i. I'm I'm all for screening at Sundance and making sure people see it talk about well. How can we change things? How can we improve things moving forward? Kitty Green is is the writer and director of the Assistant. Kitty thanks so much for coming back on the frame. Thank you for having me the assistant debuts at the Sundance Film Festival then opens in theaters on January thirtieth up next on the frame. Jonathan Pryce have a Prayer Academy Award for for his portrayal of Pope.

Workplace Gender Dynamics Dyna Weinstein Kitty Green Jonathan Pryce Sundance Harvey writer director
"sundance" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

The No Film School Podcast

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"sundance" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

"It together so it's a mystery to me right now and we run a fellowship at sundance where we encourage filmmakers who choose not to make alright steals so i'm not gonna say that it's like really exciting for us but it it's really okay i'm saying it's really exciting for us because that means there's potentially some foam acres who are gonna peace deals together and do some creative distribution unless they're just keeping it a secret so some of those filmmakers that may come to you guys are the what are their main goals for the project is it silica theatrical release as kind of the end goal or is that perhaps something that kind of kicks off the film's journey we've previously seen that as kind of open in theaters get your reviews oh on demand and we kind of move forward or is that kind of the ethical now seen is good marching pad to really go further and find your audience fill it still feels like the coal is the the directors we desire like we all hear this all the time i wanna see my film on the big screen this film deserves at the release things of that nature verbiage of that nature i wouldn't really say that the makers that were talking to our seen as a means to an end they're not talking about it as if we get a theatrical will will get better placement on vod bucket said and rooms they the ones that we talked you recognize they may get better press if they do a theatrical release but when we talk to filmmakers we always ask what are your goals i learned this from my mentor peter broderick you know is it is it i ball's is it impact or is it revenue and usually it's you know it's recouping at the very least recouping and just but it doesn't really feel like a lot of filmmakers wanna put in the mount of time and energy necessary to really give to film's release maybe that cynical but that's what we're seeing yeah i was wondering you know what you just mentioned that you you you mentioned peter broderick and the goals a lot of the right beautiful makers listening who are starting out and they don't even understand what the goals are because for some people they think go i just need to get into sundance that would be the goal but that's not really the goal can you talk can you elaborate on on the different things you just talked about for people who haven't actually heard of that because i realize that came in a little hot too like i'm just jumping into leg my business speak so let me just like calm down a little bit and talk like a human so when you make a movie i'm a filmmaker right a lot we're filmmakers and renew creatives and we usually make films because of this like immense it in ourselves like in our heart to get content out to get something from our heads out into the world so when you put a lot of time and resources into something a lot of cognitive this news occurs where you feel this needs either make a lot of money to make up for it or you know find as many people as possible to watch it which is i ball's or make it impact and try to change the world and usually we hear those impact answers from documentary filmmakers but i love to hear them from fiction filmmakers as well so when you are about to release a film the option clearly all options are important but the option you choose to prioritize is the one that informs your distribution strategy so if someone were to say i ball's than we would say let's get that sucker up on an s fahd netflix hulu amazon prime because there's a massive subscriber base and it's the quickest way to get as many people as possible so that's the kind of line of thinking we're we're on right now and being on as fahd platform of course it's available to so many more people than would be if it was the ethical releases standard theatrical release but does that also kind of sil make you a smaller fish in a large pond still how am i going to bring people to.

sundance
"sundance" Discussed on The Canon

The Canon

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"sundance" Discussed on The Canon

"Uh paul newman's butch cassidy shows up and basically kind of talks their way out of a fight where in attritional western the introduction to the sundance kid wouldbe him blow in the shit out of this guy and in like like shooting him in any crawley's cool thing okay she's rolfast while the la la um and then and then right after that goes into a scene where were butch kasese leadership of of their gang here primarily called the whole n wall gang is is challenged and any wednesday by kicking a did in the balts wishes like the most atypical thing for a western hero to do you know like john wayne would never do that none of these none of these characters even like henry fonda on what's once upon a time the west wouldn't do that antitank of anything lowering attacking summary in the bosnia western i guess it would just be kicking in in the balls from behind maybe like qichen their horse in the balls versed allies i always get wait a horse's mouth but you know there there's right from the beginning this movie were chipping away at a western icrc iconography western movies do at how they set up conflicts now they resolve them and consequently who these characters are yeah and we must find jarring i mean the dialogue here i call it dialogue but it's really like a one person dialogue it's really just paul newman doing all the talking pretty much uh it's screwball dialogue i mean this is fast moving but at at at at at at a die like clip he could be funny dialogue in exchanges reasoning but aren't you can ask us to sit down all finds that dental like yet either we oughta go like it's it doesn't fit all with anything it's kind of jarring i think at first i think i think this movie which jiang author of the way throughout its deliberately jar i think it's deliberately jarring in the music to you know they're they're segments were the that are scored by this.

paul newman butch cassidy crawley john wayne henry fonda bosnia attritional jiang
"sundance" Discussed on The Canon

The Canon

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"sundance" Discussed on The Canon

"Uh paul newman's butch cassidy shows up and basically kind of talks their way out of a fight where in attritional western the introduction to the sundance kid wouldbe him blow in the shit out of this guy and in like like shooting him in any crawley's cool thing okay she's rolfast while the la la um and then and then right after that goes into a scene where were butch kasese leadership of of their gang here primarily called the whole n wall gang is is challenged and any wednesday by kicking a did in the balts wishes like the most atypical thing for a western hero to do you know like john wayne would never do that none of these none of these characters even like henry fonda on what's once upon a time the west wouldn't do that antitank of anything lowering attacking summary in the bosnia western i guess it would just be kicking in in the balls from behind maybe like qichen their horse in the balls versed allies i always get wait a horse's mouth but you know there there's right from the beginning this movie were chipping away at a western icrc iconography western movies do at how they set up conflicts now they resolve them and consequently who these characters are yeah and we must find jarring i mean the dialogue here i call it dialogue but it's really like a one person dialogue it's really just paul newman doing all the talking pretty much uh it's screwball dialogue i mean this is fast moving but at at at at at at a die like clip he could be funny dialogue in exchanges reasoning but aren't you can ask us to sit down all finds that dental like yet either we oughta go like it's it doesn't fit all with anything it's kind of jarring i think at first i think i think this movie which jiang author of the way throughout its deliberately jar i think it's deliberately jarring in the music to you know they're they're segments were the that are scored by this.

paul newman butch cassidy crawley john wayne henry fonda bosnia attritional jiang
"sundance" Discussed on The Canon

The Canon

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"sundance" Discussed on The Canon

"Uh paul newman's butch cassidy shows up and basically kind of talks their way out of a fight where in attritional western the introduction to the sundance kid wouldbe him blow in the shit out of this guy and in like like shooting him in any crawley's cool thing okay she's rolfast while the la la um and then and then right after that goes into a scene where were butch kasese leadership of of their gang here primarily called the whole n wall gang is is challenged and any wednesday by kicking a did in the balts wishes like the most atypical thing for a western hero to do you know like john wayne would never do that none of these none of these characters even like henry fonda on what's once upon a time the west wouldn't do that antitank of anything lowering attacking summary in the bosnia western i guess it would just be kicking in in the balls from behind maybe like qichen their horse in the balls versed allies i always get wait a horse's mouth but you know there there's right from the beginning this movie were chipping away at a western icrc iconography western movies do at how they set up conflicts now they resolve them and consequently who these characters are yeah and we must find jarring i mean the dialogue here i call it dialogue but it's really like a one person dialogue it's really just paul newman doing all the talking pretty much uh it's screwball dialogue i mean this is fast moving but at at at at at at a die like clip he could be funny dialogue in exchanges reasoning but aren't you can ask us to sit down all finds that dental like yet either we oughta go like it's it doesn't fit all with anything it's kind of jarring i think at first i think i think this movie which jiang author of the way throughout its deliberately jar i think it's deliberately jarring in the music to you know they're they're segments were the that are scored by this.

paul newman butch cassidy crawley john wayne henry fonda bosnia attritional jiang
"sundance" Discussed on The Canon

The Canon

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"sundance" Discussed on The Canon

"Uh paul newman's butch cassidy shows up and basically kind of talks their way out of a fight where in attritional western the introduction to the sundance kid wouldbe him blow in the shit out of this guy and in like like shooting him in any crawley's cool thing okay she's rolfast while the la la um and then and then right after that goes into a scene where were butch kasese leadership of of their gang here primarily called the whole n wall gang is is challenged and any wednesday by kicking a did in the balts wishes like the most atypical thing for a western hero to do you know like john wayne would never do that none of these none of these characters even like henry fonda on what's once upon a time the west wouldn't do that antitank of anything lowering attacking summary in the bosnia western i guess it would just be kicking in in the balls from behind maybe like qichen their horse in the balls versed allies i always get wait a horse's mouth but you know there there's right from the beginning this movie were chipping away at a western icrc iconography western movies do at how they set up conflicts now they resolve them and consequently who these characters are yeah and we must find jarring i mean the dialogue here i call it dialogue but it's really like a one person dialogue it's really just paul newman doing all the talking pretty much uh it's screwball dialogue i mean this is fast moving but at at at at at at a die like clip he could be funny dialogue in exchanges reasoning but aren't you can ask us to sit down all finds that dental like yet either we oughta go like it's it doesn't fit all with anything it's kind of jarring i think at first i think i think this movie which jiang author of the way throughout its deliberately jar i think it's deliberately jarring in the music to you know they're they're segments were the that are scored by this.

paul newman butch cassidy crawley john wayne henry fonda bosnia attritional jiang
"sundance" Discussed on The Canon

The Canon

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"sundance" Discussed on The Canon

"Uh paul newman's butch cassidy shows up and basically kind of talks their way out of a fight where in attritional western the introduction to the sundance kid wouldbe him blow in the shit out of this guy and in like like shooting him in any crawley's cool thing okay she's rolfast while the la la um and then and then right after that goes into a scene where were butch kasese leadership of of their gang here primarily called the whole n wall gang is is challenged and any wednesday by kicking a did in the balts wishes like the most atypical thing for a western hero to do you know like john wayne would never do that none of these none of these characters even like henry fonda on what's once upon a time the west wouldn't do that antitank of anything lowering attacking summary in the bosnia western i guess it would just be kicking in in the balls from behind maybe like qichen their horse in the balls versed allies i always get wait a horse's mouth but you know there there's right from the beginning this movie were chipping away at a western icrc iconography western movies do at how they set up conflicts now they resolve them and consequently who these characters are yeah and we must find jarring i mean the dialogue here i call it dialogue but it's really like a one person dialogue it's really just paul newman doing all the talking pretty much uh it's screwball dialogue i mean this is fast moving but at at at at at at a die like clip he could be funny dialogue in exchanges reasoning but aren't you can ask us to sit down all finds that dental like yet either we oughta go like it's it doesn't fit all with anything it's kind of jarring i think at first i think i think this movie which jiang author of the way throughout its deliberately jar i think it's deliberately jarring in the music to you know they're they're segments were the that are scored by this.

paul newman butch cassidy crawley john wayne henry fonda bosnia attritional jiang
"sundance" Discussed on The Canon

The Canon

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"sundance" Discussed on The Canon

"Uh paul newman's butch cassidy shows up and basically kind of talks their way out of a fight where in attritional western the introduction to the sundance kid wouldbe him blow in the shit out of this guy and in like like shooting him in any crawley's cool thing okay she's rolfast while the la la um and then and then right after that goes into a scene where were butch kasese leadership of of their gang here primarily called the whole n wall gang is is challenged and any wednesday by kicking a did in the balts wishes like the most atypical thing for a western hero to do you know like john wayne would never do that none of these none of these characters even like henry fonda on what's once upon a time the west wouldn't do that antitank of anything lowering attacking summary in the bosnia western i guess it would just be kicking in in the balls from behind maybe like qichen their horse in the balls versed allies i always get wait a horse's mouth but you know there there's right from the beginning this movie were chipping away at a western icrc iconography western movies do at how they set up conflicts now they resolve them and consequently who these characters are yeah and we must find jarring i mean the dialogue here i call it dialogue but it's really like a one person dialogue it's really just paul newman doing all the talking pretty much uh it's screwball dialogue i mean this is fast moving but at at at at at at a die like clip he could be funny dialogue in exchanges reasoning but aren't you can ask us to sit down all finds that dental like yet either we oughta go like it's it doesn't fit all with anything it's kind of jarring i think at first i think i think this movie which jiang author of the way throughout its deliberately jar i think it's deliberately jarring in the music to you know they're they're segments were the that are scored by this.

paul newman butch cassidy crawley john wayne henry fonda bosnia attritional jiang
"sundance" Discussed on The Canon

The Canon

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"sundance" Discussed on The Canon

"Uh paul newman's butch cassidy shows up and basically kind of talks their way out of a fight where in attritional western the introduction to the sundance kid wouldbe him blow in the shit out of this guy and in like like shooting him in any crawley's cool thing okay she's rolfast while the la la um and then and then right after that goes into a scene where were butch kasese leadership of of their gang here primarily called the whole n wall gang is is challenged and any wednesday by kicking a did in the balts wishes like the most atypical thing for a western hero to do you know like john wayne would never do that none of these none of these characters even like henry fonda on what's once upon a time the west wouldn't do that antitank of anything lowering attacking summary in the bosnia western i guess it would just be kicking in in the balls from behind maybe like qichen their horse in the balls versed allies i always get wait a horse's mouth but you know there there's right from the beginning this movie were chipping away at a western icrc iconography western movies do at how they set up conflicts now they resolve them and consequently who these characters are yeah and we must find jarring i mean the dialogue here i call it dialogue but it's really like a one person dialogue it's really just paul newman doing all the talking pretty much uh it's screwball dialogue i mean this is fast moving but at at at at at at a die like clip he could be funny dialogue in exchanges reasoning but aren't you can ask us to sit down all finds that dental like yet either we oughta go like it's it doesn't fit all with anything it's kind of jarring i think at first i think i think this movie which jiang author of the way throughout its deliberately jar i think it's deliberately jarring in the music to you know they're they're segments were the that are scored by this.

paul newman butch cassidy crawley john wayne henry fonda bosnia attritional jiang
"sundance" Discussed on The Canon

The Canon

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"sundance" Discussed on The Canon

"Uh paul newman's butch cassidy shows up and basically kind of talks their way out of a fight where in attritional western the introduction to the sundance kid wouldbe him blow in the shit out of this guy and in like like shooting him in any crawley's cool thing okay she's rolfast while the la la um and then and then right after that goes into a scene where were butch kasese leadership of of their gang here primarily called the whole n wall gang is is challenged and any wednesday by kicking a did in the balts wishes like the most atypical thing for a western hero to do you know like john wayne would never do that none of these none of these characters even like henry fonda on what's once upon a time the west wouldn't do that antitank of anything lowering attacking summary in the bosnia western i guess it would just be kicking in in the balls from behind maybe like qichen their horse in the balls versed allies i always get wait a horse's mouth but you know there there's right from the beginning this movie were chipping away at a western icrc iconography western movies do at how they set up conflicts now they resolve them and consequently who these characters are yeah and we must find jarring i mean the dialogue here i call it dialogue but it's really like a one person dialogue it's really just paul newman doing all the talking pretty much uh it's screwball dialogue i mean this is fast moving but at at at at at at a die like clip he could be funny dialogue in exchanges reasoning but aren't you can ask us to sit down all finds that dental like yet either we oughta go like it's it doesn't fit all with anything it's kind of jarring i think at first i think i think this movie which jiang author of the way throughout its deliberately jar i think it's deliberately jarring in the music to you know they're they're segments were the that are scored by this.

paul newman butch cassidy crawley john wayne henry fonda bosnia attritional jiang
"sundance" Discussed on The Canon

The Canon

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"sundance" Discussed on The Canon

"Uh paul newman's butch cassidy shows up and basically kind of talks their way out of a fight where in attritional western the introduction to the sundance kid wouldbe him blow in the shit out of this guy and in like like shooting him in any crawley's cool thing okay she's rolfast while the la la um and then and then right after that goes into a scene where were butch kasese leadership of of their gang here primarily called the whole n wall gang is is challenged and any wednesday by kicking a did in the balts wishes like the most atypical thing for a western hero to do you know like john wayne would never do that none of these none of these characters even like henry fonda on what's once upon a time the west wouldn't do that antitank of anything lowering attacking summary in the bosnia western i guess it would just be kicking in in the balls from behind maybe like qichen their horse in the balls versed allies i always get wait a horse's mouth but you know there there's right from the beginning this movie were chipping away at a western icrc iconography western movies do at how they set up conflicts now they resolve them and consequently who these characters are yeah and we must find jarring i mean the dialogue here i call it dialogue but it's really like a one person dialogue it's really just paul newman doing all the talking pretty much uh it's screwball dialogue i mean this is fast moving but at at at at at at a die like clip he could be funny dialogue in exchanges reasoning but aren't you can ask us to sit down all finds that dental like yet either we oughta go like it's it doesn't fit all with anything it's kind of jarring i think at first i think i think this movie which jiang author of the way throughout its deliberately jar i think it's deliberately jarring in the music to you know they're they're segments were the that are scored by this.

paul newman butch cassidy crawley john wayne henry fonda bosnia attritional jiang
"sundance" Discussed on The Canon

The Canon

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"sundance" Discussed on The Canon

"Uh paul newman's butch cassidy shows up and basically kind of talks their way out of a fight where in attritional western the introduction to the sundance kid wouldbe him blow in the shit out of this guy and in like like shooting him in any crawley's cool thing okay she's rolfast while the la la um and then and then right after that goes into a scene where were butch kasese leadership of of their gang here primarily called the whole n wall gang is is challenged and any wednesday by kicking a did in the balts wishes like the most atypical thing for a western hero to do you know like john wayne would never do that none of these none of these characters even like henry fonda on what's once upon a time the west wouldn't do that antitank of anything lowering attacking summary in the bosnia western i guess it would just be kicking in in the balls from behind maybe like qichen their horse in the balls versed allies i always get wait a horse's mouth but you know there there's right from the beginning this movie were chipping away at a western icrc iconography western movies do at how they set up conflicts now they resolve them and consequently who these characters are yeah and we must find jarring i mean the dialogue here i call it dialogue but it's really like a one person dialogue it's really just paul newman doing all the talking pretty much uh it's screwball dialogue i mean this is fast moving but at at at at at at a die like clip he could be funny dialogue in exchanges reasoning but aren't you can ask us to sit down all finds that dental like yet either we oughta go like it's it doesn't fit all with anything it's kind of jarring i think at first i think i think this movie which jiang author of the way throughout its deliberately jar i think it's deliberately jarring in the music to you know they're they're segments were the that are scored by this.

paul newman butch cassidy crawley john wayne henry fonda bosnia attritional jiang
"sundance" Discussed on The Canon

The Canon

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"sundance" Discussed on The Canon

"Uh paul newman's butch cassidy shows up and basically kind of talks their way out of a fight where in attritional western the introduction to the sundance kid wouldbe him blow in the shit out of this guy and in like like shooting him in any crawley's cool thing okay she's rolfast while the la la um and then and then right after that goes into a scene where were butch kasese leadership of of their gang here primarily called the whole n wall gang is is challenged and any wednesday by kicking a did in the balts wishes like the most atypical thing for a western hero to do you know like john wayne would never do that none of these none of these characters even like henry fonda on what's once upon a time the west wouldn't do that antitank of anything lowering attacking summary in the bosnia western i guess it would just be kicking in in the balls from behind maybe like qichen their horse in the balls versed allies i always get wait a horse's mouth but you know there there's right from the beginning this movie were chipping away at a western icrc iconography western movies do at how they set up conflicts now they resolve them and consequently who these characters are yeah and we must find jarring i mean the dialogue here i call it dialogue but it's really like a one person dialogue it's really just paul newman doing all the talking pretty much uh it's screwball dialogue i mean this is fast moving but at at at at at at a die like clip he could be funny dialogue in exchanges reasoning but aren't you can ask us to sit down all finds that dental like yet either we oughta go like it's it doesn't fit all with anything it's kind of jarring i think at first i think i think this movie which jiang author of the way throughout its deliberately jar i think it's deliberately jarring in the music to you know they're they're segments were the that are scored by this.

paul newman butch cassidy crawley john wayne henry fonda bosnia attritional jiang
"sundance" Discussed on The Canon

The Canon

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"sundance" Discussed on The Canon

"Uh paul newman's butch cassidy shows up and basically kind of talks their way out of a fight where in attritional western the introduction to the sundance kid wouldbe him blow in the shit out of this guy and in like like shooting him in any crawley's cool thing okay she's rolfast while the la la um and then and then right after that goes into a scene where were butch kasese leadership of of their gang here primarily called the whole n wall gang is is challenged and any wednesday by kicking a did in the balts wishes like the most atypical thing for a western hero to do you know like john wayne would never do that none of these none of these characters even like henry fonda on what's once upon a time the west wouldn't do that antitank of anything lowering attacking summary in the bosnia western i guess it would just be kicking in in the balls from behind maybe like qichen their horse in the balls versed allies i always get wait a horse's mouth but you know there there's right from the beginning this movie were chipping away at a western icrc iconography western movies do at how they set up conflicts now they resolve them and consequently who these characters are yeah and we must find jarring i mean the dialogue here i call it dialogue but it's really like a one person dialogue it's really just paul newman doing all the talking pretty much uh it's screwball dialogue i mean this is fast moving but at at at at at at a die like clip he could be funny dialogue in exchanges reasoning but aren't you can ask us to sit down all finds that dental like yet either we oughta go like it's it doesn't fit all with anything it's kind of jarring i think at first i think i think this movie which jiang author of the way throughout its deliberately jar i think it's deliberately jarring in the music to you know they're they're segments were the that are scored by this.

paul newman butch cassidy crawley john wayne henry fonda bosnia attritional jiang
"sundance" Discussed on The Canon

The Canon

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"sundance" Discussed on The Canon

"Uh paul newman's butch cassidy shows up and basically kind of talks their way out of a fight where in attritional western the introduction to the sundance kid wouldbe him blow in the shit out of this guy and in like like shooting him in any crawley's cool thing okay she's rolfast while the la la um and then and then right after that goes into a scene where were butch kasese leadership of of their gang here primarily called the whole n wall gang is is challenged and any wednesday by kicking a did in the balts wishes like the most atypical thing for a western hero to do you know like john wayne would never do that none of these none of these characters even like henry fonda on what's once upon a time the west wouldn't do that antitank of anything lowering attacking summary in the bosnia western i guess it would just be kicking in in the balls from behind maybe like qichen their horse in the balls versed allies i always get wait a horse's mouth but you know there there's right from the beginning this movie were chipping away at a western icrc iconography western movies do at how they set up conflicts now they resolve them and consequently who these characters are yeah and we must find jarring i mean the dialogue here i call it dialogue but it's really like a one person dialogue it's really just paul newman doing all the talking pretty much uh it's screwball dialogue i mean this is fast moving but at at at at at at a die like clip he could be funny dialogue in exchanges reasoning but aren't you can ask us to sit down all finds that dental like yet either we oughta go like it's it doesn't fit all with anything it's kind of jarring i think at first i think i think this movie which jiang author of the way throughout its deliberately jar i think it's deliberately jarring in the music to you know they're they're segments were the that are scored by this.

paul newman butch cassidy crawley john wayne henry fonda bosnia attritional jiang
"sundance" Discussed on The Canon

The Canon

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"sundance" Discussed on The Canon

"Uh paul newman's butch cassidy shows up and basically kind of talks their way out of a fight where in attritional western the introduction to the sundance kid wouldbe him blow in the shit out of this guy and in like like shooting him in any crawley's cool thing okay she's rolfast while the la la um and then and then right after that goes into a scene where were butch kasese leadership of of their gang here primarily called the whole n wall gang is is challenged and any wednesday by kicking a did in the balts wishes like the most atypical thing for a western hero to do you know like john wayne would never do that none of these none of these characters even like henry fonda on what's once upon a time the west wouldn't do that antitank of anything lowering attacking summary in the bosnia western i guess it would just be kicking in in the balls from behind maybe like qichen their horse in the balls versed allies i always get wait a horse's mouth but you know there there's right from the beginning this movie were chipping away at a western icrc iconography western movies do at how they set up conflicts now they resolve them and consequently who these characters are yeah and we must find jarring i mean the dialogue here i call it dialogue but it's really like a one person dialogue it's really just paul newman doing all the talking pretty much uh it's screwball dialogue i mean this is fast moving but at at at at at at a die like clip he could be funny dialogue in exchanges reasoning but aren't you can ask us to sit down all finds that dental like yet either we oughta go like it's it doesn't fit all with anything it's kind of jarring i think at first i think i think this movie which jiang author of the way throughout its deliberately jar i think it's deliberately jarring in the music to you know they're they're segments were the that are scored by this.

paul newman butch cassidy crawley john wayne henry fonda bosnia attritional jiang
"sundance" Discussed on /Film Daily

/Film Daily

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"sundance" Discussed on /Film Daily

"Everyone welcomed the slash on daily for january 25th the two thousand eighteen i today's show we're gonna be talking about our favorite film from the two thousand eighteen sundance film festival this peter shore joining them to this podcast is slash home we can editor bright omen adding on andor on senior writer then pearson hey what's up so i as you guys probably know i was at the sundance film festival for less than 24 hours i did not get to see any films but ban and brad both got to see some films for the side and we also had steve iaak capone covering some reviews for the set but right now we have on the line brad and ben uh to talk about their fever films at the sundance film festival and before we get into that i know some people will probably already tuning out because they're like sundance film festival i don't want to hear about this but um you know we should mentioned you know some of the biggest films that people were talking about today uh appreared at last year sundance film festival the big sick call me by your name the aim emailed so the even even though the you have not heard of these films now you could very well be very excited about these films under the air so uh this your chance to get in on the ground for here but some films really early and i get excited about something before all your friends and be in the know uh i uh before we get into it i just want to say i you know i had been going to suddenness of us will for sixteen years before started slash film was volunteer there and i would see films there and out come home in uh you know when those films he went dvd out have like moving nato with my friends in expose him told these like weird move like you know primer and you know small independent movies date people probably wouldn't have heard i mean i guess now with the internet and social media at like people here but things more but baghlan it wasn't the case uh and i i think is kind of actually have slashed.

writer pearson the sundance film festival steve iaak capone brad social media editor sixteen years 24 hours