32 Burst results for "Sumptious"

Battery Rollout Plan Plus Elon Musk Production Email

Tesla Daily: Tesla News & Analysis

06:10 min | 8 months ago

Battery Rollout Plan Plus Elon Musk Production Email

"We're here today we are talking about a potential roadmap for tests roll out of their new forty, six eighty battery cells, and then we have a few other news stories to go through on Tesla's well, we'll start off with batteries where we have quite a bit of new information coming from a very active Ilan on twitter today and the first tweet I want to highlight here is on the forty-six, eighty sal and gigabyte lint yuan in response to whole Mars on twitter says quote Berlin will. Use Forty eighty sell with structural battery pack and front and rear single piece castings. Also new paint system. A lot of new technology will happen in Berlin, which means significant production risk Fremont and Shanghai will transition in about two years when new tack is proven and quote this whole situation with the ramp up of Gigabit, Lan has caused quite a bit of confusion because we do expect that to happen sometime pretty early in twenty twenty one probably sometime in q two would be the start production. But Tesla on the other hand side a lot of the technology during Battery Day was still in sort of a pilot phase and I think there were a lot of sumptious that initially this new Salle would be used in the Plaid Model S, which we know isn't expected until late twenty, twenty one. So that's where the confusion comes in of. Okay. What cells are going to be used in that initial motto why Production Pretty early next year from Giga Berlin with this tweet from Ilana it. Appears that we now have a pretty conclusive answer that from the beginning, it seems like tussle will be trying to use those forty six eighty tablets, battery cells, as well as these of of sell to pack or released sell to vehicles structure battery format as for the chemistry used in those cells. Tesla during the Battery Day presentation split up into three groups, iron based Nicholas, manganese, and high nickel in terms of cathodes and the model why image did appear in the nickel plus manganese section of that. Approach. So presumably, that's what we would see in the model. Why though did add in another tweet that quote we do expect to make heavy use of LLP for medium range cars and stationary storage and quote with L. B.. Being with the modern phosphate I think one of the key questions around the ramp up of the model y from Berlin is how Tesla handles that and the potential osborne effect that that could have on Mata y from let's say Shanghai or from Fremont this could be one of those ways if actually starts off with a lithium iron phosphate model Y in Berlin that would be. Obviously, a lower end vehicle that may have specs more comparable to what Tesla's producing today and Fremont, and presumably soon in Shanghai on the other hand, it would be a little bit unusual for Tesla to start production with some of that lower and vehicle usually they start on the higher end that work their way down. So I think whichever way Tesla approaches it is going to have its own set of issues and that's going to be one of the most interesting things to see how it gets handled. Next year we'll set that aside for now I wanNA talk more about the production and the timelines. Year homers reaction to this on twitter I'm not GonNa read all of it here but basically, he said that you had sandbagged the presentation during battery died in terms of of the timelines and he replied to those tweets by saying quote prototypes or a piece of cake. A high volume production of a new technology is extremely hard takes much longer than people think to climb the production s curve I can't emphasize enough that production is by far the hard part and quote this was something that Yulon emphasized consistently throughout the day presentation saying that not all the stuff is fully functional yet in a full. High speed production type of way just working really right now in a pilot line and with somewhat low yields or not yields up to what they would like quite yet. So that's what Tesla is working on figuring out right now at that pilot line, and once they do that hopefully, they can expand the concepts used in that pilot line pretty quickly in Gigabyte Lynn but I think that is the uncertainty that remains if the main issue is yield, Tesla knows how to settle this stuff up and they can get some production out of it. They may just not be able to produce at a higher. Rate for some period of time until those yields improve, obviously it's going to be more capital efficient if Tesla can figure that out on the pilot line before expanding dramatically in. Giga. Burlington but it's not like it's a binary thing. There's a lot of new technology here a lot of different steps in this process that Tesla's working on making more efficient and I'm sure some of those advancements those new technologies are ready to go right now with high yields while others such as the dry battery electrode process will probably take tesla a little bit more time to perfect. But just because a part of that. Process is imperfect yet doesn't mean that there's not going to be any production. It just means that production is going to be constrained until TUSLA can improve that the other element here that we haven't talked about yet is what about Giga Texas it seems pretty clear that if did you, Berlin is going to be using the new cell right off the bat. Then Gig a Texas probably also doing the same as we've talked about the targeted date for first substantial completion forget Texas is may first twenty twenty one. So we put all that together. It seems like by Q. Three next year Tesla is aiming. To have these new cells being produced at three locations, the pilot line and Fremont Gigabyte Lynn and access. So let's breakdown how this all might fit together and how it might spread across various product lines and will start with a couple of points. Tesla. Made at Battery Day. So the first is the plan Tesla said that in twenty twenty two, they hope to produce one hundred gigawatt hours of battery cells in house. We also know that the pilot line in Fremont, they hope to get that to output of ten gigawatt hours per year. But over time they hope to have each assembly line be capable. Of An output of twenty gigawatt hours per year. So piecing all these things together, I've put together a hypothetical forty-six eighty battery roadmap emphasis on hypothetical because a lot of this is just guesswork at this point in time but hopefully, we can kind of use this as a starting point and have a discussion about it and slowly gain more confidence in this roadmap as time goes by. So to orientate those of you that are watching on video on the left hand side, I have the products and then a hypothetical average capacity for each battery pack inside of those products then I have a table with. The number of units from each location the Fremont Pilot Line Giga Berlin and Gigi Texas, and then a second table showing the amount of batteries that would be required in gigawatt hours for that level of production each year

Tesla Fremont Pilot Line Giga Berlin Berlin Twitter Fremont Giga Berlin Shanghai Giga Giga Texas Salle Ilan LLP Yulon Texas Gigi Texas Mata Y Nicholas Burlington
Brazil's biggest cities start reopening as COVID-19 surges

The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

01:46 min | 1 year ago

Brazil's biggest cities start reopening as COVID-19 surges

"Brazil ranked second to the United States for the most coronavirus cases and deaths of any country in the world yet it's pushing ahead with reopening businesses and its largest cities series Bill Weir's and some hollow for us. right now, so set the scene for US Bill. What are you seeing? Well a lot of the businesses were only allowed to be open for about six hours today, usually in the middle of the day source, seeing folks sort of trickle in and out of the shops here as they get closer to closing time, there's a mall across the street that was open today for the first time as people get to sit down restaurants at forty percent capacity, or so, but in the shopping district in the center of town today I saw people elbow to elbow, and not all the masks were at full mast, so to speak at a lot of that has to do with the way Brazil as the United States, the pandemic has become really political. Down here, thanks to the man in charge President Bolsonaro of from the beginning. Has dismissed covid nineteen as little flu that Brazilians are strong enough to handle He pooh-poohed calls from the Health Ministry to social distance and to quarantine fact. He fired his health minister. A lot of people were worried that president trump would fire Dr Chee well most scenario did that replacement quit after a month? And now the man in charge of the pandemic response is a loyal army general who has no health policy experience at all, but what's interesting at the same time is Brazil is now the site of two major vaccine sort of phase three. Three trials, thousands of Brazilians will volunteer to get very promising medicines, but wolf those probably even in the best-case won't be ready for public sumptious until this time next year.

Brazil United States Bill Weir President Bolsonaro Health Ministry President Trump Dr Chee Donald Trump
Colin Mulholland

Hacking Your Leadership

01:11 min | 1 year ago

Colin Mulholland

"On this episode I WanNa Recognize Colin Mulholland. Collins. Title is the Enterprise Change. Management Global Practice leader of change healthcare. Colin has some great posts. On his Lincoln page, it has been a guest on a few podcasts sharing his views on Change Management Co, creating shared vision, aligning goals and embedding continuous feedback. I appreciate counts thoughts on how to have a systemic approach to creating efficiencies while including the voice of the employees and customers I also appreciate his definition of a system as the shared behaviors, beliefs and sumptious of a team, and that anyone on the team is in the system. In recent posts Colin shared and I quote when we show up with a willingness to listen openness to learn encouraged to co create together. We are better when we attempt to coerce or change others we are doomed to lose trust, and our best will not be accomplished. Grateful to learn from a comprehensive approach by Michelle, Kim to navigate during traumatic times key takeaway know that your team will remember your compassion, but they will also remember your silence. So. I highly recommend checking collins content in as usual is the links to is linked in profile in the episode notes Great Job Colin and thanks for helping others to Hashtag be a better leader.

Colin Mulholland Change Management Co Collins Global Practice Michelle Lincoln KIM
How Tech Is Failing The Trans Community

CodeNewbie

05:59 min | 1 year ago

How Tech Is Failing The Trans Community

"So you WanNa Post on Dev titled. Trained in your name is a hard unsolved problem and computer science. Can you tell us what this piece about? The thing is like the title of the Post is is very much like a play on a classic joke. Meam trope, which is kind of like. Is A hot until probe in computer science, which can go like either like the things that genuinely all that things that genuinely on and to me I think. It was a subject that became rapidly extremely important in my life as I went through recently I guess kind of still am in the process of changing my name to better reflect who I am and sort of just like all of the systems I bumped up against that were fighting me in any way to do that and really like being a accomplish sulphur engineer. Feeling like a lot of it should have been much easier than it was and really sort of coming to understand that a lot of it is less to do with software engineering writ lodge in multiple with sort of like how people think about information schemers. What was the impetus for writing this piece? Really? It was sort of my earn frustration more than anything else like sometimes. Sometimes when I'm writing will be a point. I'm trying to get across and it's like I have to really work at it to get the words onto paper. Like doesn't I dare I. Have It's? It's very big in Amorphous and it takes a lot of time, and this post was not like that. The text of this post fell out of me in the space of. Of about a day and a half, and it really was just like writing very quickly and fluently, and it's because I am transgender and I it because changing your name in the way, transgender people do is not such a common use case just like many computer systems I expected to be able to deal with it just one and it's like genuinely frustrating and disheartening to. To me to encounter that and I wanted to write about my experience and what I really saw after I published that really really resonated with a lot of people, and that was really nice to see. Yeah, I can't imagine how difficult that must be. Especially because you're in the position to fully understand what the flaws and decisions, people made to end up where we are. So, you read about your experience in particular restaurant when you made a reservation with your chosen name, and then the restaurant workers actually address you by your dead name shortly after you WanNa talk about that experience to me, this was like a really interesting example of like information systems, getting this wrong and not like the people involved so as best I can piece together from what happened. It's like one of those restaurants where you like a cell number, and then they like text you when your tables ready and then. Then you, come back, and they call out your name. And what had happened is like at left them my number and I'd said like my name is penelope. And then when they texted me, it was like Oh tables ready with no name in it whatsoever and then when I got there and told them I was there, they were like Oh. Do you mean and then they said my dead name to me and so like somewhere in that loop. My dead name had been associated with my phone number in. In such a way that even when I was giving my name to like the people in the place like they were being shown the old name in a few minutes later, right, what I sort of in fall off from that ineffectual is able to later determined to be true is that the system was cashing the name against the phone number and like either they didn't type in the name when I gave them my phone number, or it just overrated what they had said to it, and so like icon determine. Determine exactly what happened, but that is an actual site effective like these to identify as being linked in a way that is like actually like a really shop experience for me to have you know. How much do you think is inherently difficult or more sort of a blind spot with the way? Software is developed in terms of the demographics and what software developers are sort of carrying about most so the thing is we just bad this as an industry like Patrick. McKenzie wrote his fallacies computer program. Believe about. A blog posts several years ago and like most of the advice in it is still relevant today. Mike pursed is like a slightly different take on the same idea, which is the way that we build these information systems inherently make sumptious about ways that the world is that ton out not to be true, and so when I used, put my social engineering hat on, and really look at this icy like that most likely what's happening is people take a very simple view of the world about how people relate to names and include that into that systems, and then like that's just it right I mean for example like the assumption here that a person has a single name holds true for wide swathe. Swathe of the population, but is not true for me and is like for example, not true for lot of women who get married are impressive, changing the legal name or people who get divorced during process of changing legal name, right and other affected groups beyond and so like really to me, it's that we just haven't educated ourselves like as an industry on like many different kinds of human factors that actually we need to encode in our information scheme as even for the simplest of

Engineer Meam Mckenzie Mike Patrick
The Voice First Games with Jeferson Valadares of Doppio Games

Alexa in Canada

05:28 min | 1 year ago

The Voice First Games with Jeferson Valadares of Doppio Games

"The other thing that makes me and Chris. which is the CO founder? Like Chris Barnes excited about tractive stories of the buyer and I'm and different things but we So we we got really excited about him Somebody mentioned it to me like as a possibility in the beginning of dismissed it but the next playing with like actually no. There's something years like voices. Human Metro thing to teach really people like people. Don't hope say things. Obviously the advice doesn't always reply the right way but I think if there's a potential here to do something like very metros I kind of reminds the evoque this beginning of mobile beginning of facebook games like Nfl You can do start telling here obviously when you say something when the wind goes through your pipes it means a little bit more than if you just type it or something like the weird cultural thing such I felt there was like a combination of both good business opportunity because his vice a CR- growing like crazy and and I know they cheap so you know the are where you need like a you know. Whatever expensive headsets tried out like the zoo and so keep to get the right? That's right and so they're very. That's one reason why they're exploding on the but also this idea that you know voice entertainment. It's kind of new. There hasn't been a lot done in that area because the tech wasn't good enough so I think there's some creative. Yeah it's true like nobody knows what best game is like. It goes like we. We have been very little so I felt like it was both like a good business opportunity but also good creative opportunity pretending so. That's kind of why we start. The company said okay. Let's go folks on that So the first game gortex which I like it was actually on Alexa? Release Tober UH twenty eighteen. We we did just increase like we kind of paid ourselves. We hired contractors. And you know the game name Just to just to see for ourselves. What the market was like his is actually a fan? You know how it is bound on like how. How do we get people to find? Find the game like how how. How does the whole thing work right? So we visit game Yeah like pretty good reception Fourche for reviews with on average with you know like a thousands of reviews they. It's reasonably popular game platform. So we're Kinda happy with that and then we decided to go all in and then we got some. Investors Awesome actually raised the Round last year at both Kgo participated around and Yes so based on that we took the money grew the team. So now we're ten people. Well is facing Portugal. Well yes I guess that when it once company company sumptious with kind expensive. I mean it's great if you were you know facebook Google apple but if you're like a small guy trying something new that you don't know who's going to work it's Kinda Kinda risky mortgage costs and health insurance costs and like everything's expensive lease for the office or you know everything is way more expensive right. Yes I think We looked at a bunch of different places in Europe. ended up in Portugal. I think there's a mix of It's not the most like gaming and like the bees gaming hub in Europe. Opposite like London and Stockholm Helsinki Berlin Barcelona displaced more developing games. But nobody knows what they're doing. Voice Games right so they can go go out in London. Hire ten voice specialists because they don't really exist so I felt like the talent pool. Here's pretty good than I speak English. I mentioned from just local language can go to the office and have less less of a harder time than the other foreigners as I felt like it was a good approach and yeah so we did that last year. We're going to start a company and that the funding and Yeah now are we good. A team released a second game last year in walk up to go in October and skull. The three percent challenge those any partnership at flicks. It's based on an athlete's Shoko two percent. I've watched it always didn't go yet. Yeah so we kind of how it happened like through a friend come on I met Bianca. which is the lead actress and She was really excited about doing something gain in. And I'm like wow enough to present this actually pre because it's salad tests and challenges. We gotta go when and now the other thing we wanted was to get a game that allows us to do some sort of multiplayer competition Two percent kind of fits dead dead and also we wanted to do tests differ mechanics because our first game was more like a traditional attractive starring. We want it's gotTa test different things on the second on a we. We felt like he would also fit those. Their ability to make different types of challenge. Steady could play Such different types of mechanics if they're gonNA work so we have seen different type hiking games inside on top of having that interactive story that he'd talk and get an answer a new kind of choose. What what you want at Cetera or to gain seines pains accordingly? We also have these kind of multiplayer role where you you play this new challenges and again a score. There's a weekly did aboard Yes it it does kind of things wanted to push with. It's great that's great. Wow you've done a lot and these games are pretty cool. I've played around with both of them and I think they're really

Facebook Portugal London Chris Barnes Co Founder Alexa NFL Europe Stockholm Helsinki Berlin Barc KGO Shoko Bianca. Google Europe.
Mighty Caseys Home Run

MarketFoolery

15:42 min | 2 years ago

Mighty Caseys Home Run

"How are you, Chris? I'm not quite as rested. Yeah. I'm not as tan. Thanks for bringing the main weather with you. It is fantastic outside. It is gorgeous out. So and here we are in a window through. I know let's make this quick. We're going to dip into the full mail bag. One company is having trouble finding a CEO. So depending on what your resume looks like we may have a job opening for the dozens of listeners. Let's start with some earnings from Casey's general stores and by earnings I mean blow out earnings starting with the thunder. Are you Chris had really is Casey's general? The stock is up eleven percent attending an all time high. How good was this quarter? It was really it was a really good quarter. I mean sixty eight cents versus fifty one year ago for the quarter five dollars and fifty cents for for, for the year versus three eighty one for a year ago. The stock edgy said up ten percent and all of this came in the environment in which I think the thing that people were surprised about is that it's one of the things that Casey's does one of their big revenue items gasoline sales, and it's been kind of cruddy environment for selling gas right pricing. Hasn't been there spreads haven't been there. So for them to come in with a quarter like this. That means. Their front of store has just performed magnificently. That was the thing I was thinking about when I was taking a quick look at the results, and I just and this is not a apples to apples comparison. But I thought of Costco, because every time Costco reports earnings, you know, the gasoline is part of that question, but it really does seem like Casey's general has. Through no fault of their own invert put pressure on Costco in anyone else who is in that business to basically say, hey, look, you don't have to be victim to the whims of past prices. If you are really getting it done in the front of the store. Do you have you been to a Casey's? I've never been to a case so you know what they're about. Right. So folks here on the east coast probably familiar with wa wa or sheets cases kind of like that. But in the mid west. And so, yeah, maybe they've put Costco under a little bit of pressure, but they're really, really putting pressure under fast food restaurants companies, like McDonald's that have dominated the, you know, the travel food market for for such a long period of time. And I mean there are multiple stores. I mean I would love to be I mean while might be at the top of my list for companies that I would like to invest in that don't exist. But, you know, are there that you can't not the doesn't exist while was a real thing? But. But Casey's is a pretty good alternative. I mean, there's circle K. They're seven eleven even but Casey's may be the one that is most similar to a while her sheets. When you look at the stock hitting all time, high is it pricey because cases general, is one of those stocks that in good times, and bad has never really struck me as being pricey. No, it's okay, it's, it's a little pricey. But given compared to what else is out there in the market. I mean beyond me trading at a price to sales of thirty four I think we're fine with Casey's. I mean Casey's Casey's food margins, the margin of their store spectacular. This is a really really, well run company and it's really taking share from a lot of the quick serve restaurants. The particularly again is we get out into the travel season. You know, over the summer. I you know, I see good things for this company, they're gonna start to run up against some real competition, particularly as they pushed the east, but nine thousand nine hundred stores they know what they're doing. Let's move onto the latest in the US China trade war, and the latest hook from from the Wall Street Journal involves Foxconn which has come out and said, Foxconn is prepared to move apple production out of China. Yeah. And not only are they prepared to they could do it. They feel like they could do it rather quickly with without any disruption. So Foxconn one of really interesting things about this article was that they, they noticed they noted that the company's been public since nineteen ninety one, the actual name of the company is Han. Hi precision. This is the first investor conference, call in meeting that they've ever had the first one. Why do you think they why? Well, part, part of it in one of the reasons that they did this was that the president and founder of FOX cons guy named Terry, go is running for president of Taiwan's. We has to step down. So they're talking about some of the. Some of the issues having to do with, with leadership transition and such things. But they took the opportunity to say, by the way, we had been up in Wisconsin for nothing. We don't have massive facilities in Vietnam in Mexico in Brazil, and even Japan for nothing. We're ready and we've been thinking about this for years as the advantage for manufacturing in China has declined. So in some ways, it's almost, you know, the thing that fascinating to me in this talks about how pragmatic these, you know, the, the Chinese and the Taiwanese are with each other. It seems to be entirely uncontroversial that the potential next president of Taiwan is one of the largest employers in China. I mean, that's not even something that they're really even you know, they're not even really talking about. So. Yeah, I mean, this is, it's just interesting to see the ways in which global trade and global manufa. Lecturing are shifting based upon the potential for a long, protracted trade war. Does that automatically mean that the price of the next generation of iphone is going to be higher as a result? Let's say this act. Opposed to what? That's well, that's fair. Yeah. But, but if you're someone who loves Apple's products and you see this headline, I think it's reasonable to ask the question, wait a minute is stuff going to I? I apple has always had pricing power are gonna have even more now because if they're moving Foxconn is moving production out of China, Maya sumptious is it's going to cost more to build the iphone in Wisconsin than China. Yeah. I don't I actually I don't think so. The iphone and the ipad, particularly the iphone have had such huge margins that the manufacturing component. I mean it's like it's like if you have to spend a little bit more to manufacture pharmaceutical that doesn't really have anything to do with the price that they're able to charge me. They have really, really found a way to find to price it at the point in which, you know, the customers would still consume. So I don't I don't really think that this is an issue for them. I mean it could it could impact margin just a little bit. But that, that margin is already being impacted by by virtue of the fact that these things are being manufactured in China under under a new tariff regime. If you're. Looking for a new job? You might wanna check out the job offerings at Wells Fargo which continue to include the CEO position monster dot com may have this listed Wall Street Journal, reporting that Wells Fargo shocker is having trouble getting some of the top executives in the banking industry, interested in the job at wellsfargo, it's hard not to have just a little bit of shoddy in for about this as poorly as Wells Fargo has behaved over the last several years. Oh, yeah, no, we're definitely going to have a little bit of shot in for, you know, who else is Jamie diamond. Yeah. I like the Jamie diamond last month took a shot at them average, and I'm quoting here, he was at an investor conference and said, it's not responsible for a company just my own view to have a CEO leave with no plan in place. I don't personally understand that these referring, of course, to not just a company but a but a sustained. Important bank. Absolutely. No. Absolutely. And you know, I mean put aside. The issues that they have at the fake credit card accounts, and all of the cultural issues, although that all of those things lead to where they are right now having trouble filling this spot. Yeah. But he's got a point. I mean he shop at he's got a point that, if you're the board of directors and Tim Sloan suddenly, walks out the door. You gotta be ready. It's baffling to me that they didn't have an emergency break glass plan in place. Not saying Tim Sloan was going to leave, but they had no idea what they were going to do. So what they've what they've ended up having to do. They've gone out. They tried to get the CEO of PNC guy named Richard DEM, Jack. They went after Gordon Smith from J P Morgan, they've even gone after a guy name. Richard Davis, who was the former CEO of US Bank or Bank core. Who is now the CEO of the make a wish foundation and all of these people have said, no, we're really not interested because I mean for one thing they had to each watched, you know, when the Senate banking committee, just absolutely torch, Tim, Sloan and said, that's just not worth it. I mean this job really, really must be toxic. And there's fairy little to see in Wells Fargo Fargo's future because of caps, that the Federal Reserve has put on the Bank any type of turnaround in the Bank is years into the future. Well, and if you're Gordon Smith JP Morgan, if Jamie diamond ever decides it's time to ride off into the sunset Gordon. Smith is on the shortlist of internal candidates to replace him. So why would you leave is? And he has he has, I think the number was fifty million dollars in deferred compensation coming to him just remaining where he is which, you know, good for. Him. Would must be nice. So getting him would be quite expensive. And they really this has to be a good hire for for for Wells Fargo. So I can take why they are perhaps going slow. But the fact that they didn't have a plan in places is perhaps unconscionable. And also, perhaps demonstrative of why no one wants the job. Is it a given that it's going to be someone from the banking industry because obviously industry expertise is important, but they still have cultural problems in Wells Fargo. I think I think the answers, it's a fantastic question. I think the answer is. Yes, simply because. Yeah, they have the cultural issues to solve. And maybe that is a higher. But the bigger issue that they have is that the regulators and the Federal Reserve are down their throats, and I don't know that a non banking person would necessarily have the tools in place to be able to navigate those issues are Email addresses, market fully at fool dot com. Got an Email from Andrew who writes, it was great to see and meet many of you at full fest last Friday. Thank you for all that. You do your research inside humor makes investing enjoyable and time efficient. Thank you for that, Andrew. He goes onto right? You've certainly made me smarter happier and richer, as well as annoying. My wife when I walk around the house with headsets on listening to your podcasts. Andrew. We downside. We appreciate. The nice comments there. Don't don't unnecessarily annoy. Mrs just. No. That's, that's a self-inflicted admit it. Yeah. L which, I mean, what did you think we were going to do with? So also, we don't want any residual blowback from Andrews white. If we don't want her being, like, hey, you know, you are making me, certainly less happy. I know that's not good yesterday market fully MAC and Jason Emily talk a little bit about full fest. Our biggest event we've ever had and. One or two things that stand out for you in terms of highlights. Well, I was I had a wonderful conversation with the CEO of upward command named Stefan, casserole and just listening to him, really describe the issues around the, the gig economy around around contractors and how nearly thirty five percent of all Americans do actually have our temporarily employed in some ways a lot of whom were by choice. And I'll be honest, I think about business a lot. And I think about the economy in the way things you know, try. Things are progressing lot. But he brought up some really, really interesting concepts just in terms of the power of the worker now and the fact that perhaps the relationship between employer and employee is breaking down and maybe actually in some ways, it should that was I didn't catch all of your interview with Stefan, I caught the second half of it, it was really great. It was very enjoyable. I just say this every year, about full fest, but it's always so great. Just a meet people talk to people and get a sense of where they are in their investing life. Some people are just starting out. Some people are younger. Some people are older NAN, they're starting to think about their kids and their grandkids and sort of setting, you know, ways to pass on the love of investing for them generations. And, and it was it was just great. I do love both of those constituencies. And you at some point it becomes it becomes so. So fun for us. You know, I, I look forward every time to for example, seeing the Morgan's north family from North Carolina who come to each and every event, and they're, they're just lovely people, and you get a chance to really interact, and they see these things that are meaningful to us, and we'd like for you to do more of and carefully. People say, you know, maybe do a little bit less of this, or a little bit different. And so I can't even you know, I can't even begin to describe how valuable those interactions are for us and I do do love when, when folks bring their you know, their kids, they're, you know, their college age, you know, young adult family members and guests just seeing them begin to understand, because they have the biggest advantage of all, you know, they have all of their earnings potential in front of them, and they have so much time. And it's I mean, it's it is a wonderful that tonight, enjoy each and every year it was great. So thank you to everyone and all the, the listener. Who came up now both of them both. No, no. There were a bunch of because they're a bunch of people come up. And they're like I listen, here's how I listen here's when I listen now, and then there are people who come up to me and say, do you work here? Can you? What time is lunch? Where's the coffee which is a good question for you? Can you introduce me to Andy cross? Bill man. Thanks for being here. Thank you. Chris, as always people on the program may have interest in the stocks. They talked about in the motley fool man formal recommendations for against so buy or sell stocks based, solely on what you hear that's going to do it for this edition of market fluids show is mixed by Dan void. I'm Chris hill. Thanks for listening. We'll see you

CEO Casey Taiwan Foxconn Chris Hill Costco Apple Tim Sloan Wells Fargo Wall Street Journal Gordon Smith Jamie Diamond Wisconsin Federal Reserve Wells Fargo Fargo President And Founder Jp Morgan Andrew
"sumptious" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:27 min | 2 years ago

"sumptious" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Jonathan thank you very much indeed. We're going to open this up for questions in just a moment from audience here at middle temple one thought that I had I was hearing, you speak the expansion of law schone, isn't that just a natural consequence of a more complex society? We have more lawyers, but we also have more accountants. We have more actually more of us doesn't just show that we live in a more complicated service economy. I'm sure that we do. But we still have a choice as to where abouts on quite a broad spectrum. We place the intrusiveness of law, and of the state my point is in areas where we do have a choice. We have opted to the more interested end of the scale. Okay. Let's take a question here. My name is on way from Petah in Buckinghamshire load sump sumptious you criticize the expansion of the law into areas that have historically been the. Ream of politicians. But when we have a broken law, that is causing a great deal of suffering, too many people, where else do we turn to? But the courts if politicians refused to act, the blanket ban on a sister dying is one example. It forced my husband Geoffrey to make the difficult decision to travel to dignity in Switzerland, earlier this year, he was dying of motor neuron disease and simply wanted to avoid the final agonizing weeks that lay ahead I helped him by arranging, his final flight and accompaniment by doing this. I was criminally accused by an anonymous notification of our plans. And I was interviewed under caution. We were terrified Jeff might be stopped from traveling that I might be arrested. The investigation was eventually. Dropped, but the police intrusion into our lives devastated our family, the current law on a sister dying is not working and a huge majority of the public wants to see a change came to mind if I just put that to Jonathan sumptious entirely understand the concern that you have. But I think what I would not accept was the necessarily means that decisions on these matters have to be made by judges. The problem is that this is a major moral issue, and it's an issue on which although you say that the public is overwhelmingly in favor. A lot of polling evidence suggests that, that rather depends on the degree of detail which goes into the asking of the question. But on any of you, this is a subject on which people have strong moral views, and which they disagree. There is a large number of people who feel I'm not expressing my own opinion. I'm simply pointing out that, that many people who feel that a changing the law, so as to allow assisted suicide would render large numbers of people vulnerable to unseen pressures from relatives and so on. That others who feel that the intervention of somebody in the life of another so's to end. It is morally objectionable now the question that one has to ask, is, how do we resolve a disagreement like that? It seems to me that there is a difference of opinion within the democratic community. We need a political process in order to resolve. I ask you. I'm going to come back to you, even though you'll retired you seem very unwilling to state you feel and what you think about your exactly what I think about this. I think that the nor should continue to criminalize assistance in suicide and I think that the north would be broken, I think it should be broken from time to time we need to have a lower against it in order to prevent abuse. But you just always been the case that this has been criminal, and it has always been the case that courageous relatives and friends have helped people to die. And I think that is untidy compromise of the sort that I suspect very few lawyers would adopt, but I don't believe that there is necessarily a moral obligation to obey the nor ultimately, it is something that each person has to decide within his own conscience. That's something that I think that is where it to be decided, I am very grateful that with, as much can I just go back to the person that raise the question. How do you react to the point that was made by Jonathan which is don't change the break the law, which is essentially what he's no law needs an adoption? I thoroughly agree with Lord sumptious that there has to be a law against suicide. There's two points, the fact that somebody assisting, obviously has to be covered, but there's a compassionate point as well, which should be not that I should have had to go through caution. And all that time before the case was, obviously, finally dropped and. The second point is the law can be adapted to accommodate those of sound mind with terminal illness who've had can be proved that there is no, no pressure from anybody. On my husband had to go through a great deal to prove this in south. Thank you so much. Thank you. Very much for sharing very past. I appreciate it. Very painful case with over here Helena Kennedy a barrister member of the house of lords Lord. Some I think that you're rather stout about the past and that you see through rather rose tinted glasses. One of the things that has happened is that people have actually turned to the courts, to deal with abuses of power, and that has been a very important development. And so the expansion of law has actually been a good thing because many people are able to take their.

Jonathan sumptious middle temple Helena Kennedy Lord sumptious motor neuron disease Switzerland Petah Jeff Geoffrey Buckinghamshire
How the Name Letter Effect Influences Your Preferences

Curiosity Daily

04:20 min | 2 years ago

How the Name Letter Effect Influences Your Preferences

"There's some really cool ongoing research looking into how humans feel about each other, and I'm not talking about how we say we feel I'm talking about how we really feel starting today. And over the next few Mondays, you're going to learn about some of the ways researchers are testing their hypotheses along with some super interesting results. The various experiments have shown thus far it's all part of our mentality Mondays miniseries, and it stems from the conversation we had with the director of the personality attachment and control laboratory at Cornell University. Vivian zayas. Here's professors, I s with an overview of her research, followed by specific example. Of an unconscious bias, you just might have. So one of my interests for a long time has been how do we mentally represent our relationships? How do we represent people who are really close to us parents partners close friends? How do we represent ourselves? And you know, one way that we can try to figure this out by asking someone what do you think about, you know, your partner? What do you think about your mom, but I'm not as interested in what people say, I'm more interested in reactions that may be triggered spontaneously. But that people may not necessarily be aware that they're triggered. And so I'm interested. These are called sort of spontaneous evaluations automatic evaluations, and the, the jargon, implicit attitude. So these are attitudes. We might have. And again, we might not necessarily be consciously aware that we have them, but they're expected to color how we behave. And so in my lab, we've been trying to measure them. So we can't ask people directly. So we have to try to get at these evaluations without asking people. So we try to develop measures to try to tap into these evaluations. And then try to see well, what would they predict do they predict things that are meaningful to, they predict relationship satisfaction? Do they predict whether we're going to stay in the relationship or break up? And also, what do they reflect do they reflect our experiences in those relationships? And so that's been a focus of my work since the beginning. How do we represent relationships and really focusing on these sort of non conscious responses? So how do you test those non conscious responses, good question can be challenging, but one approach that's used assess evaluations about oneself sort of implicit self evaluations is called the initials preference tests, or the name letter effect. And the way it works is Cody. Initials are CG, so sumptious. Is that what we would expect is that you like the letters CG more than I would like the letter c g more than Ashley would like the letter CG because CG they're associated with you. It's part of your name. And so one way that I can assess your implicit evaluations about yourself. How much you like yourself at the sort of non conscious implicit level is by seeing how much you like CG more than everybody else like CG, and it's non conscious because I didn't ask you directly to tell me how you feel about yourself. I didn't ask you anything about yourself. I'm just asking you to evaluate letters. So that's one way that we could try to tap into these non conscious evaluations. When it comes to how you feel about a partner one approach has been to do something similar. We would expect people to like the initials of their partner more than the average person likes those same letters. And that would be. Measure of serves positively the more positive. It is the more it's supposed to be that you're thinking about your partner, or some association with your partner activates positively and it's supposed to be a meaningful predictor of outcomes. So what does it say about me that I married a woman with the same first initial as me? I mean, have both of our hassles or CG now, which I'm pretty thrilled about actually, yeah. That is pretty funny. There is some work where people gravitate towards certain professions that have their initials. So you might expect there's some work showing that people were named Luis are more likely to be

Partner Ashley Vivian Zayas Cornell University Director Luis
How the Name Letter Effect Affects Your Preferences

Curiosity Daily

04:21 min | 2 years ago

How the Name Letter Effect Affects Your Preferences

"Some really cool ongoing research looking into how humans feel about each other, and I'm not talking about how we say we feel I'm talking about how we really feel starting today. And over the next few Mondays, you're going to learn about some of the ways researchers are testing their hypotheses along with some super interesting results. The various experiments have shown thus far it's all part of our mentality Mondays miniseries, and it stems from the conversation we had with the director of the personality attachment and control laboratory at Cornell University. Vivian zayas. Here's professors, I s with an overview of her research, followed by specific example. Of an unconscious bias, you just might have. So one of my interests for a long time has been how do we mentally represent our relationships? How do we represent people who are really close to us parents partners close friends? How do we represent ourselves? And you know, one way that we can try to figure this out by asking someone what do you think about, you know, your partner? What do you think about your mom, but I'm not as interested in what people say, I'm more interested in reactions that may be triggered spontaneously. But that people may not necessarily be aware that they're triggered. And so I'm interested. These are called sort of spontaneous evaluations automatic evaluations, and the, the jargon, implicit attitude. So these are attitudes. We might have. And again, we might not necessarily be consciously aware that we have them, but they're expected to color how we behave. And so in my lab, we've been trying to measure them. So we can't ask people directly. So we have to try to get at these evaluations without asking people. So we try to develop measures to try to tap into these evaluations. And then try to see well, what would they predict do they predict things that are meaningful to, they predict relationship satisfaction? Do they predict whether we're going to stay in the relationship or break up? And also, what do they reflect do they reflect our experiences in those relationships? And so that's been a focus of my work since the beginning. How do we represent relationships and really focusing on these sort of non conscious responses? So how do you test those non conscious responses, good question can be challenging, but one approach that's used assess evaluations about oneself sort of implicit self evaluations is called the initials preference tests, or the name letter effect. And the way it works is Cody. Initials are CG, so sumptious. Is that what we would expect is that you like the letters CG more than I would like the letter c g more than Ashley would like the letter CG because CG they're associated with you. It's part of your name. And so one way that I can assess your implicit evaluations about yourself. How much you like yourself at the sort of non conscious implicit level is by seeing how much you like CG more than everybody else like CG, and it's non conscious because I didn't ask you directly to tell me how you feel about yourself. I didn't ask you anything about yourself. I'm just asking you to evaluate letters. So that's one way that we could try to tap into these non conscious evaluations. When it comes to how you feel about a partner one approach has been to do something similar. We would expect people to like the initials of their partner more than the average person likes those same letters. And that would be. Measure of serves positively the more positive. It is the more it's supposed to be that you're thinking about your partner, or some association with your partner activates positively and it's supposed to be a meaningful predictor of outcomes. So what does it say about me that I married a woman with the same first initial as me? I mean, have both of our hassles or CG now, which I'm pretty thrilled about actually, yeah. That is pretty funny. There is some work where people gravitate towards certain professions that have their initials. So you might expect there's some work showing that people were named Luis are more likely to be lawyers, for

Partner Ashley Vivian Zayas Cornell University Director Luis
"sumptious" Discussed on World News Analysis

World News Analysis

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"sumptious" Discussed on World News Analysis

"It would not be Republican sumptious at least not in the short term. Well, this New York Times report vol counter to the narrative them president foam has pushed for decades dot is successful businessman. Yeah. He wrote art of the deal. Well, he didn't write it. It was ghost written. But in one thousand nine hundred seven it was a big blockbuster of a book came out during the most mulch financial period for Donald Trump turns out he lost so much money in the eighties. He was too poor to pay taxes. That's according to the New York Times piece, and he's he's obviously blamed his earliest bankruptcies on other factors the recession. What have you what he left out is that he ran his casino business into the ground in Atlantic City. He almost bankrupted New York City vis-a-vis the tax credits. He was afforded by the mayor for Trump Tower. And some of those other projects we know from this. Port. Donald Trump was nowhere close to being a wealthy man whole boat. What has the president's response to the New York Times report? He's not said anything which is unlike him, but his lawyer has been talking the lawyer says the report is inaccurate. But he's not specified, which parts are wrong. The New York Times does point out. This is how it sort of got the information on those tax returns. They didn't get actual copies of them. They relied on what are known as IRS transcripts the Internal Revenue Service which collects taxes every year has transcripts and those were obtained by the New York Times from a source. They say by legal means auditors the ones who check up on people to be sure they're filing taxes appropriately said that these documents are legitimate. And that's what they use to summarize tax returns. So what happens now because appears the president and congress are at an impasse of the release of his tax returns. Will the time story does a lot of things what it doesn't do is answer the questions that the House Democrats have regarding the last six years, we're talking. From twenty thirteen to the present day where Trump's tax returns are concerned. Why are they important? Well, congress wants to know whether Donald Trump is still making money on his businesses is he still profiting if he is he's breaking the law. He says he's passed those onto his sons in his daughter. We don't know that without looking at these are selves Treasury Secretary Mnuchin told congress his department has no plan to fulfill the committee's request, and that the Justice department would be issuing illegal opinion. Well, the guy who runs the Justice department is Bill bar. The attorney general who has already shut down congress this week refusing to testify regarding the mullahs report into Russian interference with the Trump campaign. We've never seen anything like this joing and American politics. President Trump is now for his part suing his own Bank to prevent it from turning over his tax returns. That's where we are. Okay. Thank you, Patrick Flannery for your insights, still to come. EU commission. Forecasts the euro-zone economy to rebound next year this world today. We'll be back in a minute. Breaking news and stories that matter to you. Find us on Twitter by searching for China plus news, where we'll share with you are up to the minute news in-depth analysis and live streaming videos. Visit China plus news for your window on China and the..

President Trump The New York Times Trump Tower president congress New York City Twitter China Patrick Flannery Atlantic City IRS Justice department Treasury Secretary Mnuchin EU commission Bill bar attorney
The Holy Cosmos: The New Religion of Space Exploration

John Bachelor

04:58 min | 2 years ago

The Holy Cosmos: The New Religion of Space Exploration

"Bob Zimmerman keeps the website behind the black looking at the exploring of the cosmos after we do the space engineering this particular kind of exploring requires cosmological thinking, Bob what is the gravitational wave that we keep chasing? Well this. Had been for decades that when when very very heavy massive objects merge or collides just two neutron stars or two black holes or a black hole. Ethane neutron star. The process will call cause a ripple in space time literally like you drop a pebble into his into a pod. And you see ripples move away. From it case. The the merger would be of that pebble hitting the water, and it causes ripples to radiate out actual space time, and those reputational wage and get an instrument sensitive enough, we could actually detect those those ripples is they they sweep past the solar system in the earth. And if we could do that, then actually get evidence of those kind of mergers going on somewhere else and get some information about them. This astronaut Nicole research, it would be a whole different way the universe. And so they built. Two different detectors that work together in Virgo, and they've made some detections in the last few years this this week. They announced the two more detections that occurred in April of this year, and they appear to be emerges of a binary Staw to binary stores come together. And the other detection could be the first collision of a neutral style with a black hole. That a lot of there's a lot of sumptious based on what these collisions off because we always see the gravitational wave. So imagine, you're you're you're, you know, you're little lily pad in a in a pond and a wave goes by you now from that weight have to speculate where the event occurred, and what caused it. And of course, you CV event. And so with speculating strana murs using telescopes trying to see if using the wave that they can trace back and detect the actual event, but there was. Good. So you have to look a lot of the sky. And so they haven't been able to do that yet. Eventually they will. And that'll be a big deal when that happens, but right now, it's just cool science which is getting another way to look at the first to tone down the concern about puffing. This is a near earth object. It's watched very carefully you can calculate its orbit's. It's revolutions and within these last days in a from a came. We're told within nineteen thousand miles verse oppo fice is a very large near earth object. It would make a very bad day in Paris and the rest of the planet should have hit us. Bob, nineteen thousand miles. That's close. Right. That's within the high orbit satellite. Yes. Except I have to correct something John the close approach of office nineteen thousand miles is year away. And they beginning to prepare for that right now. Scientists want. They know it's coming they schedule that for several years. They know that they can't get that. How it passes the earth could will change the pulses, and there is a one hundred thousand chance that when that Alba changes it will send poll into a collision course with the earth into the future. But there's a small chance of that the more likely thing is that the Albano fly by will will send father away. So it's it's, you know, understanding how near earth objects like this function. And and can be made of is critical understand how we can prevent them from hitting us. It's one of the reasons why both the mission and the affairs Rex missions to Ragu and Ben new assault important because those are the same kind of near earth objects, and they're over piles figure out how we can move them as well just one more detail about puffs, Bob when it passes. I read will be able to watch it like a shooting star. Correct. It's that close. Yeah. This is. Thinking all distances. And it's large enough that yes, it will be something that's going to be. It's going to be one of these things for this. You know, go go go out night, depending on what you are. Sometimes it'll be daytime some people see it at night. It depends on what you be on. But yeah, it's going to be an is there any plan for a mission to to watch the fly by no not at this moment too soon. We're not ready for it. I mean, they can't put emission together that quickly at this point at home. Of course, someday they might have

Bob Zimmerman BOB Albano Fly Nicole Research Paris Affairs Rex Missions Alba John Ragu Assault
"sumptious" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:56 min | 2 years ago

"sumptious" Discussed on WGN Radio

"This year. I don't know. Some people still like them moved on. All right. So here we go. We're going to get the way we normally do and asks for recommendations who wants to go I I have one here. But I don't know if you guys are ready. Okay. Eric zoning Kenny went around name, a fiddle. Tune walls. Tennessee waltz. Well, that's that's not about the the one of the most people know is the is the one from Shokhin farewell is the theme in Ken Burns's, civil war. Oh, yes. It's actually it sounds like an old civil war tunes written by j anger and younger has another wall. So I think it so gorgeous it's called the lover's waltz, and I was goofing around found at this week, and that's my recommendation, the lovers walls by Jay and is gorgeous in the same way that shocking farewell, scored music to see. So we're sticking to a friend of mine. Rob Rogers, the former cartoonist from Pittsburgh who was laid off because doing anti-trump cartoons was in town recently. We have time to spend a turnaround in this group called lake street dive that sound familiar she they're terrific band. I'll send a link, and we can listen to part of and the lead singer her voice is gorgeous. It's sumptious. It's it's gr- and their songs are delightful, so lake street dive. All right. I am watching the series catastrophe on catching up on for a while. I really enjoy it. It's about an American businessman who meets a teacher in London. And they have they have a romantic encounter, which ends up being something that affects the rest of their lives because she gets pregnant so and the ensuing hijinks hijinks ensue. On the last season. No, I'm only on the second season. But what a lovely surprise as he Carrie Fisher as rob Delaney's mom in the I I just started the second season. Also, I think it's a great show. It's very fun. I just started watching. I haven't finished the Elizabeth homes documentary was that on Netflix that I was looking at a Griffin. Hey, Griff, are you listening? The Elizabeth homes documentary is that on net. Flicks. H B O on HBO and. It's very it's it's she's she's fascinating. She's the lady theranos who said with a prick of your finger. You can get a drop of blood, and we'll be able to diagnose your illnesses. It was a fraud was sham. She's going to go to jail billionaire and she did at least on paper. The company was worth like ten billion dollars ten minutes and they announce worth negative zero. It's worth less than zero. But it's an amazing story, and she's an amazing creature. So Elizabeth homes dot com. Because I read a review this morning actually that they said even after watching the documentary still don't get a strong sense of her. I think she's what do they call that that we sometimes called broad Blagojevich sociopath? I don't think she's in normal person. I really don't we are out of time. It's nice to see.

Griff Elizabeth homes Rob Rogers Eric zoning Kenny Tennessee HBO Carrie Fisher Ken Burns London Jay Shokhin fraud rob Delaney Pittsburgh Blagojevich Griffin ten billion dollars ten minutes
"sumptious" Discussed on THE EXPLODING HUMAN with Bob Nickman

THE EXPLODING HUMAN with Bob Nickman

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"sumptious" Discussed on THE EXPLODING HUMAN with Bob Nickman

"And so I would say that what's happened is is evolving me, and my sumptious is when it's done teaching me what I need to learn. Then I'll be ready to go back home again. That's a nice way to look at it. I told you that I didn't tell you this. I've mentioned it on the pocket. I said it was going to tell you this story that I remember my birth experience. And it wasn't like I would remember walking through that door when we entered this room, but is going from a dark. It was like a dark place in this big energy. Like kind of scary energy like an almost like an explosion type feeling in being really scared. And then the next moment was this big internal laugh and the thought. Oh, yeah. This again, and I remembered that my whole life, and I I have mentioned it before and other podcasts because it was such a powerful experience. And I know that that's influenced my entire life because I never forgot it. Did you give it did it give you the feeling that there was more than you? Absolutely. And I've all yes, always. And that off and that gives you some comfort doesn't it? Yeah. Yeah. There's a lot of comfort in that. And it's also it's and I can't explain it. You know? In any other way. And just that. I know it that's that's the only just it's just what it is. I can't I can't prove anything. I can't you know. I can't even say that. I thought didn't think that when I was to accept. I didn't know that it happened. I just know it it's in me. I don't know how many times I've been here before. But this isn't the first right? So when you meet people, certainly when I meet people what I look at is. That it's really important to be as responsible as you can in your interactions with them. In in a sense that there's all sorts of different people on the planet where the stories I liked this to say is or to share is that if you find a pond Heathrow pebble in the pond there's circles of water into the frog. Those circles of water are wave to a fish the water is air to horse. That's been running in stopping at the pawn. The water sustenance into the sky the pond is a reflection of itself. So one thing upon can mean, so many different things to living and also other entities in our planet. And what we do. I love that never heard that one before. But I saw I develop them. That's why. I developed. I haven't talked to you before this is all new. You know, what I've been running into lately, I don't know why my mind is going here right now. But I've been running into a lot of people lately who have trouble sleeping, they have insomnia, and they really struggle with it. And I always felt like. Somebody once said to me, well, that's a spiritual problem if you're waking up at two in the morning, that's something inside you giving you a message. I don't want to say that to people to get mad at you. Right. You know, you don't know because you don't have it. And it's like, well, you're right. I don't I don't have that one. I don't have a sleep issue. But when I'm troubled. I do. Yes. Just so I'm not saying one hundred percent of people with insomnia have some sort of spiritual malady, necessarily, they might be a physical component..

insomnia one hundred percent
Vote with pride: LGBT politicians

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:05 min | 2 years ago

Vote with pride: LGBT politicians

"The city of Chicago, we'll vote for a new mayor whatever happens label second we're gonna make history to African American women won the runoff. It's Lori Lightfoot a lawyer against veteran politician, Toni preckwinkle either way Chicago will become the largest American city run by an African American woman. And there could be some other history in the making Louis Lightfoot is a lesbian. She said at a public dinner lately that her career would have been impossible when she first came to the city. Right. Think about where we were. And where we are. Now, I'm an outlets Byan Mary with child writing in the city the first ever make the ballot of from the LGBTQ community, not even remotely possible certainly back in those days. But even frankly, it wouldn't been too long ago that it wouldn't have been possible. So I think Kansas comes at a key moment for gay bisexual and transgender politicians in America in last year's midterm elections. Gay rights groups celebrated the election of a record number of candidates from minority sexuality and gender identity. Groups Colorado's governor is a gay man and Oregon's bisexual woman, and there's another high-profile out mayor in the midwest. I'm people to judge the mayor of south into the end when he announced his run to be the democratic nominee for president with video including a shot of him snuggled on a sofa with his dog and his husband I belong to generation stepping forward. Right now, we're the couple livestream their wedding last year. With you. I think the way the American voters are seeing gay and transgender politicians has transformed quite dramatically quite quickly in the last decade or two we see a really dramatic change. Adam Roberts is the economists midwest correspondent he's been on the campaign trail with both Mr. Budaj and MRs Lightfoot, recently, even on the left of American politics. You have politicians Democrats who have shifted to be far more relaxed fumble at ease with with gay politicians than they were in the past. So we heard I there from mrS Lightfoot who's a candidate in the election today. What did she tell you about voters attitudes to her sexuality? So when I went out with with Lori lights it on her campaign trail little while ago. She was come painting in a part of Chicago that is the most liberal and progressive part of the city and she spoke about being an openly gay candidates. She spoke about the fact that her opponent had appeared to criticize that and use of dog whistle politics against to try and get some of the voters to to turn against her because she is openly lesbian, and she argued that this would be a problem for her opponent that in this day and age voters would rather shrug at the fact that someone has a different orientation, the reality is that especially in the city Light's, Chicago, Lori Lightfoot can use the fact that she's open about her sexuality as proof that she is authentic, and that she's honest about who she is and voters like that. And that chimes with which what you saw when you met Mr. Budaj. Yes. So going to south bend. Which is a smallish city in Indiana. And you might expect in a very Catholic state where Republicans general quite strong that it would be a problem for for mayor Pete's to to be openly gay. But in fact, his constituents and everyone he meets he says a keen to show that they're relaxed about it. And he's approached by people in the city who they may be a bit clumsy about it. But generally, they're well-meaning, and they want to come up to him and tell him that they're very relaxed with the fact that he's gay, and so he sees this as a massive change from and he's already thirty seven, but he sees a massive change from when he was young and people were far more repressed about this other thing. So what do you think is behind this out of the surgeon gay and transgender candidates is it just gradual social change is it some sort of perhaps backlash against the Trump administration. I think is a combination of the two, but the by Flos the more important factor is the long-term change. If you look. Across america. You see opinion polls showing that people especially young Americans millennials much more at ease with ideas, sumptious gay marriage or having a gay schoolteacher or gay doctor. So I think if you look back over ten or fifteen years, even you can see that when Barack Obama was campaigning to be a state Senator in Illinois. He was much more hesitant candidates talking about these issues than when he became president. And by the time he left his his his offices president he was in favor of gay marriage. So you see the transitions Republicans very very clearly. Absolutely. But some of these candidates are kind of explicit about campaigning on civil rights for their communities K or transgender communities, for example, and still wanted to be taken at face value on all of the other issues. How do you think these sort of strike balanced between representing their own communities, but also tackling all of the relevant political bits? Well, when I sat down with piece a little while ago. And talked to him about that he had this clear on. So which is that you have to distinguish between the message and the messenger. And so as a messenger as a gay man he thinks that being out and being offensive about it helps to win him some attention. It'll mean that he gets noticed in this very large field of of democratic contenders. And perhaps progressives will pay more attention to him because he's out in an open about it. But fairly quickly the messenger has to give to the message. And the message that he has the most to say about the things you really wants to talk about or about revival of midwestern towns that are about economic change or about economic Justice. Whether we need some minimum income for poor people. So he isn't making gay rights. A big issue that he's campaigning on. He's just letting this part of his profile. It's a similar approach that Lori Lightfoot has here in Chicago a much the same for the governors of Colorado and Oregon. They're open about their identity, but they don't want to be seen as somehow representing only a small minority of voters. They want to represent as many of their constituents as possible. And so they talk mostly about economic, social and other issues and not about gay rights. So if these attitudes than our are changing are becoming more progressive, you would you would expect to the number of for example, gay or trans elected officials to sort of match up with the demographic in the country at large is or reclose. So when I was talking recently to Anisse Parker who is the head of the victory fund, and formerly the mayor of Houston, she talks about great progress. That's been made the fact that some seven hundred elected officials across America who are out the fat. There are people in congress these governors and so on, but she also points out of it in ammo in Michigan forty five years ago today by coincidence. A woman called Cathy CASA chanko was elected to the city count. Sel and she was the very first American to run on the ticket as an openly gay candidate. And she succeeded and is now being celebrated for this historic milestone. But mayor Parker and east Parker points out that forty five years is a long time, and she would love to have seen more progress by now and the diff- roughly five percent of the American population is gay or lesbian or or has a minority sexual orientation the actual proportion of people in office is less than one percent. So if you want some sort of parody we've got a long way to go yet.

Louis Lightfoot Chicago Lori Lightfoot America President Trump Mr. Budaj Colorado Oregon Toni Preckwinkle Anisse Parker South Bend Byan Mary Adam Roberts Indiana Barack Obama Cathy Casa Chanko Kansas Congress
How Old is the Universe?

Astronomy Cast

08:42 min | 2 years ago

How Old is the Universe?

"Learned how to figure out the ages of objects in the solar system. Now, we push out into the deeper universe. What about stars galaxies? And even the universe itself. How old is it? All all, right. So we kind of have taught people how to figure out how old stars are. But we have not taught people how to figure out how old stars that aren't the sun are very well that is fair. So let's say so let's start there with with. How do we figure out how old stars are in the wider universe? Well, there are a bunch of different ways. And the newest way that scientists have come up with is to actually look at how fast stars are rotating. And this was something that I never knew would be a thing and one of the factors. I loved most was the press release actually said how to pronounce this technique, which is. Guy row chronology low term it just like a gyroscope. Oh, the the idea is that stars changed their speed over time as they undergo mass loss, and as that mass is carried away so two is the angular momentum of the system, and so it's super difficult to measure the rotational velocities of stars. But if you can do it, this is the cool new way that the cool kids with the best instruments are measuring the velocities of stars and their ages. So I'm trying to think about how you would measure that. Right. How do you measure the rotation of a star? And then how do you know what the rotation tells you about the age of the star? So how do you measure the rotation of a star? I the the most accurate way to do. It is to look. It stars that have sunspots and measure how long it takes for that sunspot to go across the face of the star. So just like we measured the rotation rate of our son to first order by watching this little sunspots March across the front. We can look at changes in brightness. If distant stars that are tied to changes in whether or not we're seeing sunspots on that distant star. That's amazing. Yes. Right. That you can see sunspots moving across the face of a star. But by guess by like how much light they're putting out, and then you can use that as a way to say, okay? That's probably a sunspot an imminent returns to that same level of brightness. Just a couple of say weeks later, then then that's probably that same group of sunspots is moving across the surface, again mind-bending now, I would also assume that there's some way sort of with the Doppler effect. You can measure the like, the the sides of stars to sort of get a sense of how quickly they're turning one partisan are moving away from one part of stars moving towards you. If only you could separately measure the light coming from either side of the star. But we don't quite have the capacity to do that. So we do. Instead is we look at the line broadening, but there's a complexity to this that can add a lot of error to the measurements. And that complexity is gravity. So the surface gravity of star also affects the thickness of the spectral lines of star. So if you can accurately figure out what kind of a star, it is what kind of mass it likely has you can make assumptions about what it surface, gravity will be and make sumptious about how that gravity will affect the width of the lines. And then you can assume that whatever's left behind is lined thickening due to rotation, but it's a much less precise. Method although to be fair. We're looking at sunspots on distant stars were we're going a ha it's Brighton. His dipped this many percentages, and then came back up in a non periodic way. Therefore, this is a sunspot. So this is one of the techniques that is sort of like, well, there's a lot of error. But this is cool. That's amazing. Okay. So so that's your your method for for star. So now, we we are measuring the speed that a star is turning. How do we then use that to figure out how old the stars? Well, this is where you have to couple different methods. And just like we have a distance ladder for measuring. The distances of stars. We kind of have an age ladder for measuring. The ages of stars in this age ladder is based on our understandings of stellar of Lucien that is then grounded in radio isotopes. And then we extended out now. With the rotations of stars. So the science teams that did this a they were looking primarily at main sequence stars. These are stars like our sun that are burning primarily hydrogen helium in their core. And they were looking at late f g k and m stars. These are the smaller kinds of stars and insistence where you have a main sequence where you have stars that are still in the process of evolving. This means that you may have your biggest stars have already Welt stopped being main sequence stars they've already evolved away and because stars predictably from largest to smallest evolve off the main sequence finish burning that hydrogen helium in their core. Other processes for bigger stars as they evolve off that point says, okay, everything more massive than this is done burning everything below this is still. Burning and from radio isotopes, which we talked about before we can get precise ages for that point for stars. That are close enough to get high enough resolution spectroscopy, and we use stellar evolution models for systems that are further away that we can't accurately measure so through a combination of stellar evolution models and actually getting measure things from radio-isotopes. We can say, okay when we see this turnoff. It means this age when we see this turnoff. It means this age. Now, they'll know that technique of measuring the spins of things Ken tell you like how some degenerate objects are how old they are. I think the best example of this, right? Is is pulsars all neutron stars that whole process, right? By measuring. The spin rate you can tell Kyle. How old the object is and this is also reliant on them being in isolated systems. If you have a massive star that goes supernova collapses down to something tiny. It's initially going to have a much larger rotation rate over time, it's rotations going to slow for a whole variety of different reasons. But this starts to give you relative ages of different systems. Now, there isn't I say that this only works with isolated stars is it's possible to transfer angular momentum between stars in a binary system. So anytime you're looking at the rotation rate of something it needs to be the non influenced rotation rate. We can see this in our own earth where we're to some estimate of binary planet with our own moon. And our rotation rate is slowing as the moon moves further away. And it's this tidal locking our two systems that is in the process of heading. Towards being completely titled locked that. We're changing the rotation rates of both worlds as we evolved their separation. Right. I mean, like we win star goes supernova it. If it's more massive than much whatever five times more massive than the sun. Then you get a neutron star as the outcome. And they start out having a ton of that would that that angular momentum. They're spinning very quickly. This is a pulsar and the fastest millisecond pulsars are the ones that are the freshest, right? And then as over time they are losing their energy.

Brighton Lucien Kyle KEN
NBA proposes lowering draft age to 18 amid Zion Williamson injury backlash

Jalen and Jacoby

02:06 min | 2 years ago

NBA proposes lowering draft age to 18 amid Zion Williamson injury backlash

"Design injury reverberated all over sports and in the league. And allow players tweeted about it, including Danni who simply put it with four simple words, go play in Europe. What is he trying to say there, he stating the obvious? But the difference is if you look in the mirror it's easier for Luca to play overseas because he grew up there, and he gets a chance to do it while he's thirteen fourteen fifteen years old as a high school prospect the best trajectory overall. And I said it this is what ninety eight percent of players actually, do it is to go to college. I know the ideas should be like tears, Ferguson. He went over school. He went overseas. Everybody forgot about Brandon Jennings. Did it as well? There have been players that have done it. And it is available to you. I'm not going to advise the player to play in the G Lee. No. So if you got a chance to go to a major college play big time basketball, get better every day be on a big state and increase your market value. The last time I checked how much do playing at the university of Michigan being a member of the five help value would not be sitting in that chair right now if you did not go to Michigan B member of the fep also Zayn Williams win played for Olympia, close or whatever we would not be talking about right now, if he exploded a shoe playing in Madrid, we would not be talking about the exposure that comes with the college system, and you know, the broadcasters that broadcast those games like us make it such that it is advantageous for a high school prospect who go to college instead of other option, those days could be separate but equal they're gonna be people argue with what you just said and talked about why the player brings value to college and not the other way around. But those things don't have to be mutually exclusive. The thing is out of high school. You should be allowed to enter the draft. Go to college there should be. So former revenue share says that doesn't take place at least holes in coverage. So now all we do is debated for publican sumptious.

Danni Ferguson Luca Brandon Jennings Europe Basketball University Of Michigan Michigan Zayn Williams G Lee Olympia Madrid Thirteen Fourteen Fifteen Year Ninety Eight Percent
Family of Shamima Begum, ISIS Teenager, Says Britain Plans to Revoke Her Citizenship

BBC World Service

05:19 min | 2 years ago

Family of Shamima Begum, ISIS Teenager, Says Britain Plans to Revoke Her Citizenship

"Home secretary has made an order depriving Shamima Begum of her British citizenship. She's the British teenager who ran away or one of them from her London home when she was fifteen to become a so called Islamic state bright in Syria. She's just had a baby the question is. Of course, what will she do? Now, Dow Babu is a former metropolitan police chief superintendent who is a friend of the Begum family, and he joins us live now on the program. Great to have you with us. Good morning to you. First of what does the family been saying? Quite surprised that they should happened. There seems to be some concern about the ecology of the home office decision. She does not have dual citizenship. So effectively she stripped of citizenship. She's be stateless. Well, there is of course, the issue of Shamim is mom having a benefit is being a Bangladeshi national. And it's believed to be the case and under Bangladeshi law. Shamima then is a Bangladeshi national doesn't that give her Joel citizenship? Legally incorrect, there's no guarantee that the the Bangladeshis will be prepared to accept her as a citizen. So I think the make this option and actually if she today she could government refused average citizen, then she will be she will effectively become stateless. So legally if that happens what happens next in the magically have the right to return. Well, she she remained spacious at the government. The lawyers are challenging the government decision. So the government I think this is a knee-jerk reaction by the government that company I haven't planned ahead in in real what's going to happen with the returning fighters from. Icees families from ISIS and Dave now seeing the public uproar and have played to garrison made the nature decision. I think you'll be legally challenge. And there's no guarantee that the government's position will be upheld in the family has been quite outspoken that they want her back that they're going to take legal avenues to challenge. The home. The home secretary's decision has the family actually spoken to her yet. Details about what what what are the communications that family had what why would like to just remind listeners to. The reality wa- watch when she initially was a grid and radicalized she effectively you had a fifteen year old child who is being. Been radicalized. And the police knew about this the school about these entire council were aware of this. And despite that they didn't share that information with the family. In fact, they gave a letter to the girls takeover decided I wanted to interview the individuals and surprise surprise letter. Never got to the paddock's. Wisconsin the school's back. So we country failed in safeguarding somebody who's been radicalized. And when we say, we talk about jihadi, brides sexual abuse. She went there a fifteen year old girl within within day issues ninety a man almost twice right? This is not normal behavior. I think Jamaica is is was brainwashed. And she was brainwashed over the internet. Do they take the point just the family take the point though of what the home secretary was saying that the priority is the safety and security of Britain and the people of Britain, and that Shamima Begum could potentially be a security threat. If she returns. I think the family except there's a legal process to go through. But there there is several hundred individuals from ISIS area coming back to this country. I think that does appear to be an element of planes that kind of race with actually looking at the legal process the legal law. So there's a lot of some sumptious here that the Bangladesh is just gonna except somebody who has never been to Bangladesh ranks. I want to bring I want to bring you view of guests that we had earlier for Musso any rack were obviously, you know, I the so-called caliphate was announced these people have lived through hell as he put it as Allie put it. For us under the so-called Islamic state. And he's watching this from Iraq saying, I just cannot understand this. This is someone who chose to go and join a so called Islamic state knew exactly what they were up to new exactly what they were capable love didn't show remorse and now is asking for a second chance. What about the people of Iraq? What about the people of Syria? Well, I think. Even organization and tie, basically butchered demoted people. Shimmy shimmy knows part of that. She was a fifteen year old girl that was groomed. And and the authorities were aware the police the school the Tammy's council where where she was being blamed they didn't share that information with the parents, and he was only they gave her letter to take home. I think I think we shouldn't lose sight about the failings of the was in terms of safeguarding. And I nobody is gonna question. No sane person. You're gonna question Caesar's an uneven organization. But the reality was she was a fifteen year old girl old child who is being groomed on the

Shamima Begum Secretary Syria Government Musso Dow Babu London Iraq Superintendent Isis Shamim Wisconsin Bangladesh Caesar WA Jamaica Britain Dave Allie
"sumptious" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"sumptious" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"It's just it requires a bunch of extra sumptious. Yeah. I mean like one it's it's basically like any investigation, right? Yeah. Like if you were investigating an actual sandwich incident in your workplace, it's far more likely that someone in the office did it than someone. From a neighboring office who would have a harder time accessing the location in which the sandwiches store. Yeah. Then you also have to hypothesize them sneaking in and all that. Right. And like the further away you get from the sandwich from your office, the the more of a leap it becomes right? So the main reason you'd favor the co worker hypothesis is that you have to make many fewer assumptions without evidence to assume it and so at first glance this kind of thinking can make something like the aquatic a hypothesis looked good actually because hey, wait a minute. It's just one assumption. You have to make in order to explain all this different stuff. But the more you examine it the more. It becomes clear that the aquatic pipe out. This is actually requires a lot of assumptions of things not in evidence that just sort of get rolled up into one big scenario. You're picturing you can say that all how about all evolutionary increments in all steps in evolution of all. Features are caused by the ghost of biology, which is a spirit that lives in the sky that decides that creature should change and then makes little mutations to change it over time. That's just one assumption that explains absolutely everything in biology, but yet, but it's a big assumption yet the defies, or at least goes beyond the laws of science. It's like saying ghost took a bite out of the sandwich. Yeah. It's only one step, but it's a step that that goes beyond the scientific understanding of the workplace or the world itself. But then actually hawks makes another point he that I think is a crucial extension of this idea. So it's not just what we've already mentioned about some types of sumptious appearing parsimonious, but actually requiring a lot of assumptions, even though they only seem to be one scenario hawks actually shows a second way that it's not parsimony is. And he writes, quote, certainly, it makes sense that hominids would develop new anatomies to adapt to such an alien environment. He's talking about adapting to the water, but w-? Once those hominids return to land forsaking their aquatic homeland the same features that were adaptive in the water would now be maladaptive on land. What would prevent those hominids from reverting to the features of their land based ancestors as well. As nearly every other medium sized land, mammal, more than simple file genetic inertia is required to explain this. Since the very reasons the aquatic ape theory rejects the savannah model would apply to the descendants of the aquatic apes once they moved to the savannah, this is far from trivial since fossil hominids did inhabit open woodlands starting by eight million years ago and did move to the open savannah by three million years ago. Okay. So the idea here is that want you could maybe reasonably make the argument that right? The aquatic humanoids move out of the water, but it's still living close enough to the white. It is still going in the water. There's still a coastal species. You can say we'll maybe they retained some of those features. But they're moving further inland if they're becoming an inland species savanna species, then they would need those adaptations anymore. The the the economy of natural selection would drive those away. Yeah. One thing to be clear about here is that a very commonly still believed. But actually now obselete hypothesis is the idea that anatomical modern ity in human beings evolved on the savannah that we'd been came basically the animals we are now on the savanna landscape that used to be believed and now that's not true anymore. What what generally is believed is that we became basically, homo sapiens, in woodland environment in some, you know, basically, a tree oriented existence and then later move to the savannah, okay?.

savannah hawks w eight million years three million years
"sumptious" Discussed on Pod Save America

Pod Save America

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"sumptious" Discussed on Pod Save America

"I'm a single mom of three kids while we've been recording. Some pretty sure I hear my children screaming out in your life. Maybe pundit barking your kid. I can't tell but. Yeah. It's stuff like this. It's you know, it's things like, you know, my kids are coming with me to inauguration swearing in day should say swearing-in day, and people are like could you have photograph like just, you know, children wall. Where would they be like where would I put not in the photograph with me? And so I think there's some aspects about this that not only by the way are built around two parent family around your kids being older, but also frankly around people having personal wealth that are really challenging. And so I've been to go sheeting a lease for my district office, and they keep saying we want security deposit, and that I can't access congressional funds. Until after I'm sworn in January third, and so I keep explaining like, I can't afford a security deposit. It's Christmas time I'm trying to buy Christmas gifts. I have a lot of expenses right now. Coming off the campaign. You know, just sorry like, I don't have the money for security deposit. And so I think there are things like that. I keep wondering how other people make this work. Many rich. I'm not eight minivan. Glad to have it. Right. And so I think there are just some things that are baked into the system that makes sumptious about kind of who goes to congress that I think this class is going to push back at in a big way. How how do your children feel about all this? My kids were troopers on the campaign trail. I mean, I people said, well, you're gonna you know, kind of hide them. Do you want to hide them? Like, please. Let me know we really didn't have a choice, but to to have them be part of the process, and we actually tweeted the campaign something we did as a family. And so my kids came to a lot of events, you know, that my son telling me at one point like mom kids at school are making fun of me. They're they're saying, my mom is liberal, Katie porter. That was the big TV ad was liberal, Katie porter and could have been worse. I I said to Luke you don't well hunt. Maybe don't wear your campaign t shirt every day to school because I'm washing it like every day in the laundry, and he's like, I'm not doing that. I'm proud of you mom. Nobody can silence me. And so it was like, well, you know, you buy the ticket you take the ride to wear the Katie corner for converse t-shirt school, you're kind of inviting your conversation about Katie for congress. But they're they're very exciting. I will tell you that the other day it came up that have reelection two years. And my middle son said what two years mom? I don't know. If this is a good idea. So they definitely learning a lot about government is your biggest supporters. I'm sure Katie Puerto. Thank you so much for joining us and good luck in congress, and please come back anytime. We'll do. Thank you so much. Thank you. All right, everyone. Thanks to Katie porter for joining us. Thanks to Paul Ryan for being Dan's punching bag and thanks to all of you. Happy birthday, Dan. Happy holidays everyone else merry Christmas and a happy new year. We'll we'll see in twenty nineteen happy holidays. Everyone and good luck in the world Christmas..

Katie porter Katie Puerto congress Katie Dan Luke Paul Ryan two years
Apple appears to have three new Smart Battery Cases ready to go

The MacCast

01:05 min | 2 years ago

Apple appears to have three new Smart Battery Cases ready to go

"So apple is offering now a clear case for the iphone ten are. It's simply called the iphone ten are clear case that selling for about forty dollars u s and it is out and available. Now, we also did get a rumor that apple may be finally looking to update its battery cases for the iphone apple released. Its smart battery case, I think way back with the iphone six series might have been. Earlier, and they continued it through the iphone seven, but we haven't seen one sense and this week nine to five max gear may Rambo found some references. In a recent version of IOS that looks like they may be planning three different new battery cases, these sumptious being that those would be for the for the iphone ten are and both versions of the iphone ten s ten s and the ten s max, of course, they have to change the orientation a little bit because the camera lens orientational changed between those two models. So the current version besides

Apple Forty Dollars
"sumptious" Discussed on Future Thinkers Podcast

Future Thinkers Podcast

05:03 min | 2 years ago

"sumptious" Discussed on Future Thinkers Podcast

"Your child is going to have most of their time either by themselves indoors or with siblings. There's not going to be a lot of real opportunity to go out with a. You know, a whole bunch of kids aside from regimented school kind of situations and. Yeah. So I think there's a bit of a rush to have them all at once you want the kids to be the same or close to the same age. So they can play with each other. And that's one thing. I thought about more recently since we have really trying to figure out what we want to do in the long-term where we wanna be based in in where he won have kids and stuff. It's like. Really difficult to sort this stuff out in our kind of lifestyle. When you have the same expectations of having all the kids at once. But after reading that book sapiens, I have redefined what I want out of raising kids in it's more now about like spacing them out and letting them interact is much as possible get them outside. You know? Yeah. Go play go meet some other people some other kids in play. And then all of a sudden the pressure is way off of us. Right. Like, we don't have to just have all of our shit sorted out immediately. We don't have to have a home base necessarily perfectly sorted out. Because every child is gonna get like a four year span of attention. Yeah. From us. And then there's the problem with the education system, which we've talked about before that it it prepares people to be little robots in to succeed in the corporate ladder, rather than be self sufficient or think for themselves or anything like that. So, you know, if we're not living in the same location all the time, then had schooling happen. Well, you know, if if the traditional school system isn't really suitable to get people to kind of be creative and to self actualize in learn to kind of, you know, hone their gifts rather than just fit into a box than what does an education system of the future. Look like, yeah. This in other standard way of thinking an assumption about education that I can't help challenge. Now. After traveling. I mean, my post high school life of education has only had to do with music in audio production. And it wasn't like I went to university and studied something deep and got into a profession like I started my own business in anything. I study. He'd officially. Could have been left behind that could've taken into leaving it on the other hand, my desire to learn and the willingness to take courses in read books, and and you know, really set my own curriculum in veraciously. Learn has been critical. To our success over the years. And that's something that I just can't help. But think about the standard education systems as being detrimental rather than helpful setting people up for that kind of factory line work that doesn't exist anymore. Memorization of facts getting good at you know, beating test scores and not really focusing on results or at real application of what you're learning in real life. How many people how many young people today don't know how to cook a meal don't know how to do their taxes don't know how to buy a plane ticket properly in in planet travel schedule. Don't, you know, just so many practical life things because school never bothered to teach them any of that not to mention how to run your own business or. Oh, yeah. Taking one single like two or three week course on entrepreneurship, and it was so irrelevant in unhelpful that like everything is just on the go learn as you go. So I guess my my point really is like the education system is another thing that gets a the assumptions about the -cation systems is the thing that gets turned on its head. When you've been traveling around you realize, well, the skills we've had to learn nothing to do with standard education yet. It's really interesting. I've been thinking about this how long term travel being digital nomad is kind of a form of initiation. Because it an initiation kind of like brakes, your your current world view in sumptious and push your limits. And then create something new where you're transformed as a result in long-term travel. Does the same thing where just flip Soulier assumptions on their head and over time, you know, through struggle in trial and error, you figure out how to do differently, but it's definitely an initiation type experience. Yeah..

sumptious veraciously three week four year
"sumptious" Discussed on O'Reilly Data Show

O'Reilly Data Show

02:53 min | 2 years ago

"sumptious" Discussed on O'Reilly Data Show

"Giving loans up this very closely related to the storm practice. Redlining were banks with intentionally draw these maps in rule out entire neighborhoods, justified by saying, this is a high risk neighbor when in fact there many credit worthy individuals in that neighbor against calibration. But in masks what the what I would call a fair policy that circumstance, Miami-Dade rational and I came across jer guys. Asparagus does this great, but then also, man, this is discouraging in some ways. So what practical advice would you give data scientists are building algorithms. So obviously they read the same papers that you do in many of those favors these professional these streak outta go. Gory of satirical metrics are extol. Yeah. So I think the highly point that we want to communicate is that data scientists practitioners should be really worried about people's wellbeing necessarily ask themselves how the album's designing. Again, victim was wellbeing, and that's sort of Hollywood point in terms of different fantasy challenges. There are lots of other finish times that are that are real challenges that desert a lot of attention from data scientists from domain experts. I also like to ship the compensation to what those challenges and so, but basically one of the things that I out of this that you need domain experts. Right? So there's snow, there's no silver bullet. This one test will to all my algorithms yet enough matrix is no, there's no black box that you can stick your outcome into, and it just gives you the thumbs up or down. Right, right. So you always will depend on the domain and the haunt decks and and man in in some applic-. Nations may be self. These metrics are sufficient, right? I think it's it's actually tricky to find locations where you would really want to divert any of these metrics to decide whether or not your albums fair. The main issue is that we often don't know what distributions look like without some sort of side information and what these metrics are based on is the assumption that these distributions look kind of the sing. And so in the recidivism example, these metrics lease implicitly are assuming something like, well, the overall distribution, a risk is similar among different groups on its whatever that sumptious violated. All of a sudden these metrics can give you very funny conclusions. So they're snow. So they're a standard set of audits that you might wanna run true. Not because you wanna give thumbs up, but just basically if it doesn't even pass this set of honest, and they're so point. Going forward the I think that's a more productive at direction. The one of the biggest ones we talk about in the at is the presence of measurement era..

Miami-Dade Redlining Hollywood sumptious
"sumptious" Discussed on Don't Worry About The Government

Don't Worry About The Government

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"sumptious" Discussed on Don't Worry About The Government

"They may have some sumptious about Jews have some prejudice about Jews run everything what we do all the banks, what we do that us run the media. Well, we do you know about all that stuff now when you do that is the issue, but the reason they won't know where to start with that. So just go to this. This is no in debates testicle Faxon choose almost of the banks. She was completely dominate the media Voss disproportionately represented in all of these professions. That's just a fact antique anti semitic two point statistics. But you know, you seem to have. You know you've missed what? What? What you agree on feminism respects when I'm suggesting to, you know, Andy semitic point out that these things are true. Now with a real story was Rubin's contract is coming up. He had a be show on the t. y. t. network. He came time to renegotiate and he wanted to make six figures doing a mediocre, be level program on YouTube that wouldn't stand on its own merits l. l. k. want more money get a patriotic creepy THAAD rights. So Jake Uber antedates varied said, we're not making that innocent that to Dave Rueben. And if there's anyone who has a claim to six figures other than jank, it would be a very, she's clearly the other face is operation and she's like, I don't make that day. You hit the bricks buddy. So he did. What he did is he hit the bricks and he of joined the Prager you coke brothers online. Oh sphere. Where like the cokes have been siphoning money into Dennis Prager operation Prager university little bit into the Ricky shape podcast network. And then Dave, Rubin was ultimately able to get himself some of that coke brothers cash and build out his operation. And so what we've seen and this is why we kind of brought them up here is that he has slowly drifted narrative also kind of like a gimmick from being progressive too slowly, realizing that classical liberalism is the right way. Well, Dave Rueben host of the Rubin report once called himself aggressive and even worked for progressive news outlet. Now he says he sped up at the modern less autocratic tendencies cannot endorse Moore joins us from Los Angeles. Thanks for coming on. I wanted to have the on after I saw amazing video that you did that did go viral explaining why you're at least shifting. If you're banding all your former beliefs, but you reorienting for sure. Could you just basically sum up what happened? Why change your mind. Yeah. Well, I actually, I believe the same liberal principles that I believe probably since around nineteen eighty eight when Michael Dukakis was running against George H W Bush. And I was in a social studies class where we have a mock election. I thought liberal was good. I mean, look, I should lay out, you know, on Fox News,.

Rubin Dave Rueben Dennis Prager Prager university Prager Michael Dukakis Fox News Jake Uber coke brothers Los Angeles YouTube George H W Bush Moore l. l. k.
"sumptious" Discussed on Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

03:39 min | 3 years ago

"sumptious" Discussed on Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

"Listen, you grit. There's a lot of minutes at center that they have to figure out what to do with in. Like if you go with small ball lineups I kinda how the warriors germ on green while Linus sumptious was that would be LeBron and maybe it's still will be. But I think there's been some talk, maybe coups do that off the bench and playing that kind of role in a small his. I mean, obviously, battle evolve at the preseason. And if that were. Works at all, but you look at starting lineup. Second units like coups does figure as probably coming off the bench this year and especially if they go with mall line, it does doesn't very different. The Mona understand that you know what the cab spaces recent been clear with the luau Dane law resolution and the fact that we always been pursuing either Paul George or Kawai, you know, basically for like the last two seasons. What do we have a Paul George Kawai in the wing that we're not necessarily seeing right now? I mean, obviously already on the team, these young guys, Brandon Ingram. Cow coups. Do you see star potential number two potential championship team from these guys. Well, I think the guy who has a highest feeling will be Inc, bright into talent. Like you look at Ingram and you go that. That's the guy who can really be a star in this league. If he takes it to that next level with, I think they need, they need to know. 'cause he's gonna be eligible for an extension soon anyway. Right. You need to kind of know how good somebody is, but the mentality in terms of like who's got star quality, I thought it was coups in terms in terms of talent. Maybe he doesn't have his high of feeling, but in terms of going, I'm gonna make myself into something I was him. And then though you know, it's not like those bad. It's just that that's not what he profiles us profiles as in the Florida. The guy who runs up and down the court and silicates your offense. Like you know, tells you learn to to shoot, you know, at a high level affected that way. He's not like a guy who's gonna go out and take over game. So, I mean, I think like Ingram is. The guy that you look and say, okay, how does he grow his game? When he plays alongside of LeBron? Does that help him get to a next level? 'cause you you saw him giving villa last year. Ramona Shelburne joining us here on Keyshawn l z and Travis in the mornings Ramona. When you talk about growing in young players? Ingram, not a lot of talk about Lonzo ball lately at all. It's almost like he disappeared off the face of the earth for the Lakers. It's cool. It's Ingram, it's the Bron. It's not Lonzo. What happens? Lonzo this summer is going to get better or do you see him continue to just kind of sputter along especially since Rondos here now. Thing that we haven't heard that much about him. Right. A little much last year, you know that and I think it created this unrealistic expectation for him where like if you look at lonzo's worth year, it was way better than Ingram's rookie year, right? I mean, bold picks, but I, I saw enough Alonzo to go, okay. He's really good player in this league, especially on a good team because he plays go quote the right way, but I don't know is how much gonna grow physically and you don't know what's inside yet, like you haven't seen that that that personality. That's like I'm gonna be like one at an all time. Great. You haven't seen that from within yet..

Brandon Ingram lonzo LeBron Paul George Kawai Lakers Lonzo Alonzo Ramona Shelburne Linus sumptious Paul George Florida Rondos Travis
Netflix plummets as subscriber growth slows

Bloomberg Surveillance

00:51 sec | 3 years ago

Netflix plummets as subscriber growth slows

"John. Farrow in New York I'm. Tom Kean in London in between us we have. Eight net flicks accounts we tried to get rid of them as. Best as we can different people keep signing up using art. Names and that's on Netflix has. Done it until yesterday the stock down over fifty dollars call a. Twelve percent. Right now Joins us from LeBron. London is we look, at. The end of net flicks, is we know, an. And I just did a two standard deviation. Chart net flicks is such. A juggernaut it's not even down to resistance it's. Amazing it's pulled back twelve percent this morning and it's still within trend his the bat been broken of net flicks is unreal. Bull market is this just a. Quick blip along the road or is there something different this time I, think what we'll have. To see is one of. The results that come out from the following quotes? Mean it's always dangerous taking one quarters Results, and then extrapolate move across. Having said that there will be some particular points of concern for people in terms of longer term story berry mind given the market cap stock Four hundred fifty million dollars you really need some punches sumptious both in terms subscribe because as, well off, because moving forwards to justify Now I think people will be particularly concerned about this the courts to subscribe Which is not great then the tweet subscriber addiction, doesn't look victory fantastic Come back to this point before it's the the the argument that, Netflix has that impacted. By the fact of a lack of new. Shows What is it suggests that they have to continually invest in very expensive very costly drama which quite frankly nobody knows whether, we'll be showed to keep that subscribe of immense and the rest of the the package Just doesn't seem good enough to watch she gets to subscribe Then some expecting out. Down the street so As I said I won't call numbers let's not put it into. A trend if this Qatif the next quarter. So I think people would be very wide so let's talk about a couple of things in the first point, you've made as the as the quarterly miss and. I want to talk. About the communication Rian we didn't just miss we miss by. A million subscribers when you miss that big typically something's gone wrong with communication both from the company towards, the street and just the general visibility internally how if they got it this wrong. In I think they they probably a. Company doing what you. Love you look at the trends that being going on both. In, terms all q on q and then year on year you'll take of you on that you'll say, since of all markets than you in previously Suddenly you become all the more productivity growth as well I think therefore full of things What extrapolate from that worn either the growth markets hasn't been is good as they expected all they've. Seen more weapons to slow down Markets both of which is obviously of a Boeing trend. They might argue that the World Cup is having, the fact in the sense that the World Cup probably was much better received competition. The many would've expected, the star, of, the tournament and. I think that will probably be the main line of defense

White House President Trump President Putin Abbie Philip Ford Motors Takata Helsinki Aclu Diego SAN Three Hundred Million Dollars Twelve Hours
"sumptious" Discussed on The Brain Candy Podcast

The Brain Candy Podcast

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"sumptious" Discussed on The Brain Candy Podcast

"Were just describing how move we could make some of sumptious right okay correlations that are very loose they were describing how the act of singing as you're familiar produces endorphins it's really good for your you know just feeling happy yeah and so that is something that people are drawn to that feeling that you get when you sing and then that because it let's say you normally if you're comparing it to like just going to a bar it's hard to like meet somebody 'cause you how do you break the ice but like karaoke death there's a lot more of that like oh you did good i'm on this or and there's also the factor of people tend to sing along with the person and when you do that to the past yeah it's just like being church because you're singing at the same time the same song and again excited about it that shows the importance of your karaoke song pick true i feel like i i mean i know it's raining men is a fantastic toy do that we have to do it if the problem with it is that it's a very hard song to sink 'cause those the weather girls really had some powerful yeah but here's the deal is that really what karaoke singing is about i don't know i'm going in there singing bat they said this song bad or l o but good she fair question poorly i do.

"sumptious" Discussed on Business Daily

Business Daily

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"sumptious" Discussed on Business Daily

"The sumptious that they would have those things and indeed that the next generation would have a bit better the getting to a road that pensions are being comment that there's a constant fear in this country that charge will be introduced in the nhs and so on people i think are baffled by that because they said well hang on the society's becoming richer so why is it that we're no longer able to afford these things the previous generations were able to afford and there are complex answers to those questions to do with the age of society some paps to do with globalization and others somewhat argue to do with increasing inequality and who gets the rewards from growth and so on but it does mean i think that in an environment where large parts of the population feel that things that they should be able to take for granted they no longer can take for granted inevitably you get a much more polarized political system i think you've got far more anti system parties anti system ideas emerging in the uk and in europe and in the us indeed trump is the ultimate expression of an anti system politician suddenly in charge i speak to the gideon rachman of the financial times is the chief foreign affairs commentator there and he was speaking to me here on business daily from the dc well antisystem politicians are now also in charge in italy the populace lega and five star coalition there want to rewrite the debt and spending rules govern the euro single currency and that's because they have big spending plans all of which has led to worries that this could be the start of the eurozone financial crisis round two over to the bbc's lawrence night for him it's all dejavu we journalists love to talk about the eurozone being in crisis eu plans from to help crisis hit eurozone countries announced the financial times recently could a eurozone crisis benefit brexit asks britain's rightwing spectator magazine but in reality eurozone has not yet experienced a genuine crisis note in.

nhs uk us gideon rachman italy bbc britain spectator magazine europe lawrence
"sumptious" Discussed on This Week In Google

This Week In Google

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"sumptious" Discussed on This Week In Google

"Slightly resting there might tesla so old it does not have you don't know so i think this is a little unfair certainly tesla knows this the guy could easily had his hands on the wheel another question is why he didn't notice that the tesla was veering into the guardrail as ahead done before like i've driven other people's cars with auto pilot and at some point you're like well i'm gonna decide to trust this because it's worked in the past week so i could see how you could be like oh yeah i think it's really unseemly tesla put out public press releases saying well he didn't have his hands that we wasn't paying attention that is not nice your dad yeah i i think this is why ntsb says look you know what really said the quote from the ntsb releases of incomplete information often lead to speculation and incorrect in sumptious about the probable cause of class of a crash and that is why we're revoking tesla's status as a party in the probe they too many public releases and i think that's completely appropriate tesla's going to play now i'm going to file a complaint with congress contending that it's in its own statement the ntsb is quote more concerned with press headlines and actually promoting safety and going after the ntsb is kind of a jerk is kind of odd move because out of all of our public agencies they're actually pretty they're not hated by anybody well and as as this article from nbc points out tesla has really been blaming the driver.

tesla ntsb congress nbc
"sumptious" Discussed on /Film Daily

/Film Daily

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"sumptious" Discussed on /Film Daily

"Inserts like spits out this number right so they want the same thing but just from like quote unquote real movie fans instead of critics is that what it seems like it's sort of like drawing this distinction between you know i it's furthering the distinction between fans and critics as if that law isn't big enough already that's my least favorite part of his whole quote in that he buys into that the popular but really annoying sumptious that critics aren't movie fans like movie critics do go out to enjoy movies that's why they went into the film criticism this the first place so that it's kind of averting that ledge between critics and audiences that's kind of ongoing on rotten tomatoes itself i think what they're going for here is they want to just have everything on one app reviews and general general sort of opinions so that it can drive more people going to theaters and because because users tend to be a little bit more i guess positive on first reaction than more depth movie reviews than i think that's that's what they're going for in terms of like how that will drive more movie pass users at cetera but yeah i i dislike that sort of assumption as well kristie thoughts about this just just way in and say that once again i am i hate when people use this language when they say this is for quote unquote real movie fans stop it there.

"sumptious" Discussed on Jalen and Jacoby

Jalen and Jacoby

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"sumptious" Discussed on Jalen and Jacoby

"All right jaylen not everything in the world of sports of cultures worth discussing so what we do is we separate what is worth the time vare listeners and what is not by playing keep him look if it is worth discussing you will say the brakes and we will do so and discuss it if not me you meth skewed move abel balbo gabriel union has more information about the banana boat trip hit the brakes okay i think she's like on a book tour sumptious knew a lot of press she's been popping up she said that they mounted the banana boat in its her her spouse cp three and then lebrun and then what happened was is the boat took off pulling the banana boat and they all fell off facefirst all of their weight and it was painful but the paparazzi only got them all they're on the thing i'm going to get her book oh yeah have you read your book no other redefined book either when they said you will they said he the copy and they were like read through this measure this is good did you read the tired the no because any nice book initially i'm like i'm just to hire writer and i've gotta do nothing shut the air koa hungry and then i realise wait a minute he can't write a book about me what out my help any be a bestselling great product you bali curtain out over air call was like he doesn't really text me back now there are supposed to write this book how do i get him in texas and i was like here's machel's it for me and so.

balbo gabriel union lebrun writer texas sumptious
"sumptious" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

02:03 min | 4 years ago

"sumptious" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Way i would not gotera whereas your right i get out of east going away has goes up where would have no one thing i'll go don't go through awakens if the la lakers and i know these sumptious paul george but around abroad james doing well lottery team i understand that the lakers and it's the lakers but they may be a lottery team again yeah but not with him in a lot of the latter pti braun their gore's to the what's the difference outer idea i i guess i just i just think you have to look at things selfishly right the i get things in your and my team is further away from winning than your team roy script were your team as a shot in two years i can't write that scrip with my team to why would you want the route to be enough i guess so i feel like you're just bosnian because i just know my teams not winning your this like like the knicks mix a championship also does two words is so far removed from me draw sure that it see it's absurd but i i just don't go no no i i get it goes badly i think the problem for the king's go to central messier naming team them good with you sikh you sir i was wrong why would the feds to europe go go to play for the sacramento kenya gory clippers sacramento soda growth italy minnesota they got a super i want to go there on don't go through the lakers but stop it get out of the euro which by the way if he does that he's the it if it's the garbage on the autism i guess the celtics would be to the the favorite the celtics the wizards the rising new york knicks arising arise in germany live lead brooklyn do what a minor league conference that would like oh my gosh that's the only thing i don't get about lebrun going to the lakers or the way the western conference 100 percent right you're even though you could argue well you gotta be the warriors either way i get it but there's a difference between losing in the nba finals and losing in the second round reading the conference finals like the.

western conference nba lebrun germany italy kenya sacramento europe roy la lakers brooklyn york knicks celtics minnesota messier knicks gore paul george 100 percent two years
"sumptious" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

The Guilty Feminist

01:44 min | 4 years ago

"sumptious" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

"Sometimes there about library but yet they all had offices about you know that it was about gender equality and that they understood that and i said is everyone included vilius school like if i turned up here today and i didn't have any invitation would i've just been allowed to come in and usual library and i'm like no i said we all included some places and not included others but you go home to your parents tonight if you knocked on the door opened at the kind of legally obliged to include g they're not going to go and one of them went my mom does make that face into early funny so then i talked about the history of the patriarch in when it began and the idea of women and children being property and we looked at also people of color most of them were people of color and so we talked about that and different ways that we could be included or not included and different power structures and i said the truth of the matter is we were on the front of the school and a police officer walked past if i said this poised on my iphone who with the police believe and he went you know it yet because i'm more included in that system i look like a white middleclass woman who's going to be telling the truth and then we in sumptious made about you and we started looking at that and what assumptions do we make about women and what assumptions do we make who did we include when to include them and then we start looking up when would you ally for someone would you stand up for someone because they all agreed with the idea of equality but i was like yeah but okay would you step pain and i say to be honest with me i'm not you don't have to give me the right answer and they gave varying onces one little boy whose sweetest little boy he went yeah i would he said i was in the changing room at the swimming pool one day and his man started saying somebody else that women want good at mats.

officer middleclass sumptious swimming one day