20 Episode results for "Sulaiman"

Islamic Folklore The Ant Prays For Rain English Edition Podcast Version

Jannah Firdaus Mediapro Podcast

05:44 min | 11 months ago

Islamic Folklore The Ant Prays For Rain English Edition Podcast Version

"Once there was a big famine in Palestine it was during the time of the Prophet Prophet. Sulaiman King Solomon. He came out with his people and proceeded to an open place in the desert to pray for the rains to come. Suddenly he saw an and standing on. Its two legs raising. Its hands up towards the sky and saying oh Allah we are but very small among all the creatures we cannot survive without die. Grace please bestow upon US sustenance and do not punish us because of the sins of human beings please send down the reins so that trees can grow farms become green in grains become available and we have our food to eat prophet. Sulaiman knew the language of all animals. He told his people let us go home. The prayer of this end is enough. It then rain too heavily in all the land became green and productive. The end is an intelligent creature. Warm days it collects and stores grain inside the hulls. It knows that during wet and cold months it would not be able to go out to search for food for fear that grain may start growing because of wetness it splits it into two or more pieces at times during Moonlit nights it brings the split grains out of the stores for drying and preservation against decay. The holes under the ground are made very carefully and covered with shelter to prevent the rain water from getting inside the holes the end unlike the other animals can lift a burden twice. Its own weight. It is not a selfish creature. When aunt finds some store of food grains it runs up to its group takes its fellow ants to that place. It shows everyone of them. Its own find of this door. The always behave in this manner. They work in live in cooperation with each other. This shows how the aunt works for the group and how each of them fulfills the needs in livelihood of its fellow beings how shameful it is for a man who has no regard for another man who has no concern for his fellow human beings who could be starving because of want of food. Once while Prophet Sulaiman was traveling together with hosts of men. Gin and birds. They reached valley events. When the chief of these ants witnessed the pomp and the glory with which Prophet Sulaiman and his companions were approaching toward it. He warned all the answers to get into their holes lest they got trampled and crushed unknowingly by the approaching men and Jinn Prophet. Sulaiman smiled at. This warning sounded by the ants chief and ordered his companions to wait till the aunts went inside their holes. None of us should hurt any aunt while passing over their land. He said it said that Prophet Sulaiman addressed the chief of the aunts. And Said How could my people hurt you or your fellow ants when they are floating through air? Don't you know that I am a messenger of God and would never act unfairly? The chief of the ants replied o Messenger of God my cautioning. The ants was not for any hurt that they would suffer but to prevent them getting stray and forgetting the glory of God after seeing year pomp. And show there is a deep meaning. In this event it shows that even the most humble and smallest of creatures has been endowed with the necessary wisdom to live safely and avoid being hurt as far as possible. It also shows how even a small end does have the natural understanding of the true position of Allah. It imparts a lesson. That one should not forget the true might and glory of Allah when one experiences a great power and dignity of any creature in this world thus an aunt is one of the most wonderful small creatures in this World Surinam L. The end in the holy current is a chapter named after this creature over one thousand three hundred years ago. Imam Ali was giving a sermon in Kufa. In which he was describing the beauties of creation in various forms of life he was referring to small creatures in asking men to study. How God made them so small yet so sturdy strong he described the end in these words. Look at an end. How tiny is its body? And how delicate features it is such a small creature that it often escapes the eye and few people care to attach any importance to it. Among the living beings found on this earth. Look at it and study its ways of life how it crawls how it attacks its food how it lifts a grain so many times heavier than its body carries it to its whole how it stores grains and how in summer it gathers in stocks food for winter and rainy days.

Prophet Sulaiman Sulaiman King Solomon Imam Ali Palestine US Surinam Grace Kufa one thousand three hundred yea
Federal Executive Council Approves N47.2bn To Boost Electricity Supply

Newscast - Africa

01:24 min | 10 months ago

Federal Executive Council Approves N47.2bn To Boost Electricity Supply

"You're listening to. The news are in Africa. Business Radio the Federal Executive Council on Wednesday approved. Forty seven point. Two billion naira boost power supply in the country. The Minister of bomb. Mr Sulaiman said it will supply additional forty megawatts of power to the national greed hits Old State House correspondent's after the F. Meets in Mitchell's held via video conferencing but a forty megawatts will be moved from the Khashim Bela Dom in Taraba State. The Minister States that are council approved the ministries memo for the revised estimate a total cost of the augmentation of the subsisting contracts and the sum of four million two hundred thirty five thousand three hundred and three point nine zero to provide additional forty megawatts currently being generated from cashing VAT tackle would carry and Janda three national greed. Hilas states in the and Benway states asked the beneficiaries of the forty megawatts evacuated the F. E. C. also approved a separate six hundred eighty three million naira for German Ports Authority. And that was the news of Time on Africa Business Radio you can continue to listen live online at. Www Dot Africa business radio DOT COM. Or if I am unable. Thank you for listening.

Africa Federal Executive Council Dot Africa Khashim Bela Dom Mr Sulaiman German Ports Authority Benway Taraba State Mitchell F. E. C. forty megawatts
The Eugene Souleiman Story: Podcast Special (Bonus Episode)

How To Cut It in the Hairdressing Industry

1:11:03 hr | 2 years ago

The Eugene Souleiman Story: Podcast Special (Bonus Episode)

"This is how cut in address an industry by show wisdom lane and Eugene Solomon. To how to cut it in the head. Jesse industry broadcast this show, you that gives you that incites rations and information to take your handwriting and offering to the next level as your host dome. And welcome along to these very special Wednesday because I am delighted to bring you this. How to cut it podcast Bashar with myself dumb lane. Because today, I'm in the company of none of than Eugene Sulaiman. One of the most influential has always in the world Eugene is joining me for this podcast special to Shay, his magnificent career story in hedge in I mean, this is going to be a very special. Listen few from a very special address. Now, anybody the knows anything of Eugene will know that he is an absolute true visionary who inspires and Setzer trends of a starless follow. So to have him on the show is truly an honor for us. Or mean, we really are in the company of somebody who is at the top of the game now ever since launching need. How? Cutted podcast two years ago. Eugene has always taught my list as a wound. Guess I've most wanted to interview, and I have reached out to g many many times, and our know how busy is out to get him on this show is off the charts of mechanised for me. And hopefully for you to now, I'm gonna be asking Eugene all my burning questions upping wanted to ask in two years. And I want to learn about his journey address in and I want to find out about his out of the box, creative vision rethinking, and of course, life as one of the world's most famous session stylists of all time. This interview with Eugene will give us all a very rare insight into the mind and life of a hairdressing genius. And may showed that you stick around to the end of this interview because we're going to be learning how we can watch Eugene's live online event with hairdresser in live, and is going to be saved is going to tell us how this works. In what's going to be going on? And when this will be and how you can sign up to this event. So let's not say anymore. This really is a proper good podcast that you are not going to want to miss selects jump to it. I poke a'special we've Eugene Suliman today. I have got probably the the most influence you has dollars today. Is somebody's been top of my list from day one of start in how to cut podcast. So I am just. I am. I am. So so made up to finally get onto the how to cut it podcast. The amazing Eugene Solomon, Eugene, welcome. I think I've been pestering unify some time I not Eugene to be. You find you funding. I only eleven year. Just shows you listeners. That's what you get with persistence or I say serious works. But you are so busy are no choice. I difficult. I mean, you you just traveling the world, so where are you at this mode? When we talk in Eugene just to give our listeners are literally just I studio in my well outside my house in a living countryside now. The literally just been studio you crumbling. I may of spike insanely in my new money spice. Love it. Swung a studio. Then Eugene, what's the reason for that reason? The reason for is a bit of Sarah sleeping, dying for my own of little place, where I can am player ramming ideas. You know, have my stuff instead of doing hair in the kitchen when the kids are impedance, I it's just a it's just more spice. It's a convenient place because it's obviously where live and I can still lies stuff. Here will can ideas play music. We'll career in more boxer shorts in one to and just do HALE, but his vision for civil I mean, so you're a man in the shed I much is stable, but it's beautiful. So this is a a works basis is not for you to in any clients his view for your creative output, certainly about daily Clinton more, which are communists released. I what do you miss that? Now. Artists artists miss them because like like turning to prince that night coins. United new you you build up a relationship with them, and you know, generally have tie with United. Upi very lucky with them. I guess so I've done because I think you at strikes what you all United side. I've otherwise had off caught. Interest-? Interesting clientele that so. Really, really great personalities. They're allow you always look forward to do. You never really kind of handed climbs health at spinach, Rama unite the Willett like just thinking about on a PayPal. I'll I've she I mean, we would just took it before. I'm not unhappy with put it that way. It's a dollar, absolutely. Ju just gonna pick up on you just set you move to the country. Would you live in the city prior to this move? Mark. I lived in York, we live in New York and never knew that they lived in New York. I've lived in Australia lived in London. I've always lived in confirm big cities or my life and. A literally in the countryside two and a half year about two and a half years now. And what might that move? Well, obviously the kids to his. Wanted to beat a spice fool room in a garden. You enjoying it? I'm really, I'm really enjoying it. I find it difficult because I'm caught fast paced person. Eventually a slowdown gripe. Go into that whole kind of village community life used to Dan the Bouza getting to know people not so Kate sales pretty proper. No, it's so is is. I guess I've counted three areas to to Milan live unite in marriage. My case, Molly session career also have another career where you know. I think I'm global create what I think on the global. Of central Wella professionals. So it also half that as well. And end of golly. Oh project room to I'm trying to work on a book at the moment. Yes. Yes. I can you. Tell us more is. Harmfully? It will be it. It will be an ongoing book. And I kind of see it as. In a in a full Matt of volumes much like lot the niche now National Geographic where I'm by newly. I'm going to bring out book any expert will be I different area of my working life. They will be a collection of Polaroid's dedicates pyrites. A book dedicated to a postulate mighty Orioles. There'll be a book on shows, and then they'll be another book, which which how very dear to my heart, which is. I a book which I think we can account be on which encompasses the creative solid of hairdressing analyzing other elements to inputs ROY at craft and creating. Guess what this on? Need? I think I think a real room need full me to actually kind of sit down and work in a slaughter day for why a type stuck of what I've done and and do something. Is a strongly directed towards the future of O'Hare Jason about cross a real creative. So is the stuff that I dream about. The I probably not at the trees. A US she working on this now on when can we expect? Working on this in my head for about fifty. As now, you can feel Tom on those airplanes. Finally feels like it's. The right time to do it. And I I always coated like look to book says a kind of a bit of a full stop to someone's career. In intranet fields, always thought biographies, and what I really wanted to do was. I wanted to tell a book that was about a month old son have my history and aware say going in the future or I would like to be in the future. So I really see as a full stop. I see as a an aviation reached shine love butts off in these books are just they will just go can already failing hearing people say when can we get hold of these and wet you know, that the. We re really quiet quite fantastic to book in volumes. And we can just exercise volumes as a win. We we we need. We might even provide binding service level. We'll have to bring you back again Eugene of worked-out to get your first mobile ready planning the second would that's so we took even more about about the book. It'd be great. I think so I think so look when you you will the fifteen year old Eugene, let's just tell you right back. Okay. And somebody said to you now. And if you know, mommy, asking here, we are two thousand nine hundred how old are you Jin? I am fifty five still looking super cool. Okay. Fifty-five as that fifteen year old Eugene, yes, did you ever envisage a career lot unit? You know? No, no, no. I million years. Not not. So what did you expect when you came into this Caribbean? I will I be really honest with you. When I came into the career, obviously, I didn't come into the career directly as a left stole a climbing. Sue Hendrickson kind of much lights up. And I I would say come from quite humble beginnings. You know, I grew up with a counselor style in southeast London. They weren't particular a job opportunities. You can eat a work in show working. Factually. You could lead adopter lawyer. Or accountant. Pretty much the options that were kind of open. So you. As a cake, I've always been different and on a ni-. And on a ni- otherwise been different and I'm very comfortable with being different. I didn't really fit into any of. Is areas. A wasn't particularly good at school or events. Also, I was really bad school. Now, there's a term for I think up believe his dyslexia. And it's time we didn't have those labels. And now we didn't have I was like. And it's all I I was knocked tickly goodness go, however was created if which is a an actual picture of dyslexia the gift of this light series. He lie. So I realized very early on. I was really good at jewelry knows good at crise solid things. Was good at scouting. Wasn't bad at maths because I a like a like numbers in a not to think about systems and away things were couple of ways. One of those cases, pending, Chris if an kind of lived in their own little, Brian, you know, when I was a kid I used to Mike bikes from a pulse. Another bright of how'd you might pay the I wanted, and you know of a of a waste. Pulling things Paul in two thousand one to stand how they work and choice to might better more interesting. So so so that was a guess my my early start. I was in a band as well as in a punk band. It had to be Pengfei it why back in his diet like most case in in a guarantee United average brand. And as you know, it was advice player, ROY. I got I was terrible audited. And and I finally got placement in in an obstacle. And I really honestly the always Hawaii too young to truly appreciate. School when I was lowering to the band because the band was more fun, and I really didn't go so. Did not get Cates out of a ghost his colleague a very early any. That's one for the bullet. I should and. New parents split up really think of a toy. What's to be honest with you? And I went to jobs saints and filled out. The questionnaire lot multiple choice questionnaire in the light events that you'd make really good up. What was your reaction to that? I had never been in a here. Salam to be only really didn't know about what she say. But a really didn't want to go to work did want the job 'cause arms disarming way too, much fun. So I ended up doing city, of course, Ayers, college of technology in a bothering ladies hairdressing week, Mike king. Well, that that was a real cut the seventeen. Where boy found I should in my love of mon- cross began. I love that. You could just literally you could touch someone's hand will hair and do something to China's you could transform them. You know, love your daily, you what you were looking at could change in you could actually change it. So that's where my kind of love for hairdressing salted end. It was really very instant. And it wasn't something. I felt that I had to work at it was something I just kind of really dive into a love from the getting Mary beginning. You know that was that. And then I got a jump in a barber shop. Gymnasts. Just stop you that so many top headresses styling barbershops. Well. I session coin pony said that because I think being a Bob, but gives you really a great understanding of of of of the head and of griped patterns. Yeah. I'll get that. Completely is quite is quite a microwave thing to do as well. It's really about little details. So it it really kind of Heinz you kind of find mine too skills in get you to study what you're doing. So you'll really spa. Shop is his show papers. A very high end on sale in a Impala playing Gordon the house hotel. Headed china? Bow shots magazine awarded fund sandwiches in the old witch in WC animals, another one in a really an amazing Hartselle with Churchill hudsell, which is a open square in life L. I'm. And were were there. Obviously, I had an estimate Haleakala shows a one side the other side was was hanging from oil. Burgundy an awful, you send plot new romantic very, very, yes. Here's an not sound what I was. Vivier whistle. It's you know, and I'll still love baby whistling side. Never, leslie. God bless. So I started what they're in. There was there was a manager. A young lady could seal Sylvia Lacrima. She sits mate will on ener for you doing here. Why are you working here is not look at it time for in you. Units units units. All you need to work somewhere on this trendy and up and coming at interest in United fashionable. Some you know, you need some life. This is this is like for you. You know, shaving planning Pohan. And I didn't show bike inside annoy Ciccio up can review more civil to an appointment of the Saillant. Trevor sylvan. Get your haircut boy by the owner Trevor sober what you asking for a job. And I got there. You know, went from my head cut oversleep Trevor wasn't around. But the manager the manager the manager was John Nixon back in dynasties, probably the very early IT's of price when you met me tell. I just got my head cotton. I Austin for job, and he said, oh, actually, we're looking for assistance. You know? I wouldn't you comforting to the Trump is intimately, and this is really weird, you know, back in back in die. And I think there are lot lot lot more younger people that were interested in doing hair. I was having this chat with them. The kirwin won't show. You know, you say CJ is real good really ties night. Mine. Nicole monday. And you said this is amazing. And we were talking about. And I think there was something like about two hundred awhile joke, but in a mess like. Oh. At travel United waiting for my mouth verbally incident where your to late may and. I was quite shakier south by lane of China that much thought. I thought I we love you for it. I think he quite likes me. Oh, yeah. Your your your mail. Let's see if you can let's see if you can actually will walk it. I listen. What did you do? I'll see your job and he just signed off. And. And he was like, well, you know, if you if you if your chest is good as you were unite. I've been quite impressed. So luckily want check what's is going to smell it. And so I got a job as system and I worked to Trevor's full. I think about fifteen years before doing session. I cannot just stop you that you just might reference when we simply full end on a half dimension it because you are a complete hero of mine needs to be in a big part is the I briefly worked to Trevor's as well. They nine thousand nine hundred six Shielfield homesick full months, but I was actually Eugene's assistant. He may not remember this. But he was just incredible. And I have to say. To see your career as well. Go on from that point in one thousand nine hundred eighty six but you would just a love how you have a one. I just I had to pleasure view, cutting my hair once, but how you scissor over comb, and there was a lot going on to that period. Wasn't there? It was. But also one of the big memory's, not only will you just an incredibly great guy to be around and work with, you know, your personality with brilliant made me laugh, lots. But also we said about I could see you'll visionary. And you're thinking back then because they used to be an area downstairs in a stock hair is dot cupboard and you spit. He's Paula sarin heads wasn't there. Eugene where I think you will preparing looks for show. Sound rule? Let let's give him some ham prices today for the next shot. But that was kind of of your. It would just we would software ideas. You know, and not be really honest with you. I would we loosely with him. And I went just up bungling the dungeon. I rented ice on with not and tweet just be playing around with hands. Anything season ended up? In some driven showers that we use the kind of tight home tool. So was this early part of you, then Eugene where that real connecting creativity fashion? Call it what you want. But that away from the commercial side of the seller. Floor was this where it started to happen for you? Yeah. For sure I mean, I. I wouldn't side. I was. I commercial hairdresser Lee nets in that sense. You know, I can't do commercially obviously because of had such great joining United peak. Peak travel out on Coppola. His is another is absolute genius. Or was an absolute genius. So up very Fulton it in the fact that. On I wanted to Trevor's because not only did on lens cut hair precisely, but I learned to dress hair as well and believe right? That was probably one the only real places in world where you were you were you trained in Susu by cutting ham is trivial swear physicians and he's like, the I guess that the the the man was in charge of a the education. So I learned technically have cut hair, and I also have to dress in. Little realize that there was a Paul more personnel eating which was missing which was the rebellious soy in in doing hair that pump. And that was the thing that we can't fight may from the beginning. Was the fact that you you could actually bright the rose the US tool, and if you knew those roles, you could brighten them, and you could create a new set of rows, would you turn? Once you've done that. If you're anything like me, you break again, you know, ongoing China of creative thinking, I I think for me the a lot too bright rules a lot to do things that haven't been done before. And then again, a lot of kind of alleged destroy what I've done in create something else in places that that's been the theme. This guess five we creatively through L career. You know? Just standing little listening to this is incredible to get that thinking that really just take us all the white back to that. Eugene the ladder at school took have Finke par. And then we put it back together. And and create new. As an that still carries on so walk us through then. I mean, as I said at the side, you are probably. One of the most influential has solace in the world not Cape in the world. And you know to get to that you have an you are and sometimes probably you're in Eugene's, but book sometimes you don't realize sometimes definitely the the greatness it goes on round. And and I think but you'll humbleness is. So what makes you so wonderful this what you are? But so mega mega talented. When did that break away moment come from the commercial side to become in? We use the word session star. Let's even back then Eugene nominee people really knew what says she started. As was did, they really know? I saw I mean, I is pretty much everything in my life of I've never really have had this plan. Right. Brian another people have and I think that works for them. But I'm very much one of these people. That's a guess you'd be in the moment counter people and an fa may. I guess the most the the the thing I love about. What is a love the journey. I love the end result. But I I really love the journey and the process because for me, the price is is is is is is the is is a sanctuary right? And at its it's that place, the helps you create you know, you you things at if you crisis is sign, and when you when you working you results Lewis bay, the sign, you know, the journey is the most important thing that leads you to these places amo- live at up getting my famous goosebumps. Otherwise mentioned is about the journey and the any experience in how you feel emotionally about what you doing. Yeah. It really for me is very personal. Do you need to move on and develop then say, yeah. So you cannot sit still for a period of time. You of was that whole process starts to dry up. Well is not even that process starts the joy up. Just the icon. Hey, I'm just not my that, y you know, I was talking to someone about retirement. With all white to retire onslaught county think about how lie. House lie. I think when you stop you just stop riot unfamiliar. I wanna I wanna keep Gabby in when it keep spiracy and things on July things I to try things out. This only got some new places every night. I wanna week beans on Thais therapy guy on United. Another one would be feeding. You the soup in the ball. You know to say. Say phone. I mean, I think that's that's the issue. I'm definitely a thrill seeker. I'm not I'm not into standings oil. I saw is believable everything that you're saying I'm on the same page, and it's people like you not on putting us hope anyway, your quality. But I resonate completely in what I feel and see and oil way. See you was you are revision rate and visionaries are. People that those few visionaries often, but ruled wise people that don't want to do what everybody else is doing. An and I see that and that is kind of gone through and and then you entered into this world of session before everybody else was a session star. Let's now on I want wanna get to join up in the world of session because I know it becomes a real. Topical deterrent. But how have you found his world as a session stylist? The really really funny thing about this is when people talk about session signing as if it's lis- brines kind of thing is nothing grind about a toll a moist. Not well because you know, like, you'll you'll Florence's I align. You'll take an evening slot. Your land in LA. United eleven thirty at night, spend, two hours in customs Rolette, you'll get your hotel. And then you got a Feith pickup coal to drive to the desert. Unite Andy finish probably about seven o'clock, eight o'clock at night. Not never I wanna off drive back. Ten o'clock. So didn't you you were really low as you might be jet like. You you what we've already high pressure twins like Calvin Klein unit. Just provin. You recall has a lot of energy or not focus and any as as hard work. It really is hard work. It is any anyone that even fakes like wanna do job lightly style. You have to be really aware. The. It really is work, and he's much more work working is not on much more work dating. We just want going. You dating clients. You know, you dating people set of lot says he equal. With them pressures in the early days. On just for me. I I'm just very focused on my work. Roy. And the goes and everyone I want to commute having a good time. I really won't pay telling and have enough and feel comfortable, and there's a lot of work the way do that people aren't really aware of unity. Oh, yeah. You to head for should well either much more than that. You know, for instance, if you go you're on a shave, and you got an actress on the show or a motto. I spend time with you any any sound. So might feel beautiful and fantastic. Given the confidence to have that pages. Heineken you not. So so there's a lot of background were that actually goes on behind just hand over showed. Because you can't just walk up to a shoot all runway up. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. You know, and and it's like for runway as well. I'm not you. You know, you can have very early on that five six o'clock in Mony. But what is it? So that it's difficult is challenging. But what is it that you've lived about it? I love doing hail unloved doing. Head is larger launches by. I love. Working on depression, a tone brings out the best in may a lot. The Thais of it is really fast. Perfect. So you've been doing session stall in for twenty five years how you can't energy and infuse Yasim and the just that keep going thick. I just love what do. It's that simple. That simple. If you're not passionate about what you do. You just not a passionate person. An on really passionate about while. I'd say. A lawyer absolutely of what. Why? Really sorry for people that. Deng enough. What do I don't know? How that is possible. A really done. Pack that failing gal words die you. It'll be okay. When weekend comes never be net person ever. So if you we have a listener he's sitting here day in I've had them getting such a mandate. You know, some of them have said look these pop cans of really helped them just to get that excited about that career. I mean, we'll advice would you give to any hairdresser baba? That's just aren't into Wayne with their love of what they do in. How can I get that Mojo for what they do? I think he's everyone's personal responsibility to find that job. And generally on phone what people that are not mighty in in in work, really probably not motivated in other areas of life. United is really a question of I guess. Finding a strong connection with what I do. I think that's the most the most important thing to be at without being today bail obeying one with what they're doing. Because it doesn't just happen. Does it simply you have to work everything that we do to get excited and to get engaged? Yeah. I think I think the the wonderful thing about well onto and handwriting this will because he Chinese. I mean, if you if you look at hand through the ages, and you look at how much is changed and has fifty it's as become. Can you not be interested in new phones technology when you you're doing a? Techniques. Made a think it really really Isabelle. What you say, you know, everyone's different. Everyone's going to say something different. It will in what later, and that's the way it should be. But I think some might figues interesting. I think you've you've got Sabet quite free visited and NFC. The other thing is everyone saw talks about. Be doing things. Rightly right, sometimes ROY it find use combined the things that really might see like you. I might see light may. So while he is that then Mikey mistake in combatting a pop Pov, your crave prices and Ligi somewhere else. That's a good to shed at. Thank you. When you talk about your creative process. I am really came to just get an understand it. So again, I'm not super pollute upon the everyday world of Yuna session when you work for a runway working for design book. A creative process. How does that star? So for example, you're working for designer a collection. Let does that start for you? Well, first of all you've got to think of a designer as person, that's we stop and people everyone's different every house has its own energy fine chemistry. Every house is different. So is much led to redefine what I do is. I tap pain too. And why have working? What they understand. They're living with heist. How bravely have have create you follow like, what's the music like what the shoes? Like, what's the what's the big picture? And I think I look at things as a whole to begin with and. Ivory periods and quite quickly something in the collection or something with dissolved what the designers said all a reference picture will spark an late Magana pass. Sometimes someone will just want opponent tail but this tiny style in town. Two very the I it's quite a generic con of look. But this this is there there were piney sounds near piney tells unite this clean piney tells texture piney styles. Punish house, Bryce different types of pro-nazi. Ponytails taxes? You know, it's it's is actually. Quite ruled. And so when you work in you've got that from design, a you go back to your studio now or previously you kitchen. What is it that way of working at that? Eugene Solomon, I remembered in nineteen eighty six who will get polystyrene heads workout these break say that's the fame. This the thing is I I kinda done that mary-anne only my career so. It's kind of ingrained in might not that but kind of not philosophy but that wasn't working. But sometime for instance, I'll give you next of the activity sample, which is someone not your GM emerged, ROY. Now, he's he's Japanese guy who they say is the most wrote black and absolute genius now on much Japanese, right? And he doesn't speak much English. But he was the first show that I have dated Paris, right one. The first shows, and I've been Tony for got nice any years. And when people look at like showers, they got a, you know, they think of Lee young g as as as as in innocence. And and Pat McGrath. Now, you you you might you might think took hours to crawl ISO ideas, right? The lost show debut. Yaojie? The fitting was an hour and a half. That's incredibly quick. Well, right. And. I because I understand him. I know I level of ties non level. It does on very much is world in any sat me down. At least said UJA Choi really hard this season because I think faculties date. Well, obviously, it's not a question show, you these fashion in the sense of. Something that's sunk precious. Takeaway is lacking so's like spirit, and I want I want to go back to win. April. Plus, not might of people might Orion close, and he said in that for me is very hard to kind of design we've on tonight. And I said, oh, kind of like the fact that you know, you've Conaco is craft is profit the elements in there. They're very so you even record. But when you when you when you used to work can be someone that you just pick up those things the arena collection. Or things that revisit low pay notice. But that quite important these house, I'm. Analysts say to sell them. When we starting the hand. Ryan is not. Yes, he said, I want anti style. Well, that really want anti style you want. Something that's not been joint gazillion Blige is by then you don't want anything this been cold. You want it to look like it was done very quickly. It's not starting conventional sense is very is is really about something does some. Spontaneous. And also, I'm really like that blankets states that you've done. In. That is Lee went. Yes. That is the original stage. Right. That is having mine close originally unite, and I always like great. Let's do these hairstyles or not. Cutting a hedge wa hairspray by kinds lis- stitch, the herrings who hey style. And that's really what we did. We literally got NATO WinCo sincere threats, and we literally blanket stitch the hair opinions as kind of a kind of broadcast win win eight five of the net. We just lot left the the threat hanging with the NATO on as well. And the goes went down we have that way. So really, it's it's just a question of carnival Gubbay into fencing really clean head. Not really kind of having. I. A any preconceived ideas of what you're seeing what you should ROY is you should go into fixing. An experience the collection. Okay. That comes back to that journey and that process that you were talking about and really kind of really enjoy and many inspired. You relax. Let let let let it get. You. Coming is mega. Well, how cool is that? Have you share that we were? So just brilliant stuff an are one. And now the hairdresser that you've nail because you'll Thais level. How how do you combine you'll ties level with some a designer making sure that it works? So you've got the just connects because if you get an ask to do. Really strange. Roy painful that are really strange and creative nine hundred eleven is really not is really that. Simple. Soi wanted an interview with John Lewis. Colorado failed which across the Donut center physiology. Mr. Valentin, I Calvin Klein, the manage self Ralph Lauren in I've worked for lots of mainstream designers. And. Dishonestly right. A few years ago that is just a little bit bulled. Was there any? And I wanted to. What we pay that won't count. Maybe be more like minded, but more autism. And I just thought I'd play one Catlin. I'm just really loved. And and the work and the designers. I kinda went we've now all they're the kind of note. Then they all might Streep is honest, but then not commercial mainstream designers that people yard today. Tom brown. Junk Eliana for mice emotion law. You know, they're all kind of brands that creative. Other people that I don't work we club design is that you use e they closed down the high street. I mean, I tell you but working with people on a sane. Saint full processes now musician museum the. The books, you know. I counting books about careers. And you know what? Like, Don unite the were Enlai mcquaid and people like that, you know, group ISIS, and they love working remain all of where it can be then because we're law Monday PayPal. You saw a young. Yeah. We just saw glad to have you as as Eugene and doing, and it just blows my mom when I stand here, and you're just rattling off these names that you work alongside and. People. Yeah. Absolutely. They United Stu really jump for someone you have to really like will. They do you have to get them. I'm not providing a service on giving something, you know. I mean on Taekema Mijo in-inside can be on Nejad. We're going legitimate together. You're not unless very much how I see it you do and I'm just gonna come away a little bit from now. And I just wanna get your force on just the culture the culture shift in what we see in in the world now. And do you feel that this has a big reflection in the word that you'll create an under designers? Creighton do you see things really changing? You're not. I'm thanks so much faster. Now, right. Let's deal. Nice. We've social media. You know, why wait why the Weiming were now? And. I think there's great in it. And there's bad in it the positive the positive side of as because things are happening quicko. Well, I can only talk about it from a personal point of view. Because this will I feel it might not be anyone else fails. But this is how I feel about it. I think that is maybe less precious because I have to Quaco. It's kind of I will be up low. Maybe more relaxed and free. The the I guess the bags bad soil is you never really have time to truly appreciate what you've done. Roy you feel that you don't appreciate or maybe what you've always done. Well, you know, you want to the next thing. Right. And it's like, well, sometimes when you've done something it will be nice to conham be allowed to have the time. So pre shite what you've done think about what you've done in think about if you could do it in other. Why all where it could go? You know is very is. Very frightening should at the moment. United State you you didn't want Jovan his tongue next, but none of them kind of inspire. One. Another roaring full one. Another very separate. Which is obviously why what really creative designers because on. They don't. They designed with the concept, but is very much this United not just Mike and Clive biking close 'cause they have tonight lies is that may now. And as law may all loved to do hair. I don't have to. Isn't that simple? And what legacy you're gonna leave? You choose one. Are you gonna remember of that that? Good lasagna. I have no idea. Mica your world. You know, when they talk to their might scene, you, you know? I think it's really quiet. Finally, you know, I was talking to this the other day, and she's my oldest Rosie fees just turned twelve. Just before Christmas, and we were talking about Frings, and she's very much likely. She's quite she's calling out outwardly going kind postage quite loud. She likes people, but she wants her own space, and she's a creative. She's definitely not an academic by any stretch of imagine is nine. She's naked hamic joys are amazing the way she thinks. He's amazing. I'm we were talking about friends, and she was talking to me. She's well, you know, I really haven't go that many frames. Go 'bout four or five friends and that kind of worries over a little bit. And always knows what what did you say nice. She said will probably cause I'm different from law. Paypal. I know says. Yeah. She's all I thought that some good unless it will. I actually think he is good. She said well that is good. Well, I think he's really good because PayPal that actually really didn't understand you really think like you really day. Like you love that. And I think you're not with those things that people think really strange is a nobody we'd about you. I says you're gonna find as you get older they in the best things about you. They innovative themes that give you carry. You know, how you Julia loss? And she was process. It seems. Kanev in agreement which did it by consumer that the wheels win kind of United Saturday. She's of she got what I was cited. And and I think that was that was that was a source come for for athletes. Right. I think so. And you know, so anyone to to my son at similar things. And actually when I think of the people that I really really love and connect with people that have their quirks. Don't you know, always do things? Norman, I find them people so exciting and interesting. Sure, I mean, I find it hard to connett workout wear when what with women not starts way career. And I mean, somebody they're all the same thing. You kind of I kind of work together. And I guess you'll probably like many people the passion you don't get to where you are without loving. What you do? But it is just part of you is probably you'll live it units of it. As is is probably not. Yeah. Sure. Now, it's amazing. I mean time is just annot. I could just site on deathly gonna bring you back. Suddenly when that book comes out because I can't wait. I can actually see how that Oates is going to my brother is. Darren is ending credibly good street photographer long before that became fashionable. And he gets his books at some amazing world famous street talk. Visit I love looking in books. I'm kind of magic that you could look saying similar to that. Yeah. Probably be a lot with. Kawhi. So we are going to because you know, I always have a little bit of a flow in front of me. But I haven't even looked at it just gone off in a lovely. It really is unfunded really kind of an interesting time by mid because on signs of. Of. I guess title of Lucas as a very different law like originally. I I saw in Ceylon. And I saw it educating and then unless boy Anaconda soy's do session because it was, you know, twenty one years older those extremely attracted to young lady models. If Mazel advice surprise. I'm not spent lie gets the best parts when he followed years very night. And then I kind of go contracts with will professionals ONA southern unrealized. I was back in Detroit again, which is quite an interesting. You know, I feel right things kind of coming round full circle there. Yeah. It's it's almost like the exactly on that globally heads rolled it. You have their G HD incredible rose. And and also haven't even touched upon the British hairdressing awards hairdresser of the year nominations. I mean, generally briefly how was that the felt like all the industries? Welcome me back with open arms. Off the so being a wife. You know? I mean, it was it was really quite mind with that creative environment. And it was. Really got me kind of thinking about. United kind of commit by kids Detroit goal divvied things the United. The Laura educational again because I learned quite a lot since I've been away and different things, you know. And I think maybe it's time now to bring order those things back into this ROY just I just journey is up process in the planet. Let's just see. But when you just fiery Kentucky gunning into Nova, you might meet I wanna ask you another question. But you sort of say I feel like being away. Do you sort of say you feel like you being away? Because been working so hard to not being Sifi focused on. Working with these on this. I mean because like tight capo law of time, you know, and a low of energy United. I really do get you know, what someone junk getting on fade from my salon jello is like four days every models different character. And it's saw immediate have to think about it. You know, I think site for instance, you you look what you have thirty two gals was he to Motta was in a show. Right. You have to create a specific look for that. One. Post sounds haunted tight about three or four gutters to find. That thing. The the worse with some if you if you multiply ROY thirty two by four selectivity doing the dying of so. Clients. Right. You know, what I really so? But that's the really great thing. You know, not lost shine was I was like that is starting often. It was it was very colorful. What it was? It was loaded and the idea was Jones saw it off with something that was lot reloaded, and it became minimal became turned into nothing. And we were talking about is this is what you know, you really minimal. Would. I is. Oh my slot. We kind of saw the shy bites from, you know, like, the, you know, the big pace ROY is nobody at the end of the show. But it was not it was right at the very beginning. Ryan us ethnicities thought we've done shied bytes bytes from you know, in reverse he was low. And we was we were talking about it. And I we'll. What we start off with something really maximal loads of kala this loaded. Right. Impair it down. So like the laws person should have shied pace. I should have known hair an excellent idea. You know, what I made? So you really you really have to kind of understand paint, we work with you know. I want to go come on with you know, Mckee night. They they just got out the shower. And bits of hair stuck in clothes and stuff like that. And I'll sit. I said is you know, when it's like stomach highs. I said could I have had the shallow but forgot to rinse the shampoo out. And he's a love the idea. And we say goes out with like five minutes. Wis shampoo thought bubbles. Is very own pun, ROY. And he's a real creative. So you know, we played that is Justin joy you have to remind yourself. I guess up, you know. And I know it never wanted to Joe, but never do wanna joke and interested in avenue Joel I just wanted to something really just really passionate about love. It just comes through. And it's why way we're glad we have you as I was British hairdressing hairdressing live. You have got a master class coming up on the fifteenth of April. Tell us what's going on here. What we told about me could've like coming back into the industry. I've ever seen twenty five twenty parents. A lot of things and a lot of different things outside Aaron destroy. And I think for me. I really love supremo realize influences and ideas and bring into the Hendrickson audience unim- hyping. The people are going to be inspired by that. Could you give us a little snippet of maybe what we might see? Well, yet is three sections. It is obviously essentially is in our first session would be an introductory section of wear. I kind of to briefly about in my philosophy. And I. Use Nokes of creative designers lay McQueen and yard GM might side. But. I titan for the United. I mean spy binds, look, so I found and we do something different. With those looks. Then there's the third section which will be a a section on ham prices a week work. Which way Paul the process, and then they will be a completely free style section which kind of give you really good insight into modern philosophy and how I fail and narrow none on deers for that. It's all I am gonna might not his up on the day in front of everyone and put Moines Nick other than the lowing. Enters. This is live, isn't it? I just really kind of go. Put my parts on the Trump your block and just put it out there for everyone assay enjoy to do something that I haven't seen before and tight myself out of a comfort zone. And to show everyone, ROY I guess. Sometimes when you step out of your comfort zone, you can create things that you never thought you could know to be comfortable with been uncomfortable. That's another one eight full of most motivation on really excited about this. Can't tell you because I've got there are a few tickets a big sold in a hell, we can get those tickets in interesting life, you can get on their on their website on the lake and there's also an audience there as well. Amazing. And you'll use just gonna pay paper. The I truly value idiot industry. The I think of. The best people in the world that have it spied my in my career, and I feel really surely been. Am I z ambassadors this travel? I haven't asked yet can come July seminar, Mark high as. Tim Harley you, not answer the impact Nick this. This is going to be laws headdresses that are. Really have a bright respectful, right respectful. I to be an audience call why? And I'll just tell anyone down. But I'm sorry. Use. This is this really is one of those industry events. The are just. Be just amazing, and we're gonna put all the links to hairdressing live to this event on the show notes as well listeners. Don't worry I'll give some links are mentioned some of them are failing. I think the amazing thing about is. I think everyone, you know. And there's there's some created heads the journal. You know, those guys are coming at I'm high pin? Roy is going to be not just a seminar is going to be a little bit of a a bit of a of swale a club people. And we're gonna have really great compensation as well as educating United. So it's. It's more of any vein. This is really fancies could be till it very special. You know, a whoever applies Mike awake might some very interesting clients. I'm not going to tell you about. We'll just have to wait and see everything about is about up slightly. A recently. Are- appropriate in something and put it somewhere else. And creatively on very happy with where where we where we are at the moment. You know, brilliant. We'll thank you ought to say. I cannot wait what she's say listeners. Don't worry. We're gonna give you all those links that you need to know for this spectacular event. I mean, it's really is a one off event, and that you just have to get on an what she's Weldon PU DIVY former guests of the show. I think yeah, he's he's done a brilliant thing. Big fan of Paul really, good games. Right. So we're congratulations. Eugene. I wanted you to be my longest ever interview. We have is fantastic. I could run sometimes I I just have to Sean things out a little bit. But few I've just kind of just this has been brilliant. So so engaging up in fruit in every power what you're saying. But I'm just gonna finish on five questions fun lighthearted has nothing to do with hair whatsoever. I just wanna leave some thoughts on you a wife and have industry. So just as quick as you can if you don't mind answering these just fund, so of course, you one away from work. How do you best light to spend your time eating he's and that lasagna, I've got your lasagna my mind. All music, and I love my kids, and I love sweet love the social up going on in life. You ought to be nukem nothing. You'd be great great guests to go to and house. Right question to what's the one song that makes you jump up and hit the dancefloor? Ooh, hit dollars full. Does he have to wait? It don't slow. It could be wherever you want as long as you bust in a move. Boston. My it would be I records on a Bank Ruutel Quint. Yup. And it would be all gone accumulates. So we're going to be checking on Spotify AK so question free. What was you doing last Saturday night? Law saturday. Woah, what was either I was actually working? Question full. What was the last big treat? You gave to yourself. My studio. That does sound it Australia. I came on final question to just bane. The best interview ever. I could've ever asked is tell us one more thing that we really need to know about you. Booth. I would say you should expect the unexpected valley. Lovely puppies, and everything I think of it. Absolutely perfect. Perfect interview. Perfect guest, you'll just brilliant and you're on Instagram. Where can we go find you there Eugene sue owner AG and a as a U L, E, MIA brilliant? There we got listeners again, I'll put in a link, and I'll say again headdress in live links in so just want to tell you this opportunity to I just say thank you for that you've done for the industry on behalf of our industry. Eugene, you you're you're brilliant. You're gentlemen, you humble. And you're great. And you're just amazing. So thank you really coming onto the Cutty podcast. It's been my pleasure. What an absolute on a that. Was he was a true gentleman who shed I'm Pugh agree so much incredible. Inspirational insightful information, you could ever get from a true headdress in great now, if you are interested in finding a anymore at the things that we talked about in the show today as well as some images from Eugene. But most importantly, his online masterclass with headdress in live than we have prepared some show knows for you with them links for you to sign up for this Monday's event, April the fifteenth two thousand nineteen and you can find it bug going to WW dot how to cut dot it slash podcast special zero one. And if you want to learn more on hairdressing live, we also have more information there, again, we'll put the links there for you. They've got so many incredible guests some of our. Have been on this podcast show of also performed for hairdressing live nephew on new to the how to cut it in the headrest in industry podcast. We bring you these shows every Monday morning, we've got so many exciting guests coming your way every week as well as Lori of over ninety seven interviews, including the lives of Antony Moscow. Trevor soobee and read lease staffer Sophia Hilton. The list is endless go and check them out. You will just be blown away by some of the information and insights down sharing you now if you don't want to miss any of the shows that simple, you can subscribe to them using your podcast provider. And once you sign up to them if allows that will give you a notification straight to your phone every time, our episodes, go live, and if you are listening on I tunes, then please do leave us a writing and review. And if you're loving them, your friends and colleagues all. About them. And also if you would like to reach out get in touch with myself, you can find me on older social media platforms by searching how to cut it. Thank you all for listening to this very special podcast special bonus episode. I look forward to speaking to you again on Monday sun to then peace loving, smiles all the way goodbye. How to cut it in the head of the industry. Taking your hairdressing. To the.

Eugene United ROY Eugene Paul Mike king Eugene Solomon Trevor PayPal US Australia Eugene Sulaiman Eugene Suliman Mark high Lee nets Milan Tom brown Eugene sue Brian York
123 - Going On Autopilot

Not So Standard Deviations

54:00 min | Last month

123 - Going On Autopilot

"Happy twenty twenty one to you. Yes yeah it's so funny the it actually. This is twenty twenty one to like the in january. There is just like these shockwaves. The went through like so. I was floored when someone reminded walls. A podcast mentioned this. Which is that de. Remember that like assassination of an iranian general No but now. I do thousand twenty twenty. Well okay to me. I was like oh my god that was ancient history anyway. That was january third. And like i feel like we had similar. We had that whole call come out or trump was like actively trying to shake down the georgia secretary of state for votes lake. Any semblance of like this is because of some credible concern. I have was out the door and it looks like literally just like come on. Help me out. I only need a few. I think this is worse. This is more of a bag. Yeah yeah it is. But then it's also like immediately you know for liberals Mmediately undone by the georgia wins. It's just so funny. It's the same state i guess. Maybe that's why there's been so much focus. We went from fifty states. To what like i. I was trying to remember like if georgia flips. I don't even think trump would win. Like i think he needs more than just georgia to flow. He needs way more than yeah. Yeah so it's like it's so it's so it's like. Are these calls happening in the other swing states yesterday. But there's there's the added fact that these kind of like threatening like i'm not going to support the senate races if you don't do this for me and then that panned out. Yeah there's like a anyway so it's just been a while to start so that's true. No i agree with you. It has been a while. It's only what we're only six days in. Yeah it's been a wild six days. I think i don't know my feeling about what the six days of twenty three hundred so far is not like dramatically different. I have to say. Yeah i mean it's such i. I'm someone who i do. Believe in like ceremony and symbolism as like important human function and so i do think like the celebration of the new year and like a fresh beginning and like i don't think that's up is worthless like i do think it's an important like journeys gone but i also did not think anything was actually going to change. Well okay i mean so. I i agree with you on the on the need for ceremony and ritual but also. I feel like not to not to be that guy who's always a statistician but there's like It's like i feel like i'm we've gotten i've gotten so kind of what's the word like desensitized to just variants know. I think everyone is just like. Oh there's like so in my mind it's like i'm not thinking of like the mean like things are just on average better. Updating like has the various no does not change. So therefore everything zave totally your you and i think the variances what's caused the like the trauma of the year you know or of the ability. I think that's like pretty. Basic gun the moslems pyramid or triangle. I an lower hi. it's slow. Yeah are it's like yeah and so it's a and the ability to emotionally cope with stuff is still bad because we're all still in like a pandemic are emotional. Reservoirs are are low very low. Yes i guess. I don't know. I guess. Full because they overflow i. Don't i always miss bad analogy reservoirs. Well you okay. Yeah you're right because you want at high because that's like that's like your reserve. It's like use the reservoir of less. Yeah tempting so you have nothing to give angry. It's just funny. 'cause someone in my life like would use it being foale the bad thing. Okay so so like overflow. He can't fit anything else in like. It's i it could go either way. I suppose yeah. That's the problem at analogy. So one thing. I just wanted to mention this before i forget. It's a little bit of a review from last year. But like you. And i were just talking off the air about how through much of last year. Our it doesn't seem that are listenership was fairly stable. I mean i have individual level data at our listeners. But you know i can see the numbers in the downloads and we have the patriot and so you know it was everything was fairly stable so i was very pleased to see that and i say that. I'm grateful that we're grateful for our listeners. To kind of stick with us basically and you know keeping it going. I totally agree. Yeah it's i. I'm happy that. I know that i have podcast. That i've just like escaped into or you know where the people really feel like friends. Which i don't know if that's a good thing or like a sad thing it's like should i have real friends instead of my podcast friend. What is real anyway. I mean i know i was. I was genuinely thinking about that. Where i was like. Isn't this stimulating. The same like centers in my brain of talk anyway Obviously i can't call up the. How did this get made people be like. I'm having a hard day but it's just like it's just nice it's genuinely it's like being you know out with friends and being able to listen to your friends have a conversation. So i'm glad we've been able to provide the that i understand the value first of all. I like doing podcasts. I'm glad that we're still doing it. Just for my ability to lake cope with the pandemic and like all the craziness in my life of you know like two jobs and now being unemployed and just like it's nice to have that stability and then Yeah so. I'm really grateful. And i love hearing from people and it's it is a two way relationship and i think The for me. Think the doing the to podcasts. That i do was like the thing that changed the least in all of last year. Exactly and i think it really did make a big difference. It helped a lot just to do them and also to kind of know that people are listening so that said. I just want to take this opportunity because we don't really talk about it that much but to mention that we do have a patron on page. Where if you are enjoying the podcast you can support us and it's patriots dot com slash. Nss deviations and You can support us at the one dollar two or three dollar per episode level. Yeah we have different like goodies. Actually i think we only have goodies for three dollar No no we have different goodies for all levels. Yes the two dollar level. Gets you the sticker which we have right. Yes and the three dollar level. The sticker plus occasional outtakes from our things get cut from the main episode. So yeah cat related. A little remiss on the outtakes. But i'm going to hopefully get back on that train very sued so i think my new year's resolution for twenty what is just getting back on the train. So do you actually do resolutions. No not really so anyway. For those who. We have a number of patriots with us since the beginning really which is really great and so anyways encouraged supporters. And if you're interested in supporting us going forward feel free to check it out that leads me to we have some follow up an email that we can do it. Yes you know. St milk actually. While it's yeah it's fo- steamed so we got an email this. This is the kind of email that like baksi not reminds me. It makes me want to just keep do the podcast forever right so this is got an email from andreas from a switzerland where he says i'm going to hold on a second guten route know any swiss german called. I didn't realize this is different. Claims this means good slide or in other words happy new year. So oh what i get. That he's like slide into the new year. I guess maybe you're like sliding head sliding toward well cool. Thank you anyway. He wrote a long email. Which is like. I can't do the whole thing but it's awesome so you should take a look at the university. But he did write in about one hot encoding l. Excellent we also had another email from chris who also wrote in about one hot encoding and With a very similar kind of explanations. So i feel like there's consistency in the data here so we may be onto something here so i. This is something that i did not know. So i'm going to say so. The basic idea is like you had to like in the location of land like a memory location in a computer right. And let's say there's like eight locations right if you were going to do that in binary you would need three bits right to threes eight so like but the problem is there. Is that in order to get all eight locations. You might have to light up more than one you might have to kind of like imagined. Each bit is like a lightbulb. You might have to light up more than one bull time to get to all eat locations by definition have to right. Yeah exactly The other way you can think about is leave. You have eight locations you want to address. You have eight light bulbs and then every location just gets one lightbulb. And that's it. Yeah so you never have to light up more than one at a time and so that the ideas that approach. We just have one lightbulb per thing that you reference per thing that you reference is one hot encoding. Where does the hot come in. We'll delightful of his hot but the light bulbs will be hotter had but they wouldn't be one hot if you like multiple hot. I'll i see okay. So it's like if you if you are like there's eight light bulbs one lights up and becomes hot and the other seven are cold right age just different than the other one. The hot card. What was the cold. Hot car with. The hot deck station is totally different. Yeah yeah 'cause that lens like by reusing it becomes hot whereas sustain eve is less i think maybe the use of the word hot is like totally different than the two different. So the point is that like there's like you could imagine. There's a charge going to this lightbulb in that. But you only do one at a time. That's why it's one hot right. So if you had like a categorical variable and wanting code the categorical variable you could have. If there's like eight categories you could use three bits. Orchestras eight bits and that would be one hot encoding. I understand it. But i don't i don't like it as much as much as what the hot deck because it felt like hot deck is like a physical thing that happened. Well i agree with you. I think the hot deck the reference to hot deck imputation is like physical like it's an actual thing that occurs whereas the hotness in the one hot encoding is. i don't think it's totally hypothetical. I think it's possible that like in the early days of computing like you had actual like going to different places in the computer and it would actually make that hot and so i. I don't think. I don't know if that's an issue now but you can see in. There are trade-offs right like because if you have the one hot encoding the the new kind of your level of hotness is always constant right. It's always one lic okay. You like the three bit encoding then you might have. You might have three light bulbs on it you know at any point right. I just wish that it wasn't the word hot for hunting codeine. I wish i was like i will. I don't know maybe it's just another word. It's like one on 'em encoding for one bit encoding. Yeah but isn't but that's confusing because it's like that has to be a non like binary. Yeah that this guy anyway. That's the explanation. That undress sent us in. It seemed to make sense to me. it does. I don't like it. It's not satisfying but it makes sense and the other person did they stay the same thing. Yeah the bill. Chris says basically there is some some metaphor like an incandescent bulb being on or off basically out. Though i mean that's like if you turn it on i guess with an incandescent if you turn on just her second. Is that actually hot. Well i think it is. I think it gets high because there is a there is energy that goes through there that is basically wasted in into the light bulb. So like if you if you like turn on a cfl and turn it off. It like isn't taught to touch. And not if you turn it on for a second but if you turn on a while with it but you don't when you're just encoding the data. What are we talking about. I don't know. I just think it's hard to imagine the physical like whatever but you could imagine the wires that go to the light bulb also get hot it that a better like there's resistance of the wires right and so like the more you use a given lightbulb. The more those trinity's flow into those wires and they get hot they'll flow through all of them. They'll all be equally hot all eight in the if you have like if you like good coverage in your data of all the different okay. But if you don't then if like if one that's dumb like you shouldn't name your method off of like and sometimes when you have one variable way over represented that one gets hotter than the others. I will admit that this is like what. I saw this explanation. I thought wow. This is a really abstract like demolishing. I don't see what is the path that went from this which does make sense in like an old time in context to like. We're gonna use this exact same phrase to talk about category. Philip variables like past. Yeah i guess. The i do. I will in defense of the name. I do not have a mental image. For which is like now. I have my little minora love pop sign. You know like that. That's there now so that's good. I'll tell you if the encoded categorical. variables with candles. They would really be hot. Yeah i this is so stupid. But i learned from Wake i have a gas stove. Which are going to be illegal in san francisco. I think starting this year realism or not illegal. But you can't install new ones anymore. Yeah and Like i'll turn it on. I have this little the nine barista coffee thing has like a plate that you have to use if you have a gas. Don't like a heavy kind of battle Like a metal plate that is itself heavy not a heavy and it Sometimes it'll be like off center on the burner the noticed I've like tried to move it. I like it's a high at chev- with their heads get. Yeah then i'm like turns out sulaiman actually high second. Your fingers are one hot and coded. Now it's just like in any other system like with an oven if you turn it on and then you're like let me go in there really fast like it's cold it's like i said it's dumb. This is very much someone who this seems like a twenty first century problems is flame high. I say no way. That's the first century the discovery that flame is hot. I mean the fact that like. I don't have that intuitive reactions like i can just slide. This plays on oaken flame and get it into the right spot and it won't be hot yet like that's something. He doesn't use open flame for cocaine often. Anyway okay was good to know anecdote. Yeah that's one. Hot encoding doesn't like work for me. Because i'm not familiar with he properties anymore. Yeah now we're getting to the root of the problem here. Yes hillary problem. Not one hot and cutting problem all right next bit. Are you ready so we got some yet to help me with this one. We got some followup from On twitter for a mark jones jr. I guess it's mark jones junior twitter at know that like. Why would you not just the handle. This isn't episode of examining our assumptions and knocking them. I'm just reading the handle. Okay just leave your logo. See okay. I got it so he tweeted at us. He says i can answer. All the airplane autopilot questions from your recent podcast okay. So here's my problem. I don't recall talking about autopilot. We did we talk about it on the last episode at laying. So you really don't earn saw this tweet. I thought it was maybe like thirty. I was like what episode was that. Oh my god. That's hilarious that this is like this like scathing for both of us. Twenty one does not so we were going. It's because you're talking about ai and we are talking about the difference obviously and then it was like between the machine. Learning that made started talking about self driving cars. And whether or not that they i guess at then i asked lake. Well is autopilot for planes. Ai offer like quite of wile about like how autopilot in planes work. And you're saying it's very like a process like it's it's like a control system and then it was like well are control since i because they are mimicking human action right like But i think. I think no because we like the i have to be like an interaction. That's like a human interaction. Well okay so let's okay. Now that i remember that we had this conversation like prepared to discuss it But just l- quick background. So i guess looking at remember it now at least yes. Yes and i guess this guy bark john's. Jr is a pilot of some sort. I think he might have in the air force. Okay this is experimental tests but might be. It's as personal views. Not dod so you might actually be the airforce right now So anyway has experience with planes is the key So i asked like to. What extent are autopilot. Systems based on classical control systems approaches. And by that. I mean like what do i mean. I mean basically. It's an is like a filter was basically taking an input data processing it and translating it into like actions that the plane has to do so. Like moving yeah like like movements of actual steering column right. Yes exactly translate into like the old days like physical movements of the steering column whereas now please don't work like that it's all digital. But anyway so that's why. He says he says one hundred percent at this time. But i want to be clear. That quote classical quote means control theory not any description of the mechanical components. Modern aircraft have highly automated digital flight. Computers that send commands to actuator so the idea. I think this is what is called. Fly by wires. The ideas that can you move the stick in the cockpit and that doesn't actually correspond to like like a literal movement of the control struck coal control surfaces mercedes. Are that way i am. I hate only with the steering. Yeah like when you shift. I've rented one. It's like when you shift. Click it like like makes like the gearchange Yeah go on the totally separate things. You're not like like. I'm used to like driving. Stick shift where it's like. You can feel lake things moving when you like at steak and it's it's like it's such. It's such a hellish experience. If it's not working. And i had that with a rental once where it would not change former verse to forward only one out of ten times and it was. It was so scary. 'cause like there's so many times when you need to really quickly move for reverse to forward for your own. Safety is very important that that works one hundred percent of the time you just like. I remember once. I think i stopped the car and like got out of it. I was like what the hell. I'm so mad right now. It does concern me sometimes at like. So how many of these kinds of things will rely on just like software computers working and like i drive so i drive. An electric car was do so. It's basically like driving an iphone at like. It's a little scary. Do you ever have to just like with the mercedes. I finally figured out that. If i turned off with the button and then turned back on. Eight would work. Like i literally had a power cycle is car to get it to go from reverse before that. I haven't experienced anything quite that dramatic but had i have gotten into the car. Hit the power button. Like things were wonky turns it off back on. It's just rebooted. The car basically there was fired. Well i'm sure plenty work much better than that. I would hope so but like who knows. Well there's anecdotal. When actor the boeing seven thirty-seven was initially like this to some degree. Right is like a software issue at seven. Thirty seven max. Radio i think they have like people in the plate like software engineers in like a flying plane like fixing it like i don't know i somehow it was like debugging it's like that like oh we're building the ship as were we're building. It was like actually like ahead. Not heard that. But i don't know if that was just i i saw. I just saw a tweet like that. But it was like holy cow. Could you imagine if this were. Your life is a software engineer. All right let me just finish this little threat. He has. Yeah so the next one he says right now. Ai slash are being used in our in d- But they provide an output that then goes into the traditional hardware software architecture. That supports autopilot. Get control so. I think i think the idea here is that there's like a. There's like a core control system algorithm which basically takes inputs and translate that into actions but what does inputs are could could vary. And i think what he's saying here. Is that one of those. So what are those opposed know radar or something like that or like. They have these tubes on the plane. To tell you what the angle of attack is like that. Just like an air sensor right but you could also have like a camera. That's looking at the looking out the window or whatever and recognizing objects and that could also be input to this. There's the reason why that couldn't be input so that would be like ai. Component that feeds input into the standard control system. Why would you a component so it could be like an image recognition algorithm right. I see the. There's one so he mentioned this blog posts and said that i saw i just clicked on the link it goes to like there's a view of like of a plane landing and it recognizes the runway. And it's you know what angle the runways ad and so it can kinda like towards the right angle. Whatever so so that could be like i. I would call that machine. Learning about the yeah. It's like did wait. Where do we land with the self. Driving cars are those. Ai oh good point. Yeah i think we did call that. Ai right. i thought that. I ended up being like no. But i can't see redoubt the of the elevated forgotten this conversation. Well okay me not remembering. My conclusion is really different than not remembering the whole conversation. That's fair You're not getting off the hook. Obviously but i like when you're in a car like it's like a self driving car mimic speen a passenger. When you're actually the driver you know what i mean late. If you're a passenger you're not expecting to change the way that the cars driving you know it's not conversation between you and the the driver i mean i guess you could but like i don't know when you're in a self driving car. Can you be like. Hey can you get the right lane is we're gonna turn right and a half a mile like it. Does it just do that for you. I yeah i mean. I don't think maybe not that level of detail but if you're like hey we're going to go to this. Other place really really changed destinations. I think if it got to the of us sane you know when you're driving up maybe just my parents do when you're driving and the person who's giving new directions is like okay now in half-mile you're like get the right lane very calmly if i think if you got a self driving car to that level where you were like talking to it and you're like hey traffic's bad i think you should get in the right lane and then does that. That would be a i. Yeah okay the car is hard. I think i think where i landed and i could be wrong but i think we're it landed was that it's like real time machine learning. It's yesterday. imagine. I think what mark was saying. Is that these self Autopilot systems are deterministic yangzhou. I guess like i s to it takes. There may be some. I don't know. I i guess. I'm not knowledgeable enough of current techniques but like the classical control system approaches are deterministic happening. Therefore do that. And they're very highly tuned with engineering data but once out in the field. They don't get updated. I'll think yeah. Yeah for sure. But then mostly i think like an were you like Locally on your phone that doesn't get updated either not dynamically. Yeah wasn't it jeff's blog posts like it's a ui problem and we're at the edge cases of the u. I i feel like okay. Yeah i think so. I think it's up to me a self driving car. Which changed the i if you were like. Hey never mind. I want to go to this place again like well. I think the issue now is that first of all self driving cars like have mass like exposure. That's the second of all. It's not clear what the interface is because well first of all. I've never been in a self driving car so i interface just like probably a button you push. Let's go into self-driving mad but then what but where does it drive. You know like you have to tell it where to go right. Yeah that's the interface right. Yeah yeah and as far as i could tell. That's it right. Like i don't know what the so if that's all there is that doesn't feel like hey i Because it feels like the same thing as would you put in your like google maps. Like right right. He destination but if be like what are the other actions that you that a human would do a car besides drive the thing right. Yeah well that's what. I am focused on this conversation between passenger driver. Yeah so i think. I take it. But i think i agree with you. I think it's not there yet. But if the interface were to like become more nuanced than it would and then by this logic like a pilot it doesn't seem like there would ever be a ui makes autopilot into a i. You know what. I mean i. Yeah it's hard. it's hard to imagine. Yeah it's like. I mean 'cause it's like a technical task already it's a highly technical task and limited to just a very small minority people. Who can this right. Yeah yeah and like the juice wouldn't be worth the squeeze to like. Make it like an like a conversational by. It's like right well because i think the the direction of the industry is more towards drones which are which are what we call total. Self-driving humans involved type vehicles l. crazy. I guess now that you say that. It's like i feel like there is a whole conversation about like do you need the pilots. Unlike commercial jets right. Yeah it's a little bit more like the trucking conversation. I feel like Laborde analogous to that. I think But let me just finish. That tumor tweets so one. The next one says some of the coolest examples of autopilots that do amazing things that seem really magical need little more than a calman filter so that's just like a standard filter account. Filter is basically taking. I tried like the easiest way to explain it. In terms of like statisticians would in terms of the statisticians would understand is basically like taking. You have like a latent variable bottle and you're taking data and kind of inferring the values of invariables from the data. That's a everything's normal. The key the calvin filters at everything's like normally district normally distributed. Yeah okay yeah. Yeah i mean the state i mean it. There's a state space model. Which has like these latent variables and then you had these observed data and you take the observed data and you kind of infer the parameters. Okay so i mean the so. The state space model in an aviation context would be like the orientation of the plane like or in the end. It's like location and so you have to estimate that from very gps and whatever l. I reminds me that i was gonna chuckle that you now. That was the angle of attack or something. Yeah i don't it's just tech that you like clearly know your stuff. When the only reason. I know that is from that horrible article which was actually. I think i've talked about like twenty time. But this article about one of those like plane crashes like exactly they have like the cockpit recorded and everything and the angle of attack was like the issue. So that's the only reason why. I know that i think that's the only reason i know too. That was the issue with the some of max right. I mean this was like a flight from brazil to paris. Yes yeah we talked about it a long time ago. Yeah oh my god that. I don't know why. I think some reason that was in my head and i was like. I don't know whether to advertise this article or because people will have that morbid curiosity but like if there's ever one article i read the like haunted being for my whole life it is that line. Okay let's not continue that let's continue. This is the whether it's relevant. I think he's his second to last. Thought the ev revolution so the stands for electric vertical takeoff and landing. I'll wait so like a like a spacious room like no. he says. Think uber elevate. I don't know what that is. It's like uber is Like flying division And he says it's small unmanned aircraft are really big areas where artificial intelligence and machine learning or getting used a lot so drones and other kinds of small aircraft but it still sounds like they. Just go up like vert. Ev like can you say the definition. What's electric vertical takeoff and landing. So how how airplane takes off. It's not vertical. i think that's what. I meant the spatial it's like goes up. Well okay but simpler example would be a drum okay. Fine but okay. Yeah so that makes sense. And in those cases a interface would make more sense. Potentially because you might have way. More operators trainees them. Yes yeah so. It's like a left. Not that far left. That is closer to the Like the self driving car. Like example So if you think of like he'll like all these like you know like air-taxis for example Right right then you can imagine. The interface is more human like with an air taxi. What is that. It's like a huge drone that like has people on it you may have like four or five people in it. yeah wow. Is that happening somewhere like right now. I don't think it's actually happening. I think there's people working on it. Yeah yeah we don't have to continue that conversation either. If you don't know. I mean it's just all crazy. Yeah i don't know. Do you think the first autopilot systems were literally people with like. I can just imagine it's like it's like the when you put like a brick on the accelerator rustic to give the steering column. You know what i mean. That'd be interesting to look up. I don't know maybe mark can help us with that. I mean i have to imagine because it just would have started so long ago. That bat was the first ideas. Were like like highly mechanical things that were just like nudging the steering column left and ray were the first Cruise control for example right. That's an autopilot of sorts right. Yeah and that's mechanical. Because i feel like you feel the Like that would just be like. Hey can you just like leave the pedal in this spot right exactly this specific location. Yeah and then as they got more advanced it was like oh case slowdown. When you're going downhill yeah. I don't know that. Because i only ever had the type that just maintain the same speed. Yeah yeah i can. I just remember what i hit like. Cruise control it would like the pebble. Would galway kind of it was like you'd feel the pedal go somewhere this or now. I can't remember if i ever had a cruise control. That was like more than just those less than like maintaining this i think cruise control has always maintained speed as i. I guess i was wondering if the speculate. I was assuming that the first system might have just literally been like a leave. Freeze the pedal here. In which case it wouldn't maintain the same speed it would have been taint the acceleration. You can't really freeze the pedal because that would be a continuous acceleration forever. Now all the continuous acceleration. If you're pushing the pedaled forward wasn't that what you've okay. So where are you. Freezing the pedal. Ns five so just stays in the same spot but if that spot is anywhere down right it won't be accelerating. It'll like eventually. It'll i haven't driven awhile next time. You're at a car. Tried this experiment. Push the pedal down and don't move. See what happens it'll get. I think it'll get to. It'll start accelerated. They'll get to a steady state. 'cause like it'll just isn't the pedal like how much gas is going into the engine. All right maybe we should do some important national standard deviations up. Here's what i'm gonna do. I'm going to. I'm going to do this for you because i know you don't have regular access to a car next time again to my car which maybe six months from now. Who does my car. I'm gonna take data in my in my phone. Okay use accelerometer. We're going to see what happens all right. I'm pretty sure. I mean i like yeah. I'm pretty sure that's how it works early. What are you saying that if you're on the highway you would have to constantly be like leading the pedal up slightly to maintain the same speed. I feel like that's what you're saying. Yes that's that's how you drive no way you just don't realize this because it's like unconscious action for you at this point right then you would stop eventually. You wouldn't have your foot on the pedal at all. No because eventually the car would come to a stop because there's friction in the system right so yeah filling in order to maintain the same speed yet to keep the pedal down at some amount. Are you class like pushing and pulling off and then if you're on a flat road totally flat and you just you pushed down the accelerator to a certain certain distance right. Yeah and you just hold it there. Yeah the car will accelerate until it reaches its maximum speed. I reject this like what if you just leave it at a very slight angle. So the mean is that so the okay. I have found confuses as myself. Sometimes is the difference in velocity acceleration right so the pedal fixes the constant acceleration but but constant acceleration means increasing velocity. I thought when you speed up your like cushing the pedal more like it's like i to speed up like like push the tunnel a little bit more and more. You don't have to push it like a little will go forward and if you just hold it there it will just slowly get faster and faster faster. I feel like my foot would be so much more tired if this were true. But i'm like driving on the highway. I think you've just you've been doing it for how many decades you're just used to it. This is like when you do your iran godal highway where imagine you imagine that the pedal is a velocity pedal so you hold the pedal at a certain place in keeps philosophy but the pedals does not a velocity pedal. The i'm assuming that the pedal is like a set gas into engine thing and then it like has to speed up like speeds up. I guess yeah. I assume that the pedal is like a speed. Like it's like okay. Let me push to like sixty miles per hour and if the car is going slower than that it'll like speed up to get to sixty and then allstate sixty i i feel like a i'm telling you i don't know how to explain to you that like i don't know how to disappoint you. Feel like you know. Like if i don't understand the pedal if you've pushed the pedal actually do so. Let's say the pedal like a Creates a constant stream of like fuel into the engine right. Yeah and like more pedal more fuel. Let's say that's how it works right. Yeah so that would imply. Trust me when i say this. I had to relearn all this myself like this does not come to naturally. Okay that would imply that solit- if you imagine that like a certain amount of fuel creates a certain amount of force starting say like if it's already if the engines already going and you're putting more fuel into it'll start going faster. Well a the my point is that like a constant amount of fuel translates into a constant force. Going forward is the force constant that means it's like continuing to get ignoring the friction elements. It's continuing the blasio be increasing. Yeah i just. I still feel like if you're if you're on the highway you're going like seventy i feel like there's somewhere where you could freeze the pedal and it would stay at seventy like in the input would have to be exactly equal to the friction. That i think is i will seventy like for my car seventies pretty fast so or in texas like. I don't know if you've ever gone on route. Forty like you can just go. You book like it's like. I'm just say that i would think by cargoes like much beyond have a nissan leaf. That doesn't go. Wow well. I know it goes faster than seventy but it's like it's strains yeah okay. Let's say you're going fifty five. Were on like but we just have to be on highway. That's like the reason. I'm thinking seventy s 'cause like you in texas or oklahoma like that's the only place in the country. Have you ever driven out there. Only place in the country were light. You could just like basically fall asleep like just like you're gonna say the same you like have sticks on the steering column. That would be the place to do it. Yeah just like like the biggest interrupted eight. Yeah that like if you hit the friction if you hit the right place you could just leave it in the same spot. I think the there probably is like a like a local maximum somewhere where like the friction equals like the kind of amount of acceleration. You're adding and so like the. The las does stay constant even if the pedals down like the pedals down like a little bit then. Okay so when you're both right. I think i think when i have driven on the highway. I've always tried to achieve that. I mean it makes sense because it's like you're not moving your foot. Yeah well and more importantly you're not like getting seasick from like i cannot stand your drive. I get carsick release. If it's like neural like speed up and then slow down. I like i. I want to jump out of those uber's like i can't do it a little concerned that after this whole conversation that like mark ashamed of i now. We've heard so far from like the advanced. Discussion is trying to a great response to her. Comments about autopilot. Well he now. He knows how low he had to go. Yeah bring me on. But it it is like i mean i think it's at the border of ai. And i think that this idea of like training model offline and then having a go online. I mean that's like i really think you're right. I think i learned a lot from the discussion. That they i is just the interface. Do you think that component of a i is like is like basically incorporating new data on the go. Yeah but then the but then the well. That's what i was arguing last time that there's like a real time interaction. Look the model is changing. You have to. You can't just spit out recommendations in those are static like a now has to be like okay new input new recommendations but it's not like retraining. It's like that could be deterministic. That could be part of the model right. Yeah that's part of the model but the model has to in real time show you new results based on your input. Yeah but in the most basic imagine of the models like linear regression right like a simple linear regression. Just the line right. Yeah and then. Do you imagine that like a model. Could at some point after get taking in enough data. Be like actually. It's looks more like it's polynomial or looks like more like a quadraphonic seles change to cut roddick. I think no even though probably a lot of people think well if it did that you wouldn't need a human data scientists straight that's self learning right. Yeah i mean. I think ultimately that's how some of these kinds of i guess it depends on what you think the model is you know like i. If the model is super flexible right then then it comes down to definition but okay but a lot of the lake almo. I feel like with ai. That's actually the place where more than ever i've heard Like it's it's entered the consumer pitch to be like this model will live on your phone so that there's not like a back and forth from the server road and so it's faster because like you put. The input is like calculates output. Right away like to you. But then that means that the static model. Yeah i think at the end of the day it's all it's all static because it's like you have to write a set of rules. I mean there has to be like a fixed rules and whatever that is is the model. So i'm saying i isn't like that because i like in a. We actually have empirical proof based on the way people like do their consumer level marketing for a i that they like explicitly. Tell the consumers we don't retrain the model because it lives on your phone. But i can imagine. There are ways to update the model with lake. So there's like the desert approach. It's like let's take aggregate data right and so the idea. Is that the model that lives on. Your phone is not the whole model right. It like it takes your personal data. It keeps it on the phone but then it kind like merges. It combines it with like aggregate data that comes from other people right right right and then that part could be updated. Anytime i think the data from other like the parameters like the fit the coefficients. Yeah yeah yeah yes. I don't i don't know where we are now. But the idea like model that retrain that self n. is like let's change model assumptions based on the data. Were seen on your phone. I don't think that's part of ai. And i think that. That's like when i keep going back to this lake consumer pitch but like not only that but i think that people understand that okay. The other thing that these like. Google like the I don't siri and google assistant or whatever that's called They every once in a while they ask you like. Hey was that. Ray answer your question and so i think people understand that like bear will. Actually you know what people do think. Their experience is going to change based on my answer like. Hey you're going to recalibrate this on the fact that you i said the wrong. I said you did it wrong. Road guessing dozen. That's just training data for like maybe a month. The new model release will include training data. Oh oh yeah. I think that's definitely what it is. It's not like like the very next requests is gonna be better. Average person thinks an extra cost will be better. yeah. I don't. I don't know behind the scenes like it'll be like syria. Google assistant like how updates work. Because i don't think it's i think there's a certain amount of updating that occurs when there's like a new operating system right and that that might be every six months or something like that but then there's also certain up being that occurs like at the server level Which can happen any right. It seems yeah. But i don't know those companies don't tell you when that happens. Yeah and i think also is bringing this up. Because with the autopilot. It's like i like he was saying like explicitly like this would never be retrained. No yeah and i think for something like that. The amount of validation that has to the testing that those kinds of algorithms have to go through to be put on a plane. I mean like just. I mean just look how long. It's taken the seven thirty. Max come back online. It's been two years and that's purely a software problem right. Yeah i let's talk like it seems like it would almost always be a mistake to train automatically based on real time data it. Yeah it seems like it would be hard to prevent from going out of control. Yeah like spin off into some weird direction. Yeah yeah i mean you have. This is just self just like have data scientists somewhere ourself interested that like heated discussion about how cars are so. I never would have guessed that that would be the thing that brings the cast i. Well i still feel like i've kind of right. Should we put it out at a poll. Put a sort of like hillary right. I know i think. I learned something but i still feel like i'm sort of right about the you. Know i you if he drives stickshift. There's this state you wanna be in like a feather point when you're okay so if you're in a stick shift the hardest situation is if you're stopped in it's uphill so you're like you can roll backwards right and especially if it's a red light cars behind you and stuff 'cause then it's like actually dangerous right role has to go green. The after like i'm going you are actually. What's even worse than that and i've been in the situation is if you're honest love you need to enter like some sort of fast road and so if there's an opening you like half to go and if you go to slow if you mess it up you could get hit by a car okay. Anyway in the situations may are stick shift. You want to hit this feather point where you're staying still but you're hitting the gas. Yes yeah and so. That's just like an exaggerated version of lead. The state i was thinking of like the gas is equal to like the force. Pulling you to stop or i'll i'll take that for now. I also agree. I think well whatever i think. You're more right than me. I did have to learn the only reason. I know anything about any of this stuff at all that the autopilot is because last year i did teach this class on time series analysis and i decided that like it was time for me to learn like common filters so i did. It was like. I just got an app. You can get every phone has like an accelerometer and gyro and all that right so you can just like take that. Read that date off the phone. And so i did is. I just kind of drove around. Put a drove around in my car. With like. just measure the accelerometers gyros and everything and the just like use that data for you have no advantage here mazing cooler quite interested in this stuff. Generally i care about being a good driver. I don't. I'm not someone who once again the engine see how it works. I don't care about cars per se or like how they work really But i do think that like terms like self-driving algorithms. I'm curious about how these things work and like kinds of approaches. They take. yeah. I did care about that too. Although not enough to like research my free time. I care about it in that. It's an enjoyable discussion for me on the podcast agreed.

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Floridaman exposes his balls while mattress shopping. Floridaman denied his attempt to join ISIS.

Weird AF News

21:04 min | 3 weeks ago

Floridaman exposes his balls while mattress shopping. Floridaman denied his attempt to join ISIS.

"A florida man has been charged with trying to join isis. A florida man with the state of florida tattooed in the middle of his forehead was arrested after calling. Nine one one for a ride home. A florida man in scuba goggles and a scuba suit was charged with dui after crashing. His car another florida man has been accused of exposing himself to a saleswoman while mattress. Shopping are the weird stories for friday and they all come from. Yes you guessed it. You know it. The state of florida because on weird af news on fridays. We only do weird news from the state of florida. That's why we call it florida friday. I'm so glad you're here. Jones e. the host of weird af news. Let's get into these weird florida stories. Those bizarre stories. You hear about all the time that seemed to only happen here in florida. I know this stuff up. It is just one of the many wacky news stories out of florida. Does the sunshine state consistently produce such strange news. What accounts for all this bizarre news. The weather is it. The people report is for the crazy story. A florida man has been charged with trying to join isis. Oh yeah that is a former florida. Resonant has been returned to the us after travelling to turkey and attempting to join the islamic state group. They turned them down. Apparently the this is isis reputation to uphold. We're not going to allow floridian to enter our ranks. Okay what do you think this is. We're we're very organized. Upstanding or okay. You're not going to bring us down with your florida. Ways sir the. Us attorney's office in gainesville. Florida announced that muhammed fattest suliman age thirty-three a. Us citizen has been charged with attempting to provide material support for a designated foreign terrorist organization. If convicted he faces up to twenty years in prison. That's pretty steep for trying to join a terrorist organization It says you're attempting to provide material support. I don't know. I'm kind of curious about what that phrase could mean material support. That could be like if you sent them laptops or something i. He's offering his own support. He's like hey. Ads i to i to help out here. I've done some shit and florida do you. Do you need someone who knows how to hold a gator's mouth shut and cook up some meth. I mean what are you guys doing over here. I'm ready to live in a cave and shine a weapon. Terrorists here's a quote from the us attorney for the northern district of florida. They're very serious about not tolerating flurry who want to join isis or any terrorist organization despite living in a state that is really one giant terrorist organization florida. Okay here we go. Let me keep a straight face terrorists and would be. Terrorists need to understand that. No resource will be spared when it comes to protect us citizens and prosecute those who seek to provide material support to designated foreign terrorist organizations. That's right again. They use material support According to the criminal complaint suman booked a one way flight from orlando to alexandria egypt with stops in chicago and stumbled turkey rather than travelling on to egypt. Sulaiman paid cash for a one way airline ticket to the turkish slash syrian border officials say sulaiman was arrested by turkish authorities and accused of illegally crossing into the country of syria. A search of woman's emails revealed attachments that contained various files that consisted of messages calling for jihad. A message seeking comment from sudan's attorney wasn't immediately returned. Okay so they caught him trying to cross the border and then they found with audiophiles talking about you know she had. I'm sure there was some other just suspicious stuff on his phone and laptop when you're trying to join a terrorist organization. Your phone's going to be filled with applications and whatnot. They wanna do background checks. I'd imagine this probably some who knows what text messages between you and some dudes in a cave. Well you know you really. Can't the put down a florida man for trying to make something of himself. You know the guys got goals you know. Most floridians don't and this guy is goal was sophisticated. It had a lot of complicated plans involved to make it. Work crossing borders by implanting egypt and shit. That can't be cheap. Yeah so you gotta give them credit for trying at least and you certainly gotta give it. Give credit to foreign countries that recognize that when you encounter a floridian you need to definitely strip. Search them because they're probably up to no good a florida man with florida tattooed on his forehead was arrested after calling nine one one for a ride home. He's ahead of the curve. This florida man. A florida man with a tattoo of the state of florida on his forehead was arrested after twice calling nine one one for a ride home. Police say there is a photo of this guy named matthew letham age. Twenty two is please. Google florida man. Florida tattoo on forehead or just florida tattoo on forehead. This should come up. Maybe just florida tattoo will come up the state of florida in the center of his forehead but no other tattoos that you can see. It's very strange. I don't know if he lost a bed or he's just. He's just very proud of his roots. Really trying to represent florida. Maybe he was like. I'm going to be the ultimate florida man. Yeah tattoo it in my head. I mean even a florida tattoo. Artists would have been like are you. Sure ma'am the state of florida in your forehead. Are you shore man okay. So this guy's matthew leave him as age twenty two. He made his first call to nine one. One four twenty. Am in north west tampa according to the criminal complaint a cop offered to call eight the metaxas. Oh that's quite lovely. Very nice and cooperative of the police to offer a drunk man whose improperly called calling nine one one. I mean he's already breaking the law by calling nine one one to do this but yet the police were nice enough to be like you know what we're going to let this one slide. Because they couldn't see what he looked like on the on the phone. I mean i highly doubt this was a facetime call Had they been able to see what he looks like. They would've not called him a taxi. They would've went and picked him up because definitely a man with the state of florida tattooed on their head has drugs in their pocket and possibly up there but So the police offered to call a taxi instead but he declined because he says he had no money then cops say that he wandered down the road and tried to call nine one one as a free taxi service again. This time the officers arrested him. They searched him and they found some drugs on him. And it wasn't what i expected. This was only a small amount of marijuana. Which i mean you wouldn't have thought that he would only have marijuana on him now. I mean it's probably because he smoked the other drugs. I'd imagine the guy's got a state of florida tattoo on his head. He's got much stronger chemicals than marijuana usually in his presence is my guest. Letham was charged with two misdemeanors. Misuse of nine one. One in possession of marijuana. He was released after posting three hundred dollar bond. That's not enough if a guy's put into your prison and he's got a florida tattoo in the center of his head. You've got to that bond. It can't be just three hundred dollars guys. 'cause this guy shouldn't be out mingling among the rest of the citizens with a tattoo of florida in the center of his head. He's just good. He's going to be. You can see the future when you just see his face. You must google this. You must florida tattoo in the forehead. Just un believable. A man in scuba gear was arrested for dui. This point gorda. Florida punta gorda. That sounds lovely. Sounds like they can make amazing burritos in punta gorda. A man was arrested on suspicion of driving under that thing called influence in southwest florida after deputies found him walking near a crashed vehicle with scuba goggles and a scuba hood. That is gotta to be a strange scene to come upon a crashed vehicle and then a man walking around in scuba gear just from the neck up. What's the name of this maniac. John clayton kagan age. Twenty eight was arrested on charges of dui alcohol or drugs and dui damage to property. According to the county sheriff's office online booking records according to the deputies kagi was detained after crashing his vehicle in that lovely place called punta gorda deputies observed this guy keggi walking near the crash site with with scuba goggles and scuba hood. I assume that's the the thing you pull over your head. But that's it no other scuba gear. Authorities had seen scuba suit and what appeared to be twisted tea cans in the car which was abandoned with. Its airbags deployed. I love this this guy. I'm wondering if he was driving with the scuba goggles on and maybe that's why he crashed. Nah nah it was probably the alcohol. The maybe this guy just likes to give wasted put on his scuba gear drive around town. That could be a thing that he does there he goes again. This guy larry and punta gorda. I don't know he likes to drink a bunch of booze and then put a scuba gear on and drive around. It's a miracle he hasn't crashed there. He goes okay. There he goes. Oh he's on the ground. He thinks he's swimming while he's really drunk. Khakis blood alcohol level was reported. Guess what it was reported as guys. I'm gonna tell you right now. The the level in florida for impaired driving otherwise known as the level is point. Zero one eight. Can you guess what khakis blood alcohol level was. School boo boo dean down doomed. Point one eight. You are absolutely right. He was way over the limit Yes he was at the put on your scuba gear that you have in your trunk alcohol level at that point and if you think that's something you should see him drop acid and where his astronaut outfit you like podcasts. You're listening to my podcast. Maybe thought yourself. I'd like to make a podcast too difficult. No not with anchor. Anchor has free creation tools. That allow you to record. And edit your podcast from your phone your computer anchored distributor podcast to apple spotify stitcher and more they have advertising integration. So you can even make a little money off your podcast everything you need to make a podcast in one place. Download the free anchor app or go to anchor dot fm to get started and good luck with your podcast. Good luck with your creation. Good luck with your life man. A florida man is accused of exposing himself to a saleswoman while shopping for a mattress. A seventy five year. Old florida man. Seventy five year old frisky. Florida man has been charged with exposing himself to a sales. Associate while looking at mattresses at the sleep number store in salem salem florida i used to live in salem mass. A place that is near and dear to my heart eric. Jacobs of fort myers was indicted on one felony count of indecent exposure and lewdness for the indecent which allegedly occurred inside a sleep number store at the mall at rockingham park. Oh hold on a second this. This is salem new hampshire. How it doesn't say that. He's a florida man. But he was up in. Salem new hampshire doing this. 'cause i remember the mall at rockingham park. I used to go there as a kid. It was the coolest mall around I'm sure they have. Cooler malls do eat people even go to malls anymore. I feel like that's not happening. The seventy five year. Old florida man. What was he doing up there. Well obviously trying to find somebody to touch his genitals. He's thinking to himself. Where where could i get someone to touch my genitals. Oh yeah the sales people mattress stores. They'll fall for this. All i can do is show my genitals and asked if you'd like to try it out with me. This is sure to work. And if it doesn't. I'm seventy five years old. I'll just say hey i'm an old man. I don't know what i'm doing. I expose myself sometimes. what can i do. I'm an old man. Let me tell you something. You're you're way far from florida. Mr eric jacobson okay. Maybe this no one will bat an eye in florida if you show your genitalia at a mattress store but in new hampshire. This is gonna make headline news now. According to these. Salem new hampshire police affidavit the female sales associate told investigators that mr jacobs came into the store looking for a mattress. Here's a quote from the officer. During the conversations jacobs would climb in and out of beds when jacobs did this. He would slowly in exaggerating spread. Open legs jacobs was reportedly wearing very short running shorts and no underwear allegedly exposing his genitals while making these legs spreading movements on the mattress in front of the sales pitch. This was his plan. You know if. I wear short shorts. And then i asked them if they wouldn't mind if i roll around on the mattress a little bit and you know give it the old tryout next thing you know they're going to see my you know what's and once the lady see what i'm rocking down there. If this guy is seventy five years old. So i'm guessing that as he rolled around on the bed his balls just kind of slipped all the way down to his kneecaps right. I'm sorry guys who are over seventy but we know the situation down there okay. It's not pretty. It's not pretty. What's going on down there. You need a little bit of a lifting tuck now. The police asked this saleswoman to elaborate on her description of the movements that mr jacobs was engaging in on the mattress and she explained that mr jacobs would quote pick his leg up and lift his knee high and spread his legs open to get in and out of the bed. The store worker also told the police that she felt uncomfortable during this interaction. Yeah no shit. You felt uncomfortable. It was a seventy five year old set of balls in front of your face. You're just trying to sell matches. This guy's rolling around a jacobs. Did this behavior several times during their interaction. The police say jacobs asked what the best number for sex was of the bed because they have sleep. Number's yeah what's the best sleep number for sex. What do you think. would you be doing it with me about it. Hey i'm seventy five. But i can still make it work lady once you try and roll around on his bed with me. Are we in florida. No sir. I don't know how you got up into new hampshire. Jacobs told the police that he was at the store shopping for a mattress for his. Rv it all comes full circle. This guy's trying to buy matches of course he lives in an rv. And he's in florida. And you wanna be in new hampshire in february january. Because it's just a lovely up there just inundated with snow in your rv. Are you stupid jacobs. This is the worst time to be in new hampshire. Wow what a dummy. He's clearly running from the law. Check his forehead for a tattoo of florida. Mr jacobs also stated he lived in florida would be heading home the next morning following a going away party thrown by his family. The is really pleased that you're gonna leave like finally we don't have to see his balls anymore. Can you believe this short-sea war. Did you see what he were at christmas with those short shorts. wow according to the authorities. The indictment was elevated to a felony on this character because he was previously convicted of open and gross lewdness for some similar conduct in concord massachusetts in nineteen ninety-three. This guy's been showing his balls for twenty years at an age where we do not want to see your balls sir. Thanks again for being here for an episode of weird news. A florida friday episode specifically. And thank you for sending me florida articles. Those that did. I got a lot of them. They were great. It was difficult to choose. Four of them But i think we got the good ones in there I got a quick announcements This is this'll be the last time that you can get the free tales of florida comic book if you join the patriot. Just want to make this announcement. One more time. tales of florida features the story of our new favorite superhero florida man. Who's solving crimes. All across state with his With his fellow superheroes So it's pretty funny. It involves florida man stories but also some great artwork and some pretty cool superheroes Based out of florida you can imagine the tropes and the themes so. Yeah if you enjoy weird. Florida news and florida men stories. You might really enjoy tales of florida and You get a free free. First edition by joining the patriot. Patriotic dot com slash weird af news or going to wear day of news dot com and joining the patriots there. In addition you can By the comic book from tidal page comics They have a facebook page with all the information. Just look up. The title page comics tales of florida. And i have a feeling this series is going to be great. It's got some things that i really which is a great artwork and humor in comic books like funny comic books. This this is right up my alley so check that up and joined the patriot to get a free dose of it to check it out as well i got. I got a nice email from april. Who is the niece of our beloved friend. james from texas. Who recently passed away as you guys know on the show April reached out to me with a nice email. She wrote hey jones. I just wanted to reach out and tell you. Thank you so much. My uncle james really enjoyed your jokes and you made his life one hundred times happier. He died very unexpectedly and he didn't and he didn't get out much. He had c. p. and he looked forward to your podcast. So thank you. It makes my heart. Happy that he had you to help him laugh when he had very rough much love. April and the thank you so much apron of april listens to this show at all but I wanna give it. Thanks to april for reaching out that that was a very lovely email and n and made me so happy to know that you know weird. News brought james so much joy in his life especially during rough time Those are the kind of stories and experiences that That i really do this. Podcast for You know i i. I don't really make much money at all in a closet. Like what is there to get out of this. I'll tell you what there is to get out of this for me. It's to know that people are enjoying this. Like i'm bringing value to their lives on bringing joy to their lives. I'm maybe i'm just even just a simple distraction from their lives That is enough for me to know that. What i'm doing is is useful in the world and to keep doing it so yeah and when i get an email like this it just reinforces that so. Thank you april for that You didn't have to send me that email. I'm glad that you did them What else did i wanna say Yeah that's about it Mentioned the patron got. We hit up that email. Oh yeah one more thing just want to wish you guys are happy. Super bowl weekend Super bowl weekend is always a big deal in my life. Because i'm such a sports fan specifically such football fan. I'm a big patriots fan as many of you know being from new england and You know my team is in it. But tom brady is. And he's somebody that has brought a lot of joy to my life and so Of course. I'm pulling for. Tom brady to win this weekend. but If i would ask me personally who do. I think when i believe the chiefs will win because i believe their team is superior But i will be pulling for tom. Brady and I hope you guys are able to have some sort of nice super bowl experience With some friends or family in a safe way I don't know exactly what i'll be doing after work. Most of the day But i get out right before the super bowl starts so i have to come up with a plan. Maybe find a place to watch near work. I don't know maybe. I'll just bring my laptop. I don't know what i'm gonna do but figure it out. Meanwhile i hope you guys enjoy yourselves. Please be safe hope. You enjoyed the florida. friday stories. Have a nice weekend and we'll see on monday.

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The Ottoman Empires Influence on the Present Day

The Book Review

1:03:38 hr | 4 months ago

The Ottoman Empires Influence on the Present Day

"This episode is brought to you by the House of Chanel for Gabrielle Chanel reading was a refuge which allowed her to invent her own destiny. Right from childhood literature became a passion she shared with the love of her life boy Capelle and her friends like Cocteau Colette Peer Review Eddie, and Max Jacob. She, hoped the also she'd mind without them knowing she read for inspiration and then became an inspiration herself. Watch the Film Gabrielle Chanel and literature at inside Chanel Dot Com. How did the Ottoman Empire shaped the? Modern. World. Historian Allen Mikhail will be here to talk about his new book God's Shadow. What really goes on in the supermarket. Benjamin, Laura will join us to discuss the secret life of groceries. Alexander Alter. We'll have an update from the publishing world. Plus our critics will join us for the latest literary criticism. This is the poker view podcast for the New York. Times. It's October sixteenth. I'm Pamela. Aw. Alley Mikhail joins us. Now he is in New York City and he is the author most recently of God's shadow Sultan. So Liam has automated empire and the making of the Modern World Allen thanks for being here. Thanks for having me. This book is about the Ottoman Empire which I think for many Americans. Certainly Young Americans. It's sort of encountered in the history textbook. In its waning years World War One it's sort of the dying empire that you know is obliterated at the end of World War One along with the austro-hungarian empire. But what was the Ottoman Empire Lake at peak? Height of its power the Ottoman Empire ruled three continents, Europe Asia and Africa some thirty three countries today have an Ottoman history. It was an empire mainly of three religions Islam the religion of the ruling elite of the empire and not the height of its power, the majority of the population but also Christianity and Judaism it was a multi linguistic empire. The languages of the Balkans of the Middle East and parts of Africa, as well, and it was one of the world's great powers of the early modern period. When you talk about the early modern period, what years do you mean specifically roughly we're talking about fifteen, hundred, eighteen, hundred. Okay and the subject of this book is really looking mostly at the sixteenth century, right the fifteenth and the Sixteenth Century. That's correct Salim the protagonist of the Book Lifts From Fourteen Seventy Fifteen twenty tell us about Sultan Salim also known I I love this as Salim the grim and as God shadow on earth and I'm assuming the title of Your Book Correct Correct Salim is the father of perhaps the most famous Soltan Souleymane the magnificent. She was the Ninth Soltan of the Ottoman Empire she was born as also tons were to a concubine mother than at the time a autumn Prince who would become the Soltan later on in Selena's life he was born in the city of a mafia, which is in Anatolia Modern Day Turkey. And he was the four, th of his father's ten sons and not favored to succeed his father to the throne and much of the story of his life is how he outmaneuvered is older and more favored brothers to eventually become the Soltan which he becomes in fifteen twelve. And, he rules only for eight years a very short period of time. But in those eight years, he expands the Ottoman Empire more than any other Soltan in six hundred year history of the empire. Key makes the empire for the first time in history a majority Muslim empire. He is the Soltan who gives it the shape that will have until World War One why isn't it ham wise it Suliman who is the better known Sultan Sulaiman is very important sold time I don't want to take anything away from him. He rules longer than any other Soltan it's under his reign that the empire achieves the kind of height of the arts where it's at its most involved in your affairs. It is during Sulaiman's reign that we have an enormous corpus of source material of correspondence between the Ottoman Empire, embarrass European Towers, and those were some of the earliest sources that European historians used to tell the story of the Ottoman Empire, and therefore they gave a lot of attention to Salim on one of the things that I argue in the book though is that it's because of. This enormous expansion during Selena's rain that's only able to achieve everything that he does during his rick. How much territory did Salim Conquer when he takes the throne, the empire is an empire, basically of the Balkans, and the western half of Anatolia. So if you think of Modern Day Turkey today in the middle of Turkey over to the GNC Salim adds to the eastern half of Anatolia. So all of modern, day Turkey what we conventionally think of as the Middle East today. So the Levant, Syria, Lebanon Israel, Palestine Jordan parts of Iraq down into Saudi Arabia, Modern Day Saudi Arabia, and then over in North Africa all the way to modern day. So from Egypt over to Algeria. So it solidifies the autumns as the dominant power in the eastern Mediterranean after this defeat of the Mamluk Empire, which is the Empire that held all this territory before the Ottoman control basically the Mediterranean coast from Algeria following all the way around of events. The guiding principle of his territorial expansion was this economic? Was it about spreading Islam was it just power? I really think it was about his ambition and his desire for territorial conquest to be the major power in the region. When Salim is younger, he is the governor of a city in eastern Anatolia on the Black Sea and it's there that he really is introduced to some of the enemies that he will come to fight later in his life. So I, really do think it's about his own personal ambition for expansion and power aren't to tell us a little bit about who he was and why was he salim the grim the sources that we have of Selena's life are you know the bureaucratic sources that he promulgated orders and appointments and those kinds of things we have some of his poetry? And we have some correspondence that he undertook, and then we have people who are observing his life. So from that, we come to see that he again was someone who turned the disadvantages of his life being unfavored son into an advantage. He thought that the empires should be militarily aggressive and not defensive. He struck out against enemies on the eastern border of the empire when he was governor of the city on the Black Sea, he was maniacally focused on getting to the throne so that meant that. He bucked many trends. One was the trend of non favored sons becoming sultans. Another was that he himself as best we know there some historical debate about this had only one set himself souleymane to save his one son, the succession crisis and battle that would dominate so much of Salem's life and he was known as the grim because he was quite violent as both the governor and eventually as Soltan and I WANNA be careful here not to ascribe any more violence to a Muslim leader than any other. Leader in this period was very bloody period in world history the inquisition is going on at this moment. European, powers are executing people in public squares in these kinds of things. So Salim is very much a piece of this world. He kills eventually his half brothers is rivals for the throne. He also deposes his father, which was a very unique thing in Ottoman history usually succession occurred once Soltan died or was physically incapacitated for some reason, and he forcibly deposes his father. So this idea that he's the. Grim is one that comes out later in the later writings of Ottoman. Estonians to describe this period in which it was thought, we don't want a system whereby sons are deposing their fathers left and right we won't succession to occur in a very ordered and deliberate fashion whereby it only happens when a Soltan has died or is otherwise as I said incapacitated, and so that moniker is given to him in the later writings of Ottoman historians, and as you point out, this was a time of the inquisition. Yet, Salim, you say foster diversity and encouraged toleration of the Jews and other minorities was this a major departure from earlier sultans and was it an anomaly presumably at the time? It is not that is one of the striking things in thinking about the Ottomans in comparative perspective. So the expansion that Salim Achieves during his lifetime. The. Empire for the first time in its history, a majority Muslim empire. The majority of the subjects of the empire are now Muslims up to that point. The majority of the people living in the Ottoman Empire were Orthodox Christians of one kind or another. So. This is two hundred and twenty years of Ottoman rule the ruling elite of the empire limbs but the subject population are Christians. So tune in twenty years is a very long time that's almost as long as the United States has been in existence. So the Ottomans were very good at fostering communal autonomy giving the Orthodox Christian communities of the empire autonomy over things like marriages and divorces some property relations. Dealing with their own affairs, not imposing Islam in any kind of violent way on the subject population, there's also a large Jewish population already presence in the empire which will only increase after fourteen, ninety two and the expulsion of the Jews from staying many of those Jews eventually end up in the Ottoman Empire and after fourteen ninety two, the largest Jewish city in the world is in the Ottoman Empire Salonika vessel. In today's Greece. So unlike Spain for example, the Ottomans never attempted to forcibly convert their non Muslim populations or to expel them from the Ottoman Empire I don't want to overly romanticize confessional relations. There were plenty of Anti Jewish instances violence in the Ottoman Empire and anti Christian as well. But it is the case that in comparison to powers in Europe that the Ottoman empire fostered a of ecumenical polity whereby non-muslim communities were able to to do quite well underneath Ottoman rule and I'll just say here. That Salim is is also known as the grim because he undertakes one of the largest domestic massacres in Ottoman history up until the end of the nineteenth century, and that is against other Muslims in the empire specifically Shiites. So one of the major wars that he undertakes during his reign is against the Safavid Empire in what is today, Iran? And they are an empire that ties their rule to she is. So he very much sees because of this alphabet enemy she ism as an enemy to his own power in the Ottoman world, and so during this war against Shiites be Ron massacre some forty thousand, his own Shiite subjects. This tolerance on the part of Salim and his Ottoman empire was was not reciprocated in large part by you're afraid I mean this was the time of the inquisition how largely did the Islamic World Neum in the minds of Europeans at this time? Hugely, and that's a very important part of the story of Selene and his age because he expands the empire so much nearly tripling the size of the empire. There is this sense in European capitals of an encroaching threatening Islam coming from the East we might argue that that was a long standing obsession of European Christians, but in insulin's age that really ramps up. So for example, someone like Columbus and I spend a good deal of time in the book speaking about Columbus Columbus born in fourteen, fifty one. So a couple of years before Celine's grandfather matinee conqueror conquers constantinople at the time. One of the Pope's describes this as plucking out one of the eyes of Christendom, the eastern capital. Of Christendom and so for someone like Columbus, he's raised in this world in which Islam is threatening force that has to be dealt with in some kind of extreme way. This is redoubled for him when he starts sailing around the Mediterranean and his first forays outside of the Mediterranean, he sales to North Africa, he sales to an island in the Aegean he sales down the west coast of Africa and everywhere he goes he sees that Islamist presence and that at that Christendom seems to be in the retreats and his presence at the Conquest of Granada in fourteen ninety two that other major event that happened in fourteen, ninety two whereby Isabella and Ferdinand conquer the last Muslim kingdom in. Iberia. Uniting. Iberia under Catholic rule. And this for Columbus, is a piece of what will come to be the Atlantic voyages. He thinks of the expulsion of the Jews from Spain, the conquest of Granada and sailing west to try to find a route to India as all pieces of this kind of global march of Catholicism around the world. So we often say that Columbus was looking for an alternative route to Asia but why was he looking for an alternate routes? Asia, that is because of Muslim power in the eastern half of the Mediterranean. and. You're lucky. Bright right whether politicians, pundits and traditional historians not the world we inhabit is very much an Ottoman one. What do you mean by that? I mean that if we look at major world changing events of this period that have resonances down to the present. So Columbus the Protestant reformation, the rise of commercial relations that the Ottomans have a hand in all of these things. So it's not as though Columbus didn't cross the Atlantic of course he did or that Martin Luther didn't lead a prospect reformation of course, he did. But there are Ottoman and Muslim elements to those stories that we have ignored or not paid attention to and. So a lot of the work of my book is reinserting Flom and the Ottoman Empire into those stories to give us a fuller and I would say more empirically true story about all of these events that we think has something to tell us about the making of the modern world how and when did the sultan die I mean you'd mentioned that he only ruled for eight years and to the next Sultan Sulaiman carry on his legacy or did he then undo things or make changes? Salim Dies in fifteen twenty. Interestingly. He had fled Istanbul because of the plague outbreak much like many of us have done he fled the city to get away from a pandemic and historians argue over whether he died from plague or some other disease but he died due to an illness that his doctors couldn't treat Eddie died at the age of fifty as I said he he only had one son. So on succession to the throne was very. Easy and so they in many ways does carry on the legacy of his father. He continues to gain some territory for the empire a little bit in Hungary a little bit in Iraq. But he really consolidates the territorial expansion that Salim achieved during his reign. You mentioned in kind of fro a line that Salim Roco of course this is a books podcast so we can't ignore dot tidbit was his poetry. Any good. Poetry to my year, and I is not very good. It's mostly about his conquest talking about what a great leader he is and all the territory that he conquered. It's certainly not the height of autumn poetry. One final question for you you an addition to writing this book. You are a professor of history at Yale where you share the Department of history what's at Lake right now teaching history at Yale University and charing department presumably. You're not all back in class. That's right we're teaching almost exclusively over zoom. These days are classes are attending to be smaller this semester, which is not such a bad thing. But of course, you know there's the oddity of doing it over the screen we live in a time in which the president of the United States has has gone after the teaching of history in both secondary post secondary education. That's something that many of my colleagues have very strong feelings about and I think this is a moment where history has to be taught and we have to stress the importance of thinking about the complexity and what some might term the. Negativity of history as an integral part of the study of our past there many things that we might not want to have to think about any kind of serious way. But I think it's absolutely obviously important that we deal with the history of this country in the history of the world in all of its complexity and nuance I couldn't agree more. Your students are are lucky to have you even if only over Zoom Allan thank you so much again for being here. Thank you very much, Allen McCall's new book is called God's Shadow Sultan, Salim, his Ottoman Empire, and the making of the modern world. and. Benjamin Laura joins us. Now from Brooklyn his new book is called the secret life of groceries the dark miracle of the American supermarket. Ben Thanks so much for being here. Thanks so much for having me. This is actually weirdly well-timed book right? Because everyone is obsessed with the supermarket right now during quarantine we're all scared to go there. We must go there. We are all cooking, all of our food you planned all this yeah. Yeah. This was like my dark nightmare I've been obsessed for years, but I do think the pandemic provided kind of perfect ramp for everyone else to kind of realize that this banal institution in our lives was actually vitally important and that understanding it was something that would be really interesting in reality Ben. You've spent five years researching this crepe not knowing there would be a pandemic what got you interested in supermarkets and and what took five years Well, there was a kind of a light bulb moment that stemmed right off my last book. So my first book explore the Bickham Yoga World. In this obsessive group of yogis turned out that the guru was Kinda Meglomaniac narcissists also that turned oddly relevant after the book came out but I was at a teacher training there and there were a group of Yogis who had been kind of trapped at this teacher training with. For a long time and they let them out to go supermarket shopping and they all descended on this trader Joe's in the area with a maniacal glee. That I just hadn't seen in adults it was like going to the amusement park with a busload of kids only it was a supermarket and it was. And I just thought Oh there's this odd parallel between this book that I'm researching now on obsessive Yoga and this kind of call and the cult of food that has kind of grown up around me and the way that we place meaning on food in an interesting way. So where does you go from there sort of noticing this this cult like Terry Jews thing going on well. I will say that was a light bulb moment that I wanted to write about it. But for a long time, I've been fascinated by supermarkets I'm the person will go to a supermarket on vacation and just browse around I. Think there's almost a hallucinogenic quality with these saturated bright colors and the fact that you walk down the aisles and to me it's both soothing and comforting all this choice in abundance like neural land but also there's a power that radiates out of them and it's almost threatening so I had long been drawn to the supermarket and I wanted. To. Scratch the surface. So I started by just interviewing as many people as I could from just people I knew who had worked in there and just kinda working up the ladder of talking to someone them who I should talk to because it's such a sprawling industry. Well, you're you're speaking to the right interviewer here because I too am obsessed with supermarkets and always go to the supermarket at least one supermarket. When I travel one place I know that you did go to travel as Thailand where in the supermarket there's always a full I'll dedicated to baby powder you. Which I it says a lot because they do wear a lot of baby powder in Thailand and they're they're many different kinds. You also went to Thailand, as part of your research what brought you there. So I was interested in exploring the bottom of the commodity chain and Thailand is one of our most integrated prominent partners in terms of seafood, and it was really important to go and get the physical experience because so much about trade is misleading when it's on the level of kind of physical reports, annual reports and charts. I had this image of the supply chain in my head kind of mimicked one of those flowcharts and was nice and clean but on the ground when you're dealing with the volume of commodity that. It takes to run a grocery store, which is premised on the notion of continuously available abundance. Right the supermarket manager is phobic of this idea that there will be a stock out that there will be a shelf that doesn't have the item that has been promised. So quarantine is not made them. Happy. You know it's like it is truly a nightmare for them, but it also exposes somewhat the extent of the customer doesn't care that much about this, but it create that abundance requires such volume and to go back to Thailand. Is, something that is not captured will by these companies themselves importers in the. In the manufacturers that rely on the bottom of the commodity chain, the supply chain itself is so big that it's it's less like. Clear lines and more like a thick of different interlaced inter hatching things that produces places that unless you really go like with a reporters is to study it's hard to get to the bottom of manufacturers. Don't often know where product is coming. They use aggregate to get to the true smallholder fighting your way through that thicket with something that I thought was really important and what did you find when you? Were in Thailand about the food chain that you maybe didn't expect. I was there focused on traffic labor and I think at the bottom of the supply chain I found just truly horrific abuses that I think the fact that they exist in twenty twenty would surprise almost everyone from people who were literally bought out of prison and kept at work on a fishing boat for years at a time against their. Will beaten when they didn't work. There was really no other word in my mind than slave to describe them, and then what was I think unexpected about this portrait was that how active these people were as agents in their survive on how little their predicament involve them being tricked into something terrible. But the way that global inequity works and their struggle for a better life often lead them into these positions. With is not exactly open but with far more human agency than I think comes across in some of the NGO reports that I had read ahead of time can you connect the dots between those fishermen in Thailand and say the seafood display of whole foods which is where you actually start your book yeah and I do some time working edifice counter at whole foods a fran retail you are undercover, right? And in general as a writer I try to get as close to my subjects as possible I want as much first person experience, and so you know for the victim book I, ended up doing gobs of Bickham Yoga, and for this book I thought if I'm writing about the grocery store, I have to get on the grocery floor and do some work with customers. You can put the weight back on that you took off doing hot yoga. Precisely. Although the fish counters. So you know this is relatively healthy mother. You couldn't afford that fish on the salary where we're making for. Sure. To connect the dots from Thailand to the retail counter. I think one of the big messages the book is at that's really hard and even people within these companies who work in quality control and do this for living can have trouble with that line there often isn't a clear line of visibility with complex supply chains like Thais Shrimp, which is where I really honed in on because. The boats. Were these men were imprisoned were collecting what's known as trash fish as part of their job they were out fishing for other fishes well, but trash Fisher small fish that would usually get pushed right off the boat. But because we have this burgeoning aquaculture sector that is raising carnivorous fish and shrimp, it relies on actual protein so that trash fish then gets turned into fish meal that fishmeal gets turned into shrimp food, which is itself a discrete property than that gets used to raise baby shrimp, which then go through several stages of production and are swapped around the country as. They grow from tanks to ponds, and in those are taken to processing plants which exist in a variety of different structures for final processing and then to exporters importers at some point in that last phase, a label get slapped on them and they get the country of origin label and they get perhaps a brand label but that's very late, and at that point, they head to the retail counter all the sounds sort of okay. was there anything incredibly unappetizing disturbing about this process I mean are you still eating shrimp it? All sounds sort of okay. If you one can put the. Enslaved fishermen at the bottom of the chain out of sight out of mind, which is something that I think the entire system is geared to get used to do and all those different layers of production help at. But I think another big takeaway from the book is just how efficient. This is an the shrimp in the fish that we were selling is perfectly hygienic moreover, although a lot of people have read the book and have come to the conclusion while now I need to add shrimp to. Another thing that a good middle-class person should not eat I gotta add it to the list along with like slave grown tomatoes. That's really not the takeaway I intended from the Book I. Think I intended to show just how horrific these conditions were on the bottom of the supply chain, but also how intractable they were and how reliant they were on certain structures that need to be changed in those structures are big ones from trade treaties to really global poverty inequity that is driving the migration that drives these men's trap live so. There are no wicker easy solutions there and. The can seem okay only in the way that it can also seem helpless at the same time maybe a learned helplessness. So another tale of the dark side of globalisation. Yeah. I think the ability to outsource this certainly helps that although another major section of the book I visited with truckers, which as recently as the nineteen seventies was middle-class job, you know smoking bannet Ruffy unlovable but had been in very close parallel to what was happening in Thailand reduced to a job that a lot of the truckers I was with jobs share cropping on wheels I. Don't think it was an overstatement they were trapped in a system of debt. Where they were grinding out poverty level wages for working seventy hours a week, and we're not free to leave because they had taken out loans on a truck and we're beholden to the trucking fleet that had leased it to. How closely connected to those kind of worker policies are the supermarket chains themselves I. Mean we started talking about trader Joe's which positions itself as a kind of good company. Whole Foods of course is owned by Amazon which does not allow for unions at least in the warehouses I don't know if if there are are unions in the whole food stores. What's the Labor? Policy. Like at these stores at the major chains in terms of how they treat their own workers, it can vary and there are certainly chains that have good labor policies. I think there has been a rise in certainly when I was working at whole foods. We felt this effect although these policies weren't at whole foods proper. They kind of defined the labor market in terms of treating. Employees as more on demand. So you know back in high school when I had minimum wage job, but you'd still get the schedule a few weeks ahead of time. So you can kind of plan your life or maybe get another part time job that's no longer the case and you're getting your schedule three days ahead of time that our that you're working are being shifted based on big data. Algorithms that are predicting customer demand, and so the hours you're working could vary by up to forty percent week to week, which, of course, means your take home pay various forty percent week to week that type of quote justice time scheduling is certainly extremely problem at but to the larger question of like connecting grocery stores to the plight of the trucker I was talking about war tic-. Food traffic laborer. That gets really tough because these chains are not designed for that type of supply chain overhaul the you know I talked to NGOs who specialize in that sector and admitted openly that they just barely were understanding how you reform complicated supply chain and I think as consumers there is this notion that we can vote with our dollars and make change with money and you. Know I think unfortunately, one of the takeaways I had is there is no great conduit for doing that through the supermarket and that's a bit of a foodie fantasy and very self serving one when you start to think about it oh, I, can buy something for myself and make the world better. It turns out that that's not totally the case or at the very. least, supermarkets are not the way to do that Internet not well equipped to do that. We'll full disclosure as I. Think I've talked about on this podcast before I worked in a supermarket when I was in college and it was one of my favorite jobs ever as a cashier they loved working at the cash register. So it's it's distressing to me to hear about. That the just in time policies, how prevalent are those and does that mean that working the cashier is no longer a viable after school job for teenagers for example, just in time in nomenclature is changing because it's kind of gotten a bad reputation and people realize but the practices that underpin it are very prevalent because these are low wage jobs at whole foods where nobody. Just in time what did not happen in name or company practice, but we were always told that we were team players and had to be team players and we had to play for the whole foods team, and there was this subtle notion that if we weren't playing for the whole foods team, like we might have to be asked to play for someone else and sometimes they would ask us to to do do these just-in-time things we should just do it. So there's a soft coercion and I do think. The. Dea that the job that you were working in highschool is not the job that's available. Anymore there's a nostalgia it's not helpful I talked to a seafood supply chain expert who said something about she was like the big problem is when you go to the store and you pick up a a tuna. Just like the canned tuna that your parents your grandparents were buying but the the way it's produced is completely different now and I think that's true for these minimum wage jobs where it's easy to say like why did that but but that's not what's happening anymore and moreover it's not just high school kids who are working these jobs. These are now fulltime forms of employment for adults I mean with a lot of these companies that rely on minimum wage workers the prophets are often pretty Sweet I mean how much money do supermarkets me? You would think that for Amazon to make the decision to go into this, it would have to be a pretty high margin market. Well, they make a tremendous amount of money is seven, hundred, billion dollars a year industry, and it is such an institution in our lives. We spend two percent of our lives in grocery stores that it also is a great platform for launching other things which would obviously make very attractive for someone like Amazon. In terms of margin, however, it's a very low margin industry. It's just premised on volume, and that's kind of the great genius of the supermarket that we're going to sell at such volume. We can reduce prices down to create kind of a buying frenzy where people put more into their cartoon they intend because it's just low priced food. So margins tend to go from one point five to three point, five percent, which is razor thin of course, and it's something that I get into in the book supermarkets find other ways of juicing their bottom line and the modern supermarket operates much more like a landlord leasing space out something called slotting fees where they. Will Sell Shelf space to poor and I'm not talking about end caps at the end of the aisles where you think we all know that those are probably soult because they're very visible but shelf space anywhere in the store, and that just goes right to the bottom line and it's not included margin. You did a lot of research for this book including and we haven't talked about this. You took a USDA class which I mean I didn't even know that you could take a class with the USDA what did you learn about supermarkets that most surprise you I mean I just have to ask that question because there's so many interesting factoid in this book. I learned too much to figure out what my most surprising fact is. Now I mean I could give you the line give everybody the book was just so sprawling. was blown away by trucking like I think I've driven on those highways next to truckers all the time I had no idea. The job requires that much vigilance. I'd no idea. It was so dangerous more deaths than any other profession are in trucking and yet at the same time, I had no idea about the the debt. And the did a lot of these truckers are grinding it out. That was shocking. I spent time with Joe Gloom who founded trader Joe's and I think the other really surprising thing was just how. Connected, grocery branding was to my identity. How much? The store is acting to serve the consumer and so however much we might scorn this giant system. It's working on our behalf kind of bending on both knees down to serve us, and that was something that I didn't go in with. The dominant Foodie narrative is like these big greedy corporate places serving plastic food and that there's truth to that. But it wasn't in the grocery industry. This was full of people who had good intentions who are trying to serve consumers and consumers were asking totally contradictory chaotic things making that service extremely difficult than ending in dark places that we discussed in Thailand. You talked about the fact that the just in time scheduling is if not entirely going away certainly under under scrutiny are there other major trends in the supermarket industry that you think are going to really shape the direction of Our Future Grocery store on the? Corner. The pandemic is accelerating a giant push into online spaces, and so I think that that trend is going to continue and it's going to shift what the physical store looks like. Will we need giant two hundred, thousand square foot costco like space to get things I'm not sure about that. I think we're GONNA see a lot of smaller format stores start selling at the things that the online world doesn't do well at like small interesting specialty goods, voyage of discovery type stores, seeing little stores that you already kind of see for boutique easy things but can look your best friends most clever friends pantry. Like. I think those type of stores are GonNa Start. Popping up at the same time as we see this shift to buying a lot of our staples through more routine online purchases because the pandemic has kind of cemented that for a lot of people. One last question a personal question but you brought it up. You said that you know your local market like your market of choice ends up kind of shaping you and serving you what's your local supermarket or your supermarket of choice Ben and what does it say about you? Oh, my God it it says terrible things about the. Didn't know. It knows that I'm lazy that I go for convenience that despite the fact at is why I hope this book never comes off as preachy because I I really am very comfortable with human flaws but I go to the supermarket that's closest to me. It happens to be a union market. It's pretty boozy. They play Herbie Hancock in the aisles because they know that that's the type of music that I bought my head to and will make me linger a little longer. They have insane assortment of Mushrooms and Chili peppers which I think is fantastic but it's also one of those choices that they've made because that's the type of thing that I value will then. The fact that they are way up charging me on. Any type of branded content that I would get there. You know the cereal is atrociously expensive but I walk in because they have this Herbie Hancock in this great display mushrooms in its rural close and those are the values that I represent when I'm shopping and they big consequences for the world. Lena weapon that Mushroom Chili Pepper supermarket actually sounds pretty good to me. So I think if nothing to be ashamed of. Thank you so much for being here. Thanks so much for having me. Benjamin Moore is the author of the secret life of groceries the dark miracle of the American supermarket. Alexander altered joins us now with some news of the publishing world. Hey Alexandra. Hey? What's going on this week? So we're getting a clearer picture of how the publishing industry has withstood the pandemic shutdown, and as we've discussed before some of the news is very encouraging. So the Association of American publishers released their latest numbers that show book sales through August and compare them to the previous year, and they noted that trade sales, which excludes educational materials were really substantially almost seven percent year over year, which is kind of crazy when you think about all the challenges that there have been to the retail ecosystems chain, all that kind of stuff and you know. There was a huge fall off of educational material. So that's something one area of the industry that is still struggling quite a bit i. think they showed a decline of nearly fourteen percent for K. through twelve instructional materials, and then university process were also down slightly higher education course materials were down. But if you're looking at sort of trade publications fiction nonfiction, they're pretty much across the board adult books were up nearly six percent children's and young adult up nearly six percent as well. So that was encouraging and we've continued to see a rise in print sales from NPR. I think the question, a lot of people have and one of the alarming things now is just this major shift in where and how people are buying their books. So there has been a real strain particularly on independence is more people are shopping online or shopping at big box stores, and they're buying books when they go there, a lot of independent stores are struggling and our colleague. Elizabeth, Harris had an excellent look at the fate of independence in a story that she did this week for the paper she talked to some of the. Stories that have been struggling are looking at the holiday season is kind of maybe meeker break for them. A lot of independence I think count on holiday sales for something like thirty percent of their annual revenues. So this is something that a lot of people are worried about on top of that. You know they're concerned about getting printed books in time they have the additional costs because their mailing books to customers instead of selling them at registers. So they're selling a fair number of books, but they're spending a lot more money to do so. Number booksellers were part of this coordinated effort this week that was led by the American Booksellers Association to sort of get the word out that you know we do need Your Business and we need your help some even just raising money not just selling books. A lot of independents that participated in this outreach effort put up signs kind of pegged cheekily to Amazon, prime shopping day where they give meter discounts and so some of the sign said things like if you want Amazon to be the world's only retailer, keep shopping there you know. So they were really sending up alarm and asking people. If you care about your independent store. If you want to exist in your community, you know you really need to to shop here or help us out earlier in the pandemic you reported on a new website called bookshop dot org that is selling books on behalf of many of the independence. How is that going? So that has continued to grow and that's been a positive development. One of US sort of silver lining if you will from pandemic because they were prepared to launch this year anyway but. They always hope to kind of present themselves as the independent alternative to. Amazon. So if you WANNA shop online come to us and we will either directly to an independent, you can buy from or you can buy it from us a raise money and share it among independent. So this point, they've raised more than seven million dollars for local bookstores. So it really came out of the gate kind of right at the start of the pandemic and got a ton of attention and I think it's been. A really a good channel, a good new sort of sales channel, but bookstores don't do quite as well in the sell through bookshop they don't have to handle any of the merchandise so they don't have any cost, but they don't get as much money because again they're you know they're not selling directly. So it's not necessarily going to be a solution long-term. It's sort of a nice supplement and I think it's a good addition to the retail ecosystem particularly as more and more people are shopping online. But I think independent stores often say we still need your direct sales in your direct support. Well, had the good fortune of getting a day off a couple of weeks ago and I went to a nearby independence store which I got to visit by appointment only and I have to say, I, really really Miss Bookstore. Browsing yeah. It's one nice thing is that I? I went with my cousin and this story allowing one household or grouping in at a time. So we had the entire Stewart tour. And it was really great personalized customer service and really nice to. Be. Able to search for you know full half hour. So I spent much more money than I was intending to do but I feel good about it in the end exactly. We can all feel good about spending money that way plus there's so many good books out this fall who? What are you reading Alexandra? I just finished a book that had been on my radar, but became rose quickly to the top of the list because it's a finalist for both the Booker in the National Book Award and that's Douglas Stuart Shuki Bain and it's long and it's absorbing. So it's really I think exactly what I want to be reading right now we give us the like to sentence summary like what's this about? So this is a story of a boy growing up in public housing in Glasgow in the nineteen eighties and he has is the primary caretaker for. His single mother WHO's really severe alcoholic and although his circumstances almost couldn't be worse he suffers from bullying he's gay but doesn't quite know it and he gets picked on and he's lonely and he has to skip school to make sure his mother doesn't do something terrible to herself. It's also very funny and very sweet and tender, and it's almost a love story about their relationship and the language is beautiful. There's incredible dialogue. So it's been a wonderful distraction from the news. Will you've distracted me? Alexandra, thank you so much for being here. Thanks for having me US Now parl single and John Williams to talk about what they are reading and reviewing and thinking about John Pearl thanks for being here. FM. Thanks for having US parts. Start with you because you didn't interesting thing. Recently, you reviewed an Audio Book I. Did I reviewed Thou- She by Michael Specter starfighter the New Yorker who wrote a profile of Dr Ouchi, who's known for decades in the professor? The New Yorker came out in the spring I think in April. and. It's now been expanded into an audio book. And I. I was interested in in both about sort of like backstory of doctor didn't know very much about him and also you know the experience of will y y make us into audiobook. This article that already felt pretty comprehensive pretty detailed. So I had a really interesting experience week right I was learning a lot about Dr Fauci and also really trying to think about why put the article in this medium and increasingly see journalists moving over to podcasting in so many ways. So it was a real chance to sort of think about also, what are the advantages of that particular medium? What medium is this it? was released by Pushkin, which is a podcast studio released as an audio book as you say, built on an article what is this thing? So it's very faithful to the article. First of all sustained structure takes you from early years to sort of presence that he's had during Covid, and then kind of opens up to talk about pandemic preparedness or our lack of pandemic preparedness. Now, the audiobook sort of augmented this with a lot of archive footage and you know some, you can hear his voice you can use some conversations. Now, the idea that this is a biography biographies a bit of a Misnomer. So th Ouchi you the access to choose very tightly controlled by the White House Specter and She was known each other for very long term I think talked a few times on the phone they they didn't meet in person. The book doesn't really go into some of the questions I invariably have as very nosy person you know, and especially about somebody likes Ouchi who's who's had this life he's worked under six administrations. He's seems so much. He's he's really worked within these corridors of power. He's had huge transformations in his own politics maybe not. His politics that in how he regards medicine in regards his own position. So for this psychological back story, there isn't much of that. It's more sort of story of his public life and what he exemplifies that Specter's very interested in this idea that she is somebody who throughout his life has been characterized by very rare trait in life, which is an open mind and an ability to be persuaded by facts and he'll change his mind he'll change his. Course. So this is the sort of personality trait that I expect to really seizes on in this book and says how rare this is important. This is what is sort of lost art, his ability of good old fashioned trust an interest in the facts we did this came out in his response, his initial, and then revised response to the AIDS crisis. Absolutely. So he was part of the medical establishment and became the public face of the government's inaction. Indifference and part of this was was related to the fact that there was a very, very high bounces to a clinical trials that if you were on an experimental drug, you could not take another experimental drug which the active protesting they were saying look we have people dying. Let them have access to some kind of medication. Let them have to choose between dying blind or dying all of these things? It's a fallacy in the beginning was resistant but. There's a moment in in the audiobook and in the profile where nearly started to listen to the voices of the activists and you he thought these are these are primarily new, Yorkers. Larry Kramer this act opne said that why are they? So angry, why are they taking these to these measures at Fao she considered histrionic in fact and he said, let me let me listen. So he went to act up meeting you went to war he went to the San Francisco went to the castor. He met these men and he started to listen to them and he started to to see the sorts of unbearable choices they were going to have to make and you're verse chorus he said. Look these activists actually a lot more than we do. In certain cases they become student they've been forced to become students of their own disease. You know he made his transformation that really flabbergasted a lot of his colleagues there was a whole lot of like what the Hell is happened to fetch you. He's sort of sold out. He's become an activist, but it was a case of him sort of looking at the evidence and and saying that this is not the best course of action and with Specter is is he says that will why haven't we'd looking at the evidence you know we're entitled to a lot of feelings about Kobe title to our grief were entitled to our. Feelings of panic, but should we be surprised I don't know for entitled to surprise, and so he done he starts to chart the long history of pandemics around the world all the lucky breaks. America. got from SARS from swine flu. What did we learn to learn anything and will we learn anything from covid if and when this thing comes to an end not even when when it comes to an end? So this is the way that story refraction opens up even though biography may not be the most. Accurate word, it becomes this this really interesting way to ask a lot of these questions and for Specter in in a in a way to reflect on his long career reporting on epidemics all around the world was the audiobook that best medium do you think to tell this particular story? Well, I don't think it. It has to be does there's so many mediums. The story has been told I was actually surprised in the beginning about how moving it was to even hear Specter's voice he doesn't have the best. Sort of narrative doesn't have a good typical audiobook voice in it feels like somebody reading a little bit at times but the because it didn't feel professional in this way, and because he was talking about his own work and his own relationship without Jeez relationship with Larry Kramer if emotional felt exasperated points, it felt authentic in in a way that I started to appreciate and I think that there was also something very powerful in hearing the voices of the activists in hearing vouches cheese on voice in during their. Accents and hearing how New Yorkers story is in certain ways all of this sort of made a a more more intimate experience of a feeling of your felt less rarefied. It didn't feel like this is something happening in some other some other place, some other sort of corridor partner this happening very much here between these people that are personalities and who know each other and worked together and and been antagonists for a long time. So it worked for me it worked very well and made this. made it seem. I vivid vilified it again for me made it seem really guard I. Want to ask a question actually from one of our listeners and ask it both of you and John Have you. So this comes from an email from Bruce Kendall, a longtime listener of the podcast who says that recently he's found books are sort of easier to listen to better listen to than read and I. Think he started thinking about this after listening to us talk about or a crime by Trevor Noah he says, Trevor Noah speaks the voices of the characters and born a crime most memorably his mother in. A way I could never ever imagine, and then he writes the other author who immediately comes to mind is the Great George Saunders. I listened to Lincoln and the Bardo a fairly experimental novel but the cast of notable in rather talented narrators saunders also narrates apart and is to my mind by far the pick of the bunch. When I hear saunders narrate I, hear the construction of sentences, the music of his pros in a way I can never recreate in my reading of this work. This I found true of his short stories as well. George Saunders is better listen to than read. Perhaps. It is my mind playing tricks on me recognizing the voice of Saunders and believing that his narration must be ideal. He wrote it I suspect not having listened to many other authors narrow their own work. Many are very fine writers but truly awful narrators. So here's questions. He's curious to hear your positions on reading versus listening, and then he has some kind of fun really open ended questions like what long dead author would you like to hear read their own work and which book would it be over to you John? God. A lot of questions. I can make some of this very short because I almost never listened audiobooks, and in fact, I'm not sure I've ever listened to a full audiobook. I could say sort of you know antagonist way that this was. A bias against them it's more just the way I think that my listening brain is built. I remember this all dates back to about twenty five years ago. Probably I bought the cassette tape at least twenty five years ago of the accidental tourist by anti which I had read and liked, and I saw that John Malkovich to the narration and at the time I was. You know in sort of a John Malkovich phase about bunch of movies I. Love. And so I thought okay I've never done this and sell it try it out. And of course, at the time I was driving around a lot in my car and listen to it. The problem was is that I found. That I'm such a huge music listener but what I realized very quickly as that and of course, this makes sense is that my mind very often drifts when I listen to music. So you'll be in the car and you'll hear three songs on the radio but one of them didn't even really register they'll thank you, I, heard that beat for a minute. I forget actually the process of listening to it and so I would. Phase out and then a minute. Later, we'll have to rewind now for the plot and the story and I don't know what happened. So I think I became too accustomed to music being background for me. I couldn't bring the attention I needed to listen to an audio book because I was always doing it while doing other things and so I've never really gone back to it but I do also have a natural bias I think. I like having tactile books around and I like underlining things in them and going back to them and I just that's that's my reading life and it's very hard. I'm an old man. Only, an old man and spirit John but you know you're not alone in this and I I think especially when I'm driving if if there's an audio book in the car then it's really hard because like one you know like wait a minute is this the turn or is that the turn and like whatever I was listening to is just gone you know we would listen to remember there was a period and this may also have to do with having lake three young children in the car, but we'd be listening to like Hamilton's mythology and like at a certain point eight. Oh no what God or de my God. This is like I don't know what lands were in I just get hopelessly lost. And if you are paying attention and you're riveted. Something's gotTa go and I'd rather not die in a car crash parl. Something tells me you're more skilled on this. I'm still laughing John Oland spirits. I. Greatly appreciate that. Yeah. No I think I've written about this. I actually learned to read with audio books. My mother was a very. Great reader and extremely impatient, and at some point gave me the audiobook of Rebecca by Daphne and the audiobook by Claire Bloom and was sort of like had it work it out I've grown up with audio books and I can drift between the two very seamlessly. I still listen to a lot of audiobooks I. Actually liked to listen to audio books and two people talking while I write, which I understand is very perverse that I think I grew up in a very loud. House allowed cities. So I'm I'm very comforted by the sounds of just like ambien conversation argument in terms of people that I I. Love You know I as much as I love reading Tony Morrison Her audiobooks are sublime and she really really Put so much work into. The voices of the characters she really. She reads them thing that you don't. Oh I didn't pick up when I when I read I pick up. The irony, the Sloan is sometimes She does incredible voices and you can really hear us some of her sections or put together more like music than they pros at their poems. They're they're not stories exactly. You can hear the repetition is a real crescent with the really the task especially school I would I would highly recommend for years and years and years. I would just I would have it on and I highly recommend that I also recommend I. Mean I don't recommend listening to this one. You have roommates as I made the mistake of doing when I was in Grad school I I loved the Jeremy Irons Rendition of Lalita and my roommate at one point asking me to stop because I would like clean the house this thing to Jerry. Three Louis I really didn't understand could make anybody uncomfortable. I mean I think and so hard I suppose. To she was just like I understand this is something you enjoy this as part of your ritual, but can you not and so I chose that? And now I'm. A really good. Song. I WANNA ask Bruce kindles question again though of both of you because it is an interesting one a hard to answer on the spot. But who long dead would you like to hear read their own work? Or of course, the easy I wanNA hear Melville Reading Moby Dick and I want to hear Marianne were reading her poems and. Those the two I think for Burien more I would love to hear just have funny some of these these tones are or just how wounded and we project so much onto this poet who is very reclusive. The they sit hidden and I I would love that sort of insight and then for Melville I think just to to hear him how how the sentences rolling sentences in chapter sounded to him where he he would take a breath what he thinks some of the sentences that I think would be. Awfully. Now you're making me think that we should listen to faulkner to right I mean, wouldn't it be amazing to hear how he wrote some of the you know how he imagined some of the bear and the other stories in good. To kind of go that. Mine Wedge. The sound in the era too. You know like a tumbling sections and Mattress person in this voices for sure. Clinical recommendation for. That might be interested especially to little kids. Kate. winslet his has a few. The role doll looks especially Matilda and they are fantastic. We're GONNA have a fight owner you hate them no have you listened to rural doll read them see this is where I don't know if I could because I'd complicated because everyone dies role doll you know and I love the books but I think if I hear the voice I worry I. Don't know how we tell me about his reading will you need kate like a kind of like a like an entity area of the so it's not like a direct contact I mean despite whatever one's feelings are about royal doll the person and I think it's generally known he was not a Nice Person The way he reads his own books is so amazing. He's got that you know like weirdly Norwegian tinged sort of British accent and he reads very very quickly, and once I heard him read his stories I couldn't listen to those the Kate winslet. The Emma Thompson have a great lineup of of of talent to read those books. But for me, it's Walder no one. Intrigue I love. Kate. winslet. So I'm GonNa that's like she's John Malkovich for me. Now here on Pearl what about you? Who would you want to hear you know I was going to say as long as we're going hypothetical I was going to swing for the fences and say give me home or reading the Odyssey. But then I realized I wouldn't understand a word he was saying So I would still sort of maybe say I don't Shakespeare reading a Sonnets or something I'd love to hear just the really like Melville on. Moby. Dick the kind of. Biggest of the big. Why not? I. Think. A lot of people who I like probably wouldn't sound that great I mean I'm a big fan of people who are pretty crabby and who I don't think. I would imagine that to be very formative in terms of bringing something alive off the page and I would just everyone commute me. I'll just say for twenty seconds that you know I would love to go back and be in person when William James gave his varieties religious experience in attenborough and just read them live because they were lectures that later became a book one note on the Shakespearean sonnets apparently Patrick Stewardess, reading these aloud and some kind of social media venue I don't remember which one and they're supposed to be quite good. Right, I just someone like one of those but open it up parlay apologized for picking a fight with the Roald Dahl rating I will be more open minded kate. Coming I'm sure. Remember. There's more at NY, TIMES DOT com slash books, and you can always write to us at books at NY TIMES DOT Com. I write back not right away but I do. The Book Review Podcast is produced by the Greet Pedro Rossato from head stepper media with a major assist for my colleague John Williams. Thanks for listening for the New York Times. I'm Pamela Paul.

Ottoman Empire Salim Roco Thailand Amazon Ottoman Empire Lake Selena Joe Gloom Michael Specter Sultan Sulaiman Middle East Africa Europe Asia Ottoman Empire Salonika United States New York City Mediterranean Alexander Alter
Why Iran Is in Mourning

The Daily

26:57 min | 1 year ago

Why Iran Is in Mourning

"From The New York Times. I'm Michael Borrow. This is Dale today. In the streets of Tehran Iranians are mourning the loss of General Qassem Suleyman my call for auspices on what they feel. They've lost Tuesday used in January so Monday morning was the start of the official state funeral for general by some Sulejmani by Adm. There were millions of people out in downtown Tehran. He was being celebrated as a national hero but also as a religious martyr and a saint. There were families. There were men women children Dan they had the symbolic Chia ritual symbols out feathers Schwartz. Drums music eulogies songs. Aunts and the crowd also had a very anti-american American and defiant mood people were sad but they were also very angry and we heard a lot of revenge revenge and no more negotiations the issue with the US. It's time for battle chanted by the crowd lured Kareem Iran's Supreme Leader Ayatollah Khomeini many recited the Muslim prayer of the dead. On General Sulaiman is confident. Mamadu Paul Rine in the middle of the prayer several times. He paused and openly cried where that ability and the crowd also wept very loudly with him as a reporter who's covered Iran for are over twenty five years. What struck me? was that the people who had attended were not just supporters of the regime but a lot of people who are generally very rick critic of the regime to be clear there plenty of Iranians who did not love respect General Sulejmani but there were activists. They were the opposition figures who had been jailed by the regime who attended and when I asked them why are you there. Why are you going? The response was general. Okay money protected our national security he transcended politics. He was a national hero and I was talking to some young people who had attended attended his funeral and I spoke to a twenty two year old young man university student am I asked him. Why are you at the funeral? And he said knowing General Sulejmani was out. There made me feel safer. He was like a security umbrella above our country. And that's a sentiment that I heard over and over you're what you're describing feels like the kind of unified national outpouring that is reserved for a small handful of figures in any country. Right I mean a beloved president a civil rights that are like Martin Luther King in the United States not for what our colleagues have described as a general who specializes arises in covert operations in Iran. I think it's difficult for most people in the United States and outside of Iran and perhaps the region to grasp the unique the place and role that General Sulejmani played in Iran and in regional politics. He was single handedly. The most reverend and influential windchill character in Iran. So how did Sulamani cultivate that role. How did he make Iranians feel about? Where does that story start in many ways general? Soleil money's story begins with the story of Iran's Revolution in nineteen seventy nine. He was a young man working king construction jobs in the small city of Carmen in the southwest from the low income family. His education was high school diploma level and he got swept up in the revolution in the promise of Islam. Becoming the foundation of government and of promises to empower the oppressed and low income class in Iran which had been neglected and sidelines under the a pro western monarchy of the shah. So General Sulejmani gets a job at the local water planned and volunteers for the local chapter of the Revolutionary Guards and quickly rises up and shows a lot of promise as a military man when the war with Iraq happened in the one thousand nine hundred eighty S. He was a commander for eight years. And after the war ended he was named the commander of forces and that was really the beginning of the quotes forces and the Islamic republic's ambition to create a para military in the region and to kind of export the the idea of an Islamic revolution of Shia dominance outside of the borders of Iran. And why does Iran and someone like the money want to export this revolution. The Islamic republic theocracy was the first time that a she she a government had come to power in the Middle East. The Islamic faith is divided along Sunnis and Shias and the division and rivalry go back. Act All the way to the early days of Islam and the succession of Prophet Muhammed and she has always been a minority in the faith with Saudi Arabia. Sort sort of the custodian of the Sony Faith Iran has for centuries wanted to establish itself as the protector of the minority Shia and the theocracy of the Islamic Republic gave them the foundation and the structure to do that and As soon as they had established their government and power in the country they started looking external and general Suleimani was pivotal in expanding the ambitions of Iran's military and political apparatus in the Middle East. And how exactly it does he do that. So General Sulejmani was instrumental in elevating Iran strategy in the region through the proxy militia shook groups that it created and he started in Lebanon where Iran had already created to Shia militia groups. I'm Melissa the and Hezbollah and he helped them in their fight. With Israeli soldiers that were occupying Lebanon and later later on in the battles that Hezbollah and Lebanon fought generals so they money also becomes very involved with Palestinian Alestinian militant groups Hamas Islamic Jihad who also see an alliance between their ideologies And Islam Republican Ron and when you say that ceremony becomes involved in these groups. What does that actually mean? What does he do he helps? Help them come up with battlefield. Plans and he dispatches his underlings to go and train and fund and form these groups providing them with weapons providing them with money on providing them with strategy and he gains aims this reputation of being the shadow. Commander the man who's everywhere but nowhere. If General Soleil Mani is present on the ground then than Iran is present so understood the Monte Iran is making itself felt across the Middle East through these relationships to to these militias. Does that strategy succeed. Iran strategy succeeds but it's limited to the shores of the Mediterranean with Lebanon and the Palestinian territories but that changes in two thousand then three with the United States invasion of Iraq. mm-hmm back support for this podcast and the following message come from e-trade investing. Your money shouldn't require moving mountains. No matter how much or how little little experience you have. A trade makes investing simpler and for a limited time. Get One hundred dollars when you open a new account with just five thousand dollars. It's all about helping your money work hard for you. For more information visit each trade dot com slash learn more e-trade securities LLC member SIPC U S warships and planes launched the opening salvo of Operation Iraqi Freedom. The attack came in waves. So how exactly did the. US invasion of Iraq provide an opportunity for the money and for this strategy adage that he's pursuing for on until the US invasion of Iraq. The country was ruled by Saddam Hussein and Sunnis. Yes and she is who were lying to Iran were marginalized when the United States toppled Saddam Hussein. She has rose to power and many of these Shia leaders and political and religious figures had very close ties Tehran And Iran really seize that opportunity it used these contacts and networks works and relationships to gain influence and penetrate Iraqi society General Sulaimaniyah once again becomes the pivotal character in helping realize this strategy and this aspiration so an unintended consequence of America invading. Reading Iraq is an ends of empowering Iran when I was living and working in Iraq in those early days after the invasion Asian most of the Sunni Iraqis that we would meet an interview with say that the US invasion delivered Iraq on a golden platter to Iran. So what does he do with this. Opening that he sees in Iraq general money uses the opening to further her expand. Iran's influence in Iraq and in the region he helps create Shia militia he recruits allies a network of politicians nations religious men and militant groups who were loyal to Iran's ambitions in Iraq the Shia militia that he helped create were also responsible for attacks on US soldiers for the killing of US soldiers and for civilian deaths. When the civil war? I started in Syria in two thousand eleven. Iran vowed to keep President Bashar Assad in power Mr Assad and his constituents dance or an offshoot of Shia Islam and religiously and politically aligned with Iran. This is where Iraq comes in because of the relationships relationships and networks and influence generously money had in Iraq he was able to use Iraq by land and by air to funnel support for serious war weapons missiles even soldiers that were trained in Iran were shipped to Syria by way of Iraq. DOC So Sumani strategy in Iraq. It doesn't just fend off the Americans who have invaded there. It means means that Iran so the money could use Iraq to assist allies like Assad in Syria and all these other battles throughout the region exactly Iraq becomes a geographic extension of Iran and its interest in the region and by the time time isis takes over parts of Syria in it lip and parts of Iraq in Mosul the Iraqi government and even the Americans they were at wit's end on what to do to battle this growing threat of Isis. So what does the rise of Isis mean for Iran. And what does that mean for Iranian influence and for the money's role. The the rise of Isis was a threat to Iran. It was an existential threat to the Shia government of Iran because Isis represented the most extreme version Asia of Sony Faith and again General Sulejmani mobilize. He goes to Iraq and he repeats a true and proven formula once once again by recruiting volunteers. The instrumental ground force in helping the United States and Iraq's army to battle title Isis therefore Mister Sulejmani although he seen as a full of the United States in the battle of Isis actually becomes the default ally by For general money the rise of Isis was a turning point. He went from being a commander in the shadows and mystery figure to being in a household name. And why is he suddenly a public figure because of Isis because Iran wanted to counter isis propaganda machinery. Isis is using using its cash and media savvy Western militants to recruit and radicalize the branded content the mixing graphics moving images music chance Altay Adrift Cataloging and posting in near real time their war crimes they utilize social media and twitter and facebook to recruit to spread their propaganda to target their messaging. And this is a move tweet a short promotional video which shows a softer side of jihad. Here era a Belgian handout ice cream too excited Syrian shows and they create a personality around their leader biker back dodgy the same way that al-Qaeda had created created a personality around bin Laden so in response to Isis as very successful propaganda campaign. Iran decides to turn learn General Sulejmani into the public face of the so-called resistance and somebody that she has could love and emulate late and respect into custom sue. The money out do is celebrating gun in hand. His pictures began appearing in public in battlegrounds videos of him. Visiting soldiers unannounced been up up and down the country in the north and the south in the capital checking up on the defenses mobilizing the Shiite militias making sure that rocky states able to confront the threat from isis videos of him reciting poetry saying that he wants to become a martyr the highest honor in a slum. Join his friends. General Sulamani is increasingly. He being elevated and recognized as a key player on the world stage as Iranian influence in the region grows till by two thousand fourteen. Mr Sulejmani is so well known own that his pictures are being printed on t shirts and his posters are sold in shops in Damascus. And Beirut and Tehran and that summer his mother passed away and the funeral of his mother in Tehran. Became mm-hmm the WHO's who event of every militant group in the Middle East from the head of Hamas to Islamic Jihad to the senior members of Hezbollah all showed up to pay respects to the general that they saw as the patron of their cause and movement movements So this is vivid evidence that he is very much the source of power in the Middle East that all all these groups oh him. They're literally showing up at his door. It was like watching a king hold court and that was really the first public glimpse that we gaunt of his status regionally and what he means to these groups so at this point in two thousand fourteen how is Sulamani viewed by the US. I'm struck that all of these figures and groups that you're describing as turning out to pay respects to the money's mother at this funeral so they are all pretty much mortal foes of the US so the US was watching him but not really taking action and that was is really in line with the previous administration's policies of engagement with Iran and not escalating confrontation. That changed with with the election of Donald Trump as president right and the withdrawal from the Iran nuclear deal that president trump ordered yes since the withdrawal of Ah Iran nuclear deal by the US Iran and the US have been on a collision path increasingly taking provocative actions and policies toward one. Another the the past forty eight hours a dangerous escalation in the feud between Washington and Tehran. We commenting this past. Few weeks of violence in Iraq. American contractor actor was killed on an Iraqi base department. Defense took offensive actions by launching at Fifteenth Strike Eagles against five targets. Protesters stormed the American American embassy in the US. Says Iran is responsible state-sponsored tariff ultimately led to the decision by president trump to assassinate General Sulejmani. Right because in the minds of US officials Sulamani is very much responsible for those actions exactly in front of us. How much do you think that the very public role Sulamani occupied that and they're on created for him and wanted good for him? How much do you think that that played a role in the trump administration's decision to take him out the understanding of what it was he represented to? You're on I think. The trump administration may have not known what he represented Iran I think that they miscalculated the level. The love admiration perhaps or nationalistic sentiment. We've seen pouring out of Iran. I think the White House probably thought that it was taking out commander that it may not be very popular with ordinary Iranians that there's been a lot of discontent in November against the government and maybe Iranians would support this decision for sure. We have voices in Iran outside and inside Iran among Iranians. who think that taking Mr Sulejmani out is is justified? And they didn't like him but what we've seen is that the. US has effectively turned general only money into a martyr so this response wants that we saw at the funeral on Monday. Are you saying that the United States may not have expected this because it sounds like the. US understood one aspect of his role in Iran as the leader of this military strategy. But perhaps they didn't understand something that's equally as important which is what he meant in in the hearts of Iranians. I think that's absolutely right and I think you know. We have to remember if Iran has been an island of stability in a region ablaze with terrorism and car bombs and beheadings and kidnappings wrappings and women being sold by Isis and Iranians have watched the whole region unravel around them if you Geez than displacement for for the past twenty years and by and large the Credit General Sulejmani for that. They say that they trusted him and respected him for. You're protecting Iran for keeping your on safe and I think the outpouring of motion we see is related to that sentiments. Helped me understand this this idea. Because the strategy that you have described over the past decade of violence and provocation that Sulamani oversaw and he came to personify. It doesn't fuel protective. Why did it feel that way to Ronnie in a way that the US might not have understood? You know Michael. That's a really good question. And it's one that I've struggled to understand myself. This is the man who was responsible for a lot of violence and a lot of mayhem in the region in a lot of activity that most Iranians may not agree with that do not like but because they felt that it gave them a buffer between their day to day lives inside Iran and the instability violence happening all around the Middle East They came to respect him and view him as a protector. What does the money's meaning to people in Iran? What does that mean for the response? We should expect from the government there. The public momentum is building and pressure is building on Iran's leadership to take action at the funeral this morning millions of people were out. They were carrying the red flag of Islam which is a call to battle. They were chanting no to negotiations no to a deal. Only war with the United States and the combination of the public's defiant mood and calls for revenge and the rhetoric we're seeing from Iranian officials increases the possibility that in the next few days or next few weeks Iran will respond and retaliate. How it will do it what it will do? We don't know for us. Thank you very much. Thank you so much for having me Michael. The Times reports that Iran's supreme leader has told advisers that the retaliation against the United States for general pseudomonas death should be carried out openly by Iran's military not through proxies or militias. Such a direct reprisal would be a major departure departure from Iranian tradition and highlights the desire by the supreme leader to honor Sulamani Status and satisfy the mourners mourners who have flooded the streets of Tehran. We'll do back. Third love is a BRA and under company. That believes that everybody deserves perfect. That's why they've donated over twenty million dollars worth of bras to women in need and was more than eighty sizes including half cups. Third love is on a mission to help every woman feel comfortable and confidence inside and out go to third love dot com slash daily to find your perfect fitting Bra and get fifteen percent off your first purchase. That's third love dot com slash daily for fifteen percent off Here's what else you need in a surprised statement on Monday former national security advisor. John both Said said he is willing to testify at president. Trump's impeachment trial if he is subpoenaed by the Senate the announcement puts new pressure on Senate. Republicans took call witnesses at the trial. Something they have so far resisted. Doing Bolton was blocked by the White House from testifying before house impeachment investigators but is considered a vital witness in the case because he has direct knowledge of trump's actions and conversations regarding Ukraine aunt in Los Angeles on Monday prosecutors charged Harvey Weinstein Weinstein with sex crimes. Just hours after prosecutors in New York began a trial against Weinstein on similar charges. The allegations in Los Angeles are from two women who allege that Weinstein sexually assaulted them in hotel in twenty thirteen. The latest charges mean that even if Weinstein is acquitted in New York he will face a second trial in California. Aw that's it for the I'm Michael Barr see immoral hi. This is Pamela. Paul Editor of The New York Times Book Review and host is to the book review. PODCAST I want to tell you about a new series of events called Book Review Live. The first one is happening. The evening of January fourteenth at the time center in New York City we'll be welcoming ensure LADONNA and my colleague. Nick Kristof to talk about their new book tight rope Americans reaching for hope. The book is about the disintegration of America's working class. We'll dig deeper into the themes of tight tight rope with my colleague. Andrew Ross Sorkin the founder of deal book you can buy tickets at N._Y.. TIMES DOT COM slash book review. Live hope to see you there.

Iran United States General Sulejmani Iraq Tehran Middle East Kareem Iran commander General Sulamani Monte Iran US Iran Ah Iran Isis president General Qassem Suleyman General Sulaiman Hezbollah Lebanon Donald Trump Sulamani
#13 SAM against loss of enterprise knowledge with Sally Solaymantash

Help'n'Trade podcast

41:15 min | 1 year ago

#13 SAM against loss of enterprise knowledge with Sally Solaymantash

"Hello and welcome everyone next the episode of Helping Trade Podcast or we've space enterpreneurs and there startups might. Today's guest is Sally Sally and successful enterpreneur with over forty years experience in it and enterpreneurship itself will and if you don't mind the stage is yours. Please introduce yourself hi. I'm Sally Sulaiman Tash. I am a Persian the English American currently living in Basel. I'm very passionate about technology and equality and I'm fortunate enough to to be realizing my vision of some smart approach methodology and doing some public speaking. Yes that's how we actually went to Toastmasters co-sponsors Basel which is an association. which helps you with public speaking? Yes I absolutely loved it. They Great Support Team and I've learned a lot because I used to turn into Jelly to do front of people to speak. I still turn into Jelly but the jellies a bit more set that it was before not just much. It's shaking very good support and I highly recommend for people to attend that. It's good for building confidence and band teaches you how to speak. I love it. I'm really happy that I'm the hope you're going to be my mentor. Actually thank you. I'll do my best. Let's first talk about not renting your path before we actually go to your current in diverse. If you don't mind show from the talks that we heard before I know actually have enterpreneurship in your blood ever since. You are very young if you wouldn't mind sharing that experience. I'm a little bit older than average entrepreneurs on the market right now and when I started we didn't use the word the entrepreneurial I was like the weird kid to wasn't like everybody else but knowing what I know now and looking back into things that I did as a kid I always I always liked to refine ideas and come up with creative distinct ideas so I was selling you. One of my first memories is was. We decided we wanted to make our own money to buy crayons and paper and do some drawing one summer few kids got together. We created a theater from children's story and we bullet family and friends and parents to buy tickets to watch our theater and then when we took the money to do that and at a time for When I was a Brownie at school we had to collect money? Maybe we did initiatives. Bake Cook is assault something. My idea was sparked when I went shopping with my mom and I still corn that was colored in very vivid bright colors. I Made Popcorn and I sold them. Extortionate we high prices because the did not look like normal popcorn. Give a colorful foil. This is going back fifty years ago something and I made like twenty pounds profit from the week that we had to do this and it was such a high high demand school. I couldn't keep up with it. This is something. I've always always been idea generator. I didn't always WANNA do Dick. Follow through with the idea but happy he to hand it over to somebody else but I just loved idea of coming out with new ways of doing moving fast forward. You went to study Rt Yeah. When I was nine years old I was asked that school what I wanted to be when I grew up? It's a long story. You know going through all my options. Now be unhappy with any of them. I One time heard my dad and his friend Tolkien about this new science colt computers. And this is in early seventies is very early seventies. This was amazing because This you had to be very analytical and a the same time you had to be very creative in applying kindest new science and everything was to be explored and that was it I was sold and this is exactly what I wanted to do. Never having seen a computer aridi knowing what a computer was I passionately pursued that untold. Everybody I wanted to be a computer scientist when I grew up. And it was I was sixteen and before I had an option to actually study computing and Yeah and I have been hooked ever since you started it also working in the computer science to begin with right studied. I got my degree in computer science. I started working in the software industry. I have been fortunate Russian it. I've played every role in life of a software and then I'm a social person. I get bored when a no all that. I'm interested to know so so once I know something I need to move on so I played different roles learning each one which was great because it gave me understanding of the entire software software life cycle. And why we do certain things and how it can impact other steps and then once I did all that and deny still was hungry for more. I decided to start changing industries so I worked in different industries that way I could learn about my clients business while I practice what I already knew and figure out different ways of helping them by applying my knowledge and along the way I was fortunate enough to learn a lot and grow Roy certainly grew because he also create your own company. Yeah this was. This started. Nineteen eighty nine. When I was really disappointed as an an employee I felt like I was being promised a lot when they were hiring me? At the time you know. Technology was very in high demand. It was the peak of the growth of technology. And they promise you the world and then when you started work to said well that was the marketing pitch and now is the real life and now you do this awesome and I went through few experience of being disappointed and I decided and again. That's my entrepreneurship coming up. That I didn't know I had. I decided I I want to be in charge of my own destiny and I wanted to be in a position to choose what I wanted to do and a choose would I didn't WanNa do you walk away from and I started my first company. Nine thousand nine hundred nine Sola Montage Associates Ltd sal for short in UK. And I started doing crayons computer consultant and I worked across Europe. The major companies was very fortunate. My travels levels took me to us. I couldn't use my company dare so after Getting my green card in. US is established the same company the in us and then continued with my freelance. Under the same name I was touch wood very lucky and very successful throughout of my career until two thousand fifteen when I decided to walk away from it. You're wanting to study again. Two Thousand Fifteen I. I don't know you WANNA call it midlife crisis or awakening or whatever but after having spent my entire life being very passionate and focus goes on software technology. I came to a realization as an industry. We're not learning. We kept making the same mistakes at the beginning of every project. We were all excited. We gotta do too stiff front. This is GonNa be the best thing ever and then as the project. We're Anton Depression. And the reality set in waste OUGHTA cutting corners and making compromises and at the end everybody was exhausted and nobody was really pleased with what we produce. Just glad to be over. Yeah and I didn't WanNa do that. I didn't. I felt like a rational wheel running around around around and I wanted to get off the rat race and I walked away from my lifetime time Pasha not knowing what I wanted to do and just by pure coincidence I stumbled across my old university doing a brand new course called enterprise and business creation it was. Mse Degree the moment I sword is like this is what I WANNA do and I picked up the phone and call them and when is the deadline. I WanNa Register Ted. Line is tomorrow and it was a Thursday into tomorrow is Friday. I said but I'm your aluminum. And you have to accept me because I WANNA WANNA do discourse and he said Okay we'll send you the forums. Just send them as quickly as you can so Monday. I had interview and choose their had my offer and two weeks later I was doing the chorus because of course it started and I loved it and that was the beginning of my entrepreneurship journey on. The new title of entrepreneurship. Finally got your stand now. Finding out amazing you immediately after actually start at the company which was Step into tech dot org almost there. Pinta Tech Dot C. H.. H No all. Sorry I'm confusing confusing. Thinks he s stepping iphone. Cotton about that. I'm thinking of the next think. Yes it was. That was a collaboration. I when I was a student at university I attended hackers on in there and over there these kids. If I'm not mistaken Deborah for ten and eleven. These two boys and I was absolutely mesmerized by the energy and You know the drive to be and they pitched they actually got selected. As one of the pitches to be developed. I was privileged to be part of their team and we created this tool called sucks wchs suck. They didn't WanNa get socks for Christmas. They wanted to give shopping list of Christmas present wishlist so the family and friends could pick from there and I became very much friends with their one of the moms she had division. Did she hit this. Super Intelligent. Tech Savvy Child Aalto weight very few opportunities for him to grow and follow his passion because a lot of focus on playing football or in other type of the sporting activists which he was an into and She had to really division of starting the step into tack. She asked me you to co found that with her and help her and we started working on that and shortly after I actually ended up leaving and coming back to Basel so so I can't really take much credit for it but I did my little bed to help yesterday. The idea were grew into creating opportunities for for children who were interested in coming to tech and getting him to understand what tech is because a lot of kids in including An amazing mentality that had university think technology is games and they want to do game development that investee think all that is our our mission was to expose them to fund side of tech but also to the serious side of tag and bringing people from all different types of life all different personalities and places to be role models for these children. It doesn't matter girl or a boy you're you know. It doesn't matter turbocharger Yabloko. Why are whatever you may be a few passionate tech you can use it and and it doesn't mean that you have to be a programmer? Gramma there are so many roles intact or so many avenues and even if you have multiple passions take allows you to merge them all together and that's the beauty beauty and uniqueness of attack and die idea was to inspire these children to be all they could be ongoing. It is still ongoing. I have to say slap slop hands. I have been disconnected because this is happening in UK it deviated from at least my thought of making it a huge international international thing because it's borderless. In my opinion it became of having take a ben and having groups that kids could come in and children could mentor other children as well as being mentored by adults so they created this event that is still going on to my knowledge by Dan freely lost touch but I really think it's an amazing thing I admire them for doing. It was a big fan of our. Of course you're essentially bring anyone who is interested interest in tech and you teach them basic programming through actually giving a fixation where you show them if you do these commands and then you start with more complex things like putting if conditions ambitions within if conditions and you actually create an entire movement processing of your your in the game I find it really awesome so great it is and it's really a. Coding is a good beginning into tech. But people usually think attack is coded or software. Technology is just coding. But it's a lot more than that on that sort of been my mission to make. Coding is the evil necessity You have to coat in order to tell the hardware what to do. This is off. Ah Form of communication at the moment but there is so much more into and this is what I wanted to inject so this was the angle I came in with step into tech dot. Org this is a great bridge towards your idea of Sam. It's an enterprise software development tool will will be. It's my vision of it can talk more about or secret Nazi. This is part of the public. Speaking that I do is on on some Some basically collection of my life experiences in the technology world. But I've learned that really works. Well aw what doesn't work well. And what is total waste of time. When I stepped away from technology and went and did my university I equals? My mission became to change everything. So I'm brought up if you don't like something don't just complain about it. Change it and and this is what I'm doing with with Psalm. Is I intend to change the software technology industry. Because I believe the way we're approaching things. It's out-dated software technology hasn't changed since conception with still write code compile. Its ticket on a machine and yes we do a whole lot of other work work which is documentation and you know writing hundreds of different things last big project I did. We had more than two hundred thirty documents. That were I several hundred pages each to build a software but the reality is that has nothing to do with software. It's you do that in order to make your brain work so that when you write the code hopefully do it the right way but there is nothing other than human mind that connects six the two and to me that's wrong. That's a disconnect and there are many many tools have been developed but the all been developed opt with the focus of the current approach to technology which to me. They act like bandits and the only way I see that you can really leverage enormous progress. We have made in technology primarily through hardware. Technology is to go back to basic and and rethink and rebuild the whole thing from scratch based on what we physically have a note today a rod and creating more abandoned bandaids of different shapes size and form and challenging the whole process. This is what I've done with. Some some is going to be a business centric software mythology did encompasses the entire life cycle of software product within a single tool. So he's not just the guide you read and then followed a bit. You like our understanding ignored arrests. Eight actually mentors and guides you and helps you through that and to me to strength of Assam comes from using the strengths of us. Humans which is our creativity our ingenious way of thinking together with the strength of computers which are very good detail repetitive accurate work and if we allow each of us to focus on what. We're very good that we can create a formidable team of going for what and that's what division of Siamese once I started talking about it and getting the blank look in cross eyed expression from people I realized that not everybody was on the same wavelengths and instead of trying to convince them of my my idea I decided well maybe I should just start talking about it and letting them arrive at their own conclusion. So this is when I join toastmasters learn to public speaking and then I started public speaking about why I believe that software technology needs help help. Everybody wants to use it. I actually started looking at grants to build minded Billions out there for technology but when you actually look it it did fall in two categories. Either as for hardware technology or is for using software technology to build other things like biotech solaar so lower tech whatever attack but there is nothing absolutely nothing for building software technology itself. It's not recognized by anybody anybody that there is a need there. And that's what I wanted to create awareness and spreading the word people start having conversations with one another and eventually a right person would hear it and say maybe she's onto something less talk and then I can find the partners. I need on this new venture. I finally because I was already as I told you before. I was part of projects where we had that exact problem that we had knowledge transfer to begin with B. We had had to work with aged technology. Had No purpose and it was just a Helen and the nightmare and having something like a sandwich with actually preserved a knowledge and you could actually start and Believer Endeavour Globe and then again execute on of the entire life cycle of a software. That'll be great. Yes I think. The biggest strengths of psalm comes that it will create a single visual source of truth for the entire enterprise. So the moment if you think of enterprise any enterprise day have depending on the size of them they have from several hundred to several thousand systems. There are many reputations because they're old ones Johnson versus a new ones and nobody ever gets rid of the old ones because they always have a piece of knowledge that you could extract fully and then the whole company the whole enterprise knowledge is fragmented across all these sisters. There is actually no single place you can go and see or experienced entire car thing and because of that We'd all due diligence. We all the regulatory influences being put in a centralisation John Wooden each company. They're literally hundreds of different standards. There is hundreds of different ways of doing things. There is hundreds of different languages is operating system just most -cations and and to me that's a failure on the self technology people or the technology people as a the whole that this has happened and to me an enterprise should have the single source of truth with some electronic that officials a single source of truth because as humans we are visual creatures. We are amazing at pattern recognition. That's why when you go on a website it asks you read that silly blurt tax though number because to us is like. Why is it doing that like you? You know it. It doesn't make sense but it makes sense because a computer can't do that or you know which parts of which pictures of traffic lights in it. A witch picture has is bridges in it even a two year old can tell the difference. Or what's the difference between poll. An Earth a two year can tell you which is which but the computer. U-TURN will have a struggle identifying that and that comes with our strength which we take it for granted and by leveraging that then we can focus on finding problem patents and coming up with creative solutions autism. Be Buried in details that we're not good at handling bring me through a day of working for example with Sam. Let's say we wanted to have a calculator is a software product. Where would it start where we did and how it would be just like a daily life cycle of working for a normal user idea of psalm? I have couple of videos on my website but idea of some is that you you will begin with the business or the core of what. You're trying to build so to me a lot of the time we technology people get super excited and we build field. coolest things from technology will then be. Forget to ask the customer. What is the actually want? And it's like a by product. It's like Oh wait a minute eh. This product trying to see how you can use it to me. You start with what it is you want. So let's draw a picture. Destroy a process flow flow chart whatever terminology or familiar with. Let's drew a picture of how this thing we're gonNA build for you. It's going to be used. And how Oh you need to experience it so we start saying okay. I start on turning down. Maybe if it's a calculator I need to have numbers zero to nine. I I need to have plus Maynas divisions and so on for operating and I'm going to be doing you know type in a number put to operator a sign and then do another number and then it does the calculation so you start with basic of what it is doing. How is it you doing it and what you expect to see Z.? And by capturing that then you captured the use of it the USABILITY or to use a front and experience of that then that same same flow that same presentation can then be used by a software technology team to further gradual detail. All of design. So yeah you WANNA see screened with Zeros a non in some operating. How does that look? In what data would I need to designed to hold that. So he goes to your data database design a day to design it goes to your operational functional design. And eventually once you've done all that you sable deduct capture for saying did it put the logic against everything the customer asks for and the tool can say well. No actually you never did this part heart disease. There's no connection here or a dispute has a hole in it so you can actually visually see where you've expanded what was requested verses says you have gaps and by going through that and exercising that Dan you can make sure you have complete covered. If there is a question comes up. Maybe maybe you're designing so wait a minute. I don't know what to do here. Maybe there's a hole in the requirement. Oh Yeah I forgot to tell you you know. I want to be able to print this as well as just see it on the screen so there is another feature needs to be at it and this allows by going through this repetitive defition design and and verification. You can make sure you have complete cycle. Finally when you're done you go to architecture now. If done this what hardware does is this need to go to because the design is irrelevant to where it needs to go to only the code to execute -able code. It is dependent on the hardware. Not The design. So once you've done that you can then say okay. This is the architecture of one half as it hardware press a button and then it would create the executability form of that design for targeted hardware. You might use it the thing you know I saw. This would be a good one by distributing not working. Now that I experienced. I WANNA go from this hardware platform to another one. Let's go from Microsoft or HP Alpha system and see how that works now. If you don't need to build the whole thing from scratch you just select press another button and instantly happier complete solution on a new hardware going forward because everything you've done is we didn't one tool and it has traceability is used on down the road. You say you know what I was thinking king it would be cool to add these new arithmetical logarithms until log or whatever other function to the mixed. Then then you don't need to start everything from scratch you can say okay. I'm going to add this. And then the system says this is the impact of dis code. It has to be rebuild this evaluation that needs to be done. It can trace the impact of that change. Or you say you know before. I've limited myself to attend digit. JYTTE number I WANNA make it to thirty two digit number. What do I need to do? And it can actually trace back. This is the impact. This is the database partners to change nineties. Adecco discord needs to be generated. This code is currently on these hardware devices. You need to rebuild and deliver executed on so now you have complete map and you don't need to rebuild everything from scratch only implement the changes that you want to change. I mean hundred years time time somebody comes and say I wanted that crazy sally what she was thinking when she built this calculator to whole logic is there is in a human readable form. Warm not in a computer code. That's outdated in aged. Did they have to decipher. But in a logical flow to the human mind can follow pattern and understand that to me is the power of south. Sounds amazing thank you. How far are you in catching up with the conceptual part it and bringing it life? Some is super solid in my brain. It's the vision very clear. I've actually have a SAM is only the first step of a multi step vision. The idea started from somewhere completely different address in the legacy systems. That are building in our basements and then I unrealized before I could. I needed to go back and have a foundation which is SAM But then when I started talking about it I realized that the rest of the wolf that I have come across so far are not there. Conceptual did not quite thought about it did not did not understanding me so I changed tactics and I started talking about it so that could trick people to stop thinking about it applying it to their everyday life. You don't have to be a technology person person to appreciate it when your emergency services don't work you can't make emergency coal when somebody's life is depends on it you know windebank. The bank system crashes. You don't have access to EU funds to live off one. The telephone network crashes. You can't make phone calls planes cash out to discuss why people die in. This is everyday people. These are not technology people necessarily although they could these are everyday people get impacted by technological logical shortcomings and sadly I find failures become acceptable norm. Oh yeah well. That's a software to. Oh yeah that's another technology legit glitch and to me. It shouldn't be acceptable. We now have the ability to address it and we should do that now. I'm talking about it so I can can find the right partner. I want to create a quorum of partners to build this. I'm not looking for individuals. VC's to give me to cash because it's an idea and it doesn't really qualify and it's a big idea. It's not like let's get rich quick soon. I'm looking for quorum. So one leg of it would be myself self and other leg would be a university as good as I may be or I think I am pass. I'm history. I am experience experience but I'm trying to build something for the future and to me that's crucial to involve the future generation into that. They're the ones who have of a fresh thinking. They're not clouded the judgments not clouded by how things are necessarily and they're open minded and creative and did not jaded by housings are and how you can't change things but also this is gonna be. I see it as a legacy to to leave behind because because I'm not gonNA live forever. And by empowering the future generation. They're the ones who can take it beyond me. And that's why I want a university versus to be involved to bring young blood and learning and the different way of thinking. I'm trying to change the whole industry and I think it's empowering to have an an academy body involved and the other two would be my intended clients like I said we in the technology sector. We forget we build something. We're we're excited innocence. Excited I am about some and I sing is the best thing since sliced bread. It's just my vision. I before can build that I really want the everyday people who use it my end clients be part of this part of this journey to make sure what we deliver a treaty meets their needs. It is what day also vision and I don't want him to be off the same sector. I want him to be from two completely different sectors. So Sam doesn't become a sector-specific to Pacific entity if anybody's on their listening who wants to come and partner up and build a score or know somebody who may maybe interested. Please contact me. I love to hear from you. I can totally imagine. It consulting companies the big four being interested in this this would be a magnificent zing product for them. Yes no I actually think my I think enemy is the wrong word but a my for the lack of better term my biggest enemies would be technology companies because if you look at the market you know twenty years ago twenty five years ago. Whatever if you looked at the top talk companies in the world maybe it would have seen one technology company? They actually had their own sector. They were not considered a serious business now. Now if you go and look at the top companies in the world you may find one non technology company and and I think because as technology gee we have benefited from everybody else's failures every seven to ten years technology that you spend millions or billions is building gets old and you have to start the process from scratch and hardware is progressing and advancing so rapidly. We just keep doing this. And people keep keep spending more and more and more and this is why technologies are growing so fast if and when I should say some solution comes along yes initially initially gonNA spending yet more money on yet another technology that yet promises to be new and different but the long vision of some is to actually Schutte allow us to focus and allow us to rebuild and reuse knowledge and actually saved the enterprise knowledge and be more efficient. Actually GONNA turn the software industry into a circle economy once you turn something into a circular economy Stop waste you actually start decreasing expenditure on it and that's why. The technology company long-term may not be my best buddies ace and they might want to buy some so they can turn it off and throw the key away just a short switch enterpreneurship because it's also underlying topic of podcast. Although I really find same fascinating I would love to talk about for hours soon from your experience. What would it be that you were looking always up to in other enterpreneurs corners that you'll find that there was the characteristics which are thought brought those people to success? Who I think is three things? First and foremost it has to be a passion about what you're doing. And why are you doing that. Passion has to be at the core of you entertain. This is the excelsior takes. You beyond beyond when everybody tells you you know you're crazy. This is one sings the heart and it is a rough road. And it's going to keep going because you truly believe leave and understand this and this passion when I'm talking about passion is not about. Hey let's get rich quick passion but truly what I believe in what I'm doing and I would do. Would despite the fact that I know is going to be hard long road and I rather you know miss out on this fun thing so I can focus and deliver my passion. Then you need the two surround yourself with people that challenge you and compliment you not that they give you high five and say hey well done doing great. Let's go pat on the back although that is nice but people who intellectually challenged you and people who think differently to you do because when you when when you're surrounded by people who have different strengths than you and sink differently to you didn't by challenging idea new concept you constantly improving moving it and as you improving that goes to the third part which is adaptability and growth you keep improving and you adopt and you learn your grow. Oh and this is when you have the best result you can never stay put the world around us is changing and we need to change and grow with it and and if you have the passion you have the collaboration of the right people who compliment you. And then you have have to adapt -bility to absorb change and implemented and move forward as going as a continuous process to me deaths. A recipe for success sort encouraged us a fraud and printers listening. I think it's really important to here. Is Not only about the people it gives you high fives but actually challenge you and only the challenge you continuous learn continuously learning adapting. You situations people your idea towards the successful path stuck within something that you have in your head only and through the confirmation of people we just stuck in that situation. That's a bad bad way to go. Its not always nice to hear people who say oh. I don't think your idea is good because but I enjoy Elvis. Defend my idea because I believe in it but I always sit and and think through why said that. I put myself in their shoes and I try to look at it from their point of view. And there's always something to be learned from that statement either by improving my messaging. Maybe my messing wasn't clear Highlighting something that you know I I have but I didn't think of bringing it up or by changing my vision to encompass what they're seeing and I think that's a really powerful part for anybody ever if a business they do now out of my own interest ideal team would look forward to have on your team. I am a big believer in diversity diversity and equality and unlike some people that look at equality is equality numbers fifty percent men fifty percent women fifty percent black and fifty percent lie to whatever the numbers they looking at. I believe equality comes from blindness and focus. You have to be blind line to anything. That's irrelevant to the characteristics that you're looking for and focus on what is the core values and core expertise that you need to have a team only by doing not you can surround yourself with the best team and the best team in comes from having diversity of skill sets and You know ways of thinking and opinions and allowing each of them to grow flourish and contribute in their own way. This is a big thing. I'm very much against the concept that many have the equality comes from numbers because to me you'd lose at many layers you lose by not having the best that you could have had and by being prejudiced towards the ones that you could have hot and two wrongs don't make it right in my book about this happening for example the US campuses of universities where the score in order to enter. The university is different depending on which minority come from so Asians have it the hardest right now. I I As a woman in tech world for a long time I was always a minority coming from non Anglo Saxon background living in UK and US. I was considered a minority and So I was is always in that space. I was told to my face. I couldn't I couldn't earn the same as the guys who reported to me because it was a female and it could get pregnant and talk to leave and my God you know. I couldn't possibly be considered the same level as a guy I was told. I've got a job because I was the only oh new skirt that applied. I been told that I didn't get to the next level for a job because I was a female and they didn't sing. I was appropriate to to me. I always took offence at the ones. I couldn't fly so when it was still got a job. Because it's the only female I took offense to that because what could I do I turned him down. Now this lady. I wouldn't work for them because I wanted to be the best candidate not anyone in skirt but the ones quit fight when I was told I couldn't go to the next level all of interviews because I was female. They didn't think a female with suitable. I said to them I will prove to you. I'm the best man for the job and I did undated off admitted job and then I turned them down until them dead. I wouldn't work for somebody who is already sexist towards me but I wanted wanted to prove to them. They have now lost their best candidate and walked away and to me that was in listened for me and it was a listened for them. Hopefully it was a lesson for them but to me if I'M GONNA be prejudiced towards young guys today because I wanNA prefer you know. Hire women because I was prejudiced prejudice towards Dan. I haven't done anything. I'm just creating a new generation that will experience different types of prejudice zone. I will look at the candidates regardless the south whether the Manner Women Black White Muslim Jew Christian. Whatever they may be I look at their skill sets what they can bring to the team team the personality and mindsets? I not choose the best that are on the list of candidate and to me. It's a win for me and it's a win for them. Every person in leadership Russian position should hero awards Unfortunately our kids also has a time. If you wouldn't mind sharing your context where people can connect with you with social media or professional national media whatsoever where people can reach out to shirt this way is linked it. I keep my contacts there so sally M Salomon Tush you can go on. My website is smarter. APPROACH DOT C H. You can also contact me through there and I would be more than happy to hear from anybody not to give back in any way I can and we thank you for listening if you have any more questions if you would like to reach out to sell and you didn't notice the website Arlington profile. Reach out to us on facebook help and trade and also currently we now engaging also on twitter help trade one is our profile and also of course go on our website help and trade com or application which is there for enterpreneurs helping treat that to come again and that thank you very much for listening and stay tuned ten selley. Thank you again for coming over sharing your experience all presenting. Sam Is really great. Thank you for having me. Thank you bye-bye yeah.

SAM But Basel Dan US UK partner Toastmasters Sally Sally Sally Sulaiman Tash Bake Cook centric software Deborah Europe assault
Truth & Movies #131 - A killer whodunnit plus Stanley Kubricks swansong

Truth and Movies: A Little White Lies Podcast

49:31 min | 1 year ago

Truth & Movies #131 - A killer whodunnit plus Stanley Kubricks swansong

"In this week untruth and Levi's Rian Johnson brings blades of glory to his murder mystery. Kafer knives outs are suspect. Foul play eliminated new social. Mix History the debut. Atlantic's Sulaiman goofy. Lena Jennifer can explores history ugliest site in the colonial in Nineteen Gal who who who they close and in Phil gloves question is was shut really did deserve. The company received twenty years later. Ah I seen one or two things in my life. Never anything like this coming intrusive movies and little white lies. Hello T. movie truth. Is Beth Webb here keeping the hosting seat toasty for maker leader. And I'm joined today by little white lies editor David Jenkins David and we have a first time important. Where this Helen Thomas how you feel about being highly fantastic and what a week? We've got so we we have a massive lineup of films ahead of us to delve into a very special interview from the nineteen goes breakout star Ashton fron choosy. But first. Let's I two steps tentatively into the world of Rian Johnson's latest creation knives out. It knives outs. A detective investigates the death of a patriarch of an eccentric combative family or suspect foul foul play eliminated social. I'm detected early This is Trooper Wagner. We just want to ask a few questions. We understand none of his demise. The fans have gathered to hugh celebrates. Your father's eighty fifth birthday wasn't the party. Pre My dad's death great now David. You reviewed knives out for the magazine. Could you tell us a little bit about the film please. Yes it's it's an interesting one and I think is one that I think has an inbuilt level of excitement because it's been directed by someone who has gone off and soft souped from the t of the giant franchise cow mash cow and and live to tell the tale. Rian Johnson is someone who is Severi. Kenny character he kind of keeps one foot in India Cools hipsterdom and is a very kind of avuncular. He led to a presence but he comes from this background of making these really weird idiosyncratic films like brick and the brothers bloom and looper which shaw genre films but with very modern twist to them. He's really interested in toying with narrative and an expectation for me. He's a bit more interesting. Christopher Nolan. He's Christopher Nolan. WHO's willing to sort of like push the gear up from four to five I still think brick is probably one of his best films? uh-huh and actually knives out is a bit of a callback to brick really in that it's a murder mystery and he does a little bit about what the film is about. Indeed yes you see you have this. This family The thromboses who this very well to do But quite dysfunctional clan the patriarch is a guy called Holland thrown blitz thrombin thrombin be sorry Holland from me by Christopher plummer. Who is himself? A kind of Agatha Christie. Like writer of murder mystery. Mystery novels has made a lot of money and has been kind of seating out to his slightly Nettie well inlaws and ah children played by Jamie. Curtis and you've got Mike Mike Shannon and Don Johnson and Toni Collette and what their kids as well. He Li- Internet trolls and and kind of woke liberal liberal arts college types and there's this real kind of melting of political and psychological archaeological types in the family. And you have the home help who is played by an ADAMAS and she's the only one who Holland thrum be actually has any kind of respect and from this fall and everyone. Everyone can kind of tell that he is this. Sage like overseer and he He's very kind of in touch with I guess of morality on a wider scale and like what people deserve and how people should live and he's not someone who's just going to hand over his money and let these people fritter away and as he says he believes the Monitor. Lebanon Dr Arnn. US is actually the person who would benefit from the most of the money the most and deserve it the most when when he eventually dies then then he dies in suspicious circumstances and then onto the scene comes Daniel Craig's bete-noire blunk who his I'm not even gonNA attempt to do the accent Weiss. He's the kind of southern slick southern detective one step ahead ahead of the game is a little bit eccentric himself and Yeah Rian Johnson just takes that runs with it and to say any more I think think would spoil it. Yes we are staffing tentatively with this section of the past and very much honoring the mystery island of the murder mystery head that said we say that on on into Almaz is probably the film secret weapon is you agree with that lay. Yes in more ways than one again. It's difficult to talk about without getting married spoiler and she's also who has one might expect. Perhaps you've got this rich family. And she's the help so she's kind of the butt of the joke in some ways but that is played quite knowingly. I mean it's been talked about this quite good running joke about forgetting country. She's from which is quite amusing. All you want to say so much but we come next now. We are going to be seeing a lot more of moving fluid on which is very exciting. I'm she will be starring opposite Craik in no time to die. She's Playing Being Norma Jean Aka Marilyn Monroe biopic coming up as well didn't she. Deserves the kind of star trajectory. That she she's got ahead of her as she definitely definitely on the way you feel that I mean as you said that's interesting not forgotten. Actually that she's going to be in the new bond film but as we know sometimes been in a bond film as a woman historically is not always lead to great things. It can be a sort of token thing but particularly with on on Chiron Jewish she has. It's been one would hope that things will be more interesting for rather than just some sort of token gesture to look at now. Let's get into the rest of this car. Because as we've got captain America vs James spont- versus Larry Straight. Why did you think of these incredible people who have companies incredible backgrounds coach Johnston on I want to work with him? Well you know he's this high profile guy now and film might knives out you you kind of think. It's a one for him. Movie is a film that you get to make off. Div had like a big studio mega hit cynical to even to suggest it but like you just have this idea. Era of like when an actor goes and does a big studio movie in its them standing in front of a green screen like talking to tennis ball for hours and hours. ECON imagine the value of that job is that high whereas like I know people who probably say no. It's it's rubbish. It's so much fun making those movies but you you feel a film like this is actually like a fun endeavor and it's something that you is a little kind of thing that you want to be involved in and you can imagine the O.. Rian Johnson's during his follow up to the last Jedi I. It's his own kind of weird Agatha Christie riff and it's GonNa be his vision and he's going to have control over and it's going to be like a the film you know like I realize I'm being very back handed to some big studio films unintentional but yet I think historically you tend to have these these moments that the it's the cost that actually make these films work. Yeah whereas like selling audience on the idea of like a very old fashioned antiquated antiquated throwback to Agatha Christie. That might seem a bit of a hard sell especially to a younger audience. But then when you can say hey cap capping in some Ten Knitwear Sems Delicious Network. I've seen in cinematic history. I will say the network game is strong in this one and yeah so so the act is the they get into have a good time but they're also like getting to work that chums as salesman a bit. He's like you these these many hooks now for people to kind of put the money down for this one they should do on. These sheds Lee. Now this is this. Is Chris Evans. First proper proper venture onscreen since avengers. How'd you think he did these really good? I mean it's a he's ultimately bitter scumbag it's not without nuance or just want to circle back if I may to something that struck me when they were talking about cost and when you work in a big budgets and you're just working against tennis any supposed and stuff like that the this is one of those rarities where you so very aware that the costumes you having a great time among themselves but yet we as is an audience also do and how often you see. Oh it must have been you often say oh it must have been great fun survey but then everyone's like oh bothered when you're watching that sweet export of year the audience love it and year. Looks like the costs that that sense of funding like actually infectious rather than like you know repellent exactly and especially I think especially showers. Jesus tiny collapsed in this film. He kind of acquires this Gwyneth. Paltrow ask lifestyle coach online self brand nightmare and Puzo off just admirably doesn't Shea is worth mention. I think we've talked a lot about how the this genre element today in the fact that you know is playing well-known well-worn material and narrative devices but actually one one of the things that makes this very contemporary is is quite political and that comes in the characterizations across the board like whether you Don Johnson's on since character is obviously you know right wing and then you've got yeah. Toni Collette is left wing. And they're kind of various reference points points and in a comes through in the dialogue in in quite subtle ways about the this of politics characters and a lot of their kind of if they rage comes from that connection of being very disappointed in the world and and and angry so Oldest politics six also feeds into how they treat martyr and ultimately the film kind of evolved into a class war. Yeah I can see you self. Editing thing is you're saying this is very keen not to give anything away. The point is the there is thematic richness underneath and and there is a political motivation to the film rather than it. Just being a very fun frolic. That doesn't really leave anything with you. It really of tries to to be more than than a just just a workout. Yeah and it doesn't sacrifice the phone in in doing that. which is what makes you say magical a final question for you and then we will move onto scores good? I wanted to know how you feel about Daniel Craig's career outside of bond because he really shines in this film from what I can see. I wonder if how we feel about about burned in in his career trajectory. Generally because it feels like it's these parts I mean I really liked him in Logan Lucky I thought and I wonder if there's something that will perhaps tim back when he kind of reflect back on his career to no one hundred million or wherever. He's got a couple of films for rewind old in back in the eighties life a- As we know there is more to life the money so that when you got it but you can seem strength strength. Because he's east profit to me has actually proven that he can do like you say Logan Lucky and even before that is stuff road trip addition years ago and so on and so on I feel like he's still on the rise certainly as professional as as well as being a star and actually one thing that's interesting and I can go about Johnson being the big poll for these axes which is obviously the case. Johnson itself has come out and said the the big thing was like Daniel Craig first and then everybody wanted to work with Daniel Craig around that so you know. Maybe there's some truth in that some truth in that as well the he's big portrait certainly for his co stars as much as anyone else is what is obviously the producers who see the box office cash coming in my take on Cray okay is that I think when the story of Daniel Craig is written. The bond will be the anomaly in his career because I remember seeing a film like one of his earliest earliest roles and car in the title of the film. But I just remember. He's got like bleach. Blonde spiky hair in it. It was his kind of breakout role. It was a commit late ninety s and since then he always just cropped up as this kind of character actor when he was like this of no fixed abode did accents instill in all kinds of roles baddies as goodies and genre in drama. It in the mainstream and you know he was just you know he just cropped up in things and before we became bond around. He's not someone ever really thought either way you know he'll be a solid presence. But I wouldn't ever say that he was kind of benchmark of a good You know he I would never go to film 'cause Daniel Craig within it. And then he was in bond became his icon and finally got the big lead role that potentially been working four. But then he's unloading lucky in this and you know he seems like he's a bit more relaxed he doesn't need to be there's a there's a sense he's not doing these films to get the next paycheck. You know and would not be that scene other. Ben What blunk film. Yeah I think we can heartily agree with you there so with that in mind lets me if t the scores section for knives out Lee. Could you let me know what you made of this please. Oh so solid four-star for me. It's like very good worse in some. So you'd recommend to both serious cineas and you know it's it's mum friendly as well so yes same falls across the board for me. I think we've focused on the positives interview. I would say that there is maybe like some of the the thrum Lee family characters our little thinly shaded. We talked about before how they have this political element they have these opinions and it kind of drives their motivations. I found which in the field or something earning embiid single know about them. Like there's a touch of pantomime baddie about them. Yeah which didn't really sit massively well with me. But that doesn't prevent the the film from doing what it sets out to do. I think I would agree with you. That and again I'll be boring. Say Falls across the board but I would agree there some fantastic on mastic characters in that I. I would've just liked to assume Pittsburgh use and I think it's always tricky when a foam pivots on big twists as to whether it will hold it for viewing by just have every faith at that it would and and I loved Johnson Johnson. He just say tangibly loves his characters. Like and I think that really really transcends in this film and it makes it such an enjoyable experience Sam one thing to say that she is one hundred thirty minutes so it's a long film but it absolutely it feels like eighteen minutes yes I would concurrently so oh is a speedy film is a speedy speedy. Fill say we stairs and speedy film recommendations for you this week off to a good starts. It's a next step we have Jennifer. Can't follow up T- The BAR-B. This is the nightingale the next table the nightingale which is Jennifer hence followed t the Bravo. Dick the film funnies Cla- a young Irish convict. He chases a British officer through the rugged Tasmanian Wilderness following terrible acts of violence. He committed against family free to Ooh they close. So what are you doing heroin. No trouble himself. I uh-huh for the book we had. As an Woodward he is digital editors speak with adding Franchisee who is the star of the film she spoke about the film's Hosh filming conditions and working with Director Jennifer can't in terms of the practicalities of it. General was he wanted to make sure that we're all safe so we basically choreographed it. I mean really. When an intimate life we practice it over and over again but without lines and without emotion and she wants to leave up until the day that we were actually performing Ash? We gotTa Stop Coordinator Safety Guy or whatever on set with us so physically. We all felt really safe. We'd also done a lot of work shopping. She didn't rehearse scenes with their lines. Ever in any context but in terms savannah relationship between myself and as a eunuch with soldiers ozzy myself in Psalm. Eight and Damon. We just did a lot of different improv workshops to kind of create this strange power dynamic and that was that was one element and for me me. A huge part of the preparation for that scene have been done through months and months of research and months of looking documentaries by sexual violence against women PTSD met I worked with clinical psychologist officers attached project. She would return and she hated me meeting victims rape Who would share their story with social workers in centers domestic abuse? which is this the VIBE? With those women share their stories with me it was really really powerful and an homeland and gave me a sense of responsibility which on one hand felt like a pressure but on the other hand really just made me want to go a thousand percent all in the formulas I wanted to not only give performance for the sake of the story in the film but also kind of honor them. I guess in been so generous. Insuring your stories we dot come more from you want to hold. Thank Mr to thing. I mean. Incredible actress director. And so she. With all of us with SAM to like facilitated a meeting to me in compensation than Utah so yeah it was I mean she said this is the possibility you WanNa do it and I said yes of course and then also for that scene and the dynamic with with myself and Sam Conversation earlier on about perhaps not hanging out together too much so we kinda keep this distant relationship or dynamic and then as soon as we started workshop things material we just thought no we need to do the total opposite and like to know each other as well as we possibly can so that we can trust each other completely and ourselves we have to do those teams astrakan. So yeah without a multi-layered preparation so this is a very interesting interesting film to bring to the table. Certainly one that has a lot of opinions out in people led to walkouts at Sydney Film Festival. The reason being that there are a number of very measured measure. Very graphic accounts of sexual assaults mostly on the film's heroine played by Franchisee who we had just that. Who Plays Clara now? The magazine praised raced the film and said it was a breathtaking piece of work. Certainly Luke could you tell us a little bit more about it and how you reacted when you first saw it. Sure first of all I should maybe set. Jennifer can up from what I knew before seeing the nightingale which is part of the same people. You see the bubble and it's kind of great and film and it's kind of it's it's not particularly brewers gruesome but there is a few sort of jump scares and stuff like that and you. It's just very solid. Two genera work which is about a second life in the laboratory because as a character is kinda become this icon in the Oj Btcu plus community so you see the the Babari single upper pride marches and stuff like that. which is you know? Obviously great for any film I think with this is before we heard the word is out. There is a completely different character fish. It's a kind of rough from ready savage. So of what would you call. It is is released in many senses. But you know it's about imperialism it's about colonialism and it's about ultimately the why the British have clamped down on the Tasmanian sort of natives and treat this woman in a really bad wise. Well what you say that the sexual assault scenes. Aw Aw graphic and is interesting because while they're not as this is a tough one for for a man talk about because most of the the sexual is is about what he's done to a woman and it's very much like she's seen as an object some worth worth literally less than nothing and it is pretty hurrying but what interesting. It's not as extreme as some of the French new wave horribly with we've seen in last few years but it is preached summit shown in those things are difficult to watch but after that it really becomes a relatively straightforward revenge saga and honesty. I've got a lot of time for that as well. You know those always can be done can be done really well. I think after that kind of incendiary I act it for me. It doesn't. It's not like a masterpiece by is is worth you're watching the performances in particular and I resort touched on but the performances are Toland Franchisee. She's had small parts in stuff. Like I'm a frowns but this is really see her big bright fruit con moment and yeah she. She's incredible she's nuanced. She's what is fundamentally a very tough row offing for anyone to play. There's oversleep obviously degrees of brutality. And is she spends most of the film destroy really bar. She's not purely a victim. They restricting what she does when she linked up with this Tasmanian native A guy called billy who's played boy and again. This is a tough one for me to pronounce my door yourself on the next by Carly Camber Emba. I think I think that's how you pronounce it. And she hires him and then they go and they trek through the wilderness after Hawkins. Who is the officers? Donald seen injustice to her and her family. So it's quite simplistic in its narrative. It reminded me very much something like the proposition that John Hill coat film in that is savage. But it doesn't feel to me like it would be much worse than what went down at the actual time of it. You know you hear these reports and uh-huh and if you read up a little bit the stuff that was done in Australia and has mania time to both natives convicts and stuff it was. It was on speaker David. What were your thoughts on this? What are your thoughts on? How can hundred this Directa? I was really impressed. It was a film. Actually the took a wild me to actually catch up with it and sending. I've wanted to see for a long time and actually make sure I saw in in the best conditions possible and yeah I caught with it. Finally finally and yet it was fascinating is like a is a film I was watching and it constantly oscillated between me thinking. This is a quite OV- solemn Soba historical drama. Obviously one that's very unflinching and willing to to to get his hands dirty in terms of what it showing. How pigs violence forcing you and the characteristic to look at the consequences of their actions but there's also so think carrying over from a film the Buddha you can tell the Jennifer? Ken is someone who is deeply versed in horror. The Baba deck was his maternal final almost Spielberg in horror film. Eight one what you'd co quote Unquote lighthearted horror whereas this film I was thinking of films like last House on the left left and Cannibal Holocaust all these films that were like band on the eighty in the video. And that's not necessarily to say that it's a gory film. And the kind of it's Larry but like just been one. Yeah it's disturbing. It's a revenge film but there is something very melancholic about the idea. That revenge Enj- As a concept is quite few tall. And you may have the worst things in the world done to you and your family. Which is what Claire has done to her family but ultimately like when it comes to the moment of actually you know I for an eye is not it's not as easy or satisfying or gratifying? Gratifying as you think it's going to be. Yeah I think that in that lies lies an important point because there's nothing curious about this phone. There's nothing you know. There's been so many instances of sexual violence portrayed scream arts used simply for the point of being cut you itunes or as a point I know that that was a big criticism in a season and if game with trains were a major Garrett was raped simply for the the point of moving narrative. Almost obviously this is an active of deep emotional violence. That's committed against this woman. I think it's it's an important watch an important piece of history that has never been shown before and has shown with great cat and a very steady eye and with great research that has gone into something worth noting. The language spoken by the Tasmanian Aboriginals in the film is something include power. Connie and it's near extinct so this is the first time has ever been used in a major picture and also their clinical psychologists rests on that. So it was handled with the best intentions. I think as well say as you say like it's I think what makes it really interesting. Great is that on one on hand is a very kind of personal folks story about the night that the reason she's called the nineteen guys because she is this songbird who is forced to sing for the for the British soldiers in the at the beginning of the film and it's a nickname given to her by Sam Claflin character plays Hawkins who he's a fascinating character musone way. He's one of the most unrepentantly evil characters. I can recall seeing for longtime let the bow down to Ken. Commitment of actually writing a character. Who is it's almost impossible to extend empathy towards and yet they're still something quite human about him? There is no pantomime villain element to him. He's very kind of his anger. It feels real but but yeah you're focusing on her and as you're watching it this very kind of narrow idea of a woman seeking revenge inge broadens out into this question of well. What about the? ABC's mets upon the aboriginals and which we witness many many times throughout the throughout the film almost kind of incidental moments and he. He can ask well if this is what she's allowed. Then how should this. This idea pay out on on a kind of geopolitical level going to historical level and without giving way she sort of tries to answer the question but like she tries to deal with it. Ah By the end of the film through Billy's character and it's just really interesting how what begins as kind of basically kill bill tens. I sure as as quite a kind of you know. A big statement on remembering AWFULNESS OF COLONIALISM TRUSTEE JAY Z S. Well I think with that in mind. It's time for us to greater some scores. David would you like to let us know made of this going to say three four. Oh four because probably wasn't the greatest found in the BOB MC I didn't. I thought it was pretty good but not massively my cup of tea. I think this is a far more interesting interesting. And Enduring Film and brave film and I'm glad it was made and be absolutely fascinated to see what Jennifer can't does next and I hope it something as bold and original. Is this going on and unflinching. Yes cinching is the word that's the takeaway thank Lee. How about you again offered is very strong? Strong Appropriate Guy Falls across the board. Because I I was probably more into the Babylonian David solid. I came into this thinking especially there was a law festival before I had a chance to see it and I think it really does deliver considering. It's not a revenge. A revenge story. We've seen the multi million times but the hesitate to remember a revenge film. That's been quite interesting eighteen. And there's been as much to is this wonderful and I'm the same across the board that the Bubba Dickerson I really started to like horror again. That was a ten in the genre for me for again I. It's like mets him. This is a very hard for them to swallow but very very good in. It's intentions in what it is saying. And then for again and I just I hate this. This one's legacy kind of outlast the walkouts in the scandal this kind of come around and is remembered for the good intentions. That is out with next step. We've got Atlantic antics from actress. Turned filmmaker Mattia in a populous suburb. Abbas Dakota workers on the construction site of a futuristic tower without pay for months decide to leave the country by the ocean for better future Sulaiman Goofy David if he could tell us a little bit about the film please show it's In Senegal in Dakar specifically and opens on a work this dispute a big. What looks like some seven star hotel which being built on the coastline and the the workers Trying to get backpay off of the former in the form in basically is gone on holiday so then getting money so they walk-off and the character following who is this ahead of this miniature pricings things called Sulaiman and he goes back into town to meet his girlfriend. Well let me know girlfriend but a lady friend Lati Eighty Cola could played by Mama Benita. Sonic and she is due to be wed against a will to this very the kind of comically slick guy who just toss it. He wears kind of billowy white shirts and his is abroad most of six months of the year and he's this kind we'd nouveau riche. Huckster and obviously the FAM- The family won't have to marry someone wealthy but she heart belongs to Sulaiman and they have a big night planned and at a meeting point and she goes to the meeting point to meet Sulayman and he doesn't turn up and the film is essentially asking what what happened to him. And it's a film that just I loved it. It's one of. I think one of my favorites the year I think what what Mattie Diop does is is. She feels this. Yon which I kept watching it thinking this this this is going to be kind of. Oh isn't the world awful will full aren't we. Aren't we awful people. We you know isn't the West isn't capitalism awful and and there is elements so that in the film. It's of deals with them in in such a kind of interesting intriguing and eccentric way. The RE beautiful as well. I mean it just on on the visual aesthetic oral level. This film is just It just works so I mean it just looks and sounds incredible. There's a crack in cinematographer. That's my cd up on this Clem. Mathon he also did the cinematography for Trevor Latium fire so definitely. They're excellent year for her. Leave bigwigs from David on this. Would you agree. Is this one of your films of the year. Is You know very much about mighty diop going into the film. I knew very little about may go into the film by. I want to know more of seeing this. Sorry I knew about the can hyphen the cheat turn jury prize. She Got Candle she did. She won the grand prairie and was the first woman of color with instant congestion so greatly deserved a maybe not quite as strong as David on it but I do feel that it's really interesting and part of the reason I like side from the fact that it's Santa Cora it's stuff that we don't really see very much certainly not managed so super mainstream cinema noiselessly mainstream but the fact is going to net flicks so I'm sure it will get a a big audience which I feel which fill a film this really deserves because it does so much eight Scott Schumer in it and it's you know it speaks about different ways of living and the coach. There's this secret stuff that we can't really talk about value much away but it does. I suppose the way to say. Is you think it's one particular film and it's No. It's really free of four different sorts of film but rather than being an awful Mesler. That sounds like it. Kind of interviewees. These different strands in these different ideas. About not talk about filmmaking and the white stories told and always this film and that film and Really WanNa tell everything and there's like there's like police procedural elements which exclusively crazy. I can definitely talk about that. There are other bits and pieces and this is what fun so interesting about it is the local culture. Said sometimes when you get to a free different strands friends economists into a mess and Mason nothin. But this it's almost like a new top of filmmaking has been created by this blend of stuff is I think the thing that works so well for me is that it's yeah she she so of melds these ideas together in this very unselfconsciously. He don't eat. I think a lot of a lesser director would have been very self satisfied with the way that it kind of switches and flips and flips between these modes and intoned themes. And and she just does it in the in the most natural offhand way like just completely natural donor spoil it but it's a film of very very many distinct parts but never never feels like anything but a single focused whole movie if that makes sense this really delicious soup where everything's been blended together Rothman lumpy stew where you'll are all these go hungry more than anything. Yes that's perfect way of putting it. It's making mouth water somewhat. I think we should Krecko missing scores. Lee You EH. Come in very enthusiastically with this. How what was your anticipation for the film festival minds? Dissipation of we'll go often I I'll I'll go four games and You know what I'm GonNa go four across the boat again and he's really boring to go to the same school but for me is. It's not quite a masterpiece. Without what do love would it would it does. Would I want to see a film like this every single day today. Certainly want to see a film that surprises me as much as this one everyday great. They've it so I I in the magazine reviewed it and I gave it falls across the boulevard. Actually update my review now. Because it's a film that has really stuck with me and and I definitely want to watch again like very soon so probably four four. Five retrospect. I've actually got some some retrospect now insights to beautiful thing and you can follow up on Friday when it's released on net flicks. I'm coming in with a FI friend. His evasion I love My. Td Up. She's she's got an amazing body of short films that I employ you to go and find if you can and also just in terms of the historical context the first woman of color to to be entered into competition and I was very lucky to see the film at Cannes so to see her just striding up the cost and it was it was. Oh it just scheming goosebumps. It was gorgeous and then four and four for me some of this narrative Sumi just fell a little bit short. Am I preferred. The stronger elements certainly more political at school elements of the film. But it was just such an enterprising piece of filmmaking so ambitious for fest feature so uncompromising and you've just you've got respect that so much so I think that's a glowing recommendation for that on net flicks on Friday going beat the algorithm and seek out. Please okay and that brings us to you are chasing me vs film club. GCE and she this week which has really used to really divide people in it was released. This is Danni Kubrick's Swansong eyes. Wide shots is white shirts. A new DOC. Dr Embarks on a Harrowing Nightlong Odyssey of sexual and moral discovery off to his wife reveals a painful secret team. I I have seen one or two things in my life. Never anything like this all right. So we've got a few listener comments David. If you could give us the first please it's the most gloriously unsexy film of all time and gets best here. You're on every viewing Kubrick was trolling soul. Dinge Leiva dench twitter. Thanks for that leave it. I guess we've got one from at John. John W five five five five he says I love it. Everything about it is designed to unsettle the audience the strange cadence of the dialogue doc the pacing the unresolved mystery runs through it and not least the costing such a strange experience. And then we've got somebody else. Heisenberg pudge college slightly. Different Take Boring. Shallow Unpretentious Pissy. This was Kubrick's last film. What was the point of this movie? It did not say anything thing well raising to say the least. Can you tell me about the first time. So this firm. Well I can't really tell you much much about it because it was twenty years ago and the world's worst memory but well I can tell you about it is how remember thinking. At the time I was actually beginning mccoubrey. Most people should being a Kubrick. If they're not that well then. I need to change that. In my opinion I know he's an obvious person in an obvious reference point for many big and small filmmakers side. What right there's a reason for that? But let's is not getting the rest of his work. I remember thinking after our stores were shot. It's my least favorite Kubrick. I'd seen at the time I was like eighteen. Nine minutes when it come out and eighteen nonsectarian onsite saying well. Nobody knows any ninety northern thing but still face. I A quiet film in many respects by having watched again this. It's essentially a pre great bill. Work was changed fee. What's changed what? What would you go back in time? Nineteen year old. Lay that you would say to grow up my which have in the years you know got bit grayer. The truth is what are now about psychoanalysis or psychiatry or any of that when I was eighteen nine hundred nothing whereas is now and especially when you know that it's kind of based on this Viennese text. It's very Freudian. It's a film about sex. An adult film about sex six. The orgy scenes by today's standards probably wouldn't cold too many eyelids to be bad. I don't think the cost of a coach is what still stands out the fact that you've got some cruise and Nicole Kidman playing this psychologically warring couple floor in power and then they're talking about their sexual desires and then of course the cruise characters gun physically to go and actually explorers to actually gone. See what what is it. The heart of his so sexual interest and we hear about Kidman's the original book was actually their translation of it from an Australian dream story. And that is a lot of it you. You're thinking with so many films. How much of this is juryman? How much of this is really so? That's quite interesting again. Lot Very Freudian. Yeah a lot a lot more convenient. Okay David What do you think cruising Kidman in particular brought to this. There was rumors that it was GonNa be Alec Baldwin and Kim Basing Leads Steve Martin was considered for the row in the eighty s vastly. Different film that would event. What what do you think that they if anything were to the T. leads not well? It's a fascinating film and I think that I want to know where to even start and I think that what aw crews brings to it for me is an element of comedy. Because I think it's very funny the notion that you've got the world's most desired filmstar male film star making a film about how he can't have sex any he he just seems to to be rejected by everyone cuckolded by everyone insulted by everyone he. He has his vision of himself which nobody else seems to understand or comprehend Hindu in the same way that he does. I'm not saying it's glib funny. It's it's there are lots of things about the film which show a sense of humor which I didn't didn't think he brick had in the past and there is an element of stunt costing they. Were you know at that time. Probably the most high profile power Hollywood couple in the world obviously they done Far and away way together and days of thunder together so you know this was a little kind of cruise kidman mini cannon. I think now had a similar experience watching it. Ah when it came out and just I was young and it was like this doesn't make any sense to me. This is just this weird the whole the whole oh stuff about you know like I think when you kind of let's call. It immature. That his his drive is somewhat obscure like e. Don't really I understand why he needs to get to this party. Why having this of dark night of the soul where he's wandering around New York looking for stunt thing you don't don't always know what why he wants to follow this weird chain of events in certain circumstances and coincidences and and then what's also happened? You you know what this kind of malign power is at the other side which is seemingly keeping him in in check and and keeping in his pence yes. Yeah he's going up against this force that is keeping him away from sex through gratification. Is is something that he can't comprehend. You know there's an incredible look seen in the beginning where this of a semi clad state on a bed and having an argument and it just goes on and on and on and some if Y- you're watching it and I think going back to the cruise kidman thing like they had a fairly I think it's probably fair to say that their break up. Was You know she was quite happy to be out of that relationship and you watch this now. Think Well No. How much was she acting? But you know there was probably some other building character. Probably had some extra added a bonus elements that she can draw from real life experiences. So Yeah Yeah. This is probably my favorite of his films but then on love key brick I find him quite kinda cold and distant and soulless and very like like pessimistic about about the world that side of him always kinda overcomes the this amazing technical aspects of the film even if two thousand and one I just can't get onboard with. I think this I like the messy nece in the witness and I like that. It's so because I mean you know he built all the sets and and it looks like it's weird toytown version of New York you know even the elements that you have questioned about the production about the characters characters about the geography the word sequence in the dressing up shock. And you know as you say there is like dream dream element to it like. Is this Cuban extreme. You know it's just a lot going on. I think it's the one of his I think not only. Could you go with a group of people and see an everyone have a different take on it but then you would have a different take on it yourself every time you if you saw her every year you'd probably have have a different take on it because as you grow and you learn and you develop and mature. There's kind of Rohrschack vibe to it like you know you can just you'll we'll just see different. Things in in the patterns is an abstract experimental weird film. Love it great cannot just mention something on it really really hope it was done with comedic intention but the but then the lead by crack up by the end of the film is in nearly every we know every overseen at least some crews introduces himself as Dr. Now that you can imagine as you said Steve Martin taken that own and it would be played in. That's how different way but we've literally people He introduced himself to loaded from people. Like you say the dressing up. Show the fancy dress shop and he goes to hospitals spools and everywhere he goes. Oh yeah I'm a doctor. And he's like that absolves U.. Like I'm a doctor. You wouldn't go kindergarten Gulf cough Greens caper and you. You wouldn't say your job of excuses you from being a complete Nassir all from wherever and we're supposed to go but instead I really hope it was done deliberately for last because I was cracking. Well let's say it was as well and that was we'll say west. Meeting a Puto Anderson actually went to visit the couple of setting off the back of that offered cruise the role of Frank. TJ mackey in Magnolia. which is my favorite crease row? So yes maybe he did take a little bit of that guy in his next project well blocks term pack their impact. We did it. So what would be your film of the day. What would you ask people to go and watch firstly? I'd say all all of them brave nightingale if you WANNA see incredible new talent Atlantic's if you if you want a bit of fun knives out question Lee. What would you go and ask people to go and see? Well I mean in terms of the pure interests. Atlantic's is probably the best in terms of offering something new if you WanNa go Biz or gopher laugh and get your popcorn and stuff. Noise is out as the you know. That's just absolutely silly. Cyber there is I'd recommend lives out to more people but if you want to be a bit smarter bit cool you know. Everyone won't be tuned by Atlantic because it is really fresh interesting right. I mean you there so I've been on question time of et but that's fine. It's very strong week. And we're very grateful to have been able to took Robert Great films. I think she atlantic's so next week. Michael will be back in the hosting chair. Talking about honey boy sailing my son and film club the the umbrellas of show book. I've been I went on to say. Thank you to our contributors bank. David thank you and thank you Lee. Thank you and this has been a seven digital production.

Sulaiman Goofy David Lena Jennifer Lee Rian Johnson Daniel Craig Don Johnson murder Agatha Christie Toni Collette Sydney Film Festival director SAM Beth Webb Helen Thomas tennis Sulaiman Christopher Nolan Billy Ken Steve Martin
Freed By ISIS, Yazidi Mothers Face Wrenching Choice: Abandon Kids Or Never Go Home

NPR's World Story of the Day

07:05 min | 1 year ago

Freed By ISIS, Yazidi Mothers Face Wrenching Choice: Abandon Kids Or Never Go Home

"Support for NPR and the following message come from Dulles International Airport with the highest on time takeoff percentage of any airport on the east coast. I a d means I'm already departing more at fly Dulles dot com slash fast with the last piece of ISIS territory, liberated in Syria women kidnapped by ISIS five years ago are now being freed most of them are from the ZD religious minority as NPR's Jane raff reports from northeastern Syria those who emerged with children face a heartbreaking choice and just a warning. Here's some people might find this story disturbing. The little girl has been crying all day long. She's five years old. And she's cried herself sick the women. Here. Say we're in a room with foam mats, spread out on a concrete floor in the village in the Kurdish region of Syria. It's a halfway house for people held captive for five years and now freed from ISIS with the fall of the caliphate. The women and children here are waiting to cross the border to Iraq to return to what's left of their families. But not the girls two year old brother children have different fathers. He Brahim's was Moroccan ISIS fighter. The boy was born after his mother was kidnapped and forced to marry a member of the group that carried out genocide against her people. His mother is twenty two. Now, she's been told that if she wants to go home, she has to abandon her son. It's such a sensitive topic. We're not using the mother and daughters names. I mean, I love him just like my daughter, but my parents won't accept him. Nothing is in my hands. The group. She's with had tried to cross the border that morning. They left Ebrahim behind. Even my daughter was crying saying why is my brother not coming with us? I want to go back to Brahim. She cried the whole day when they got to the border. They were turned back because of a dispute between the Iraqi army and Kurdish Syrian forces. When I came back. He saw the car and ran towards me, and he shouted and hugged me. It was very painful. They're going to try to cross again. So this might be her last night with both her children. She sits on the floor her daughter's head in her lap stroking her hair, or is the little girl cries her other hand reaches for Ibrahim's tiny hand of stretch. Does he sleeps? For three years. I haven't been apart from him for a single minute and leave him in one minute. It's very hard. Mother cries, the little girl cries, practically everyone in the room starts to cry. The woman leaning against the wall with an arm broken by nicest wife, the young woman was shrapnel wounds lying on a bed even the older UCD women taking care of them who've seen this dozens of times. All of the mothers cry. They don't want to give them up they cry and the beat themselves because they are from the mother's flesh and blood. But if they go with their mother, the family doesn't accept them and the community doesn't accept them. So they are forced to leave them here. That's Fahim Sulaiman one of the women who helps families who have just been freed. It's been five years since I says kidnap thousands of ZD women and forced them into sexual slavery. I ask how many children have been separated from their mothers. Joe their thousand says Shammy Remmel another visi women running the house. On the mother says she pleaded with her parents to let her bring her son never to name him as I have so many friends that were freed some brought to children and some brought three children and their families. Still don't accept them. My parents tell me no one accepted any of these children. And that this applies to everyone it applies to everyone not just because the fathers belonged to a group that slaughtered and enslaved disease. But because only those born E D parents are considered ziti since they have Muslim fathers. These children are considered Muslim. There are hundreds of ziti women believed still hidden among ISIS families in the camps in Syria. The mother says some of them won't come out because they're told by those families their children would be taken away. If I wanted to stay with my son, I would have had to stay with ISIS. I was told they take the children away from their mothers. And it's true. Once the women crossover into Iraq. They're not allowed by security forces to cross the border again, a twenty two year old woman. ZD husband little girl's father was kidnapped with her five years ago. And she thinks he was murdered like almost all of these women. She's completely dependent on her remaining relatives Sulaiman says any family taking an daughter with a child from a nicest father would be shunned by the community, and he won nearly novel. The no one will look at them. No one will drink their water. No one will visit them. Getting any the women's Ebrahim like other children abuse ED mothers nicest father's Hobie left here in an orphanage run by Syrian Kurdish fighters for local family to adopt. None of the officials. We asked to know where that orphanage is. When we come back the next day, the young mother and her daughter and the rest of the group are gone this time the Iraqi army allowed them to cross the border. Ebrahim is still here. He plays with a set of blocks. Visit her brought him and he doesn't seem to realize right now. Anyway that anything is wrong. Both of them of searing ziti man with luxurious white hair in his sweeping white moustache Benz down to play with him. This part of Syria is run by secular Kurds, and it's one of very few places in the region where Islam doesn't rule mood raw show. Another series. Ziti says of Ebrahim went to Iraq, other children would always consider him a son of ISIS, and he would face discrimination. He says they will find good families here for the children occas. Zien Yogi family, we're giving them too. They must be a good family. They're thinking must not be radical Islamic. They must be secular and open minded says they'll be placed with families with no children of their own who can afford to raise them. The new family will likely change Ebrahim's name. He doesn't know he was born in the ISIS caliphate. And he probably won't remember his mother. But his mother will remember as she says, he's her flesh and blood. Jane, Arraf, NPR news in northeastern Syria.

ISIS Syria Ebrahim Iraq Iraqi army ZD Fahim Sulaiman NPR Dulles International Airport Jane raff Brahim NPR Brahim Ibrahim UCD Shammy Remmel Ziti Arraf five years
6 DPs Reveal Their Process and How They Built Their Careers

The No Film School Podcast

40:37 min | 11 months ago

6 DPs Reveal Their Process and How They Built Their Careers

"This podcast is sponsored. By road microphones the choice of today's creative generation small hd real-time confidence for creatives. This Charles aim coming through from Sundance. Twenty twenty with another one of our roundtables This is the cinematographers roundtable. We actually ended up doing so many there were so many interesting. Timbuktu I that we ended up doing two roundtables. The first of two and a round tables are really great opportunity to get a bunch of people together to talk about how they ended the projects that cut them. They're what they're noticing changes but the industry they're enjoying about the festival so I hope you enjoy this. Hey this is Charles. Haine here with the film school at at Sundance Twenty twenty. We're doing the first of two cinematographers roundtables. I'm sitting here to table with six cinematographers. Who have projects here at Sundance this year? So if you guys could just introduce yourself starting my right and who you are and what project you were here with. My name is Kenny. Sulaiman August I'm here with a short film called three deaths. Miami's colors Rossini. And I'm here with film called Vivas by Iowa you. My name is Wolfgang held. I'm here with two films. That are shot. Parts of one is called Boise State and the other one is called rebuilding paradise by renowed. I'M GONNA Ramirez here. We'd I care you with me? Heidi wins I'm John Morello. I'm the cinematographer of us. Kids and I also shot a little bit of rebuilding paradise. Eric Bronco here with the forty year. Old Version Oh yeah that forty year. Old version Sorry I didn't say something about everybody else's thing but eric was the last person so I could be like. Oh yeah that's on my list of things I'm excited to see. I'm aware a lot of people got here already. Usually in these roundtables we talk about what people have seen. But it's really early in the festival and I know a lot of you got here. We're not gonNA to do that but You know round tables are always awkward at the beginning but if we can like it'll flow better as we go but if we could kick off with like how you ended up getting attached to the project that you've got on because that's always a question people wonder like. How did it come to be that you were on this movie that ended up going to Sundance? There's no obligation to like go in a circle. I'm actually like I'm GonNa actually start with Carlos and be like. How did you end up working with? I way. 'cause that's fascinating to me I. We went to Mexico. Visit a museum that was offering now showing for him And he was deciding and he got involving knowing the subject of the documentary which is the forty three students that disappeared in the state of Guerrero. And he he immediately got the interesting makeup film about it. So he was in contact with a couple of producers that a friend of mine and they start into using him people and he didn't like so I was finishing a project and I use. I feel in difficult places and I'm the director so they they decide that that was the moment for us to talk so we met by Skype a couple times and then we manage to form a team to. Oh that's awesome Which Museum was it Mark University of contemporary art in the day unum the University Museum succeeding Amazing Museum Awesome yet. Mexico City is a lot of amazing museums. Although I think the I think Carlos Slim's wants a little overrated personally if I can just say something that a little bit controversial okay all right so maybe not controversial So it was a very traditional way like unconventional. Like a someone. Who doesn't you don't think of as being a filmmaker but a very traditional process of like they went out they found producers it was producers. You've worked with in the past and so it was a very traditional introduction. Yeah something like that. I actually I never worked with them. But I'm up with user so I work with them in different things they used to be interested belts the producers so we met before and I made different films and they introduced me because they were like he was looking for some something really abstracting his words so he saw the film's Shod and he was. Okay now we're talking. Gotcha so you've now said your director cinematographer and your producer. I'm sorry no no. It's twenty twenty. Everybody does it like how many people at this table are one hundred percent pure. Gps and they do nothing. But shoot I am just about three and then the other had the other three people at the table shoot but also do other things. Can you guys talk about nicely? Work as a GP. But I'm currently starting to direct my first feature doc. Oh awesome and then yeah I mean I'm primarly DP my have kind of a side. Hustle Directing concerts live concerts. Gotcha which is like very different from being like it's related but it's not like the same at all. it's similar. It's it's managing people. Yep Multi Hyphen is sort of the modern career. It a lot I. Sometimes I wish you only do one thing but is I get interested in many projects at the same time and I do. I do them project and then one Pablo. How did you end up joining near project? Well how did he was planning at dock in Mexico and it was a about two characters. Couldn't leave the states. She need like another unit in Mexico. She was going to travel to Mexico and she needed a DP at. I was considered to be the one but I couldn't at that moment in after I think two years I got a call. I she wants to talk to you about the feature film the narrative film about the same subject but and we started to skype in got into deep conversations about the theme and how to shoot it. And how would it be to shoot a narrate narrative coming from and director? Dr It's used should only docs saw. That's when I got in basically Gotcha. That's really interesting. Yeah And then we'll have to projects at that are both here. Yes I think the more interesting stories. Texas Boys State. I was actually hired by another cameramen friend of mine. I have this camera. Collective New York six of US This to women in for for guys all documentary we have fiction background and this film Texas Boys State My Torsten who founded this camera collective with me. He tossed Tito he he basically asked me. And some of the chemic- members to come along to do a very film with each of us to one of the characters of this event of five days. I shot a hole documentary and five days of these seventeen year old kids running through the Texas boys state event with government and elect governors and try to understand the political process so everyone every one of our collective members that was there for about six came in to other people Took one character and we put a mic on them. It followed them. And and some point into cross and who made it and who didn't and wine and so that's the reason. I came in to that project twisted network with Jesse MOSS director. And he asked. I came a collective members to come. Well that's nice because you guys all have an understanding of each other so it's not necessarily something you end up on projects. Sometimes we're there six operators or whatever and you're not necessarily in alignment but you guys all actually know each other worked together presumably pretty often. How long camera collected been around? We've been around for five years now. I guess and we also love verite. We hate reality. Tv We love it documentary. So that's fine line and I think that's why we wanted to to this together so we're very team. Also that's very cool and then Jenny well one of them out that working on the same project but I think it's January twenty eighteen. It was right after Sundance and I was having Tea New York with the director of our film just because we were trying to figure out a way to work together and she was obsessed with making. She had a product in the work. That was going to take place in Florida so I think it's just weird because she happened to be there when the shooting happened at the school. So that's sort of kind of how it happened. I mean it's a documentaries like the they evolve. Yeah but how would you usually met that director I think she we. You know we all know each other industry so I think she had been trying. We're working together on something I think Rod and I have known for a long time. We were at a festival in Philly called Black Star in two thousand fourteen and then actually I was here for the first time in two thousand seventeen with a short film I had shot and we kind of ended up hanging out like a good amount of the weekend and so yeah I got to call for. I think she'd I think she'd seen clemency. Also Oh cool and kind of knowing me and then seeing that she was okay It Co Kenny Well I met The director of the three deaths I met him socially a few years ago and he had actually been in production of a feature and We kind of stayed in touch his friends. And then Slowly started working together on little couple of day kind of loose documentary. Kind of things and A couple years ago we moved in together. We like into this apartment. That sort of is like a little factory. You know there's always something going on and The genesis of this came when something else didn't come through and we kind of it was winter time last year and we're like well. Many things came together and we had time we had resources and kind of just jumped into it. Okay all right so now. A little more of a free wheeling question like how have you guys noticed life as a cinematographer changing in the last couple of years? There's a few things I've noticed where things are getting different on film sets like I feel like Angry crew members are less tolerated than they used to be. Two or three years ago like people having ridiculous outbursts. Something that like the industry is changing their opinions about obviously metoo is changing the way. A lot of things are handled onset so like what are you guys noticing? As last couple of years gone by the things are different or changing or maybe nothing changed may be. It feels exactly the same as it did a couple years ago to me. For example technically speaking is a lot of lightweight equipment saw cameras again is smaller and more lights and also the lighting equipment are the output his bigger with a smaller size. And they're not heavier anymore. So you can do a feature with few things now and it's easier in his Cheaper in Seoul is like some sort of democracy about the use of equipment with which is good. Because now you hear more voices on before I think And to me that's very important because I mean I've received calls from very experiment directors but also from the newer directors that have ever interesting boys because they want to try and they don't have like this Experience of doing it in the away with all structures so also when you start to work in for example with artists that jump into into rituals into audio visuals it starts to make like a softened day. Choose between how you should work. And that's very interesting to me. You know like for example. I I did a movie with an artist That is more into you. Know like museum stuff and he asked me for some aesthetic that I wasn't used to and that's very interesting. We had to worry with almost nothing equipment because it was we have to deliver this movie with with the budget of piece of art. Which in this case was just a little and to me having equipment that is less heavy and cheaper makes an. I really good opportunity to do great stuff awesome. Just picking on the crew F I find I mean. I do both fiction narrative films and documentary. I find that at least in my world. The fiction equipment has gotten smaller done to features with only practice in available light except for exterior a love work in that way. Where just basically don't use movie lights at all anymore. So that reduces some of the crews find the documentary at least one said. I'm going with getting slightly logic without from have a second camera person. There's a drone in the area but movie going around all that stuff so relatively new I think for me anyway. The way I used to documentaries on that Zoom Lens on those heavy cameras on prime lenses so the whole language has changed in that effects. The crew so mega documentaries cruiser often almost like small fixing cruise of like eight nine people in the field and the narrative cruised after work with it. They have gone down to like twenty thirty. People Alive prisoners. Four say used to think of Dhaka's like a three or four person crew right very common in the dock but that sort of inching up. Yeah so it's morphing. I think it's good to also lose the boundaries of documentary and fiction. That's what I was always loving. Because it's it's happening in the language. Yeah I think it should have been the films even more just like there's so many great fiction films that are based on real people and there's so many great documentaries at us of fe stylized and it should just be films you know Yeah. It is sort of an artificial dichotomy between the two. I always have been interested in this kind of if I'm making a. I don't do many fiction films. I did to feature films That there are featuring but the reality component is bigger than ever. This is why I don't do so much feature films until I did. I shot one twelve years ago and I shot another one two years ago before way way film and that piece was really interesting because it was with a big big component of reality and how to put the characters in reality how to move them around and talking about what you were proposing believe that I mostly as the I work with. Women directors mostly It hasn't changed for me because I mean in in sets that they are By women so it's great and they're in the productions I make we are not tolerate in jokes are joked Mexico. We joke a lot like really heavy and we are not tolerating jobs there. LAKE AGGRESSIVE TO GENDER GENDER qualities. I don't know how to gender so bad is not changing that much because my company. We're really like you're already. Yeah exactly so. We are just making an effort to people to not be heavy on jokes. Don't be like that. Mexico is a country that always having this kind of waves and talking about. This is many years. This is kind of changing but I don't know in the in. The industry ties films. Make small films even doesn't matter. Small production teams like documentaries link for people the Chandler may where we were like seven eight with actress. Yeah that was like that. Yeah maybe Erica. Speak to this too but I noticed we shot on thirty five millimeter and a few years ago there was a flat spot kind of technical proficiency and willingness to work with film you know especially with the younger crew. They hadn't really come up with it. And the older crew had kind of moved on to a level that you kind of can't afford on the indie level and they don't really WanNa work with staff and kind of the infrastructure and the resources were not really there and especially in New York. That has kind of crept back in now. Your lab. New York has a lab that finally an more support for mental houses and You know new generation. That's coming up now. You know that is interested in exploring Ed and takes it very seriously and wants to really know in take pride and kind of adding that to their stable of skills and and but it was hard it definitely still hard you know and like finding people who are willing to like not light off of a monitor like a gaffer that can work with a light meter you know and and that you could trust and a focus puller who doesn't need to look at a monitor finding a director that understands that videotape doesn't look like the final image definitely that is a big one or producer. Yeah I mean we. We Shot four-year-old version on on thirty five mill- black and white But we oughta night exteriors and kind of like low light level things and at our budget level like it was not really possible to like get condor up at the end of the block You know and blast light on the street which like Pr. I could've done it for an attitude but also there's not one night in New York. Looks like where I was really trying to be true to that and so we ended up shooting on fifty two nineteen which is like a five hundred stop five hundred eighty color stock and pushing it to stops which looks great after you develop it but the tap is just nothing yet so we might as well not. There's like one dot of a stream you're seeing the street licensing traffic lights and like you know people like what we're their faces and I'm like you'll see it next week and it is interesting seeing the difference too. I work with some directors who do more comedy stuff and they're always watching monitor and rolling through takes and I think that that's also wonderful ineffective but Jay was always looking at the actors like basically standing right next to the to the lands looking at the at the action or looking away and listening and That's the first time I've ever worked with the director. That did that. Really just like zeroing in on specific things and it kind of changed the energy of the notes and of the day what changes the energy of space to all of the sudden the actors the director and the camera person are all together in the same space shared together whereas a lot of times when the energy goes to video village and video villages. Maybe like a room away or something. It just feels like a very split energy to me. Yeah I mean it's like Cedar Year I mean it's you know very few people enjoy watching a recording of play. But when you're in the room it's magical yeah It's the same thing I think. With whether the DP operates or you know watched monitor if directors in the room or washes off monitor when everyone's in the same room and in the same space. There's things happening that like you can't. You can't be explained to anyone worked with an intimacy coordinator yet this year. All we are talking about at school during intimacy coordinator workshops. It's like very much you tell us about. It will be from curious about in your email. I was like what it is. Is that so it is a? It is a brand new job like two years ago. It wasn't a thing. But now there's intimacy coordinators and if you're doing an intimate scene you hire them to come to set and they help you. It's like having a fight coordinator. They help you block the scene. They helped navigate the whole experience. It is a it is a new an oncoming thing. That literally like three years ago. There weren't any and now they are and it's increasingly becoming a thing and were at Fierstein like we are like requiring you to do a like we're bringing in intimacy coordinators for all the students to do a workshop with before your second year films and if you don't go to the workshop like we're not gonNA do your second year films like it's GonNa be part of our training because it is about like you know it's a complicated thing doing like intimate scenes and intimate scenes can mean all sorts of things like in our intimacy guidelines. Like you know a long hug Like or if you have a child actor in your like holding the child actor by the arm like all of those things are anytime to people. Have physical contact. There's something involved in that. And some directors are better at navigating it other than others directors always can have all these needs they have so the same way you bring a fight coordinator to make sure the actors are safe because the director might not be the best worrying about the safety in a fight because they want to get the shot you bring in an MRI coordinator to make sure that the actors feel completely safe because the director even if they're very sensitive person has other things. They're worrying about on the shoot day in Mexico. We used to have people that do that didn't was in the department. Is that When I used to work in bigger productions like in the big industry lake as an and we talk like who is a good idea for this sin is that yeah it. Was I navy thing and we used to work that way. That's kind of how it worked when I was coming up to the ad or remain the eighty was generally. Yes you know. He's like yeah in the respect and every were sometimes didn't bad. This is why we make in the curriculum. That guy is good for those things. Yeah now I think also part of it is by having a person who's dedicated. Who's like that is their only job the performers feel like? There's someone that they could go to with any concerns whereas like you don't always feel like the a d is someone especially because eighties are very time conscience conscious. If you're asking a question that might slow things down and you're performer. The ad might not be the person you want to have that conversation with. But that's interesting. Yeah I mean the aisles. Who is responsible for security and everything I mean in the end? Safety is yes. Yeah interesting all right. Well I'm going to keep asking the question every year and eventually some. Dp's we'll have some fun stories about like 'cause you know it's like things are changing. There's a heightened consciousness I think no matter what Like in in our project we had for example one shot. That was a point of view. The actor is on the bed and we had to. Someone sits beside her and we had to get his point of view and the only way I could do that was effectively to like sit on top of her but it was like you know you have to get into the feeling of what you're doing and community but like okay well like you know if if something feels weird just let me now. I'm going to scoot up. I'm going to scoot away in the shot. We have to do this. And I think just that tone and that like way of communicating. So even if there's not an intimacy quarter onset there's one like in your brain. Yeah you know and that kind of thinking of that and if you if you can't afford one which I don't know maybe people can't. I think that there should still be like the ethos of one. Or maybe like a little kind of like cell onset speech that someone or something like which we also did and so that really helped and and even in the absence of coordinator you know you still have to. You'll get a better performance. I think if you communicate crew member to crew member whether it's a a grip setting a C. Stand or You know a sound person putting love on talent like all those things matter and especially in the Dog World. Amino going into a situation where you've never met someone and then you have to put a live in their shirt and I mean. I think it's going to get added to the safety meeting. Like I hear a big studio levels. It is already part of the morning safety meeting his already. Part of the like we have the giant meeting before production starts where everybody comes out and we meet with coordinators like it is just. It's becoming part of the culture. 'cause film said culture keeps changing like Foam Sedgefield wildly different than they did in the ninety S. When like there weren't really cell phones yet except the producers had cell phones but nobody else did and it was a much different atmosphere. I kind of miss that but also saw things on sitting the ninety s that I was like. Whoa Oh yeah never let that happen on my set. Yeah but you know as far as ladies are like the way pre intimacy. Coordinators were excellent. But you in life. But if you were low on the totem pole it was very much something where you were like. I'm like you know the power dynamics film was you wouldn't really challenge it right like I'd still. You still wouldn't challenging. I feel like we're getting to a place where I think more people might. Maybe I definitely remember in the ninety sneaking around the producer told us to dump out this fish tank that was full fish and so we started to do it but we couldn't kill all the fish so we like snuck off and put in bags. We can take them back to the store but we didn't want the producer to see that we weren't killing all the fish. 'cause yeah it was. It was so crazy. This podcast is sponsored. By Road Microphones Australian pro audio powerhouse. Making incredible gear for podcasters fee lagers. 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Small HD is in the business of providing real time confidence for creatives with an extremely wide range of field monitors small HD prides itself on durability and usability whether it's paired with a murless camera during wedding or used for video village in Hollywood small hd has a monitor for every production powerful software tools a unified user experience and premium display quality helped make small. Hd monitors the industry standard. Stop wondering if you've nailed the shot start having more confident at the camera with small. Hd on camera and production monitors starting at just two ninety nine for more information about Somalia products go to small HD DOT com. And then the other big thing. Obviously the changing is larger sensors right in a less fraught more technical conversation larger centers. I've been a lot on the Ariel F- in the last six months or so and it's like it is radically different in feeling in a way that like there is a lot more abstract differences than I was expecting there to be as that. Does anybody been moving over to large format. I mean we've got a couple of thirty five millimeter. That's traditional size of anybody. Had Large format shoots lately are about to shoot my next feature film and Alex I left. Oh Nice yeah but I'm not. I really don't like the new lenses so this signature primes. I haven't tried to signature because we don't have it in Mexico but for example we we tried to the size and and I like the look. I normally go to be interest lenses. My whole feature from God. Bean into leg is beat by Ankara. Super Bowl. Or that kind of stuff and for this one. I found this double sheet banker which were the speed banker for BMW seon. Yeah so they cover the big sensor like three sets in the world of work. And where do you? Where are you getting this from? La Guy has his company called laughing. Boutique start to buy crazily glasses when they were in popular and rehousing them and they have this crazy amount of just nice incredible all lenses and I try them like in December actually during the Thanksgiving and they look great with the new sensor. So I'm starting to to to figure out how how look how to make this new image kind of in in cinema with those old glasses to to make it something new because my movie my new movies out like exploring the idea of how black and white film looks like. So I'm doing it black and white and make it like a moving imaging if you go to a gallery to see a photograph but something like that explored that idea. So the bigger sensor gave me this like depth of field that you can play with and also all exterior with this huge mountains in Oaxaca Mexico too. So it's it's really interesting to me to explore this larger sensor. Yeah I have a the new ethics y affects nine am start testing with set of lenses. I have that. I have using for documentaries. Maybe a nickel on a ness. He's had beautiful sad than people is using a high wages star using a week sense too and I'm testing I'm testing. Yeah I I will make film lake. I will start probably for months like a new documentary from from myself But I'm testing because I'm not really sure about many things that the lens mature about. Because I I know them but also affects. Nine is sort of interesting. Move because you like doc. You don't really think of as being full frame sensor doc still like shooting two-thirds inch but like Sony really is convinced that doc is ready for full frame and the auto focus is like when you need it. It's going to be there and it's an interesting. It's interesting to hear you got nine. Actually the youngest person is really. I think the depth of Field I. I did a commercial on Venice this week and the depth of field thing was really really crazy. Because you know. It's like at at like a forty mil at a two. It's still razor thin. Yeah and it was like you know. I can't imagine how I would carry that into the narrative space where you know you have to tell a story and have information in frame your you know like a set or other actors or you know like or how to do an Indian feature where you're gotTA move quickly and I've got a lot of setups in the day and it's like you know because Arielle F- is I mean Ari mini is the dominant camera of Sundance every year right. It's always like sixty percent of the sundance movies. And and even those are many Aleph. I don't know that that's going to change. I think the mini- and then the new super thirty five area that's coming up next year are still going to be the Sundance camera because Aleph is hard on an indie schedule. I haven't shot anything large format yet but I've a film coming up in the fall that we're looking at for specifically for that we Can kind of like about a character becoming isolated from her environment And we specifically are thinking about doing l. f. to be able to like be on her and have the everything else go away. I'm not sure why people are excited about it. To be honest I knew Yeah like people are really going crazy for it. But I haven't really seen it using away yet where I'm like okay. This is something new I guess. Parts of joker I think we're great That the use of different perspective more than the devil filled for me. Yeah I do a lot of dog work so I'm not that much into raised. I the only thing fog oozes this been Nah. I'm not in that. But the the option of lenses using to use twenty eight to US Twenty Lake in India. Intimacy in dock for me is like ours. It's amazing because you also get this crazy sense of presence like I shot an eighteen millimeter close up on it on full frame and I was like I just feel more present with you in a way that I do on on on like it was a fourteen in super thirty five. It'd be like the same field of view but it just doesn't feel there's something about the gate being bigger that makes me feel closer to the person in an interesting way but but yeah but I don't think it's the right for everything I think. An Amorphous crashes that. It's for me. Yes you're the main soap. It's interesting thinking about all the perspective changes and things. The people were talking. Aleph is just something that in my mind. It was like well. That's that's movie. Yeah yeah but I feel like Moore's very cold now. I'm like okay now that we've only got a little bit of time left if we want to talk a little bit about Sundance experiences. I don't know how many years people been coming anybody's first year at Sundance. Three three. Please Yet so Like what we've seen so far. What of our experience has been so far or people who are repeat anything about Sundance. That seems different. I haven't seen any film and I'm discovering the festival an completely. How is it confused? I'm confused about diversity. Well because I don't know how to get to make to get to the film theater and Sia thing I will start tomorrow. I just was to the premier to my film. I weigh him an amd discovering. Because I'm over. Yeah I'm used tomorrow. More use to festivals like Toronto and maybe some Europeans festivals. And then then this this I was like okay. And everybody's looking at your badge and saying. Oh Hi how are you? Who are you like that? It seems like to me. I notice that there's a lot of stuff that even across documentary across shorts across narrative et Cetera. Seems like there's a lot of stuff from all around the world And that's not just foreign productions. The scene like there's some. Us films that were shot overseas. And I think that that's really cool. And I don't know how that compares the Times in the past but I'm certainly more aware of it now than ever was and it's interesting I I always think it's cool when people from different places work in new places because you have a perspective that you don't see who will. I didn't want to go back to your first along with the documentary industry is different than most directors. I work with women but like I. I don't know like female. Dp's don't work as often. So I don't I don't actually I think it's like slowly changing. I don't think it's changed yet. Yeah so just say to the beginning of the like I still work less than everyone else does right and definitely like a lot of my female. Dp friends. We all complain about how we get hired for the same project. It's like we need the female DP for the sexual assault film or we need an all female crew. But you're not booking the you're not getting the next fast and furious movie documentaries pick projects because they're important to you and you you are on them for three years so you have to be invested in the material is just funny that we all only now get hired for those movies always the all female crew which is lovely great and fun but but enjoys token come that way. It's like definitely a sentiment that I think a lot of other people are feeling. Db's of color for sure while never shoot a Jennifer Aniston movie. Does that can be offered to me. Yeah I'm trying to remember a Jennifer Aniston movie but yeah I guess there are two different. Yeah I will say though in terms of Crews I used to work more in documentary so I haven't had a long crew life you know But even just in the last few years seeing the awareness and interest in having gender and racial equity kind of on on cruises just even that people are talking about. It means that something's changing like that. It's part of the the the discourse from the hiring perspective and I don't know if that's token or not maybe for some people it might be but I think people are more conscious of it which is great I also will say in a plus side There are so many female. Ac's now and I was female icy and I achieved for Wolfgang and there weren't any like I didn't there were. I don't have any friends that are my direct peers. That were women that were when I was in a c. But now like my roster of like AC's like I don't work with any men like they're all women so that's so the place is filling up for the future. It's coming up the form. That's the bench really for which is fantastic. Like I think it's really normal for them like they don't. I was talking to a girl about this recently and amazing that she had no idea. I mean I don't think I realized how weird it was that I didn't know any other women at the time when I was an AC. Like that all my friends were guys and so it's it's really kind of interesting That that shift is happening. And they don't realize how special it is which is good. Yup. I mean ideally. It's not special. Ideally just like normal. Yeah but you think we're in the very very very beginning of any change happening. Yeah takes a long time. You start changing expected immediately. Look at this table you know. Look at all the product. I mean all the productions. I've been doing over the years. It's getting better but we still have to point out all its wash by a woman. It's still a special thing. It's not like this list of. Ap Ginning Camera. It's also exciting because I think it does change the language. I think there's actually a different sensibilities. I mean it's not black and white but I think there's definitely different infection. Female of brought different sensibilities interested in the story telling us. But we're at the beginning. I agree with Jenny but even even in products like now like there's easy rig is aware of that that the body shape of yeah like no rental houses have really any costs. Haven't gotten to the point where running the rental has also the female rental house. It's not a one of that is actually a really good point. There is one in La Suny gene. Like all that stuff. Donna single one. Yeah I think a lot of this I mean I think a lot of this stuff is like above the line visible stuff. But it's not you know the Structure we'll be learn conscious of it is not your world. You're not thinking about it. Then why would you include it? That's all I used to have these weird conversations with my Golfer. I have known him for twenty years and I start forcing because at first I asked. Can you include some women? And he's a yeah I can but they're not prepare and we need to go fast and the first year it was like that and then I realized I don't care include if he's not prepare it will per- after shoot but it was like we're talks now. He's completely conscious about and he's working with he's looking for. I need to force it. That's something every changed needs to be forced my point of view but also. How many times has there been like? Somebody's cousin on genie or somebody's little brother. Genie that everybody knows slower and learning. And everybody's training and it's okay and nobody ever thinks about it and that's not something anybody ever questions but then the idea of like deliberately bringing in someone to the crew is a woman who doesn't know as much is then something people's resistant to but like they're often people who are greener on a set and nobody blinks. If it's you know the little brother I hadn't intended this to be the wrap-up conversation but I think it is a good wrap up. That's awesome all right. Well thank you guys so much. I really appreciate it and thank you guys so much for making time in your son desks while I really appreciate it. Thank you thank you for the invitation. So that was our first round table Really enjoyable conversation. If you want more you can check out no films dot com where we have all sorts of Sundance coverage. Podcasts and we do a regular weekly podcast The no films. Go podcast where we talk about. What's going on in filmmaking And you can always follow us on the twitter's facebook's school and look forward to seeing you out and about in the world.

director Mexico producer Sundance coordinator US Carlos Slim New York Sundance Twenty twenty Skype Mexico City Twenty twenty Jenny Wolfgang Dp Eric Bronco Charles Sulaiman August Kenny
EGO Search on Sebastian Muravchik of SNS Sensation

EGO NetCast

54:45 min | 8 months ago

EGO Search on Sebastian Muravchik of SNS Sensation

"God. Welcome to. The net cost. I am Martin Lindskog Coke. Welcome Sebastian Mura. Muravich each. Thank you. and. How do you pronounce your name? May I ask that in the Green Room? But you could please repeat to our listeners, Sulaiman, and many treat you. It's Sebastian. WE'RE UP CHICO SET UP. Jake Yeah and you and you're originally from South America I was born in Argentina. And I lived a full. I grew up there. And I moved here. Quite a while ago. To the UK. And I've been here ever since. Great. So you reach out to me of through email and said you had things going on here. We didn't use. Single coming out, you could call it. about your door. It's in in July. Ten visited planning to relocate. My project sensation and birds single is called your door. Yeah, and SMS is too short for him for sensation. Yes it ended up I ended up calling. It s innocent station because there were too many s acts, and too many sensation acts under it was getting old model and difficult so. There's no actual essence Asian that I know. You know it's a? It's a bit long, but it's a I like. The sound of its. And it's. It's good that you saying that because that's one segment here that I. do it Suu called Eagles search I call it myself, but it's like Eagles, surfing on your own name or somebody else names or a band name would not. have an as search on your name Sebastian a found like nine hundred. Fifty four results there I, it was like photos, and then we said old this discography that is recording different songs and labels artists and write about them. Luckily Goldmine VR and then instagram account twitter account that you have used some years ago and then antiques S. Live Radio London. Can you tell us about that? Yeah I think that was an a s Dj said I did. Yeah okay, so you! D also in Basel. III. Dj Yes I haven't done much lately, but. I would be very happy to go back to doing that lots of fun. Rewarding stuff yeah. And you're. As I said Inveigh your band called. Break with your. Band member of our he dj right. Yes he's A. Producer and DJ yeah. I saw one of your liven performance barrier that was interesting to see on stage when when you did do singing, and he was taking care of keyboards and others, and also some how to say yeah. Singing with like a d decoder, or what? What do you call it? Let's call the invoke. Yeah. Here's how this robotic kind of Yeah, it's basically the voice, or whatever sound you're. Playing through the microphone, going through a synthesizer and he coming, you know merging into some. Road kind of other worldly. Entity! which is very important for electronic music is due to. I think Crawford stuff hut. Correct that kind of sound and then you had to in Instagram Account and associated with talked about twitter ozone, and but then it will also an inch you hair that you sent by email but `electricity club. It was a into would rebound heart. Break there Soviet come up in on the first page is a good result. And then course spotify account the meal and Youtube. And also you had another radio station better in the Galactic FM from the Netherlands. What's that? Yeah, I mean that's that used to be there. CBS cybernetic. Broadcasting System The the radio initially that we used to listen to. When we were starting with with heartbreak, and even before that and the you know, that was one of the main stations that are magic waves. The, will it use to listen to? A lot on we where we drew a little of inspiration from. Lots of it is instrumental electronic music. Some stuff with focused a lot of old disco with Vogel's particularly. European of. Can of sound. And that was A. Hugely influential for us. He was you know we were writing songs, but being inspired. By instrumental music, so that's always been a bit of a an interesting challenge I think. Is Is it very in the Netherlands and also in in Belgium, and not as that this kind of music electrician electric body. And also said. School and seemed puppies, said still there popular in in in this area of Europe. Yeah, I think so it's. kind of kind of. Starting the thinking it retains people were still interested. In it. Through the years. Interest has kind of grown. Quite a bit in the last ten years or so I'd say. So, they're like waves. Disco, disco, you know. It's. It's always going to be the. One of music's greats kind of. Inventions one grade John Russ them. One of the greatest music types yeah. There's been there's been like jazzy. No, we can still listen to Jessica. Find some really. Relevant musical experiences with it all on some classical stuff and it's. The has has had. It's a heydays posts commercially, but. It's still relevant. Unseal influence on what we do. Both disco. And the. Other genres like the ones you were mentioning ABM and Sawn. Because I remember one of first members on a club Ben from two four two came in, and will some sometime in. Eight eighty, five or something like that. Yeah and it's. Great and they had the WHO must have been something? Yeah, the whole style with the military things since stone and I remember the. so-called review in the big newspaper, you wonder if that Jones he'd have been barrel rated in afterwards because it I mean it's very different style of music and arena way had their attitude or by style and maybe. They played on that, but it was interesting to learn that this kind of music was very popular in Belgium, and they've around topless very in general topless for general audience. And becky day nineteen eighty. I remember you religion Song, concept. You could say part Paroda dirty call you ruby. That song -til, aches and headaches. Yeah Yeah. Amazing. Yes one in in Belgium, but then I think they came almost yeah, not not lost but the bottom of the list teen total. Contents, but I think footage was a funny song, and it was a paradigm for who contest. And that ban was it was and that's maybe we could talk more about you. It's sometimes could be hard to point out what kind of Sti- award kind of music is it and then I've listened to the songs that you sent to me and you get to. This is Bob, but it's a more so, could you? Explain in a in a short way your latest. Piece here, what what kind of music is? Well like I. And! It's an extremely difficult question. Sean. So much so that having asking people. What what is it that I do? What do I do? And yeah! It's safe because they are pop songs on. They kind of structured us up songs, and he has to synthesize zone them on our bed. IOS under the influence of know craft work and this a very strong elements of disco disco is hugely important I'd say discourse probably a more important to me quite lot more important to me than than Sinful Asa. As an influence. So, It's I think the whole kind of journey on the reason why it ends up being something that. Escapes, definition, which is not a bad thing i. think is a good thing. Although! The some. It's kind of difficult to promote one. Difficult to define, but if you don't take your own category like Games have done games nights brittle, so you've ride. Yeah, no. It's. It's. It's the so much. musical kind of background influences playing a part on the money and you're not really thinking about. What kind of music Oh what kind of song this is your more thing about how good is it's an how strong do I feel about it, so that's kind of the focus on what ends up happening I. Think is that you do get the best music that you're able to produce at the time. the best music that you've got to offers an artist but it does end up escaping a you know John Gras definition and. That that you know that's just have to. You know that's my choice. My choices to make my life difficult by. Producing the best music that I can. And, then dealing with the consequences. But it's also it's. It's an interesting challenge because I think one of the reasons why this happens is not just the the the the great amount of influence influences that there's behind it I how they manifest themselves in kind of sneaky ways. It's not A. Obvious what what I'm doing I? Don't even know what I'm doing is just coming out like that kind of thing because of. I do a lot of listening. Listen to loads and loads of music and. I've done that over the years Liz. I'm constantly listening to music so all that stuff kind of I think about it, but I also just listened to it any kind of seeps into my subconscious oppose but I think it also has a lot to the with drawing so much inspiration from instrumental music because. That's A. Difficult position, you don't really know what you're doing. You're not aligned with A. Very clear kind of tradition. And and you know I, think these things. It's a good thing to do. You know to try and say okay. This is this why do and is influenced by something other than the kind of thing that I? Do you know it's it's? It's one of A. It's not that I consciously went about it. The said that's that's going to work. Really well is more like it just happens, but I haven't seen it happen. I, think it's A. It's a great creative strategy. Apart from from from this musical aspect of of work in this way. I'm quite interested in philosophy without being an academic qualified academic on it, but. I've always been quite interested in. In philosophy, thinking this kind of world, the thinking world, the world the mind. Particularly be impacted by French philosophy in the sixties, and the seventies or structuralism, and then kind of post, modern kind of. Analysis ideas and things like that and and connected with surrealism and. And you know. The alter the faults on goes. To meet kind of goes all the way back to highlight us. And the pre kind of socratic. Madness that everything is flex and. We could have a discussion and even a debate because. Yeah That's probably for another show while think. Say you know. This thing you talking about. That's really really important to me. In manifest itself in the creative oxygen US flow. Also. These idea of the becoming has been hugely a foundational would say to what I do. In my in my music also. When performed particularly when I used to perform with heartbreak the becoming. Yes and where restoring my creative energy to perform. and. You know defunct site used to call it becoming mixed defensively and the get better metal kind of stance. Quite nicely. Yes, yeah. And what I can see from one of the video clip that you said outbreak and vegetables s green room before the Internet age, you could say so. Could you have some reflection on that when you? Created the album and also touring, and then you also. Got On with the gigs like. Was it the lethal both sending and so on and onerous? Pretty big names in the yeah. I don't know really know what how to classify that music but I I like. Her, music The relate about stem so a lot of. Those socks were Influenced by Lice. Yeah So we told a lot with under the some bigger access well we were lucky, too to have those opportunities, we told the US been to many places, in Europe and Russia and so on, and so we had some great ex- all over the world which is. Quite quite an experience was lovely and. Yet but back then. The whole Internet thing was just about kicking off a assessor as A. It didn't have a central. Arolla said today in the music world. Some acts were having blogs. Sunday was this thing. That, they were doing okay i. mean you know we we didn't? We you were space, right? Yes, we were. Might space was like Oh. My God wouldn't. Everyone is in there? Oh. Right now. But. I think the main thing there is that we had. With heartbreak, we had kind of A. Little bit of a reaction to this idea of a new the novelty of the new style the new thing. We we. Used to think back then. That's a the MU. The new up and coming hot new star new trend. was old. It will eat felt all to be searching for the new. What the only thing that was truly knew that was just emerging. That was the archive were. We weren't looking forward to find the new. We were looking backwards to find the new, so we were disconsolately discovering not just as Italo disco gems that. We hadn't heard before, and we did it by. You know the Internet and so on. But An. Discourse and all this. kind of setting place, but. It was. Just the whole history of the world I think, and the whole history of music for shore was was being redefined. Rather than Continued there was there was no longer continuation and this kind of. Fits quite well within this call kind of postmodern. A idea. Were things. You know the. US has this idea of becoming everything being constantly in flux, and I think our Manny Diaz who. I'm not so knowledgeable. Of that, I think is kind of it's generally. Posts us the opposite thing where everything sexually. Always the same everything that's ever happened that will happen. It's all happening at the same time. Something like that and I think. I always think well, not necessarily exclusive. because. And the Sir this. Barcus important Argentinian writer if you come across stuff, but he's. Also a! kind of talking about this. multiversity know this many different dimensions of. OF OF OF EXISTENCE I. Think it's an element of all this happening and the crisis then was the crisis of the new. I think there was a crisis. This idea of new everything was like a couple of years later. There was a new trend in this new development. And you know usually company by a new technology and so on. We thought that the most important technology of the time was technology of. Rewriting history of redefining what actually went on? which is linked with a lot of things like our understanding of that history, an art -bility. To. Understand what other people are thinking. What are how other people think about history? If your if you raced in Europe and if you lowest lived in Europe than you will have a an idea of history that is probably quite different from. People have lived in South America all all the lights and had seen something else a different balance, power and so on. Yet so. I. Couldn't go on and on and on, but it's I think it was an interesting thing, and not everyone agreed. The and I don't think the industry particularly loved that. That idea. Because you know it? It makes it difficult. It makes it difficult for them to kind of sell the new start because now. What is the new stuff well? The new staff is a new consciousness and the I don't know how to. Markets will price that. Will take some time figuring that out bellingham and a half to because. Now. We're seeing. People are becoming aware of what's been going on. How tough it's been for some people. You know and how? The way. Things were recent. Yeah, it's it. It's. said to another person how you could learn from history and live. In today in the van plan for future so. Yes and I mean it's coming up. Independence Day here in America and is starting to work there. And we'll you have the history of European history and setting South America? And and a what we could learn for will come back to you and you knew stuff, Aaron, and what's going on in the world now then I need to search van. De Sensation on? Google also found this site called submit tub. recognized. Own rank. I only learned about this side recently. It's your good. said it was created here in late two dozen fifteen by music blogger is and. Of Indian shuttle. Mission is to. And transparently connect artists with. Curator's and then I went through with to go. Is Privacy so genuine and there are found an article last seen and heard Italo disco music in the Goggin, and also then the record label, but you had were heartbreak, lice and lex records. And and also van on Band camp is. Something that the have recently also. Found out liked and and adding wish list them and an following artists on. So could you tell a bit more about that? Like community for musicians and how you find, maybe inspiration may be. A artist you could collaborate with, but also how to reach out to your fans, and and if it s his head hard to be labeled, and you don't want to be labeled, but how do you? How do you be found in? How could you find others to new on that? Well yes, I have some thoughts on that because I am thinking of Alba Allot. Specially lately since I started releasing music again. Yeah I mean it's You know it's. It's it's finding. That balance I suppose. It's not really balanced. Because you're just the music hunt comes first, but then you need to figure out. How can you communicate with the other people? and. And I think one other key. Challenges of the current kind of technological kind of the structure of the world is. That it really forces particularly with social media it forces you. To Really figured out what other people are thinking and how other people are? Feeling about the information that reaches them and the music that they get to experience and that I think is obviously a very positive thing and it kind of ties in with this. New Understanding of the world on its history we we to. make some tangible progress. I think in in in our understanding of what other people go through, and it goes from marketing your music to. How you position yourself. No politically and the things that you do. To try and help in the world. So. In in that sense I, I have very I. Think it's a positive. Thing is a positive challenge. You no longer trying to sit us. Record labels and you know understand the gatekeeper and. More about really, communicating wheel. Holler human beings other music lovers. And trying to figure out how? You can reach out to them and And the more you learn about the more you understand that it's about. Communication, so it isn't just about me writing music and. Sending it through a channel for other people to have whatever experience it's they want untie. You never get to hear about you generally. A lot more in touch with with fans and. Listeners I think that's that can only be a good thing for for the artists unless you're in a bit of new trip. And you're trying to. Try to acquire power out of its and then that's. Then I. Don't know that's that's going. Be a bit more troublesome, but you know. People, that are addicted to power will always find away, so I'm not worrying about them. They'll be fine. And that's a good thing that you could. Vote with your pets. Especially, vote in your pocket book in your with your Wallet. But also that you want to support craters. And, and now we talked about also in Green. Room, but how the cheese of the way technology? Or would you quality way like vinyl MTA Becky? The David I am often listened to the music from Twenties and thirties with. That seven date. Rounds. That have have his happy music. Keep it alive. Do you have every special gramophones on? but then it's also a convenient to have stream of music, and you get the tips on you music and so on. And so it's it's interesting. How are you could find? It's it's. It's a younger out there, but is also opportunities out there. So. He absolutely an that the only thing that I think needs to be done is. Somehow. I don't know how. But, somehow we should try to make sure that the that the the understanding of how powerful the musical experiences with vinyl or tape. is so the bettys enough awareness of how different attests to own. A vinyl record than it is to you know, learn about music through streaming or experienced me. In the stream kind of. Platforms. Or downloading and so on the digital I mean it's. It's a difficult thing because. Until you, do it until you actually experience. You know having the vinyl in your hands putting on the record plan an moving the needle and and all the stuff. You, likely to know about it, you know you how? How would you know if you haven't been through it? I mean it's difficult to explain it's not so easy to say okay. You can talk about the physical ritual and being able to see of his artwork quite big and so on, but. Until you do it, you know you won't feel it. And I'm happy to experience I must say Ed right now I don't have an out. Say Functional working in. Stereo ice cream, but I had to. Weed product placement to joke with Denham, and it was I remember. That's how I was going to so called regular music store then was his. Fellows Jude said. To some experts in it was called. Good guess we'd Hi-fi Club. And that I went to somebody who knows about, would you? But also not? It pushes AIDS person they really wanted to know what I was listening to. What kind of body Ittehad et Cetera? I ended up. A small stereo equipment and it was not about how loud speaker could you could have. It was more about the sound and morality and. That it will fit me, so it was a pretty simple setup, but still it cost him of course money Banca di. I enjoyed it very much, but it was a big step for me to do that. And but I liked it and I had it for many years. But in a way that's he stew for me, but it's fun to see her revival with like tedious and bans vittoriano recording viney like. For. For fans and for. Collections and so on the suit steel. As you said, it's a special feeling to Babbitt, but then you have to have Basil's. The space for the Stereo and for the. And I remember back in the day also how to handle records. And I remember. Back then later on you learn about your mistakes and so. And and your. This bit special. Record I still have records, but some when I went over to America I gave some of simple Swedish. Band called posh page. To a friend because I knew that she shares them very much, and I thought that would be a great gift, because I don't know why otherwise you don't know where more wherever rick could. Go to, and also if you go with some special music, you'd. You didn't get much for it them, but now maybe. It's a different thing, but it's how you handle it also. I think it has faces, and but you have to understand and remember. History noted appreciate. And also see the future's off. It's some. Had had the experience of having vinyl? You're listening to music vinyl. Then you get used to the. Kind of the predisposition that you have when before music, and then it doesn't matter so much whether you're streaming or what how you playing it because you know you have now the habits of predisposing yourself decree, and mentally to enjoying a bunch of sounds that you know if you're not thinking the right way, the just just sounds that not. That they don't do anything you know. Like A. Bit like a religion. You know you have this massive churches with the big echo on zone because. You know it. It predisposes you to to to believe in this things which Some people might think are. Mumbo, Jumbo, Essay, say energy. An and the same with the sounds, what is this sound? Okay? It's singing a melody synthesizer. There's a drum machine elissa. So Guitar. This just sounds that you could. You could easily mean nothing. So No, when you're physically involved with its and you mentally prepare for it, and you have those images in your head as well then you know what it takes to to to enjoy. The power of this thing called music. Is said I have A. PODCAST together we do to other people learning invited me to the field of the analog devices like fountain, pen, and ink and Pencil since. Writing on paper, and and that technical feeling, and also what you learn from it. And that was facing now. It's convenience to stream, but then it was if you have to single. It Tate. How many minutes are maximum for single it free four or five minutes, and then you have to them to the next side and yeah. Yeah Yeah, so so that's thing also and as I, said about the album cover and the venue opened. And also that water, and then you were, Benny wanted to buy a full length. Vinyl, it was often you had to hit or some some song listen to, but then you should think about your heart hard on money if it was worth to buy the whole. Album. And then you wanted to listen to that then sample it, and that's the thing you don't want that. You don't want that you don't want. The ability to access music to be restricted so things I lot better now. But. I think it's a great thing. They're all this bands now printing vinyl swell and having that limited edition, whatever, because that doesn't courage funds to think about that, and perhaps have that experience, and then being able to dedicate themselves sue. So the listening of music, in with more focus, suppose just being background sounds. But it's better to be able to know so much. Momoa signal and then used to be able to afford. We will to four. So. I don't I. Don't miss the restrictions of not not not not being able to buy a recommend to listen to was was in there. But there's certain things like the artwork the artwork was. An. East so important. Images that that that that you produce around the sounds a really important I think because Music is automatically about. Imagination and those images encouraged. You to find in the sounds. Images and world's that that wouldn't be there. So I? I'm not sure how. Presents the artwork is nowadays you do have social media, but a lot of social media's about telling the story of the band. Following the kind of a Story as opposed to see more images that that encourage you to imagine. What this music is this? This sound worlds? So, that's that's a bit of a worry with streaming. I don't think that the the artwork is aspirin. No they. The object. But. That's not where you won't I I hear you, but I also see opportunities. We'd take technology in the future that you'll see. Image in the air so to speak in like Cam that you could touch your fee lower or when it's playing or. New kind of thing so that you can do together with physical things also. That's that would be great. Yeah, but it's, it's depending on again. The market and how we could dispute zone, but we probably see holograms and other things like that. It's already there in technology. Wise, or what if he Sheila ways realty zone. But landed should be. Accessible for it, but one thing that still owed but new and backing the day even MTV will soon music station, but I didn't have access for for a long time, but Then you had some music videos, and now you have that we do. That's one important thing, and that's when you sent the email. It was indeed you. About your use song that we will be released tune here. Could you tell about that the door I? Mean it's as simple they in way. It's beat both comfortable, but also be scary. And he's very personal I mean you are in in that? I reckon and other people, so could you tell about that and also the how they follow at boss to the small world? Yes. I before I tell you more about that. You just said that you found some of it. Quite scary and I'm really interesting to hear more about what the Science Gary. Said I'm sensitive person, so I mean I don't. Horror movies or something like that, but I still right say that hitchcock was a great I, mean moviemaker. But and I enjoyed that but I, but I had this. Feeling off it like a know doors closing open. Case. The shadows and so on. And also the boy. was writing and looking out to so-called was locked down. And is locked in and then I don't want to tell the whole thing because people see that then it's released, but it s a story. Events my expansion. I always will want to happy ending and right now we are Mitts of yeah. Jason it is. But. I want to see the hoop and particularities, but I know how it is also an how we could. It has an impact on us. And especially for for younger I. Don't think about age in a way, but. It has it will have impact on younger generation about this. Why this happened the restrictions how to be locked in not out in playing and song. But also peculiarities what you could learn from it. Maybe the older generation understand, but yeah, so that's my wreck schinder. Well that's great. That's really interesting to hear obviously. We coincide. On someone some of those aspects. Lot, I'd say. But I think in part. What were the video was doing adding this? Other element that isn't down. The song would on this partly what I like about video workout expands. The Music Rubber van compliments at all kind of. Close It Down for speaker, so yeah. Obviously, there's there's the aspect of How these effects. People particularly kits, and how important is to obviously keep an eye on. Keep keep your mind in. You know because the first thing that you think about when you think about this pandemic is. The absolute horror that that you are you're you're fearing? And the horrible stories that you hear that you need to hear about so that you know what's really going on. How grave the MATTEREASE and so on! A, but then this other aspects that also needs to be balanced in into your understanding of the problem that we have right now, and that has to do with the younger generation. Sahara pressure me and and how? Now. You need to spend time thinking about how they. They need to be careful. Right and and so I thought. It was an interesting Mu Kind of layer that the video kind of opens up another thing that I really liked the B. side from this. You know mental health. Children's. Aspect of it is. The internal journey which is something that I'm really interested in I. Think in film this whole famous about the externalisation of the internal. You see images. That express internal processes, emotional processes, and so on and I think Kate separately the most interesting cactus that are because they don't know world is so. so much so secretive not. Secretive, but it is. It's Mr to to them as well as growing up and figuring things out. And as an adult. It would be a great mystery to you. To try and figure out what kids going through how how they're reacting to. Two things. Internally to speak. So those great challenge as a someone that has a bit of a background in Fairmont. Quite keen on on on on the film side of things. To to be able to to work with that I. I like the fact that you you see a story there and I think there's very much a narrative film. I don't want to always be making narrative music videos I just wanted to to disclaimer that because it's a lot of work and. I just. Got To be a bit more pragmatic about things. But. It was very rewarding in that way. Now the FIA side of things is something that I see more in in the small world single in this one. I see us a different kind of central. Sentiment so it But you founded scary. This this particular a your door. Videos well. Yeah, until until. I could tell you a solution and that the the the listeners in the people watching the video see I mean it has an ending our an opportunity there. And and the the the kid back Grab that. So then I got released in a way and so what's happening? But I'm thinking about. Is the opportunity of imagination swell. Isn't it the dreams? We, we we. We Are we are. We have a life. We have a day to day kind of. Thing we need to go through, and then there's another live we we go through which is in our dreams in our imagination in an in the things that we project onto. What could be otherwise mutual inanimate things like? ALLOM All or music. So, yeah, it's. I'm glad you I mean it does I found it really interesting that you felt that fear because I wasn't thinking and this is one of my favorite things about. Bracing creative worker hearing. That's why I jumped at the community. To! Ask You about it because. When when you hear new interpretations, things that you haven't thought about in your work, and it makes sense, but you haven't thought about it. That's just. Just may rewarding one of the most rewarding parts of precent great work. Yeah Yeah. It's great to hear it. Interesting to learn about new you music, and also the connections how you? And be named talks your game since on, we in the email conversation. And thanks for. Reaching out there, so you want to tell some some more things about your plan. So or because as seed in other now link to that daughter induced you have had. People had this question. was about Vidana. Make the situation and the kind of music. The title about the door and invoice more world effect was Queen sedans, or if it was planned, or if it's happened like this, Oregon's about India, but please the you could do. If you want to talk a bit more about that and also. Your plans for the future. While you see when you have a big release plant like almond, you produce the physical albums or whatever I mean the the old model. I have a whole album that you worked on. At then you haven't got the ability to react to two new events and is changing so fast nowadays, so many huge things are happening all the time. that the single the digital single in particular I think it's an interesting gives you the opportunity that you were talking about before. We know about unity to to react to what was going on and small world I mean I was I had been writing music for this new face of an sensation, but a small world was a reaction. Almost deviation from the them the creative direction to some degree that I was. Going with with my previous music. Reaction to this extraordinary. Pandemic situation so I you know. I think it's a very positive thing that you can actually say okay. You know what I'm going to release a single now about what's going on right now and. It's not you don't make this decision as creating you're. You're working with music and the music of bright's itself a little bit, but. The single `a digital single allows you to to react to to allow the music to react to what's going on. In the world and to the songs to be written. You know not. You don't have to restrict yourself to plan in a more universal where you can actually. about what's going on right now I. Mean obviously my songs are never about what's going on right now, but it's more about how what's going on right now relates to existence life I mean in general. and the small world thing the your door thing. To me, Directly connected to To Life. You know there's. There's there's a lockdown in life. You know that the absolute a bit larger in the in the options on the scope of what you what you can choose, but. But it's it is their life is. A one wondrous opportunity and a prison. So and I would even go are saying an opportunity is a person. Just like. Yeah and there we could. Have a discussion I'm for a Free Wilbur. But I understand where you're coming. From. Your email. Subject titled Where You said Reluctant of your show Lawrence owes lockdown. In a way that could be become your own prison, and that's what I see. I won't necessarily see that I'm an OB activist and I'm a realist in optimist also. But I am a pessimist. What's going on right now? In essence, send journalist and I'm afraid to what. What could happen with? Censorship restrictions what you're allowed to think about what you're allowed to say, and freedom of expression, etcetera etcetera, and and also peop- some people who buy free will want to assess restrict themselves also and. It must be paralyzing faint. What's going on now and that you want to? Somebody else should tell you what to do and so. When you? Divert if you think about the third. Yacht was. We didn't live through it so we. Can't really know how how what it felt like, but right now the challenge that I see that I think is probably partly what you're. You're afraid of and partly I hoping some of the fears that you found the video that that isn't directly kind of horror inspired. Small world was this new. Your door was less less or inspite, but it is the. Listening incredibly strong death impulse in great part of the the world's population, you know an extraordinary large amounts of people just want to self destroy, and that's really unique mu thing it isn't. It isn't selfish. The first thing that the way that you could read it. Is it selfish but I think it's more wearing them that I wish it was selfish. It's It's actually a self destructive impulse. Clearly. So as a bit wearing, but you know lot of us. Still believe in in life and. Fantasy imagination love. Heart Spirit. Let's that's enough of us to. To counterweight, any might just be. It might just be a trend. In my just be a reaction suit to to how much people have got to adopt because what's happening right now? Quite fosse's that we are making some a important progress you know. Despite the gravity of what sustained on the urgency of what's at stake, we are becoming. Aware of things a little bit faster than we used to be. I? Don't know if it's GONNA. Be Fascinating funds plenty of reasons to be cared. About how slow we are being outed, but but but it's also faster than it was. I think in the past. How we're gaining awareness of what other people are are through other than ourselves? And that's I think that can only be a positive thing so. This just you know us. Some some major challenges that need very fast rapid action like plastic. You know that's a massive was one of the muscle great challenges in general. The general environmental impact what we're doing. But A. You know. Of Optimism, a bit of. Via maybe that's what we need and. Yeah the as every talked about immigration, remove a bitter. Do you drink kissed still yet by there as the coming from South America. and. Do you have any special recipe or you? You tell the listeners about this beverage. It's it's. I mean you could basically spend. You could write a six hundred page tome on it. You probably for short and this so much, so many different versions of what the right way to pull. The water on the matter. And while the stroke should be how you should mix the Shabaab before actually pouring what it needs, the distance or the a bit of a circle, a semi circle that you need to kind of establish around the straw be unusually poor, the the water that although sudden people in Argentina. Hearing me say this would probably want to. Send me to the electric chair. It's a very hotly kind of contested topic, so I don't want to say too much. I could be putting myself in danger. Man You should be safe, said by the event drinking. The beverage fettes poplar Irvine most Second, most popular beverage in the world in total, and but very popular in England do drink tea. I drink a lot of see. Yes, Do. You have any favorite too much. Well. No I I love a lot of different members. I like I like. A gray lower like. In English breakfast, wonder. Luckily reluctant. I'm big fan of peppermint, which also is quite healthy young. I Love Green Tea, our string green tea before Gig, because they good for my. For the local gorgeous entertains you from all the other crap that you take. I drink coffee. I just drinks too much. Okay. It's GonNa stop yet. You have to take it in doses spend, so it was nice talking to you. Have and do you have in the? Ending Notaire, where people could find you on the interwebs in in cyberspace, and then and. Here yeah? Yeah. I think the best. I a place to land would be INSTAGRAM FOR NOW S. I remember what that. Low lines goal but Hyphen underscore. Disco Pop Underscore Naw as film noir, and that's my Handle I think gold. and. just go that fast on will direct you to other places after that I don't know if you'll have the Lincoln this. Episode Lincoln. Yet, that's that's probably the first bottle of goal. yeah. That's. Star there see were see what that. Feed. Chelsea, what's how encourage your encourage us your imagination to. To flow. Great. So. Thank you very much. For your time and thanks again for reaching out through Mayland. Spreading the good word here about your music and your thoughts general. Pleasure thank you so much for having me thank you. Cheers. Thanks a lot.

Europe instagram South America Jake Yeah US Argentina Netherlands Belgium America Sebastian Mura twitter DJ UK Basel spotify Youtube Martin Lindskog Coke Sulaiman
FFR 116: Atlantics

Feminist Frequency Radio

48:35 min | 1 year ago

FFR 116: Atlantics

"Listeners did you know that if you join our Patriot. Community you can get nifty perks. Like early access exclusive weekly bonus segments access to our friendly discord. And more. That's right you can get cool stuff and help us keep doing. F- are at the same time. What are you waiting for that if patriots dot com slash them free? How do we get to a point where we can talk about the materiality of the black body without falling into horrific patterns wherein it is just the body where the the corporate entity of black people is always first and foremost but we don't ever talk about other groups in the same way like? I don't know that I've ever heard someone say like the White Body. Welcome to frequency radio. This is the show that asks you to be critical of the media. You Love Sarkisian and I cannot sing. Joined today by two women who both set fire to their marriage beds caroline pettit. Hey and Ebony Adam. Hey this week we'll be talking about the acclaimed genre defying super naturally tinge drama Atlantic's. Did you swallow your gum? Nope Raton here in my lap. Shut up notes not yes. There's no garbage cannon here so throw it away when I that is so gross. There's a trash can right there. Y'All every just stuck her gum on her computer. No one else uses the computer but me. Oh boy that's how she treats phone frequency property caroline. How are you this fine evening? I'm doing pretty good. You know let me so we used to segment called entertainment news and we're talking about maybe bring it back in one form or another but I thought you know just because I just literally. Saab is like ten minutes or so for recording. I want to quickly mention this clip. I just saw going around the twitter verse of trump at a rally. Recent rally railing against the fact that parasite won best picture at the Oscars. Because it's a it's a South Korean film. It's a foreign film. Now keep in mind guy who of course because he loves and only understands and respects like domination and empower strongarm tactics loves like Kim Jong UN of North Korea but this South Korean fell waiting. Best Picture is is you know is absolutely unacceptable and of course it plays so well to his crowd him complaining about a foreign film winning best picture but also one of the most revealing moments in his his rant is when he says Can't we can't we get gone with the wind back on an odd because trump is in many ways at least as I as I put it on. Twitter A symptom of the fact that gone with the wind never really went away right but when he says make America great again you know Gone With. The wind is probably not too far for these conjuring in people's minds but that statement. So what's what's really interesting is that I would have expected that. Trump trump trump wouldn't even be aware of film like parasite and so his will hanger such as it is entirely manufactured right. It's on it's been given to him by someone else. Because as far as trump himself is concerned foreign films even though I can't imagine this man sitting down to watch anything. That isn't Fox News Soundbites. Maybe he likes. Finding Nemo. I can't are finding dory or are those different I think honestly he probably just sits around wondering when he can ask people about badgers again. Can't imagine watching. What do you mean chose favorite movies cannonball so interestingly he rick many years ago He is a segment shot with trump for an academy awards segment in which he talked about loving citizen Kane but tracks a while also in the in the in his like spiel about like why he loves it. I mean his interpretation of the film it is very very different from what most experts or whatever when interpreted as being like to him. It's about like a great a great man alike or whatever else where like all of the kind of the criticism. The subtext etc is just completely lost on him. Ten to regarding parasite to be clear. It's extremely obvious in the clip. That he he's aware of the film because at one best picture but he obviously doesn't seem I mean even during his feelings like is is it good. I Dunno like he doesn't he doesn't know or care like it's just the idea of winning him is is Wrong do you think he watches films? Like it's a wonderful life and he's like that. Mr Potter had the idea. Oh my God but above food. I feel like he would like a movie. That is like dirty Harry. Sure no a movie. That is like there was a movie. I'm thinking of where it's supposed to be like critiquing racism but it's also just doing it but book anyways it was an older felt whatever. Hey Carol question question is is that your radiator making noise in the background. Oh it sure is folks if you if you don't already know Shake heroin is a wonderful luxurious apartment with a vintage heating equipment that that likes to make loud clanging noises so if you hear any hisses and claims that's just the the character and personality of my apartment coming through on the recording perfect. Just wanted to call that out. Sounds a little bit like a faucet to me beyond that. Carol's house yeah. It's all part of the charm. Charm speaking of Charm L. Let's get into the main segment about Atlantic's when a wealthy tycoon building a massive tower in the Senegalese capital of de car withholds pay for months from a group of construction workers. He gives them no choice but to seek better fortunes across the sea in Spain but one cement apart. Strange things begin to take place. Meanwhile a young woman named OUGHTA is forced into marriage with wealthy Omar who nobody knows anything about Omar. He's just ridge but her heart belongs to Suleyman. One of the poverty stricken workers who left on the ship. The night of her wedding the marriage bed burst into flames and the detective assigned to investigate. The case has no idea. Just how tangled up in its Web. He will become co writer. Director Matti Diaz. Atlantic's is not a film that lends itself easily to plot summaries. It's poetic hunted richly textured film with concerns about gender wealth and power and remarkably when it entered competition at the twenty nineteen cans film festival. It was the first film ever directed by a black woman to do so. So there you go yeah. What's so so first of all I li- absolutely loved film. I loved it so I so I was worried that I would be the only person who liked this movie but I loved it but it's it is hard. It is a tougher film to talk about in the films that we usually talk about on this podcast be cut at least at least at first glance in some ways because it is more at least the experience of watching this film in what a big part of what made it. So compelling to me just the texture and the atmospheric quality of it and the I mean it's just visually to me just so beautiful in its The way that evokes the dicara as a as a city I mean watching this film. I almost get frustrated watching films like this. That are about people and places that I've never been exposed to in my cinematic diet like as a white American person who many decades of age obviously like. Extraordinary films are unsure Obviously of course are made in Senegal like all the time or certainly. This is the first and yet mike stories like this of these characters their culture. I mean it's it's it's been Basically completely absent from my entire cinematic diet. So just in that sense to be like exposed to these images in these people and everything. It was just so wonderfully like stimulating and and captivating not to mention Might just deep appreciation of the skill with which the film weaves together. It's it's it's concerns about about wealth and labor and power and gender and all those things. Yeah I mean I suggested this movie and I was very glad that y'all agreed to talk about it. I mean the reality is that by far. You know the the overwhelming majority of things we talk about on. This podcast are white. They are created by white filmmakers. They tend to be white stories. They also tend to be Western and so I was really excited to learn about this film up by the way it's available to stream on Netflix and encourage people to check it out. But I had heard about it when I learned that mighty. The director was the first black woman to screen a film in competition at Cannes. Which is absurd. It's so absurd that it's it's almost unbelievable. It is unbelievable. I did not know very much about the film going into it and I was so Immediately immersed in this African futurist supernatural. You know slow moving as you say. Carol you know poetic and haunted story The way that it is shot the way that the narrative is composed. It's not I mean it is and it is not about the love story between Atta and Suleiman and An how she lives through her grief in the ways that grief. Kind of you know inhabits a community it is also about the kind of interventions of colonialism. And you know and Western technology in a way as as divorced from like African Technologies that I found so fascinating like the images of that tower in the background of those shots just blew me away. I mean just absolutely blew me away and loved. I loved the subtlety of it like so. Obviously it's a film. It has like science fiction elements. I mean the tower looks very much like something out of a science fiction film. It has supernatural elements but I mean it so the feel of the film though it. I mean for lack of a better term. I mean okay. I think Regular listeners of the podcast not the type of Feldman we often refer to as the care of thumb with our described as often like a slice of life type movie as you know as one way of putting it like a film that kind of moves with its more interested in character than a narrative and things of that nature and to me like a Atlantic's is a it's a film full of genre elements but it doesn't feel like genre. Film has the like slice of life kind of rhythm and observational quality and concern form of first foremost with character. So those science fiction unlike supernatural elements are there but they're not handled in the conventional kind of mainstream formulaic entertainment. Way which is not to say that I I mean I have a lot of respect for a lot of genre film making. I don't mean to dismiss genre film making out of hand but but to me. This was just so refreshing in the the sort of naturalistic way that if handled this story that is full of really these elements that are that are Paranormal or or super or supernatural. I mean I think it's hard to even call it a genre film or supernatural in that it felt like it felt so naturally part of this story like it was definitely. There's a moment where you realize this is happening in your kind of shocked and I was like way. Would I like perked up? It was like what's going on but it happened. I don't know how to describe it like I not trying to be dismissive by saying this but it feels like just a prop like it feels like such a just as a way to engage the story as opposed to being like this is a movie about Zaire fire. This is a movie about like it. Felt very natural If there's not a lot of fanfare it was just. It's the kind of whimsy. Almost that is is super subtle. That like everyone in the world just kind of goes with so it feels baked in and natural to the environment. Yeah I mean I guess I know what you're saying but when you when you get almost feels like a prop that it it. It's not something that infuses the entire film. I would say that in a way for me. It does the precise opposite. I think there's a version of this film that was created. You know In America you know with a white cast In which like surfaces and interiors very sterile and it has the look that we are accustomed to you know like we are accustomed to seeing in a in a science fiction film. Or in a m a horror thriller. Excuse me but part of what I loved about. This is that you know I. I was seduced into having my expectation subverted and not questioning it because it did feel so natural and so easy so you know when we first see. I can't remember the character. Whose is we I see with like Milky Way up. I'm going to spoil what happens. It's not the kind of film where you know. You'RE GONNA like. There's a twist that revealing alert alert so these young men who go to see you know seeking any kind of a life. Because they haven't been paid by their asshole capitalist boss All die at sea their spirits their souls something about them. They possess the bodies of people back home including their wives girlfriends. So you have these fantastic scenes of these young women walking in the streets at night. Exactly like zombies. You know with in in shadow and in in silence and this is the same movie that started off being you know about teenage girl falling in love you know kissing keeping things from our parents etc and yet there was no sort of like seem there was no demarcation that felt too abrupt for me like it. Just it flowed so easily as seamless. Yeah that's a good way of describing it and I think the larger themes are similarly elegantly handled. You know there's a moment so So after So the the night of Oughta Omar's marriage as we mentioned in the in the Intro The the marriage bed burst into flames. And it's pegged as like an arson case and this. This young kind of I think. Promising detective is is assigned to the case and And the detective kind of knows the for reasons that there's a connection between the fact that that this tycoon withheld pay from the construction workers for months between that act of just absolute like injustice. Abbott should be sort of criminal and the subsequent the arson and just everything that's happening In the wake of that I'm but when he brings it up to the commissar at a you know his his sort of supervisor at the police station The his boss is like that's that's not our. That's not our concern right. That the police do not care about violations committed by By by people in power they do not care about whatsoever about the plight of the Working Class The Right Day Those are not the crimes that they are interested in. The you know the captain even says something. Like a tycoon. You know he's he's been very good to us right. Today's benefit rape Beneficial relationship with his wealth and power and therefore like look the other way and I think that the film is constantly doing things like that. Where these these these larger concerns about power and labor injustice are very present in the film and the film was very concerned with them. By very I would say organically and elegantly woven into the into the narrative. Yeah absolutely enemy crucially. The crime that the Commissaire does want to investigate is the crime against the tycoon. So once these possessed girls break into his home and threatened to set fire to the tower if he does not pay up the the months of missing wages. This is the crime that the commerce concerned with and is given media priority Yeah I think the the ways that this film you know both within the narrative and you know sort of on the Meta level tackles the kind of like how this entire country this entire society has been completely misshapen by the forces of colonialism and capitalism such I always watch films with subtitles. So that's you know it's not new. I know a lot of people don't like it but get used to it also awesome but watching this film. I was so grateful that it comes with this. Titles that let you know because my ears not attuned to it when the characters were speaking well off or Arabic or French or English right and you think to yourself like where and when are people speaking French and this movie and when do we see French. And it's an It's on cell phone screens and administrative places The the people in this film largest speak well of among themselves The language of Sort of like police cooperate. Cooperation International Police cooperation is English. Crucially like there's just so much going on there. You know that I that I absolutely loved that. It's a film that you have to pay attention to but I felt so rewarded for paying attention to. Yeah Yeah Yeah I want to talk a bit about about two. It's it's very significant concerns with with with gender and with the plate of of women so Oughta Obviously she's in love with Souleymane but But she has. She's given no real choice. But to marry Omar who who I think. commented earlier like we don't know anything about him but that's kind of in a way. I would say by design because like audit doesn't like him or or or or know him as a person or really want to know him as a person but but yet she she is in a position. Where where she you know her. Her life in that regard is not her own. Those decisions are not her own today. We don't know anything about suliaman either. So I know the history which they aren't super relevant like their their figures but it is really about her and her perspective and her feelings. Yes and I think that we associate more with Suleyman. Because she's so enamored with him. One hundred percent. Yeah it is. It is very much like yeah. Yeah I mean we know we know that he like you know is is not getting wages and that he left and you get a little bit of time with him but it's just to me. They're both kind of equally not known because they're not really important. I agree completely. I think you're exactly right but there's one thing that I think we have to at least a mentioned and that is that That at a certain point in the film because her father demands it touch it. Oughta is taken to a to a doctor for a virginity test. Which I presume is checking whether the behind that is intact. Is that what that would it has which we all know is I got her. Yeah right so I was sitting there being like. Oh Fuck. Oh fuck like she because regardless of whether she slept with anyone else like that shit breaks real easy accurate and so the whole time. I'm like Oh God. Is that where this is going? Yeah and of course the horror of knowing that this is a thing that happens that you know there are places and cultures and by the way is not restricted to parts of the world. By the way like the concern with women's purity and young girls purity but just the ease which which with which this happens like we are going to the place where this can be done Yeah I just. There's so there's curious what your thoughts are on. There's an sorry cares so much stuff about gender in this movie in terms of like the roles that women play in. How like this doesn't feel it's creek. It's observing this. Film is observing the gender roles. And it's showing that ADA. Atta doesn't want to do what she's supposed to do but it's not like she wouldn't just go mary. Silliman have the same like have a poor life but still fill that role so like to me. The film showed issues of gender. But it's not like it was actively critiquing them and moments in which you're like it's hard to like She gets mad at Omar or sorry. Oh Margaret gets mad at her because she's like I'm not going back with you and he's Oh fuck whatever. You wouldn't give me a hard on anyway. Yeah which was one of these moments where you're like okay. You are showing us. How much of a Dick? This guy is but just it felt like. Oh that's just what life is GonNa be like for a lot of these women. I didn't get that sense like I do. Think in addition to commenting or observing the way that you know gender plays out in this culture. It's also very much An observation on generational differences. And so you know. The older generation represented by the parents Especially the older women who you know largely wear the veil and who are perceived or shown as being you know religiously observant Being subservient to their husbands and bartenders etc versus. You know this very free wild Fiercely independent crop of young women. I do get the sense. That even if Sulaiman had not died that the relationship between him and OUGHTA would have been different because it was built upon a different kind of foundation. It was you know An arranged marriage rate but also he treasured her well. I don't put theoretically but that scene where they're like making out in the beginning got a little gross to me when she's like gotta go and he's like no just one more just one more. Let me trick you into kissing you more. And you find out later that he realized like you're like Oh he's not gonna see her again but that whole scene was fucking gross to me like it was. It was troubling in the the sexual pressure that was there and the not respecting her boundaries. And so to me. I'm like well. Who is he any better at different? I doubt it. She just likes him. More like it's not like we know anything about whether he's like a good guy or better than anyone else. He's just not a rich asshole right now. I guess we there's no objective view like there's no sort of you know. Omniscient view tells us like this person is good or there's not like an A Global Omniscient view that tells us this person is good and gives us an interpretation of people. But I do think we are meant to understand certain characters via Odyssey's in view of the And her view certainly is. This is the man that I love and the relationship that we have is built upon this mutual affection and love it also totally but it also feels like puppy love. We'll also getting married. I was like twelve like I think it was kind of in. This actually leads me to the other thing. One of the things that I loved about this movie and I kind of struggled with wrapping my head around how to talk about it and Carol when we talked about book. Smart. I had Kind of a similar realization. I so appreciate Films which we get to see young people and really like gaze at them in witness kind of just the beauty of youth in a way that sounds so cornell and cheesy and so I'm looking at Atlantic's and just like so enamored of the way that looks her face and it's not just that she's a beautiful young woman. There's something about the quality of youth that you know the the DP and the director have managed to convey there and I wanted to talk about it but it it brought up the issue that I have with talking about the the the the movie as a whole and the other people in because as I'm looking at her face and body and cherishing this very loving approach to this young black woman. I'm thinking about the violence. You know and trauma suffered by these young black men and the movie and so this is a kind of comment about me and my movie watching rather than the movie itself but I was like how do we get to a point where we can talk about the materiality of the black body without falling into horrific patterns wherein it is just the body where the the corporation of black people is always first and foremost you know and like I. WanNa talk about it. But we don't ever talk about other groups in the same way like. I don't know that I've ever heard someone say like the white body you know in the way that I have heard so many times the black body and yet I wanNA talk about Ms Movie. How this the black body? I don't know To one my the thing I was thinking about is related to this just really quickly about Oughta. She was the only woman who didn't have her hair done. You mean like it was like she. She rated her hair at the very end but like for for most of her friends all had their hair braided or some other Whatever might be the only one that had fully natural hair. I don't know how to describe it but it just wasn't done which I thought was really interesting and made her look younger right and it made her look less put together then everyone else which was an interesting choice. That's put together. I questioned the use of the word done because I think that's the other thing I love about this movie right like as so perfectly not western. Yeah we'll so and I'm I'm glad you said that because I wasn't meaning it I mean how I said it But that like we aren't used to that In Film and Television and especially how Black Harris so politicized to that. It's a very interesting choice. The Star of the film is like in contract. You know what now that I'm saying that loud. It's in contrast to her older friends who wear a scarf the veil and in contrast to her newer friends who are referred to as the quote unquote sluts. Who are like very fem and she just kind of like existing in this between state which makes a lot of sense. Now that I say that it does and I think you know it is very important that she has hair that I don't think he's like chemically processed but certainly been you know like brush or blown dry straight but it is scaping the the The band that she has trying to hold it back in the way that like her emotions are escaping and desires are escaping but then at the end She does get her hair braided by Dior. Who is just amazing to me and I want to yours. Lifelike running that bar on the beach. Oh my God And just you know smoking in waking up and getting high. She gets her she gets her hair done In this very traditional African style she does not wear a wig or A. We've like some of her other friends. She does get this very traditional African style but it is her version of how like she is making the decision to do this. I just saw a little. I loved so the thing about bodies so this I don't think is necessarily as much about black bodies and what you were talking about but I. I made a note about how this story is told through the Lens of women. And and so the Ennis's we've already spoiler warning but that the women almo- it's almost entirely women that have their bodies possessed and is through the women that were hearing the demands of these men and that they're the ones doing the hunting and so I'm torn in how I'm interpreting that because it is it was fucking visually cool like it was really neat to see them and and this component but also like. It's still it's I dunno it's about men or the men who are who are controlling the situation and therefore controlling women's bodies right. Do you see my conundrum react. Yeah Yeah Absolutely. It made sense to me and that if the closest person to you is your partner. You know your girlfriend your wife or whatever. Then you know makes sense that if you are to come back and possess someone it would be that person but then it Isa The The detective who was investigating the arson with the marriage bed. There's no there would be no reason for him to be possessed by Salima and look I say That shit would I have made three notes? One of them was she made out with the COP. She fucked the COP. Like those are two of your three notes. So that was that was three notes but like why did he possess the COP like guy? Cool twist story plot twists Blah Blah Blah. Whatever but like that was very disturbing to me that she is hooking up with this cop. Gee that was harassing her and like threw her in jail was being shitty and then like she's like cool. I totally believe that you're my ex lover and I'm GonNa fuck you for the first time I ever have sex. Which is really the COP guy. Just that I didn't like that I thought the way it was shot was really interesting and I like. I like the the mirror kind of thing but I I was just like that is a choice. That was made that I feel comfortable with well. I think I don't know I have not read anything from the director about why that specific choice was made as opposed to Sulaiman I mean what would it have been for him to possess Otta right like where would the story? You have gone there I don't know why that particular choice was made. But I was just I found myself you know taking on some of Allah's investment and and remembering the just intense emotion. You feel as a young person when you are in love with someone you know in a way. That almost makes no sense to people who are older who've lived a little bit longer to a completely you know go to your whole world. Is this person that you meet. You know underneath a ferris wheel or whatever So for those who give a shit. I don't disagree with anything that either view said but I had a really hard time getting through this movie and it's one of those movies where I'm like. I'm so glad this exists. I think it is really smart. Is just a little to care for me off a little a little you know and I feel like an like I'm not intellectual enough like I go through a lot of emotions when I watch these kinds of movies because I feel like I'm supposed to really like it and that I should be whatever but I was. I I watched it into settings and there were many pauses. I feel like I will also say that like watch this movie and like give yourself the space to watch it. I watched it 'cause I had to watch it quickly to record the podcast etc etc and so I feel like I wasn't in the right mindset but it is very slow and you kind of have to go into it realizing that it's like it's kind of like a meditative viewing experience in some way. Don't watch this If you can with your phone in your hand doing something you can't because you won't be able to understand what they're saying. He bright but also. I don't think this is the kind of film wherein if you watch it in a couple of sittings that it somehow hurts the viewing experience or your understanding of it. I think this this film is it is a wide and deep enough to be able to support that but I really would encourage people to check out this movie. And if you don't like it you don't like it that's cool. Everybody likes what they like. But I would ask you and this is from your old pal. Ebbs if you do not like the movie before a writing it offer dismissing it ask yourself what is it about this that. I don't like I wanna say I WANNA say in my defense before you're like black people will lead through. That is true but I thought fucking peaches was goddamn boring as well and those were white people. Okay so anyway as the move because I do think you now and ask yourself like hard questions about like. You're you're viewing diet right because if you are not used to this kind of then it can be hard viewing for you in and I don't think there's any shame and recognizing like I'm just not used to this kind of thing and here's why But I would ask people to to ask themselves that question and Caro said like how many of us here in this country You know who are not The Children of Immigrants Emigrants Ourselves. You know from The African continent. How many of us know anything about African cinema like for real for real? You know if it's not something like this that's got play in a major international film festival. We would never have heard of it. Probably you know. Yeah I'll watch the fucking movie. Don't Jesus it's on Netflix. You have no excuses you have. You have a net flicks password in some capacity whether you pay for all right. We'll be back with our weekly freak outs. Hey Friends Caroline here. If you enjoy listening in on our conversations each week about what's happening in the world of media and pop culture and how that impacts our larger culture please head on over to patriots dot com slash FEM freak and help us keep bringing F F R to you now. It's time to talk about what's been thrilling. Us moving us of setting us or infuriating us this past week caroline. Hey I'm gonNA. Hey why are you gonNa Freak out any go? I forget about another movie another film. That is so incredible. Helling watchable and I don't understand why other people have a hard time with them by a film that Just went into wider. Release here in the. Us called portrait of a lady on fire. A film by the acclaimed. French filmmaker Selene Schema It cops. There's so much I love about this movie so It takes place in the seventeen seventies. It is a lesbian love story in. I would say that to me. It is that rare film that is truly sensual and sexy and it is in my view central and sexy because it really takes time to establish the undercurrent of emotions in longing between its two leads the longing under the surface such that you really feel it which to me is so much more erotic and powerful than you know the kind of whatever like a cursory sex scene That we saw him get in like mainstream movies. That just doesn't do anything for me. it is It's a heck is such a a like it's a fascinating and richly. Layered film reminded of our conversation last week about women in fiction. experiencing cramps not experiencing cramps women in this film definitely experience cramps and also about interestingly. There's a woman a young woman in the film who and I don't think this is a spoiler has an unwanted pregnancy and these methods that I'm sure are based in historical Mike Tradition in fact from the period to try to sort of induce. I think a a miscarriage or or NC to be lost in that whole kind of sequence is really fascinating There is a brief conversation So one of the primary characters is a painter. A young woman painter. And there's a conversation briefly about how she's not allowed to study and paint mail like nude male models. She can study and paint nude female models but not nude male models because men are the subject of great art right. Arvid focuses on women is of a lower inherently of a lower tier and that is this year to which she has an artist who happens to be. A woman is relegated ourselves to allow her to understand and paint male anatomy would be to allow her access to a world of greater art that she is from which she is forbidden with. So I mean that is just absolutely fascinating. it's deeply concerned with patriarchy It is extremely romantic and And just beautiful Yes Portrait of lady on fire Extraordinary film please go. Sia Awesome Evie. Yeah I'm freaking out about a podcast. It's new to me that I'm really enjoying called off menu. CO hosted by two British comedians. James Caster and Ed Gamble. The conceit of it is they invite people on And they basically ask them. You know to walk through what their dream meal would be. They start off with you. Know Starter Entree Desert and so you will have. Its tends to be you know celebrities or blend entertainment In the episode. I just listened to was Anthony Head Giles. From buffy Israel it was really good episode. But so people say like you know. I want You know the top us from this restaurant. I had on my honeymoon in Spain. And I want this sea bass you know from this place that I went to New York and whatever and so it just Allows them to really great stories about their lives their careers. It's a funny show. It's not just you know people talking about food although that's a huge part of it and that's great but yeah I think Anita for someone who loves food. Yeah it is hilarious show but I also just love hearing about people sharing meals and everything so off menu with James Acosta and Ed Gamble. I've listened to like four episodes so far. Armando IANNUCCI is really good. Anthony head remember. I've listened to check it out. You'RE GONNA sleep tonight boy late tonight to all right. I did I freak out about sex education season two already. I did write up so that I was on. Well Shit you can forget it. I'm not GonNa but I'm still freaking out about that. It's real fucking good. I'M GONNA Freak out about Dolphins on Hulu. So so here's the deal. Here's the stitch y'all the stitch stitch. Okay the Crochet Hook the WHO kept being like watched all face watched all face watched face and I was like all right. Fuck it I got nothing else to watch so I put it on. It's a comedy with cat denting who you would remember from two broke girls. But you don't because you didn't watch that show because it was fucking racist trash anyways. The show is charming. It's not like amazing and grade and perfect and you should totally watch it. But I'm like you know if you WanNa Watch something on your lunch break. It's one of those kinds of shows and I was surprisingly amused by it. The premise is that I don't remember her name. Kat Jennings character tools. I think her name's Jules. Her longtime boyfriend dumps her and she realizes that she has no friends and no life or anything outside of that relationship and so the whole show is about her learning how to have friends again and like how to have female friends again. And you know there's something kinda cute about that. You know like surviving. A break-up in like figuring out like her character is supposed to be really awkward and weird and doesn't know how to socialize and doesn't really want to go to parties and like she's reconnecting with college best friend there's also a whimsical nature. Where like all of a sudden like the environment transforms that? She's talking to an anthropomorphic cat. I'm into you know like we've been there. Yeah Yeah you know you get on a bus about like and the buses driven by the cat and then some people get off at the rebound central. You know some people get all you don't like it it's cute it's also like a Gr- you're talking about why it's not all white casts but it is so fucking weight because it is deeply making fun of like millennial culture like The place that she works is basically Goop at. Our bosses is a caricature. I don't know how you character Paltrow's character so that you know it's it's charming okay. That's what I'm GONNA say. Oh and hey guess what what we will listener freak out this week show. We love him that happens. We do we don't have enough. We do not freak out and in your freak outs but before you do that take a listen to David. Nylander talk about the Dragon Prince. I wonder if if he's like Scandinavian d'Avignon or Davita instead of David like an American would say his name. You let us know buddy you let us know how to say your name. High feminist frequency. I would like to freak out about the NETFLIX. Show the dragon prints. It is a fantasy show targeted towards kids featuring a lot of elements widely associated with the fantasy genre dragons magic elves etcetera. But it has a new and fresh take on it making it stand out from other works of fantasy in my opinion Because while the overall story has a somewhat darker tone doesn't stop from The show from being quirky and having lots of humoristic elements and it's one of the shows that cater both to young and mature audiences in that. It's funny to both kids sat adults. The show has put some effort into representation. Having characters characters with disabilities as well as characters of many different ethnicities That goes for both the actual characters and the voice actors portraying them and I get the feeling we're trying to move away from gender stereotypes as well on this show even though there are still some ways to go It handles racism raising morally and ethically complex questions and throughout the show blurs the lines between good and evil That's not to say that there isn't good and Evil Sidon story but the bad guys aren't evil just for the hell of it. They have their own motivations which you the audience can understand. I absolutely love this show and I look forward to someday watching it with my daughter when she gets a little older. It's on its third season now and from what I've gathered it will be Six or seven seasons total. I definitely encourage you to give it a watch The episodes are just twenty minutes long so time Miss Wilno. Excuse that's all for me. Keep doing what you're doing live long and may the force be ever in your favor. Thank you so much for that. All right I'll submit your own freak out. At feminist frequency dot com slash breakout. That's F. R. E. Q. Oh you yes we got. They're mad they're thank you so much for listening to from frequency radio. That's what you have been listening to. In case you were unclear. If this fact thank you for making it this far we appreciate you stay tuned for the frequent after party. Which takes you a little bit. Further of more of this wonderful content that we release which is only available to backers this podcast. So you can give us money for more of this content. They John Dot com slash. Themm freak you might as everywhere great. Podcasts are found any. Haven't yet go to itunes and subscribe rate and review us. You can follow us on twitter instagram. And all the social media's FM freak this show is engineered by Rob Para Kerry Stimpson provides technical support. Our work by Jamie Faran and our Indra. Music is by the incredible. Ill Circus. Ooh I mean. All of those people are incredible. They really are anyways. Join US next week for another feminist dive into pop culture by waiter.

Omar director Carol Netflix trump COP Suleyman arson America White Body caroline pettit Spain Atta Mike Tradition Sulaiman Saab Kim Jong UN Ed Gamble North Korea Sarkisian
Sinbad the Sailor II

Tales

47:23 min | 2 years ago

Sinbad the Sailor II

"The world is full of leaders. Religious military activists heads of state many people look to these leaders for guidance. Some people reject them, but a small percentage want to kill them assassinations looks through the lens of both the target and the assassin and asks did the assassin achieve his or her underlying objective. And if so how did it change the world search for and subscribe to assassinations wherever you listen to podcasts. Sinbad shook with fear the serpent had slithered around his tree all night he'd been stranded in this makeshift treehouse rampart for days the barrier of palm fronds kept the snake from devouring him, but kept him captive of the snake? But now as the sun rose, it slithered off this was Sindbad's chance to escape he peered through the FRANZ and to his surprise saw ship in the distance help Sinbad instinctively cried out forgetting that. No one could hear him. He had to attract their attention somehow, though, he shimmied up to the highest part of the tree and tied his turban around it as a flag Sindbad sprinted to the waves. He looked behind him. The monstrous serpent had heard him it wiggled quickly across the sand not wanting to let its prey escape so easily. Sinbad waved his arms frantically at the ship. Would they see his turban more importantly could the ship reach him before the serpent did the massive creature writhed easily through the sand gaining on him would follow him into the waves. It was a gamble. He had to take. Sinbad ran but slipped in the dense sand he picked himself up and stumbled forward. He was panting. Exhausted. From starvation frantically, he mustered all of his strength. The snake was almost on top of him. Now is scape would take everything. He had and good luck on top of it. Sinbad leaped toward the water. I'm Vanessa Richardson. You're listening to tales today. I'm continuing the story of the seven voyages of Sinbad, the sailor the epic tale of magic and mayhem on the high seas details on this podcast are dark sometimes scary and full of adult themes as a warning this story involves dark subjects including murder and cannibalism. Please exercise caution for children under thirteen wall. Sim beds voyages are fantastic in nature and he encounters many supernatural phenomena. It's possible that Sinbad was inspired by a real life. Historical figure Solomon, the merchant. Solomon, the merchant traveled from Persia all the way to China sometime around the year, seven seventy five BC, he fought stormy seas and pirates and made it all the way to China. Solomon, certainly amazed the people of his time. Cultivating an aura of legend and mystery. But others argue that Sinbad is purely a creation of folklore and the wildly fictional content is evidence that he's simply a character. Leave it to the listener to decide if you want to hear more tales, you can find all of park casts podcasts wherever you listen to podcasts. Many of you have asked how to help the show if you enjoy tales the best way to help us is to leave a five star review online. Sindbad dove into the water when he emerged from the waves. He could see the snake hissing and twisting on the shore angrily trying to figure out a way to get to him. Sinbad had guest. Right. It couldn't swim Sindbad laughed in relief. He turned to the horizon the ship was coming for him. He swam out to meet it as they pulled him aboard. Sindbad had to blink to make sure he wasn't hallucinating. It was the captain from his first voyage the one who had left him behind on the back of a giant sea. Monster captain Sindbad cried out in recognition. Do you not recognize me recognition spread across the astonished man's face? Sinbad he drew the weary man into an embrace. The captain excitedly lead Sindbad down below the deck. Sindbad could not believe his eyes. I saved all of your wares in the hopes that we would cross paths again said the captain Sindbad could return home to Baghdad with a ship full of treasures. This voyage had not been a loss after all. Hi spent the rest of the journey home in high spirits, telling my former mates, what incredible sites I had seen since we last met Sinbad concluded his audience riveted to every word. The porter included these stories were beyond the wildest dreams of a man who never left the dusty streets of Baghdad porter sim bad called out here a modest thanks for humoring an old man stories of his youth. Perhaps someday you too will go on at adventure. The porter took the sack gratefully. Your tales have been inspiring to the spirit. I will not forget them or you Sinbad, the sailor laughed. Are you leaving town tonight? Confused, the porter shook his head. What do you mean? Well, I'm just getting started. I have many more adventures and wild mishaps to share if you'll. Be so kind to listen tomorrow evening, the Porter's is widened, and he nodded what further wonders awaited him. And so the porter returned the next night. He was growing to love this brave generous, man, and the way he opened his mind. The money was just a bonus Sinbad had found his stride as a merchant reunited with his first bounty. He stayed home just long enough to rest before going out on a new route. He was developing a reputation as a merchant now, and he wanted to uphold his impressive standing he knew his father would be proud. And he still felt there was some unknown. Incredible treasurer waiting him. On his fourth voyage Sinbad and his fellow merchants set sail for Persia picking up valuable goods along the way. This would be his most lucrative trip yet. But a stormy sea doomed Sinbad has fellow sailors yet again, it was an epic maelstrom lightning split the sales on the ship. Caught fire splintering it into thousands of burning pieces. Sinbad and several of the other merchants held onto floating planks and watched as their cargo sank to the bottom of the ocean losing everything they had worked so hard for. But the next morning it appeared fortune was smiling upon them. The tides carried them to a beautiful island. They slept on the beach relieved and grateful their lives had been spared when the men awoke the next morning. They took a stroll around the island and discovered houses this island was inhabited happy at their good fortune. They eagerly went up to the homes, but their joy was short-lived. The inhabitants of this island were hostile a great group of them came out and surrounded the men they grabbed the sailors and handled them roughly Sindbad didn't know what they were going to do. He couldn't understand their language. The natives took them into one home and forced them to sit. They gave the men and herb and gestured to eat it Sindbad watched the native men carefully they smiled now incur. 'raging the sailors as if they were giving them a delectable treat, but Sinbad was wary. The other merchants clearly wanted to be hospitable. So they ate the herb smiling and friendly, but Sinbad noted that the locals weren't touching the substance themselves and decided that he wouldn't ingest it in case, it was some sort of poison. Slowly, his friends started speaking making no sense whatsoever. They had definitely been drugged by the locals and we're losing their minds. They seem to have no control over their senses. They bumped into things as if their vision were blurred and the appeared to lack any awareness of their surroundings as the men slowly lost their bearings. The locals then returned with a great feast of rice coconuts and the most succulent local fruit the men were salivating and Sindbad wanted to try it. He was ravenous, but he didn't trust these people Sinbad knew he was starving himself, but he had to trust his instincts. He didn't like what was happening Sindbad pretended to eat. But when the men weren't looking he spit out the food. He had no idea how long he had been there. He was growing weak from hunger. And the herbs the locals were giving. The men kept them from being concerned about finding a way off of the island. All they wanted to do was eat and sleep one night as Sindbad lay wide in his bunk wondering if he'd ever see his home again he heard voices approach their small quarters. The natives burst into the room. Sindbad's men were passed out stuffed with food and herbs Sinbad shrunk in his bed. Looking more pallid and sickly than ever one of the natives dragged particularly hefty merchant from his bed. He hadn't started out that way, but he had quickly put on weight during their time. There Sinbad watched in horror as one of the men raised a large knife and sliced the man's throat blood spilling out onto the floor. Sindbad covered his mouth. So as not to anger, the murderous group and tried to pretend he was just a dying man, no threat to them at all. They looked at him, but disgusted with his sickly appearance. Let him be gleefully. The men began dragging the bodies out of the room one by one their corpses. Listless and lifeless just moments before they had been living breathing friends. Sinbad didn't have to wait long to find out. What the natives were going to do with them. They quickly kindled a large fire roasting, the pieces of the dismembered men. Sinewy arms juicy hearts, succulent kidneys, and spleens quaking in his bed. Sindbad listen to the men enjoy their feast. Sindbad knew that he had made the right decision. He did not want to be a slab of meat for these disgusting cannibals, but he also knew that he was dying. Anyway, the men seemed to sense this and left Sinbad alone over the next few days. Finally, while the natives were gathered around a fire, laughing and joking in the language. Sindbad could not understand Sindbad silently crept out of his bungalow and sprinted out of the walls of the compound, suddenly as he rounded a corner, he nearly ploughed over an old, man. The old man's eyes grew wide Sinbad shoved him out of the way and raced past him the man shouted after Sinbad, but he didn't turn back. He ran and ran until his lungs felt like they were going to bleed. He didn't stop for days. One morning as he hurried through a beautiful field. He stumbled upon a group of men and women bent over picking peppers, the pepper gatherers lifted their heads to Sindbad and by the grace of Allah spoke to him in Arabic Sinbad fell to his knees and started weeping finally after all of this time, he could communicate with someone. It was as if he had stumbled onto old friends they listened with a staunch meant as he told them his miraculous tale of survival and escape they couldn't believe he had made it out of the cannibals clutches alive after they gathered their peppers for the day. They brought Sindbad back to the king Sinbad was embraced miraculously surviving, a most arduous ordeal and respected as a wealthy merchant from Baghdad Sindbad's stayed for a month recovering. And the king took a quick liking Sindbad and requested his company often they. Drank wine and laughed and Sindbad learned the local customs so grateful for the hospitality Sindbad decided to make the king a gift Sindbad noticed that here. The people did not ride their horses with bridles or stirrups a most unusual style. So Sindbad commissioned the finest saddle for the king when he presented the gift. The king was blown away by the thoughtful gesture and more than that the king quickly learned he loved riding with a saddle that settled it for the king. He would make Sinbad an honorary citizen. I want you to take one of our most billable and noble brides Camilla he told Sinbad who could not refuse. The offer Camilla was bright and quick to laugh Sindbad and Camillo were quickly married and forged a life together that was perfectly harmonious and yet so many times before bed Sindbad would lie awake. And one. Under how it was possible. He had taken up an entirely new life. Each day Sindbad walked around the sprawling gardens in awe at his good fortune. And yet Sindbad missed his home. He missed the hustle and grit of Baghdad he longed to sleep in his own bed again. But how could he complain Sindbad went to speak with his friends sue Lehman about his dilemma Sulaiman was a good man who Sindbad had gotten to know on his long walks through the city gardens. Winston bat arrived at Sulaiman's, he found his friend hunched over his dining table in deep distress Sinbad rushed to his side friend. What has you down? How can I lift your spirits Sulaiman could barely speak? He was so choked up faira my beloved wife has died Sindbad knew that there was not much to say to a man who has just lost his spouse, he nodded and thought of something he could say. May God grant you a long life with much happiness after this period of grief passes Sulaiman looked up at him in blinked. Do you make a mockery of my situation? Sindbad was startled by the accusation. No. Of course, not I'm merely hope that things get better for you. You're a good man who deserves much out of life Sulaiman, scoffed and looked at him Riley here. It is required that when one spouse dies both are buried Sindbad could not hide his shock and horror. This was barbaric and made no sense. Why would one kill perfectly good person? It is a patrol to not die together. Sulaiman added. I am to leave in one hour. One hour later Sindbad joined the funeral procession up the mountain Sulaiman embraced all of his friends and relatives and joined his wife on the platform that was going to be lowered into the earth his deceased wife was adorned with all of her jewels and dressed in her finest clothes Sulaiman was given a jug of water and seven loaves of bread Sindbad thought, it was particularly cruel that they gave him sustenance who wouldn't want a die quickly at this point. He couldn't watch as Sulaiman was lowered into the pit Sulaiman's. Wale would haunt him. Forever. Sindbad returned with a heavy heart to his wife that evening who was uncharacteristically in bed at a very early hour. Camila looked at Sinbad with red rimmed eyes. I'm so sick. She moaned. I feel like I'm dying Sindbad's is widened in horror. We'll continue Sindbad's adventures after these messages. Have you heard about Zola there the wedding company? 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Go to Bomba dot com slash tales and use the code tales for twenty percent off your. In order. That's B O M B A S dot com slash tales code tails, and you'll get twenty percent off your first order. Now back to the story. Sindbad didn't leave Camilla's bedside once praying to Allah for her survival just as much for her as for himself Sinbad cared for Camilla, but symbolic also spent these days realizing that he wasn't in love with her. Then he felt it was particularly cruel to have to perish for woman. He only felt mild regard for and then just like that she was gone guards came almost instantly to make sure that Sinbad would not try to flee but be buried alongside a woman. He had married out of courteousness. Sinbad knew that he must escape he never wanted to be a citizen of this place. Anyway, he went immediately to the king to ask for pardon. He was a foreigner. He should not be subjected to this inhumane practice, but the king and his court were unyielding a rule was a rule perhaps he should have read the marriage contract. A little more closely the best they would do for Sinbad was to agree to attend his funeral in a show of deference and respect Sinbad was given the same provisions as Sulaiman, and he was to be buried the very afternoon Camilla died. Sinbad refused to make eye contact with the king as he was lowered down. He was furious as the platform descended Sindbad saw that they were entering would appear to be an endless cavern possibly fifty fathoms deep. He saw with some respect that soon. Lehman had leapt off the platform, so that he would be killed instantly. His corpse had landed on a rock crushing. His skull blood was spattered everywhere. Sinbad hopped off of the platform the floor of the cave was covered in bones. He could barely see the sandy floor beneath once the rock closed above them. Sinbad had no light whatsoever. He realized this was now the challenging part. How could he find his way out with no torch? He ate his bread. And waited for an idea. He wasn't going to give up hope yet. Sinbad was growing week after a few days. He had eaten all of his loaves and gone through his water. He had little strength and was losing faith. Sinbad shut his eyes and tried to listen he could have sworn he heard something he had been in the dark for so long that his mind would often play tricks on him, including one delirious moment where he swore that Camilla had come back to life. But no she was next to him rotting. But now Sindbad was sure that he heard something. Sindbad couldn't be positive. But if there was an animal in here than there must be a way out he closed his eyes feeling his way through the rocky crevices. He tried to follow the noise. Surely, he couldn't be magic this. It was real Sindbad pursued the animal his pursuit seemed to make the animal nervous, and it would speed up when he got close to it. But this made Sinbad happy the faster he could get out of here. The better finally after what felt like hours of running through darkness. He saw a sliver of light. He blinked to make sure it wasn't a Mirage. Sindbad tumbled out of the rocks and onto the seashore he cried with relief. He praised Allah. He had never been so happy to be stranded on seashore as he looked up at the sun. He saw ship in the distance. He used his turban as a flag screaming at the top of his lungs when the boat turned toward him. He laughed deliriously swimming out to meet it. He couldn't believe that. This miserable chapter was coming to an end, and he was going to live to tell the tale. Sinbad the porter suddenly noticed that he had tears streaming down his face. He was so moved by Sindbad, the sailors triumphant return from being buried alive. Sinbad the sailor smiled at the porter. That was exactly my reaction, my friend, and then Sinbad handed him another sack of gold coins. When the porter tried to refuse Sinbad insisted it was for the pleasure of his company as well. As to ensure he would return the next evening. The porter was growing. So accustomed to this nightly ritual, he hoped the stories would never end. After spending a year or so at home. I still felt like something was missing from my life and decided to set out on the seas again in the hopes that I would find it. And so from my fifth voyage now, I was ready to be my own captain Sindbad said proudly I found a marvelous vessel and enlisted some other merchants. I knew that could help me the men set sail carried by a gentle wind they first docked for arrest at a desert island Sinbad noticed quickly that this was a breeding ground for rocks, recognizing their large domed eggs rising up from the ground. The men marveled at the eggs enormous size and were shocked that one was ready to hatch. The beak was poking out ready to burst into the world. Stand back Sindbad called to his men. They had never encountered a rock before and appeared to lack the reverence and intimidation that should come from dealing with a creature of that magnitude, but the merchants ignored him. They ran to it with their hatchets forcing the shell apart hacking into the baby birds limbs Sindbad was horrified. He couldn't stop them. They were ravenous and wanted the easy meal. One of the men quickly kindled a flame roasting the giant newborn alive as they dismembered it they offered some descend bed. But he couldn't bear to see what they were doing to the spawn of such a noble bird, suddenly the sky overhead darkened sin. Brad knew what that meant. He looked up. And sure enough there were two rocks flying towards them like two ominous shadows coming to exact revenge roun- Sindbad screamed, he raced to the ship. The alarmed men followed in quick pursuit. They hurriedly kind onto the ship and pushed off into the sea. But it was too late. The rocks had spotted them and they were flying with great speed towards them with massive boulders clutched in their talents. They were going to drop them on the ship. The first one landed squarely on the ship's deck Sindbad's beautiful new ship was crushed to smithereens. The voyage was already over and doomed one of the rocks instantly crushed the steersman and another two were ojected by the impact into the waves drowning instantly. The next boulder dropped and the others were crushed under the splintering debris wacked unconscious impaled by splintered planks. Once again Sinbad found himself lost in the ocean clinging to driftwood. Sindbad allowed himself to be carried along by the tides Mercifully shepherded to the safety of beautiful shore trees, dotted the island. He easily found fruit and fresh water. He side exhausted and disappointed at this failure of start. Why couldn't any voyage just go smoothly as he began to explore the island he stumbled across an old man who looked so weak that Simba thought he might die right before his very eyes Sinbad rushed over to the poor fellow are you all right there Sinbad asked with concern. Are you shipwrecked to the men gestured? It was clear that he did not speak Sindbad's language. He appeared to be signing for Sinbad to carry him on his shoulders, which Sindbad was happy to do. He'd bring this man to safety somewhere. But no sooner had amounted the man on his shoulders than the men sprung to life with the spine of teenager. He tightened his legs around Sindbad's neck so tightly that he couldn't breathe Sinbad tried to throw the man off of his shoulders, but the man's legs were locked around his neck, like an iron vice his eyeballs were bulging he could feel the veins in his forehead throbbing for oxygen. This man was going to kill him. Will return to sim bads fight for his life after this quick break. The victim. Nation. The assassination of president John F. Kennedy by Lee Harvey Oswald changed the course of history, but with things have turned out differently. If Oswald wasn't successful in killing the president park casts. New show assassinations takes a deep dive into the life of some of the world's most infamous assassins to discover what motivated them to take such drastic measures my friends Bill and Kate examined these assassinations through the lens of both the target and the assassin asking did the assassin ultimately achieve his underlying objective. And if so how did it change the world? I'm also really curious about Oswald. What did he hope to gain by killing the president, and what were the lasting ramifications of Kennedy's death? New episodes come out every Monday search subscribed to assess nations wherever you listen to podcasts. Again, that's eight s S A S S. I N A. A T I O N S or visit park cast dot com slash assassinations to start listening. Now, that's par. Cast P A R C A S T dot com slash assassinations to listen now. Hi, it's Vanessa. And I have some very exciting news to share with you. We're having a black Friday and cyber Monday weekend sale from Friday the twenty third through Monday, the twenty sixth. You can get thirty five percent off all park cast merch if you haven't checked out the store yet, we have some great t shirts and coffee, mugs, go to park cast dot com slash merch to check out all the new podcast gear. Don't forget the follow us on social where you can see me and all your favorite park cast hosts modeling, the new merch feel free to tag us when you're wearing your par- cast gear. So we can share head over to park cast dot com slash merch. Now. Now back to the story. The old man tightened his legs around Sindbad's neck Sindbad thought he'd faint, but suddenly the men lessened his grip slightly and kicked him hard in the ribcage the old man pointed he wanted to ride Sinbad like a pony Sinbad tried to shake him off now that he could breathe again. But it was no use the man was wrapped in possibly tight around him. And at night the old man slept with his legs clenched around Sindbad's, neck, just loosening his grip enough. So that Sindbad could breathe if Sindbad's so much twitched he would tighten up again. There was no getting away the men rode like a pony day after day for weeks roughly directing Sindbad with a swift kick. If you veered in a direction that displeased the man. One morning Sindbad found a dry calabash that had fallen from a tree he decided to use it to press and store some grapes. And after a few days it for it into a nice wine. He had not had wine in a very long time. And he delighted in its effects, he relaxed a little and laughed and sang this entire situation was ridiculous. And now he could see the humor in it. The old men noticed sim beds. Good humor as he drank his home made wine and demanded that Sinbad share the old man liked it to the old man, also became more relaxed. He sang and danced from side to side and gradually his legs became slack. And his grip loosened Sinbad let this go on for a few minutes to make sure that the man was not just momentarily shifting position. No, the man was genuinely drunk Sindbad quickly slammed the man to the ground. He watched as the men lay there motionless headed killed him better to be safe Sindbad quickly picked up a rock and raised it over his head bringing it squarely down on the man's skull. Sindbad watched as the old man's brains leaked into the dirt Sinbad lay there for a few moments in disbelief. Finally, he walked wearily to the beach where he stumbled upon a crew of sailors that had dropped anchor to gather fruit Sinbad collapsed in front of them. They rushed to his aid asking what had happened to him as Sindbad recounted, the tale, the men's eyes widened in disbelief, you encountered the old man of the sea and live to tell the tale their voices quavered with in credulity Simba had never heard of this name. But as he described what had befallen him, they nodded that. This was indeed the old man of the sea. No one had ever escaped him before he could not believe his good fortune and surviving. And so with great off that Sinbad had killed. This dreaded foe. They returned him home safely. As Sinbad concluded his story. He sent the porter home with more money and a request that he should accompany him the next night. He wasn't done yet. Now that sim bad the sailor had miraculously survived five shipwrecks, his family and close friends did everything they could to convince him to retire. They told him he had enough wealth for ten men. He attempted fate too many times. Now how much longer could he keep getting lucky? He was years older now and all of his traipsing about had taken a toll. He had to take a year to recover from that, fifth, expedition, but sim bad had life in him yet. And he would be damned if he was going to spend it sitting around his plush home like it was an old man with one foot in the grave. No, he was still ready to see what the next voyage had in store for him. On his sixth voyage Sindbad decided that he would not be the captain. He didn't wanna go through that. Again. He hired a season captain, and they set sail. Everything seemed to be going well until one afternoon the captain through his turban onto the ship's deck in frustration. What is happening captain Sindbad inquired? The captain's shook his head sorrowfully. We have found ourselves in the most dangerous place in all of the ocean. Sindbad looked around the seas looked placid enough. It didn't seem so bad. But the captain continued we can't get out of this current. We are headed towards a rocky terrain that will splinter the ship into a million pieces. We shall all perish Sindbad's. Suddenly noticed that the ship was being carried swiftly pulled without any assistance by powerful undertow the show. Ship slammed into the rocks and continued towards the mountainous shoreline of the island that was surely the cause of their demise. The foot of the mountain was treacherous. Indeed, all jagged, spikes and sharp, edges. There was no way ship could dock here much less sail away from it in one piece. The men watched as their hopes and goods were dashed on the rocks. As they sprung from the broken ship and made their way to shore discovered the rocky terrain littered with bones of men who had met the same fate. The worst part was not that they had lost all of their provision. But that there was no way off of this beach any ship that came to this shore would suffer the same fate and therefore would be in the same position as they were the one saving grace was that. There was a river of freshwater running from deep within a cavern that came out to the sea. And when they waited into the cavern, they discovered a treasure trove of sparkling gems and precious stones lining, the walls, but these rubies and crystals could not feed the starving men. One by one Sindbad's companions slowly starved to death Sindbad had conditioned himself to survive on little food after his experience with the cannibalistic natives, but even he was weary and didn't know how much more he could take when the last man perished he had. To make a plan Sindbad realized his only option was to make a raft from the debris on the shore and sail into the dark cavern hoping it would take into an inhabited accessible part of the island. He set sail into the glittering cavern the walls were lined with more rubies crystals and amber grease than he ever thought could exist in the world. He filled the raft with all the jewels. He could without sinking it the gills reflected and refracted even the tiniest sliver of light keeping the cavern bright for miles. But eventually he lost any light whatsoever. And it felt as if he were sailing into the dark center of the earth never to be seen or heard from again, finally Sindbad closed. His is ready to die. He accepted. This would be his final voyage. Sindbad was suddenly surrounded by strange men. The sunlight was so bright he had to blink and squint. What was happening? He spoke. A few words and the men understood Arabic. He came to understand he'd been rescued from the cavern by men from the land of serene, Deb, the men took him to meet their king. Once again Sinbad was treated with the utmost respect for having survived. Insurmountable, odds and conditions. He informed the king that all he wanted was to return home to Baghdad he was so homesick he wept. And so the king moved by his emotion. Lent him his finest ship and sailors to take him home. Sinbad? The porter shook his head as Sindbad the sailor concluded this tale, Shirley, you return with more valuables than any other merchant before and with such honour, indeed Sindbad, the sailor nodded, but I still had one more voyage in me. I was not as young as I once was but something in my heart urged me to go out one last time, even if it killed me. And so I went this may shock you. But we were instantly shipwrecked yet again Sinbad laughed shaking his head. And once again, I was taken in by kindly king who took pity on a wealthy stranger who had survived catastrophe after catastrophe Sinbad and the king got on quite well, and he asked sim bad if he would marry his daughter Roya since he had no male heirs Sinbad was not only honored to take the hand of such an intelligent. And loving woman. But to be gifted a kingdom along with it. The strange thing about this. New kingdom was that once a month? Some of the citizens turned into birds in all of his travels. It was one of the most peculiar things he had ever encountered one day. He decided to go with one of them to see where they went the day the ritual took place he climbed on the back of a bird man and sword towards the sun. It was as if he was flying himself. He praised Allah and all of the angels in heaven. But suddenly, right. A Sinbad was glorifying God, the sky blackened and lightning began striking down all of the birds setting them on fire. The head of the bird Sinbad was writing caught on fire, and it careened to the ground Sinbad jumped off right before he was engulfed in flames. He ran home to Roya who explained to him. What happened? The birds were evil spirits and sim bats praises to God had called down. The angels punishing the bird demons, his wife Roya was in tears. We must go if you are the one that caused all of this, then they will come and kill you next. I have heard tales of the demon birds since I was a little girl their wrath is legendary and you have shown them for what they are. But how could we leave? Your kingdom Princess Sindbad said. Royal looked at him with watery eyes. I care not for the devil birds and rulership I want to live a simple life with you. You're a king. No matter where you go. It was then that Sinbad knew that after all of this time he had found what he was looking for love. So I returned home with a wife, and then I was ready to be home for good Sinbad. The porter was so enraptured with tales that he had not noticed that sitting next to Sindbad. The sailor was Roya herself a most beautiful woman, and she looked at Sinbad with admiration Sinbad. The porter thought this was the most perfect ending to a tale of adventure. And misfortune to find true love Sinbad, the sailor handed the porter another sack of money. The porter couldn't believe how just one chance encounter had now changed his own life. Thank you. I will never forget your generosity. The porter said you will always have a friend in Sindbad, the sailor he smiled warmly and shook his new friends hand as. Sinbad the porter left the home that night. He couldn't help. But think that now that he had the money perhaps he would try his hand at being a merchant. He decided to head off to the docks to see about procuring a ship. The voyages of Sinbad have had wide reaching impact for centuries. Some scholars say that these tales had direct influence on other adventure stories by later authors, particularly Jonathan SWIFT's Gulliver's travels and Willem Dafoe 's Robinson Crusoe, but Sindbad's still merits his own place in literary canon, regardless of how many adventures came after him. He is a heroine figure who reminds us to seek new lands to never give up when the odds are stacked against you. And most importantly to be generous and give freely and perhaps then fortune will smile upon you to. Thanks for listening to tales if you wanna listen to more episodes of tales or podcast podcasts. You can find all of park casts podcasts on apple podcasts, Stitcher, Google, play cast box tune in or your favorite podcast directory. Some listeners have been asking how to help the show if you enjoy the show the best way to do that is to leave a five star review. Join me in two weeks for another dark and surprising. Fairytale tales was created. By max Cutler, it is a production of Cutler media and is part of the park cast network. It is produced by Maxon Ron Cutler sound design by Kenny Hobbs with production assistance by Paul Moller. Additional production assistance by Maggie admire and Carly Madden. Tales is written by Gina Matuzek. I'm Vanessa Richardson. We really want to thank you for all your support with the new content park cast released please don't forget to rate review and subscribe to assassinations as well as our other new podcasts, hostage and kingpins. And if you can tell a friend about your favorite park cast show, it really helps us out search for assassinations wherever you listen to podcasts. New episodes come out every Monday.

Sinbad Princess Sindbad captain Sindbad Sindbad Sinbad Sindbad Baghdad Sindbad Sindbad Porter Baghdad Camilla Sulaiman porter Persia Vanessa Richardson Zola Solomon Roya murder sue Lehman
Suleiman's Siege of Vienna Began - Sept. 27, 1529

This Day in History Class

05:58 min | 2 years ago

Suleiman's Siege of Vienna Began - Sept. 27, 1529

"It's baritone date, Thurston host of spit. I heart radio newest podcast, which one, three and me where we explore, how understanding your DNA changes, how we think about ourselves and the world around us. We've got the why clefts John. We have so much more in common than you could even imagine you put two kids together. They're going to want to play. They're gonna wanna have a good time. They gonna wanna fall in. Love have opinions. This is every kid listen to the full episode of spit with twenty three and me in the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts. Welcome to this day in history class from how stuff works dot com. And from the desk of stuff you missed in history class. It's the show where we explore the past one day at a time with a quick look at what happened today in history. Hello and welcome to the podcast. I'm Tracy v Wilson and it September twenty. Seventh Suliaman the greatly siege to Vienna on the stay in fifteen twenty nine Sulaiman was the tenth Sultan of the Ottoman empire, the major political power, stretching all the way from the Balkans to North Africa and Suliman was extremely well educated. He was a poet and a Goldsmith in addition to being the head of state, he became Sultan after the death of his father in fifteen twenty when he was about twenty six. So the mon- immediately proved himself as a capable military leader after becoming Sultan in a series of ongoing campaigns against the neighboring Christian powers in the Mediterranean area. And in central Europe is included taking the island of Rhodes, something the Ottoman empire had tried and failed to do back and fourteen eighty and August fifteen twenty six has forces moved into south central Hungary and in the ensuing. Title Hungarian king Louis. The second was killed. Two different men lay claim to the Hungarian throne. After this, there was the Archduke of Austria Ferdinand. The first of the house of Habsburg there was also Janos Apoyo also known as Lord John of Transylvania soon on favorite John referred nand and he recognised John as the ruler of Hungary, although, essentially as his vassal, and then because of his opposition to Ferdinand into the house of Habsburg, he invaded Vienna and fifteen twenty nine and it was the capital of the Habsburg Austrian empire. Unlike so many of his earlier campaigns, though this one was not at immediate success. One hundred and fifty thousand Turks left Ottoman, Bulgaria, and started moving toward the end. But they ran into so many difficulties along the way. Some of the routes were completely impassable because of flooding the camels that were being used as pack animals weren't adapted to this kind of weather. A lot of them got sick and died peop-. Got sick and died, too disease was just rampant through his military force. Their gunpowder became soaked, their artillery became waterlogged, and there were ongoing floods, which threatens to just wash them in their equipment away and which destroyed the available crops reports of the men's spending, the nights in trees to try to weather all of this. The people of knew that an attack was coming. They were terrified already before the Ottoman army got there. And when the Ottoman army did arrive at the outskirts of Vienna in late September, their attack was horrifying. They beheaded the men, they captured and enslaved the women and children as more troops arrived Suliman sent enslaved messengers into VNA to make it citizens and offer. If they converted to Islam and surrendered, no one would be harmed, but without a surrender, there would be a bloodbath as the Ottoman army began the siege. They use the canons that they had been able to salvage from all the wet weather. When they started digging trenches that they plans to use to position explosives that were meant to destroy the city walls and Vienna's accounts. Describe the actions of the Ottoman army as just brutal, but on September twenty eighth, a cold front, moved in bringing yet more endless rain and frigid weather in early October Vienna, deployed troops to attack the toddlers who are still trying to work their way under the city walls to plant explosives. They took the autumn and army by surprise and did manage to stop that tunneling. But it was at a cost of many, many lives after having been thwarted by the weather in thwarted in the tunneling plan, the Ottoman army plan. One final last ditch assault on on October twelfth, and their attempt to storm the city completely failed. At this point, the Ottoman army was almost out of food and over the next two nights, they killed all of their prisoners of war at their camps. Outside of. China before turning around to March back home and their retreat was deadly as well with more and more of them dying along the way. Although silly bond failed to take Vienna, he did cause enough problems for the Habsburgs that he was able to keep John of Transylvania as his vassal king and Hungary. You could learn more about all this in the July seventh twenty fourteen episode of stuffy missed in history class, and you can subscribe to this day in history class on apple podcast, Google podcast. And wherever else you get your podcasts tomorrow, we have an unconventional woman at an aircraft that may fly or it may not. You turn is a new podcast from how stuff works hosted by Lisa Oz and Jill hers. It's all about change and how people say that change is really hard, but it's possible to make it feel good show is all about switching directions without winding up, totally lost co host Lisa Oz Jill hers dig into, oh, kinds of questions about change in u-turns. That's why. Oh, you turns join them as they navigate their own life changes and talk about exploration, experimentation, and transformation that's u-turns on apple podcasts or wherever else you get podcasts.

Ottoman army Vienna Hungary Lord John Suliman Lisa Oz apple Thurston Europe Bulgaria Mediterranean Goldsmith Louis Jill assault Tracy Sulaiman Ferdinand Google
ExO World Small Business Summit

Up Or Out with Connie

44:51 min | 8 months ago

ExO World Small Business Summit

"The! hy-vee wand thanks for listening thanks for being back with us and the Connie, five show and I'm Connie five. You're unstoppable, diva. Today. We have three special guest who have become distant a really short time. Some really great friends that when there's a lot of coincidences between us all, but you're gonNA, learn today the reason why everyone has come together because I've invited them here to share the incredible work that they're doing for you. The small business owner our lifestyle entrepreneurs that listened to his week after week after week and thanks for being here now. This group they've. They've created any event with one sole purpose in mind, it is an event. It is so powerful so i. need you to grab a pen and paper because we're going to have some notes here that y eater right down and then there's going to be an event that I want you to register for because it is going to blow your mind, and it is going to ten extra small business or you WanNa you WanNa. Listen Up. The event is being co-produced. Give you the SME's the tools that you need to rethink and recreate your business now and into the future to prosper to prosper together, and you hear me say all the time that we are unstoppable together, and that is the truth as especially right now with the economic situation. I mean I've done. I can't count on fingers and toes. The number of people that I've had conversations with IB. The reached out to they reach out to me. We've been brainstorming and how we can get through this together. Small business ownership is tough even in normal time, so you need to attend this event. You want to attend this event. It's T E X A World Small Business Summit surviving twenty twenty and creating a thriving future for your business, so this is a virtual program, so you can grab your coffee. You bring your lunch and rest comfortably right from your home. Office is food program happening on Tuesday July fourteenth. and. I said I'm also part of the program also wanted to. co-producer was honored to be asked to provide my business insight, and I will also be one of the speakers and I'm going to be leading wanting to q and a sessions I will be bringing my secret sauce that led to my business success, so we can do this together so just meters on Tuesday July. July fifteenth for a full day. Jam Packed Agenda where thousands of people from across the globe are coming together to learn interact in small curated breakout sessions network es you can network virtually and visit interactive exhibit boots all from the comfort of your home, and yes, this is one hundred percent on wine now. The cost is ninety seven dollars to register for the full day. It's a bargain you need to be here to simply head over to e x a world dot live forward slash small businesses to register, and before you go, if you're interesting getting a thirty dollar discount and a fifteen minute session with me just to go over some some strategy on your business. Give me a call by seventy nine. Oh, six, four, three, nine five, and you can connect with me online as well so there's no strings attached. All of the information is included in this in this Social Paul's all the information year. Everyone involved in this program. They're not doing it for the money. They're doing it for you. They're doing it from their heart. People give up way too early on their dreams, and we want you to enjoy the journey, and we wanted to keep it real because it's all about you. So now let me bring on our guest today. Who are world class business leaders and CO producers of the E X A World Small Business Summit so. I up, let me introduce. Selene is mall. Who is the lead co-producer of this event? Salim, how are you? Very well, thanks for having. I'm so excited to be part of part of this event part of this program, but if you could take a minute, just introduce yourself and what you're bringing into this program for everyone Sherp by the way the program on Tuesday July fourteenth. And what we're doing is we're bringing together? Some of the rules top experts with small businesses just to help people survive and the way I got to. This was I helped start. An? Organization called Singularity University, which teaches breakthrough technologies, and how you can apply them. then I joined the Board of the X Prize Foundation, which is Peter Diamandouros's foundation that looks to offer large public prizes to create markets like the commercial space industry that now exists SPACEX and satellite companies, and so on and I wrote a book called exponential organizations. That talks about. How do you create a business structure in skills? Fastest technology in scale, and we've been doing lectures and workshops on these concepts for many years and in March. We decided. Let's take this online and we had a three day event. In April that people call the best event that have been to, so we decided. Let's count replicate that model. In the first place we wanted to start was small businesses because. They're all struggling. How can we create a model for them in a roadmap for them to release survive this year, and then totally thrive in next year while I'm so thrilled to be year I am thrilled to be part of this program so next up. Let's introduce Michele. Michele come on board either Connie how you? Well, so if you could share bit about yourself, you're really excited to be co-producing this event with Salim. An Open Axo on my background, twenty five plus years in the financial services industry. Everything from client, strategy, strategy innovation, but always with a focus on small and mid size enterprises. Left corporate about six years ago to begin my own venture called heal our world out, which is really focused on helping to support small businesses with their sustainability and environmental social governance standards and telling the stories of businesses who are committed to people, planet and profit so very excited to help produce this event so that we can actually bring real resources in tools. We'll have some great announcements about some new products in financial products will be launching year for small businesses. Anna show called Angels Zinc, which is to really highlight those small businesses that made a big difference during cove. Michelle thanks for being here and everyone. That's Michelle on Giovanni, and then next we have Neil sperling. Warning Good Morning Neil. No, it's early in the morning. You where you're at, but if you can just a minute and share with everyone a bit more about your background. Absolutely bygrave pleasure been a business development and marketing consultant for most of my life. And it has morphed into a career where I become known as a conductor and strategist briefly started when a transformative moment for me was when I had the great privilege of meeting Robert Allen. Who is about to go on stage? And I realized I didn't have much time to connect with him at that point, ask for his card and at that level people most people have the card and card, so he gave me a car with his private information, and I didn't call him for six months, and I call six months later. And he was completely confused. We only had a brief encounter and he said. Why are you calling me now and I said we'll mistrial Ana I, didn't have anything to say to you six months ago, but now I do. And I wanted to respect your time that led to a meeting at his living room. It was supposed to be in our last for three hours and looked at my cartridges will. You're not a business in developed marketing consultant I said I'm not, he said No. You're much more than that. Your connector I didn't know what that was. I had to go home on the Internet. Look it up. gave me. My brand gave me my purpose that gave me my identity, and from there I really turned us into a flourishing career. Where is led me to a meet extraordinarily people like Salim and essentially a help connect everybody here today to create their transformative purpose so. True that encounter it helped me to discover mind and prayed this opportunity I i. think you're. When Neolithic tribes you to do what you're doing today. Will you know every day is? Adventure for me. The irony is as connector I'm not on any social media with the exception of linked in. I was at my arm, twisting to get on there, but despite that I've built a community of of many many many people who are passionate and purposeful about what they want to do to create social impact in the world, so when I wake up in the morning, it's really about. Answering the telephone and seeing who I can assist and hope. You know achieve their troopers, and so that that to me is very fulfilling. Wow love that Michelle you said you left your job, your company or Corporate Company to start your own entrepreneurial business. Is there a role model or someone that you followed that you wanted to follow that. You wanted to follow into footsteps as you're building your business. Well, actually there is an I have to say that's my grandfather so as a child I grew up in the media business My grandparents and my parents were in a business. Called Television Update and they essentially were providing news features. To two different newspapers they were. Sold to scripts our. But I got to see in really live. That SORTA entrepreneurial journey with my family as a kid, and and to see the way that my grandfather the the integrity. The way. He led people. Just a commitment that people had in in in terms of just loyalty to him in how he he managed. Things was really inspirational for me so I think he's not in my blood and. The corporations I was at I was always doing innovations. entrepeneurship in my way, so it's been a great journey. I love minded my grandfather as well. Yes! He was. He created the first McDonald's Golden, arches you. A neon, creating neon signs and and doing marketing so so we continue to find something in cash. Absolutely I know I know Salim you. You've worked for some. Incredible companies I mean household household names. What was your journey like as you? Yourself stepped in and grew into your own entrepreneurial business. Lived all over the world I spent about my core of my life in India Canada Europe and the US and Have kind of a global perspective on things, and when I got to the US about twenty years ago. I really focused on. How do you build a business and got into technical entrepreneurship, and that led me to somewhat where I'm today via being the head of innovation at Yahoo, and then running workshops, but it was really writing the book because we realized as a fundamental problem in society today, which is when you try anything disruptive, the immune system attacks you and if you're a big company, it's inside the big company in if you're a small business, that's the environment. They don't want you to survive it or do anything really disruptive and I was fascinated by. We can't get new technologies into the world if we don't solve that problem. Solving ecosystem of about five thousand people that we work on solving that problem and we're now advising heads of state in. The company's around the world to do this. But the small business sectors particularly important because it turns out over the last sixty years. One hundred percent of job growth has come from small companies. Big companies been getting bigger, but more efficient, and so as we're in an environment of needs. jobs is one sector does not being helped enough by the government in this current crisis, and that's why Michelle Neela alliance up together nine yourself with the cement together. Yeah, that's great. I have to agree with you. Especially myself coming out of corporate and I was a CEO, but just feeling stifled and now allowing new technology to grow it in the company within your organization. Because you're right, they don't want you. To necessarily rock the bow so the work that you're doing today from singularity in writing your book, it's really it's really a change changing the industry changing environment where it's going and I know for for each of you. We've come together and coproducing this event and you Michelle started it initially. So, how are you keeping up with the change in the environment in the business I mean we're going to co going through chaos. And it's drastically has had a negative effect on the economy and especially small businesses so again. How are you keeping up with some of those changes? We're tracking a two or three areas. One is the radical pace of. Today in how fast that's changing the new tools that are available something that has magical today that was never possible before is that in the past advanced technologies hostile, and only a big company or government lab could afford to do rnd launch, products and services that. Today for the first time in history advanced technologies are actually very cheap by the blockchain is open source and free, and anybody can innovate right art poster child is probably Lawn Musk's and his methodologies really simply picks technology this growing exponentially names. Were will that be in ten years? Let's build a company to intercept Kurban tenure, and you don't need expertise in solar energy or cars, and so on the mindset is now what's possible? That's the most important thing and what I love about. How you talk to your audiences is the mindset. Is Everything right and so we have incredible opportunities for SME's Today in small businesses to totally leapfrog. The status quo and not be worried about big business at all and relieve transition them and transition into those now, and that's why we're so excited. I Love I love that and you're absolutely right. It is the mindset and especially I know when I talked to a lot of small business owners. They haven't quite got it yet that I. Have a business. Though there there's they're still working at how do I get there? How do I do it? What are what are the tools? And when they chef and when they realize that they do have a business, and they are the brand of that business. It completely changes that mindset so absolutely to Michelle. I wanted to ask you. Why are you producing EXA WORLD I? Mean what can what compelled you to join forces initially with with this with this team? But I'll tell you. You know given that my whole business is around supporting small businesses I really wanted to make a difference during this time of Coed, so I was really wrestling with what can I do as an individual who are little company make a big difference and I started to to frame out a concert idea. whereby, we could help. Promote and work with those. Small businesses that needed help that weren't getting. Assistance for example. And, so essentially I had this vision of the concert and I went to a friend of mine. Who David, who's also a founder, actually with Sulaiman I am this event and David Trauma and he puts together these concerts, so he said I've got a great idea I'm GonNa pull in the civic records and the Music Heals Grammy Foundation. Team and will do the concert, but I'd love free to consider joining. Forces with Selene to produce this event and I thought s fantastic. Lot of events in my time most recently did one with the Wall Street Journal in the United Nations. To on social impact and I thought. Wow, this is a great opportunity is we can really not just bring thought leaders to the table, but real solutions and new innovation. Through products that we've developed that won't be launching for small businesses here. It's it's incredible and Neil. The one that introduced me a needle I want to. Publicly! Thank you for that, but share share a little bit more because you talk about your the connector. Share a little bit more about that well. WanNa hinge off with Michelle says so David is if your friend and he came to gay, and then it allowed me to connect to you, and as a result, we have this This ecosystem here are of thought, leadership, and hopefully something that's going to create a force multiplier. But. Basically joining a little bit more about the connecting aspect is sure. Yes, definitely because you, your connector that's. Your title on some people I'm sure thinking. What is the connector right right on a lot of people? Tend to be about that because there was a study by Malcolm, Platt well I think he was paid a million dollars to to really research this phenomena. Any found that there are essentially generally three classes of people in the world. He he studied there, innovators, connectors and implementers. I think they're certainly hybrids of all of this, but for me, it's always been pretty effortless because I have great fascination with people and essentially one understand what makes them tick and most people were kind of. Swimming on the surface where they're looking to understand. What can I do for what this person wants? I like to a little bit deeper what they need. And truly understand that from a place of service there are people who can communicate, but not necessarily connect, or they can basically network, and not necessarily communicate, but if you can network and communicate, you have a better shot at connecting I'm a great believer in systems so systems thinking is just really about taking the idea that you have a a subject, and you systematize it and sequencing properly so when I constantly do in all these situations is to try to have the system and the sequence organized in such a fashion that you really do, connect and have that ability to have meaningful impact. Very, very good way to break that down. Mean excellent excellent. Let's Jim to the to the program. WHO WANTS TO SHARE? What will the attendees get? What would the takeaways before this event? So. Let me kick that off. You know we didn't event. Precise, said that proved to be very successful, we may have cracked a model on how to do an online events successfully and. We kinda using that format, so we'll open up with a Paul Polman the C. of Unilever head of the International Chamber of Commerce. And I asked him how to. How does he advised small businesses today very specifically. I said to him from where you are. What advice would you give to a nail salon in Boise? Idaho? He actually had a fabulous answer about being a leader in your community helping the. Businesses around you, except for any goes into that length, and so we have some discussions at the beginning of what's happening in the world today. Look at this time as an opportunity out rather than crisis, his easy to get down in that. Then we've got some very tactical things about. How do you actually get through this year? Ryen Neil. We assume alone joining us. Who helped draft? Legislation Most specifically, the the forgiveness clauses in there because. Congress in the Senate aren't interested in that side much and she beat them over the until they found in. And so, what mechanisms in emergency financing? Michelle is GonNa talk through her world. Our her show angels. is going to slow slot into that part of that's GonNa be broadcast to maybe forty million people around the world this new out of the program. So we have a opening and setting the stage. Be some tactical things that you can do to of get through this year. what adaptations of business models can you? Can you take on for example, one of the spin cycling studios has in order to deal with emergency has rented their rights to their customers for three or four months until they get back together night, and that's lying them at least keep lights. AWW, right, so, what can you do to the current situation? The afternoon is the really important part where we go into the workshops as to have, can you? Think about what your purposes. How does that apply to Your Business? And then? What's a roadmap by which you can really blow yourself? In different ways, and so we have a number of speakers offering workshops for those you can go to any of the ones you want, but we're taping the whole thing. All the attendees want access to all of the order segments for the entire program I love that I. Love that anybody else when add anything to that. They think he's I think. Sulaiman's really covered a lot of it. I think he's covered a lot. I'll just go on to say that. In addition to some of the great tools that seleman team will be will be presenting around taxing and innovation were bringing in sort of that SDG sustainable development. Goal United Nations. Framework that we've developed. We have some custom tools for small businesses, which really will help help them understand just how important it is to think about. Including a framework around. The sustainable development goals and people, planet and profit, because large corporates are looking for that from their suppliers and partners. Governments are looking for it, so it's prudent for them to begin to learn more about what they can do. Many of the alrighty doing wonderful things, and it's about how they can tell that story to the marketplace to help increase business. So Neil you wanted to add something yard, do so I've been looking at this kind of full spectrum I know that a sleigh Michelle or been very immersed in this than I think if I were to say the value that people could find here. Perhaps supposed to anywhere else is that you'll get full spectrum? You'll get a variety of speakers that essentially will get you the different pieces that. When you put them together, you'll have a puzzle. People like sue have the money. Will be other speakers for example by introducing who can show you how to take Your Business and get clarity on where even find more profit just before this? Call We had somebody I've introduced selene who has a software tool that's incredible in providing clarity in his. You know Mr Clarity is power, and so it'll show you where if you move some numbers around, you can get crank out more profits, and then I have another colleague for example we will be talking to various points ahead. Amplifier impact and go beyond yourself learn how to write a book or have book ghost written for you to take you to a whole new level. You'd never really thought about an amplifying your friend, and of course. Yeah, you're the you're the grand I'm glad. We talk a by your brand and yes, and having a book. Makes you an expert in your in your field in that space so putting putting words paper definitely definitely so what I'm hearing is. Without, doubt, there is a guarantee. The attendees are going to get value, and they are going to get impact, and they are certainly going to walk away with tools that that will help them scale their business so I. I mean this is happening so quick, and I know that you. When you started doing this, it was like yes, we're doing this. We're putting it together. How are you and you have? Let's call it other your business and you're still putting this together and giving you're giving it your all. How is your teams coming together to support each of these each of you and this rapid development is rapid deployment of this event and concert series. Yeah I'd like to. I'd like to definitely address that okay. Small Team I owe a great great thanks to. We. Have we've got a lot on our plate? We've got some real product innovation. Happening but we believed and committed that this is something really crucial for for the world, and so we're really honor to work with Salim team. It's only been five weeks, but our core teams have brought in people like Neil and others from the outside. Who are supporting us and I think that's really important to so so kind of an expanded network that's jumping into the help support because they care about these very issues i. It's been if five weeks that. And a huge amount of effort and passion. Across the two organizations in figuring out ways to work together in very rapid manner right very very rapid. Dating. Willingness! We're going. I think you're right. Though it's people wanting to give, give back, give from the heart, and even when I shared with my team, because some of the Marin vacation and I had. Contact with them. And I said okay, I said just need a couple of things done, and now tell me what to do, so they kind of help, make us I'm not the technology guru here. I know enough to get to get. So they did that, and then I out to my production team I producers for the show at this is what we're doing and they're like. Send it to us. We'll take care of it. We'll get it done, so yeah people wanNA give back and nate. They want to help each other Salim How do you see this playing out with your team? Well. It's been fascinating and again we got together in this such this we go right back to when you're operating in this type of environment, you're fundamental. Purpose is the biggest driver, and we had such an alignment of purpose across all of us that then it became really simple to go. Okay, we're all aiming for this. Let's figure out a mechanism that helps small businesses around the world. This is being a part of this was gonna be promoted across TVs tech on Mexico. As well as well as I just got off the phone with. Somebody that manages millions of small businesses in China last night. Non So they're interested in, so this is. Up being kind of global event, a four small businesses which are the backbone in many countries. And and the most important constituency, but they get ignored often by government knowing we had that alignment of purpose, and it's really easy to work through. The other thing is just today's technologies. Make just so simple to have pat. Get together you know. I've like you've done events in the past. It typically takes six months to put together. And now down two weeks or days right very busy weeks or days, but we it turns out we can do it. We've done a couple of these now, so we're super excited about what's coming and. When people come away, saying that's the best event we have. People saying I will never go to a physical event to get. And so that's really kind of a fascinating op transformation we've created. In in this in this models were looking to apply that to this particular world, Nice Nice Nice and you see minded may have another goodbye to reach out our friends in Malaysia. We have a whole whole spectrum of people there that we've done work with some I wrote it down in my we need. We need to reach out into Ulta Michael and talk to him. So how and you touched on a little bit? How is this virtually bent so different from others that people are saying? I'm not going to live even again. So what? What are you doing differently? So the format is probably the most important. The first is that. It's really important to have networking and so there's a feature for networking where people can randomly if connected to somebody else for exactly three minutes, okay, have a decent conversation, and then you pop up the flips somebody else. There's breakout rooms with all of the speakers. So for example, the main format on the main stage is very rapid fire, five minute kind of interviews or presentations. High metabolism because nobody wants to listen to forty five minutes of slides on an online format. That just doesn't work night you five minutes about kind of snapshots with newer nealer Michelle. Whoever and then there's a breakout session where people can go to those breakout sessions, so becomes almost like a talk show format. Which is pretty intense for for the moderator for the day. To go through a day of this and you know what that's like and. So a lot of wine is needed at the end of the day to kind of cover. Today. Through that quite a bit. But then that format seems to work really well for lying people to go to the area that we want, and we've taped all the other, so they can go back and watch. The other sites are and We had about ninety percent of our audience, actually going back and watching the other videos, which is a staggering okay. They will so they will get access to all of the videos are couch and in most events, people don't bother going back. percent it's just a staggering number so. We've stumbled across. A form of seems to lend very well to this this. Got The secret sauce there. So, what is the cost for this for this about Michelle? actually I'll turn out to Salim. He's he's sort of handling. The cost of ninety seven dollars, but I think we've got a special discount for your folks. That'll be sixty seven dollars anybody signing up through Connie's world and that's for the whole day with the workshops and getting all the access to all the other contents there as well we're we the we hope to deliver like a thousand times return on investment. If you if you can get specific tools. That allow you to solve a navigate. Your finances need some of the financing options that Michelle and others will bring to the table and create a roadmap that allows you to look your business from a futuristic perspective and say where do I want be an auto? A blow this open? Take the example of Ted. It was just a nice conference once a year, a thousand people going to at night. Chris Anderson the three things. He applied a huge purpose ideas worth spreading these. He put all the Ted talks on Youtube for Free Leverett in which media and then he allowed anybody to go create a tech's event by ending, the decades created credited global media brand. With billions of dollars out of that just applying a set of principles, so that kind of a roadmap is what we want to give to people. To then that road map in place and crisis is a terrible thing to waste. This perfect time actually take that little bit of extra yet. The emergency help you ain't right now, but then really set the process in motion for breakthrough success later. There so many opportunities that can come out of this right I mean it was challenging going into it and. What do I do next? Do I go with my business, but there are so many opportunities. If you just look at it with Your Eyes Wide Open. I could jump in to address that point. Yeah, think today. A lot of people are really seeing limitations and more than ever, because of Covid at and frankly I feel for people who, for example I've the example seal were Ole self identity is bound up in what he's done and being the breadwinner for his family. There are people literally like the Nineteen Thirties. They're committing suicide right now in jumping out of windows because they don't see. Or opportunity that's to me. The embodiment of what this conference will be will open up the landscape of possibilities that you're thinking. It's also an alignment, not just technology, but philosophy of the idea is that we are all connected. We are all part of the problem, but the solution and here we are just going to drive forward work crystal clarity as to how you can get more clearly more power men in your business so that you could take that back into your personal life and see that there's more options here than you. I thought about when you enter this conference. So right I mean we are connected connected and I wanNA say something to that we all. These really important to me. Personally one of one of the issues are several of the issues will be addressing is really diversity in inclusion and business and and and frankly supporting diverse minority owned businesses. Women owned businesses your thank. You probably know the statistics that women get if lucky less than two percent of venture capital funding while I'm hoping to change that and with a lot of really good people out there. And Bright minds from some of the top financial firms. In launching some new instruments that actually helped not only women, but diverse and purpose driven companies who struggled to get access to capital because there's concern whether it's an impact business. What are the KPI's and know? Is it still really going to make money and? So I think we need to change. What's happening in terms of mindset of findings? And that's a big piece of supporting those types of businesses that will hopefully be attending as well and while here, some really innovative speakers around that. Yeah so, what is your vision? What is your your your hope for the outcome and I know you've talked to you. Know Michelle you've talked a bit about it. Salim Neil as well I mean for this event. What is your vision and hope for the outcome? Our hope is that thousands of businesses around the world get a sense of optimism and excitement out. Get the tools required to solve for this year. And how do you just get through this? And then set up a roadmap for radical growth in the future. That I like to see exponential interactivity. Okay. I think. Leaking, connector, right I I'm always about the center point, which is that we don't lose sight of the fact that we're part of a human family human experience here, but you know the businesses are the vehicles that allow us to provide were food on the table and more meaningful time quality time with our families, which is why we're all here, but at the same time that we are efficient that we're optimistic and we're. We're effective in our businesses so that we have more of that opportunity to have personal enjoyment, even in the harshest times I mean we want to beat were experiential species, and so when we experience this opportunity to learn more about our businesses that allows us to go back and be empowered is still get through these tough times together, and how those family support systems in ways where their distress and you can still enjoy them. So Michelle! I WANNA WE'RE GONNA start wrapping up here, but I want to ask. Is there a tool, is there? Some advice you can give to on entrepreneurs. Small Business Owners right now. Something that they can implement into their business, right. Absolutely we I think there's a series of tools between what Salim team has, and our team has i. it's really understanding what is their purpose? You know what really drives them. And what will excite them and saw may really reinvent themselves. So we know that, and and so the point is, we're going to offer these tools that literal tools that will help them through the framework bits, leam has identify your purpose and take action against that, and then from my perspective, real tools around. Once you know your purpose and what you're committed to. How does that help the world and the Greater? Good in the future, our planet and our species, and in leveraging our S, you self reporting tool. See this wonderful framework of the United Nations the seventeen sustainable development goals which are all about healing, our planet and people. How do I relate? How does my business? Participate in something so wonderful and something that quite frankly as I said before you know governments and enlarge, corporates are looking in terms of their value chains and some chains. A real business benefit, but there's also a broader benefit for helping the planet, so those tools will be available through this. To really give concrete opportunity. To make a difference, the you said well dangerous opportunity. We're in dangerous times right now. Victory, our greatest opportunity I think on an individual level Thai, Connie herbal business built brought. You're you're your brand? That is your niche. But a lot of people today have gone into business, really not going to the core of who they are. What will make them happy? So in the darkest of times is the greatest of opportunities to have a sense of rediscovery of what you could really be wire here on the planet. And what's your passion? What's your purpose? I find that when I coach a lot of businesses. They've got it wrong. They went into something to make money, but they're not necessarily fulfilled or happy. Now is an opportunity. Opportunity to self discovery yourself in wet drives. You wakes you up to get out of bed in the morning so that you've apple linemate within yourself whereby you figure out what what is your passion and purpose built a company around that, and so essentially instead of coming up with a company, and then trying to figure out with the branding could be when you figure it out your own personal brand. You're already sequencing. It correctly were then the companies. The manifestation of it and things are in the fluff. Not at eleven, Selene Yemeni closing words to our listeners. You know we're we're at a time in around the world where we have two options as a society. We have a either a star Trek path ahead of us or a Mad Max. and we're heading down the Mad Max pass now, and we're interested in tool sets for. How do you switch that future? So we ended up in an environment of abundance successor. We have energy. One is coming very shortly. We've gone from information. Scarcity, information, abundance, and the business models change, and as we enter an era of abundant information, abundant energy, abundant, clean water. How do we navigate dust? Because almost every business in the world is dependent on selling scarcity. For Five thousand years. If you did not scare, Steve, did never business, so people need to take on this new mindset and shift us in a different way, because we can actually navigate I ignore the politics just go find your purpose. Find Your Passion, and you will succeed. I'M GONNA. Tell a very quick story. Absolutely those blogger in England is name is Brown Moses. Moses and he was working. Literally. You know ladies underwear store. You can't make this stuff up and he He gets laid off and he has finding other work that he doesn't know what to do. Except he has a passion for small arms and armaments, and he's researching all of the armaments used in the Syrian civil war, and he's on the breaks the news. That the US here in government used chemical weapons against his people, and he goes from UN- unemployed on nowhere store worker to highly paid consultant for for the intelligence agencies in the U N Security Council Cetera because he followed his passion. That's an extreme example, but when you follow your passion, you have the energy you are lined up with your are supposed to be in the world, and then you can really make a difference in the world, and we're going to need a lot of people with passionate. Make sure we can tilt this future because adding in a dark space right now, and that's part of the reason we're doing this. I love that wonderful, and I always like to say that your dreams your reality waiting for you to get there. What are you waiting for? What are you waiting for? Everyone that is all we have for today. I just wanted to thank our guest for being here with us today Selena's Mall Neil, sperling and Michelle by Giovanni practice. That name so I got it right. But I just want to thank you for being entered the work that you're doing and the passion. That, you're bringing forward because I know what you're purposes well. So that's all we have for today. And you learned that we are unstoppable together. You can skill a your business to where you want to go and remember when you're implementing your business or whether you're sitting there, saying, where do I go from year? Remember your purpose. Remember the passion that you have, and that is going to be your guiding principle that will be your guiding light to help you Dow. Get you there. And so, this is what you need to do next. I will be still have that. Pencil and paper out. You need to head over to eat ex world dot live forward slash small. Business Yunlin more about the program. Learn more about the many many excellent speakers that are going to be here at this program during this day and before you register, reach out to me directly, so you can get thirty dollars off thirty dollar discount and I'll give me a fifteen minute free session that we could chat a bit more about Your Business and again why this program? is going to impact and you're gonNA. Learn so much at this program that you just don't want to miss it. All of my contact information will be found here in the social post and then also. We want you to hold on new calendar for the exit live event. That is going to be happening later. This year is going to be a live event and evening concert, and that's scheduled to happen in National Tennessee on September tenth so from all of us to all of you have a perfect day and thank you all for being here, and continuing to share the Connie five show have a great day and always always kind to each other.

Michelle Neela Salim Neil Connie business owner SME US United Nations consultant Selene Yemeni WanNa Singularity University Sulaiman Neil sperling SPACEX X Prize Foundation Michele Boise
Remote Island

P.S.A Podcast

31:12 min | 2 years ago

Remote Island

"Welcome to produce sportive attestations, which is better known as P podcasts. PSA uncle vision podcasts that challenges the audience keeping outside the box using real life experiences. Clever original both and degraded use of satire in order to the audience three from negative dance and put those own personal growth. This is by no means admit to condemn or bast audience. But instead encourage showcase different perspective. There might not have been seen before he says designed to showcase to listen to the power of the mind is not a joke in person. Learn control their my NS off that will ultimately control their life. Because you built up your wall, you with certain resistance a certain things, or, you know, low timers stuff like if he's not this or anything triggers ole feeling some from your pass some us. Don't wanna do. Actually, you know runaway. I'm not doing shit. We shut down. Yeah. Talked about that the week will be recited down kinda go hand head kind of communication because you are alone. Does not mean you long. I have we was trying to tell me. Oh, you grew up like that that you will they your your. Move here yourself, you can have one if you don't love. Nobody exactly everything. All right job back at it. Again, we hear again for another episode of great persona PSA today. And this is episode five. We're moving along pretty fast. You know? I remember I was preparing for season three see through our here views lists off the charts. You know, I can't even keep up with them. I got mohair. So it's always good. So on today's episode. This episode is titled remote, either the main reas- isolation can be like a double edged sword. It can be healthy for period of two long hearing more issues than there were previously. The inspiration comes from a remote island. I don't know if anybody's bent over moat island before you know, you hear obviously being fluid out. You know, what a lot of new this actually bought to do after report this. But you know, added secluded just island is a large body water in. It's just big land. You know, circle of surrounding bottled water any so. So remote island. It's the grim. Polls by Ariel. Sharon sees a lady on Instagram. Inspirational thing is mean that she may oppose. She made Latam actually going read y'all that was inspiration for this podcast several discussions with my friends about that. You know, this kind of this yourself situations sometimes you needed. But then sometimes it can be a little excessive cause more problems you Novela ratchet. So migos feature risky some island. That was hit back in the day. I'm gonna listen to into the car day and in infamous terms elevations required separation because sometimes go to the next level. You have to kinda separate choose from people certain places all kind of stuff. So today, I have a guest so Washington where you're from during are saying Louis. Okay. We got. Mostly to. Yeah. We got taking a Bill. You know, how we doing the though is not called chicken here. So please stop saying this our slow have you isolated yourself from people's -ociety anything like that. When starting from Jones child. Okay. Did you find yourself? Getting whilst the thoughts now is cloudy, sometimes, okay? Okay. Look loud. To me. Did you reply all scenarios over and over again lights? Maybe something happened bad or good as you just kept on going over all of these. Yep. As it is your memories coming back to like just replaying and you thinking about how you can change situational doubt DEA do differ. How okay heavy ever dealt with somebody who went called a drought with you. I selected themselves from you just kinda like just let you along just without warning. Really gonna head. No. You know, they let me falter true. All right. So now number to define the word remote because that's the part of the title. So remote is of a place situated off in the main centres of population is this. So then if we define isolation, this is a few definitions. Why selection is cut off a lip behind remote has separate physically socially being or feeling set or kept apart from others. Now, I Sulaiman means far away from everyone everything else the word isolated actually co from the legwork insult, which means that is good. I didn't realize that. Did you know that? Just. Yeah. That's interesting. Because like if you think on an island isolated from everything else. So I wind 'isolation, you know, usually do play to each other. But like if I hear island naturally, I feel like I'm gonna think alike some tropical everybody everybody on isolated. You're giving the group year buddy on the beach like know thirty one young to drew them. Yeah syndrome, but then we'd 'isolation just think prison because it is kind of resin. Brisbane mind. Yeah. Thing. Because really the freeze you of gonna be okay. So they're not access. A like, do you feel as though and yo- states isolation did ever feel as though you was in jail cell because I always mitts we can't be physical now instill like I was in a a loop. Okay. Yeah. That's that's probably the that's probably the best way described it because everything just kept going over and over again years, and I rely you're trapping. Would you try to Lou? But it's not like a Jew. You can't get up because you know, his scape that loop if you'd just but way oh sauce so little time about that. Okay. So let's get into why people like themselves. So trust issues, Drake voice. You know? People have fear of. Song? I'm listen to that today to look a lot today. Listens. Mostert Yadel kitchen. Why put on my story but after listed by did? So when trust issues you answer think of fear getting hurt or getting done wrong. You know, pleasure. People damn that's. You. Got a whole plan is just going isolation. Isolating this. Rollo's per Elliot's. Six three who hurt you out too. Young to be this hurt. Joe? Again. Now, not wrote in the ACA. The second reason is people isolate them says no one understands them that when I can touch on the personally, I felt that way before you know, you feel I don't about get where you're coming from people might always overlook what you say. You you wrong late would've you agree. No matter. Listen like new. That one mental illness. Another reason why people go inside salaciously be depression. It can be by Paula, anxiety, social anxiety material such a little bit later on today. A lot of miss the one on a lot of drumming and then stay away for what? Now that will not can. This actually the best reason. Yeah. Because a lot of stuff going on. And it's just like, you know, what you know, what what you don't need being. And this is that just drum from audio. Another reason knows look funny walking isolate them says it's because I've been talking to cash money bullshit, and they're gonna give beat up also vita someone who's gonna hurt. I mean, they're gonna find you eventually. But the thing is maybe by the time, they find they might not care them up problem been years this few hundred dollars. Yeah. Ain't no. Knocking about five years. Be twenty years. Keyser? Use me the money. They like me. Y'all wanna told kids hostile way miss the cruise? Okay. So they don't wanna pop off on body. So you know, what kind of similar to the other one? You know, you just because you know, your mouth ain't in the right place in the some might, you know, be with the hit people. You know, I'm not one of those people, but people that are, you know, let me just say away because I might do some site Sunday chew going regret. They, you know, simple when they wanna get is whether it'd be spiritually, mentally physically. You know, you might wanna get your weight together. We might want to build up your weight might wanna lose weight. You know, you might want to read some books and get some paradigm shifts going to help with that. And the last reason I got the is because people just might be damn tired people full time jobs. So he will work two and three jobs at twenty one. They just might need a break. Lisin until you get home. You just kick your shoes off and relax your fees. I really didn't plan. It. Planet today. So what's your take on that? Like, any of those things I've written you probably just those reasons probably the one where people don't really understand you. Yeah. We all been early in some point of your life. You're going to gain the certain amount of knowledge where you feel like just mentally. Yeah. You can't just hold a conversation with some people isolate yourself, but you know, you got to come time reality new, I wanna people where I can you know, I can't talk with the best. We can talk about these stuff than he wants clown. Bs talk about that to talk about anything. But everybody everybody can't do some people just think I didn't know that about myself until I actually just jumped into this. Yeah. And I had to do that Oregon's. I tried to play me because it was like I don't KiKi with everybody. And they tried to play me. 'cause you know, you keep everybody. I'm sorry that I like talking to people get tired of, you know, I do, you know, me, you know. So, you know, but okay. So with that being said, it's two types of isolating. The first one is emotional 'isolation in the second one is social isolation of Gordon the five signs of emotional isolation. Arcusfoundation counseling directed at or this is once avoidance from closing intimate interactions with others emotional association is basically too much. Meantime can most if not lead to unhealthy practices in this causes distrusting envoys of any kind of interactions with others. So because you built up your wall, you build a certain resistance certain things, or, you know, low timers love stuff like if is not this or anything that triggers the old feeling some from your pass, some us don't wanna do just instantly, you know, run away. I'm I'm not. This shit this shutdown. Yeah. Talking about that the week with shutdown. It's kind of go head to head kind of communication. Is the project and defense. Mechanisms drown wants energy causes failure to address any underlying problems. That is in a way that you, and then it create any motion isolation side, this thing creates patterns of behaviors vicious cycles of emotional isolation. So as always you always on defense came to buy you nothing if you says, something don't get the reaction. You wanna hear you go you out like a light nother song this? I saw Sikhs. I got here. So moving onto the more examples so you starting to like somebody, and you cut off before get to serious is a not into in which offend like that you scared to get into much feelings, you get a new for any cut him off for whatever reason you on a team or whether it be work or football team. But you don't be a bond. Nobody just kind of like, you know, I'm at work, and that was kinda double this can go either way. I. Yeah. That's what about that will either way because these examples came from me, but I feel as though it can't go because sometimes at work, you just need these believe that that to do we just going to work just associate relationship on the science will say sometimes if you can just kind of happen where you develop a relationship with somebody at work, but I wouldn't say going looking forward. But if it happens it happens, but at the same time don't shut off if it's something that could be potentially good relation line. Now, you just walk and ride like the molding Avon of doing this. I. I feel I can see I walk around working till like thinking myself like these really think we friends. They called me bro is and I don't think we actually cool like no asthma. Hang out because I'm not gonna do. Arm say you wanna play ball like. Yeah. Become another show. This another one of a moment children will risen than this job. You've got so used to how you had that was someone does some different. You wanna hear my way our way? Now real reality. I feel every child like that only because I feel like there's the this two types children. I've knows there's the ones that super extra. And then there's ones this hill achieve. They have a lot date have pretty much all the same similarity. Besides like having extra personality. This is my personality. I'm just extra extra read all about it. Like like it. You know, whatever you gotta deal with, but you got other was real cheap. But I will say that. And I'm not going to get too much Nebot. A lot of children are is easy for them to be an isolation because it's with us. It used to be by yourself. So you know, that's the thing to just because you are alone. Does not mean you loan. I have we was always trying to tell me you grew up like that that you will. Yours yourself. Move phone with yourself. You can have one. I love I love. No by exactly everything which so if you if you'll learn nothing s today, learn it off. So emotional selection occurs with someone again is able on women should their most would others who kinda covered that some may be reluctant to discuss anything. But the most superficial matters. So lucky say, they work, you know, I'm not telling my personal visa, but we might talk about something happen at work made something happened on the internet at TV so without emotional support. They may feel shutdown or no. So again, like if you mostly isolate yourself, you maybe try to open up to someone before in the person told all your business on mad day. So now, you know, telling about nothing else in the more when you trial somebody again, I say this all the time, but you naked with their grades. Or a drive but a oxygen. Really? You know, maybe you look horny nobody jokes says humor or they or they don't get your view on life. So you just become emotionally detached. So now, I've got some stats from good therapy dot com. Twenty eighteen Cigna surveys. They're far away when not far away that it would long ago. Say that American adults claims loneliness has reached epidemic levels across all age groups, it says that although long is not the same 'isolation many studies use it as Margaret violation. So the study stated that forty three percent of Americans report they often feel isolated from others. Twenty seven percent fear that they don't have people who truly understand them and forty percent don't have meaningful personal social interaction. So they don't have really quality time with family on base. Now them numbers are kinda have they not that high. Either. Do I feel like the last one with the social interactions? I find these is social media, and like, you know, technology so loudly really interesting because his life. The really go up to you to determine how many friends they have. Yep. And whether they're lonely or not they don't really acknowledged that people this in their face as living everyday. Yeah. Philly amalia. Let's go. While. So all right. So now. Social. Is an absence of social relationships. So the snake from solitude, which is simply the state of being alone. So social isolation can occur in like solitude or in the vicinity of so short like I described earlier socially opera. So you can be around people and be you know, in the face of everybody. But you still just kinda like I'm just here. You know this. Yeah. Just that. Do you not really not really interacting with too many people mice life? Make a joke about hearing in. Why did you? Why did you? Loking have moved I boat being we get. You know, people who are socially isolate themselves socially awkward. They avoid social interaction. Due to Shane depression spent extended periods of time alone, they spirits experience. Lows executive fears of Bandon are Leah social interaction. They have only limited or superficial social contact. They let important social overfishing relationships, and I developed severe distress in loneliness is interesting facts. Know. So let's work down to me. So again, the main we already went over it. I really end just in case you get first time isolated can be like a double-edged sword. It can be healthy for a period, but for too long can create more issues than were previously. So that being said, you know, this is good. So let's not athletic isolation is always back is not sometimes, you Iceland. His can't be doing. It can be good for your health. Mentally, you know, it's from you kind of say earlier say saying something you regret, especially somebody like me. So sometimes you need to separate yourself in order to like seat that life knew it makes you I mean, sometimes you gotta be very so they actually come into terms with the truth. Actually, realizing you are. The people around you, you know, your life. You might not be where you wanna be a need to be. So you kinda gotta just isolated this. This is just see. Okay. When do role doing wrong with him. I might might be doing right? You know, it might be time for you to elevate go to that next level. But you would know because you to golfed in the mix matrix, there's some people toxic. So they don't want to be by themselves. They know they know their talks. Turns with. I self. So my like, you know, let's talk about some other stuff say for instance, you the pink apart from you. Now, I can speak on this. 'cause you already say you really had to happen. But like he might drift off. And you might think you something you did. But it really might be something going on in atmosphere with them or it might just be a time for them to go away. You know, not like that nothing, but you know, just ask him. So if somebody disobeyed sell from you, what's the first thing, that's come to your mind. What I do. Really issue or you just need this. That's my I will. Yes. Worry maleable probably before Bradley Beal again without do. Yeah. It'd be something to do. That's that's what I would think. Now, I'm about explain to scenarios. And of course, it's not news. The names one might include me, one of might not. I don't know what. Got to scenario. This call is dealing with France this themselves. Okay. So the first one is afraid this from another friend in France that was going through personal issues. But the part the front only active drive that one person it was still talking everybody else. What would you think about that? You would think this clearly issue. Okay. You you obviously got some personal beef will be or something that I did. Yeah. Was saying, oh, I'm the stuff, but she laugh at Greenway everybody else. Exactly. Now those involved. At one day self in other thought, what did I do? But the other friends coming out later on say, I was jealousy. You only because he was doing so much, and I feel like I wasn't wearing needed to be. And I could keep watching that. Because it was it was toxic for me to see like a meat constantly compare myself to you briefly causing MIR debris year, basically, that's why no friend was upset when a found out. What happened? It was like I understand why you stop, you know, top about me not talking about him. But you know, talking to me. All right. So now, let's kind of breakdown is me. So the rate the meaning that she made it a pulse that she made was before you assume someone is acting funny. Check on the person the person being a fight of their life. Mentally physically emotionally, everybody. This is sales when people fake sometimes this themselves because they don't want to hurt anyone else why they need? He'll sometimes people are just going through things that have nothing to do anyone particular. So don't take it personal getting me and just internalizing. I just kinda got like, you know, people go through stuff to, you know, don't take personal be selfish. Just let people had a space because you never know. You just never know. Some people were switcher Ross later emotionally really can't use to the view being social with anybody. You this battery because they might be they go off like if any moment yet, they might go off they might spat breakout cry. You just never know you you might be toxic for them. Like, I said, you might be toxic as far as you know, maybe. Usa seeing you being successful in life. And they not they can't watch it. 'cause they now or maybe toxic because you ain't doing shit. You just on room shoot. What they be all, you know, smoking in the basement, do you probably smoke radio. They love. What am I ninety one smoking all but you. Urge them to smoke in the basement and make beats on the wall. Don't wanna do that. You know, they don't want to hurt you what they're getting themselves together because then might not be mostly Venable. You maybe you always going through something and you come in with Joe problems. And they don't wanna hear that every day and half you. And again, if the person does this themselves stays away from you. You know, any go with is in my hurt. But I mean, it could be your life, your girlfriend, your brother, you, whatever, you know. But was meant for you always going to come back. You know, something that just had it affect on people angle. So name. But like. If you leave. I'll always so so the reasons five salacious, you know, 'isolation is good in a happy mood. It makes you more aware. We always need to be aware of our surroundings aware of what we do on it. What we not doing? You know, you looking for of. But really Uday sponsor, you know, you might need to stay away from people think like, you know, I'm looking for them. But they don't never have nothing. They depending depending on you. You know, you really realize you spend all your money on wrong stuff. You know, you I hear buying, you know, something by the LED by James. Two hundred three hundred a regular begin flew out you'd be out somewhere, you can play Costa Rica? You can use it for -cation or you use it for down payment on your apartment after momma house that to eagle one all cau- give you know. Let's like that. You can't fall on your Bryant your career your future, you know, taking you'll stuck to the next level. You can't stay you an exact same spot. You are you were in last year you need to go into some isolates. You need to distance yourself when people because clearly UN where you need to be U2. young being really at any age, but especially yield twenties. Eighteen nineteen twenty as to be an exact same spot too young stuff that too and I hate people that'd be twenty two. I am bragging about it. You can. This foot. Relationship and you probably cheating. So you stay away from everybody. Hey, you know, we've gotta look at all angles. Some people are so people are just hose you can't. You can't. Once upon a time along some people got they wanna disease wrong. The wrong. They wanna flip. Ma'am relations. I just won't you are. I you learn and unlearn from experiences again, we all have toxic patterns. Maybe you quit this out of people. Maybe you quick to cut people off. That's nothing to brag about going to do a whole pockets people. Bright about cutting people off not okay. Like, I hate people. Brag about not having friends like you don't have no friends, you the problem you're supposed to have we been we're Bill we will create a designed to have social interactions now with everybody. But you can't just be like all the phrase new, and I used to say there's some wrong with you. It's not. Okay. It's not right. And they simply also, you know, you can focus on your spiritual mental physical health. So my college students so said earlier you deal with miss stuff that don't add up always attracted self, you know, another Bill for them. If you graze any too hot duck off shift together don't be undergrad eight years, isn't that worth again? On the agency you grad. I graduated four and a half years graduated twenty two, but I know people who still college undergrad. Grew or not. You really is. You know, again, you keep saying keep saying that, you know, y'all have therapists on the campus not all of them not every school pays for. Sometimes. You do have pocket he'll still be cheaper than going to one in real world. But most colleges do sponsor it because you pay your autumn fees. You pay you run a position trying to join organization that's time to kind of duck off like if you can't only because you know, it's gonna be a lot of myths and stuff going on a lot of they trying to come and get care, whatever kind of stay away against kind of relate with grades during finals amid terms. Duck off starts the autumn parties ended the school year parties duck off various wanna get your body. Right. Start going to the gym on campus that you painful paying for the Joe fed has and that we use start using body. Whereas I wanna go drinking. No, they making you buddy. Thank you, buddy. Right. We heard that it is her own room. Yeah. Fishing. All started looking like a vision blood last month. You know, you don't go to every function. You can just kinda Chiel saying breaks they away. All right. So now gametime. One of my favorite newest segment steel, today's game is called isolation of now, I'm gonna be asking their young with should be situations these narrow so he going 'isolation mole. He's just kinda like face a situation hit on if your friend cut. You Warner says you isolate yourself let them have any moment or you should just kind of go hit on. It's like. You should if your friend you show. Let them head a moment you get caught up in scandal at work, which work wife. Got a little series with from flirting one thing led to another. Now, y'all that's going. No, you shouldn't be having going on your both mirror. Isolate yourself uses kind of take a hit on like major beach lying. They should just kind of like. Should isolated. Okay. I guess that's the news that won't talk about that one here, which I've gotta say when your family find out smoking marijuana isolate not face this hit. Do that when you or call you UBS isolation of face to face it? Yeah. If y'all can ruin them into as let yourself for six months ago, fifty cents. Because I'm the yellow he hated. Six months, you could do one. Not be multiple. So in the question of challenges week my question, the challenge for y'all you always on the scene you always in everybody face some time out stopping a local dedicate sometime to yourself. Whether it be ten minutes. Miniatures meantime, maybe if you go out four days by the week take a day to where you don't do nothing, and you hell anti or you say isolating dedicates time going out more being more socialite. You know, some people you need again, you need social rights just top the people, you know, go. Hey, let's go here this week. You know, I'll never see all those go eat somewhere. Hers money, the crow the okay Carson via yada Kroger. Do it. You're also. I I'm not gonna do that. But. That's what you wanna do. That's what you wanna do. So any clothes remarks? Now think we've pretty much everything knows. Okay. Our? Oh, boy dairy of pulling up. Tune the next week. I got two guests so tune in for that BSA signing out hours will keep it of like Kurt. Remember who you off making mind? Don't let them make you.

Joe fed social isolation moat island France Latam Sharon Oregon Brisbane ACA Washington Paula Warner Louis Mostert Yadel Bradley Beal Sulaiman Jones football Lou
Soleimani's Iran

Throughline

47:43 min | 1 year ago

Soleimani's Iran

"The hand when possible. I American contract to call one in five for We have I believe a bit you. Can you have up there Yeah Yeah Oh the tragedy of the moment for those of us who paid attention to Iran. There was this glimmer of hope that both the United States and Iran or adversaries of the Taliban in Afghanistan which was hosting al-Qaeda so it seemed like there was this natural convergence of interest and by all accounts he ran played quite constructive role in cooperating with the US and the campaign to get rid of the Taliban Afghanistan. Mrs Kareem such poor a senior fellow at the Carnegie Endowment Menton Adjunct Professor at Georgetown until two thousand and one Iran was boxed in it was isolated and surrounded by and and it was on the east side enemy. The Taliban machine on the western side Bagdhad and and Saddam Hussein's regime the attack terrorist attacks attacks off of September eleventh. Two Thousand and one changed at situation completely because the US would soon go. After both of Iran's enemies Rusada God welcomed development. The Revolutionary Guard is a military arm of the Islamic Republic of Iran. It's also called the I. R. J. We see and there were secret meetings engineer. The iology see intelligence officers handed over maps and exact locations nations of Taliban strongholds in Afghanistan to American representatives for which American presidency is very very thankful because American intelligence presence at the time in in Afghanistan was very limited. This is Allie Albany. He's a senior fellow at the Arab Gulf States Institute he's been researching the Revolutionary Guard for years ears. And he wrote the book on the topic called Do you believe it or not. I don't remember it right now. I don't know Iran and built yes Iran India. I never liked title of the book. You know that that's why I don't there. Was this hope in the air that maybe there's finally an opportunity for us. Huron Reproche Mon.. Many Iranians were hopeful about that. But the good vibes between the two changed completely clicking when president pushed liberty so-called axis of evil speech in which she put the wrong North Korea and Iraq lump them as part of one axis. seveval states like these and their terrorist allies constitute an axis of evil arming to threaten the peace of the world told that only confirmed the already very cynical world view of Iran's hardliners that cooperation with the United it states as futile walmart rain inside and pushed into God. They felt betrayed. They felt they had played a constructive role in helping to get rid of the Taliban. In their own opinion they had helped yet states when there were rewarded by being placed in the axis of evil at that time the Revolutionary Guard and the political leadership in Indus Lama public decided decided that President Bush could not be trusted and the United States was a very very serious threat. They also believe that it was about time. Time to impose some losses on the United States. That's became reality. After two thousand three were got United States also also invaded Iraq. Let me say this to all Iraqis who are listening. The regime is not telling the truth. There are no negotiations taking place with anyone. In Saddam Hussein's regime there will be no outcome to this war that leave Saddam Hussein and his regime in power. Let there be no doubt. Many of the greatest advocates of the Iraq war believed this would be a project to democratize the entire Middle East. And and that's going to immediately de-legitimize the Iranian regime. It's going to de-legitimize that theocracy in Iran and so if you're awesome Sulejmani and I told her harmony. You think to yourself we will do everything in our power to make sure that the US war in Iraq walk is a colossal failure. US Air Strike has killed. Iran's most important military commander the targeted killing of Major General Kacem Sulejmani. I think Americans have to understand how significant so the money was. This is the night Iran struck back for the death of Sulamani last night's missile launcher wrong targeted to faces that are key to. US operations in the region. Ukrainian passenger collegiate played has crash award our admitting it shot down a Ukrainian passenger plane by mistake. You're listening to through line from NPR. We'll be back in time to understand the present by now. You've probably heard the name costume solely money. Many times in the news when he was assassinated he suddenly became a household old name in America but for people in Iran his name is not new solely money was arguably the most important member number of the Revolutionary Guard which has been fighting direct and proxy wars in the Middle East for forty years it was designated a terrorist organization by the State Department Hartman in two thousand nine hundred ninety but that label doesn't capture its complexity or its immense power the Revolutionary Guard and cost him so name manny embody both outside of the Islamic Republic of Iran's identity on the one hand they position themselves as the only power in the Muslim world resisting American imperialism and on the other they behave cynically and try to dominate the affairs of the Middle East at any human cost in this episode. We're going to explore the origins of the I.. RTC and the story of awesome solely money to understand exactly what their impact has been on the Iran. US relationship Hi this is Iran on and you're listening to this reliance on NPR this message comes from NPR sponsor capital one with capital one. A new savings account earns five times the national average. That's five times more savings toward that overdue. Home addition or maybe even an addition addition on that edition capital. One is helping you earn more towards your savings goals. This is banking reimagined. What's in your wallet? Capital Abbas one. NA member FDIC. Hagi was good. You know we probably shouldn't be friends. I mean statistically speaking most adults don't don't have a single friend of a different race as it happens on the next episode of NPR's coats which were talking about making a maintaining friendships across racial lines within within and subscribe part one the Goat Def- take on we only well. This is the sound of Iran's supreme leader Ali Khamenei leading prayers at the funeral of Qassem. So money they know bill tyrod in the garlic and you you. After a few minutes he breaks down and cries Do Bake why the Romans you love. This moment perfectly illustrates the impact of Sulaiman's death. Here here you have the most powerful person in the country the Middle East longest running autocrat weeping openly because one of his soldiers has died but he wasn't just any soldier he was the head of Iran's goods force which is the intelligence arm of the Revolutionary Guard established after the Islamic Revolution in nineteen. Seventy nine when he runs king. The Shah was dramatically overthrown by a mass movement. Supporting the cleric Ayatollah Khomeini. Ah I do you know yourself. Whether you're remarkable Phantom uh-huh you'll be seen Manhattan Them they have told me that they are getting prepared. And I have given the permission to prepare themselves. House which means getting arms and the Revolutionary Guards were essentially set up in the immediate aftermath of the revolution because as the Shaw's military which Khomeini inherited with the revolution he was inherently mistrustful of them. Because he said these are not my men. These were men who were trained by the Shah's government and so like most authoritarian regimes in the Middle East that were extremely paranoid about the prospect of the cool and for that reason they set up this initially rag tag group lament. They called the guardian of the revolution. SIPA PASTA RON and To be the protectors of the revolution. And even if you look at the name of the institution the exact and word by what translation is the army of the Guardians of the Islamic Revolution in other words. The name Iran is not even mentioned in the name of the organization and in the logo of there. There is a picture of the globe not not a map of Iran so clearly this group of Iranian revolutionaries perceived their own organizations as the vanguard of an internationalist revolution That tatty Vija Omen that Buddhist chevette. Madonna's job you that this is awesome solely money speaking. I'm also amber a happy. These brandish Moham- fake mad but that Holy Schmidt when he died he was one of the most powerful and well known people in the Middle East but his story starts the exact opposite way it ended in complete obscurity. He was born the son of landless peasants who left school. After only five years of schooling left the village mountain of rapport goes to to carry on and begins working as a construction worker There is no record of Mr Sulejmani being cavalry activists prior to the Revolution of seventy-nine after after the revolution of seventy-nine he accused have joined the local branch of the revolution had got core in Carmen. At that time we are not every mirror of his ideological beliefs but there is one thing that we know in the immediate aftermath of the revolution and many of them more or less lost their belief in the clerical they believed in Khomeini yes as a spiritual leader and as a leader of the revolution but most of the other members of the cleric class. They completely distrust distrusted and the reason for that is that Revolutionary Guard officers the Bor taken out and recruited to serve as personal bodyguards to the clerics as personal bodyguards. They had to live physically under the same roof as members of the clergy. And when you live with people you find out that not everyone wearing a cloak and turbine is a saint. You find out that someone who from the pulpit of the mosque is preaching against drinking alcohol. Perhaps hatch enjoys a drink at home. Somebody who is reading Homo Sexuality may be interested in a handsome young man at home so the sanctity of if declared flash completely came down crashing so instead of being overtly anticlerical all the IRDC court including Mr Sulejmani. They developed an ideology. which mixed she? I slam and Persian nationalist Iranian national. So in that sense they managed to combine the two and this combination was so unbelievably potent that it managed to mobilize millions of Iranians one. Ghassem Sulaiman need joined the Revolutionary Guards. He was very young only in his early twenties unease but he still managed to impress his commanders enough to get an important task. One that probably had an impact on him for the rest of his life in one of his earliest assignments was to go quell Kurdish rebellion in northwest Iran. Because at the time there was an anti government. I'm an uprising in Kurdistan. And if you see the photographs of that rebellion They are incredibly violent. Approximately ten in two thousand. Kurds died during that period. And I think that that was his baptism into that kind of career. He saw terrible things with his own eyes and perhaps he also engaged in in acts which are difficult to to to defend morally. But at the time it was perceived as has necessity in order to preserve the territorial integrity of Iran immediately after that came the heroic phase of the Revolutionary Guards history in Iran. And that is the the war with Iraq. Yeah in one thousand nine hundred eighty. Saddam Hussein invaded south western Iran and the Revolutionary Guard forces were some of the first to respond and the frontline cities Iranian troops herod to engage the invaders local resistance was led by Iran's Revolutionary Guards who were fiercely loyal to I- Atallah Khomeini. What was initially the small rag tag group of men mushroomed into thousands of men? They relied heavily on rifles and rocket propelled grenades and in sporadic engagements exacted a heavy toll of the invading forces. DOC from their example stemmed the Iranian mood of self sacrifice in a holy war Iraq in the beginning of the war was occupying some of Iran's what's most important oil producing areas if Iran lost land to Iraq entire country would collapse. Even though the Iranian side was outgunned. They were able to push Iraq's military back to its borders in two years China in this Michigan Data Mugabe la-thani b.'s. This toddler Gondar Mobile Dishman. Modesto's rouge modern new gruesome should vessel to those were sitting in the House House of God standing up against the enemies of God. I will kiss your hands and shoulders over. Because the hands of Gaden above you Qassem Suleimani became a revolutionary guard commander and began to build his reputation as a brave warrior. This is the commander who would be talking personally to all men are under his command before each attack and we are talking about the war which most of all resembles were one trench warfare. You had at least two hundred fifty thousand Iranians being killed in that war. He wasn't this commander who would sit in a bunker and Tehran an order. People around you know He. He likes to go out there in war zones and and appear to be man of the people and here. You have one commander young man from Carmen. Doing reconnaissance missions behind enemy lines wants to minimize the risk for men under his command and I'm really emphasizing this because most of the people from chairman David in the same division and and many of them were actually personal friends and sometimes family members of Mr Sulejmani on one occasion radio dot which which was transmitting programs in Persian language made Mr solely money in minor celebrity of the war because on one particular occasion when Mr Sulejmani was doing wink reconnaissance mission this young peasants sees a goat and he steals the goats brings to go back and prepares Kebab for his men and and and radio DOT apparently heard of this story and began propagating. The name Sulejmani Goat Tif will be Shaw. This chatman Batman log on what Tom would do them of other manage it Jen. Gee Mom AngloGold as pitched your niche behaved Mustafa Deduction Gen with all my soul and belief. I believe our war was full of those blessed souls who the heavens were ecstatic to meet up here solely money. The goat the went on to fight for the entirety of the Iran Iraq war with almost no leave repeatedly repeatedly committing acts of bravery by nineteen eighty-eight when the war ended. He was widely considered to be a war hero. The had this charisma SMA which really engendered enormous loyalty and affection and even after the war ended. Did you know he didn't like many. Revolutionary Guardsmen than just. Enter the private sector. Try to go off and get rich like his entire life was the revolution. Russian projecting uranium power at the end of the war so they money was impact his home province Gehrmann where he became the chief of the local Revolutionary Guard. Force came on province is close to the Afghan and Pakistani border and at the time of the nineteen ninety s many Afghan and Iranian drug cartels operating in those areas transporting particularly opium from Afghanistan to Iran and from Iran International Mark Mark. Mr Solely. Money became heavily involved in the fight against the drug cartels later when Iran and Afghanistan on you know the the Taliban regime Afghanistan for almost on the brink of a war. The what I was looking for a new face for India commander and because Afganistan Afghanistan was the primary threat to Iran's national security. The regime needed and Afghanistan. Part and Mr Sulejmani was one one of those people so that was the reason why he became the chief. Commander of the force awesome solely money in the course of two decades had gone from a completely unknown construction worker to the head of Iran's most important intelligence military organization organization but this was only the first half of his rise because just three years into his tenure. As the head of Al Qods Force nine eleven eleven happened. He found himself right in the middle of the action helping shape Iran's response to an incredibly difficult the foreign policy challenge and in the process. He showed a more cynical deadly face to the world. Sam I know Houston Texas. It was John through line. NPR from run. I love Y'all you make sitting in Houston traffic way more enjoyable. Thanks support for this podcast and the following message come from the Walton Family Foundation where opportunity takes root more information is available at Walton Walton Family Foundation Dot Org. Here's some good news morning edition from. NPR News isn't just for morning people. Now you can hear every story from the start weekdays seven until three. Listen on your schedule just say Alexa. Play morning edition. Part Two the gospel of chaos and after Iran fell out with the. US Enough Ghanistan. They caught a break. A strange opportunity presented itself when the Taliban government collapsed many members of Oak Guida fled Afghanistan and crossed the border into Iran. They were quickly arrested and interrogated by Iranian intelligence. And at that time there was debate within within Iran about whether these Sunni jihadists were threat to Shiite Iran or whether they were an asset said bin Laden family members there was a guy who later went on to become the leader of al Qaeda and Iraq's Cowie and I think Awesome Suleimani was unique. That was kind of his sinner. sner genius thinking you know what we can potentially used who's these folks and so the money assigned to Revolutionary Guard. Commanders essentially tend to their needs. There were given televisions. They were giving money to build a library. Their families were taken out shopping. Outings one of the most notorious al-Qaeda explosives experts the guy was still alive. He's still on the run safer. He had access to this very posh. Jim In north Tehran in a neighborhood called La here where he used to swim. Laps alongside foreign diplomats. And you know the children of Osama bin Laden affectionately called us some Cellini Haji Qasim these to break bread together in my friends. CERMAC was tortured in prison was in solitary confinement and it really really angers me to think that hardened jihadists you know Qaeda members were treated as guests and Iran and real patriots who love their country are treated like criminals and put into solitary confinement and exiled and I think that that history is not going to reflect well on awesome Sulaimaniyah when his bog or fees are written in Richard it now this only money had these Guida fighters on his side. He had to figure out exactly how to use them the way they figure out to do that. Initially his by taking these al-Qaeda jihadists and simply unleash them into rock With understanding that you guys go do what you do go. After the United States car bombings things suicide bombings and just a few months into the war August of two thousand three uh by Jordanian Katie leader hit sets off these three major bombs Which essentially destroys the American experiment Iraq in its infancy one bomb hit the Jordanian embassy another hit the United Nations which reduced their peacekeeping presence there? And lastly the power we conducted this car bombing against the major Shiite shrine. Imam Ali Mosque. Najer this was unheard of at the time that someone would go set off a car bombing at a mosque during Friday prayers this totally radicalized the Shiite community and Iraq and it essentially I push them into the arms of Iran in the bustling money. WHO said to the Shiites of Iraq? We can protect you There's some slight parallels here with the way. The United States fought the Soviet of union in Afghanistan in the nineteen eighties because the United States also supported these Mujahedeen essentially the jihadists of their day to go fight eight. The Soviet invasion of Ghanistan obviously not realizing that those folks would be the antecedents of al Qaeda different conflict same strategy and you never understand until years later what is going to be the residual impact of these choices so they money didn't just you Sunni extremists to cause chaos in Iraq the also used Iran's money and influence to Organiz militias among his fellow Shiites in southern Iraq it managed to use the Iraqi Shia militias. Who should be thankful to the United States military because the US had overthrown Saddam's regime but the republic managed to mobilize them against the United States? It served serve the interests of the slum republic to maintain Iraq in a state of controlled chaos and anarchy so that the United States could not declare clear itself the winner of developments in Iraq. How does Ali or anyone else know this well? One Iraqi Shia fighter lider while being interrogated by American military intelligence explained exactly how he worked with Iran he would go to Tehran. He would receive bags of money. Any approximately seven hundred thousand dollars to up to a one million to form a group of fighters in Iraq out goods force funded equipped and even been trained Iraqi Shia militias on how to ambush an attack vulnerable American forces. Doc what are their most effective tactics was teaching sheer fighters how to use I e improvised explosive devices which proved group to be very effective in getting through metal tanks and maiming and killing injuring. US troops at the very minimum minimum. Six hundred American servicemen were killed. You know in those years to US officials hold Suleimani directly responsible. For conceiving of that and and that's why you have one if not two generations of American military forces whom if you were to ask them who is your worst adversary in the world the person you see as the greatest threat to the United States and even when Osama bin Laden was living and daddy daddy was living there would have still awesome solemnity Mr Sulejmani believed by imposing heavy losses on the United States military in Iraq that it was possible to target the psychology of of the American society. Every single time and American is coming home in a body bag it would have an impact on willingness and the support of the American public to preserve a sizeable United States military presence in Iraq and in some ways it worked the American public support for the war in Iraq waned as the conflict became more costly and lives and money slowly. The American presence in Iraq began to shrink in twenty eleven. The number of American soldiers there was a fraction of what it was just five or six years earlier Emboldened by their success and fearing the downfall of allies in the Middle East the Revolutionary Guard with Ghassem Suleimani leading the way began began to make moves beyond Iraq Hi this is Bob Rogers from Merida. You attend Mexico. And you're listening to rely on N. P. R. where the past is I'm the president support for. NPR comes from Newman's own foundation working to nourish the common good by donating all all profits from Newman's own food products to charitable organizations that seek to make the world a better place. More information is available at Newman's own foundation dot org part. Three a string of pearls at at least twenty. Protesters have been killed during marches in several Syrian cities. Estimated that up to a million people have taken to the streets to challenge President Bashar. Al Assad's rule protesters demanded the ended the regime ripping down a statue of the president's father bracing to see the reaction of heavily armed government security forces. The answer came quickly and violent link here. They are members of the elite Revolutionary Guards. On the frontlines of serious civil group the Islamic Republic perceives Syria as a breach head connecting western Afghanistan to took Iran to Iraq to Lebanon Mr Rafsanjani the former president he referred to this as a string of paramus if one of them collapses collapses it's going to cause very serious trouble for the rest of the system and strategic thinking of Mr Sanjay was shared by the leadership of the revolutionary. Got Doc and Bashar al-Assad had to be defended at all costs but because they locked by Charlotte criticized him as a matter of fact but they believed that collapse of the regime and emergence of a different type of version. It would be bad for Iran so the republic began systematically to send I what's force officers then deployed Lebanese Hezbollah who did so rather unwillingly. Because as Lahser as on is to protect Arabs against Israel but here they are going to kill fellow Arabs in Syria super embarrassing ball but they also felt that they had no choice Alan. JV Modem Union Massamba game Uh shoot over. Madame's changes in generated. Mom could you hear on his job. Here is not an article off the Irani out. Good soldier serving as an advisor to the Syrian military talking about the opposition to Charlotte. I said he says that. It isn't a war between the Syrian people and their government. It's a war between good and evil between Shias from Lebanon Afghanistan Iran and Iraq move against Israel. Saudi Arabia Turkey. Give us on. His window has two million. Or yes and land your IPHONE CANEA son. You know mother Jane who is related give out of the Sun are driven by Kitt told Qatada. This man was likely reporting to US soil money who was tasked with coordinating and organizing. The defense of Bishara says regime. He did this at a time. When Assad's the military was using chemical weapons against its own citizens and bombing rebellious Syrian towns indiscriminately killing combatants and civilians alike? Like despite all of this extreme violence Syrian rebels and citizens were still gaining ground and things were not looking good for Solo. Money's militant After a few years they were suffering so many losses that the Islamic Trumka public had a it had to deploy other Shia militia groups in Syria for example she Afghans from the fought immune division doc different Iraqi militias. who were already busy fighting the civil war in Iraq? Some of them are sent to fight in the civil war in Syria and and at some point of course they were so desperate that much Jerusalem only had to travel to Moscow and ask Vladimir Putin need for military support because they needed air support and after that things began to go very well for the Revolutionary Guard commanders. They genuinely believe that Syria was a sensational success. Story they want against all this happened. Happen to while. Damascus remains a target for armed groups in the region. Local residents are without doubt Bashar. Assad has won the war the schools. We won the war. No one can argue with that and as long as all presidents is in power loved everything will be financed area. The war in Syria not only provided richner got an opportunity to achieve military success on the ground but unfortunately also gave them the opportunity not to compromise themselves ethically and morally. The nation's has found massive evidence pointing to the Syrian government's involvement in war crimes news on crimes against humanity Syrian activists of accused the forces of President Bashar. Al Assad of killing hundreds of people in a nerve gas attack in the accusation goes to the highest levels and implicates the President Bashar Assad the are accomplices of Russia's Sahim use of chemical weapons against the Syrian population that accomplices of the Syrian regime using famine against his own population and as a means of controlling in two thousand fourteen. After years of fighting in Syria and Iraq Ghassem soy money and the goods force. All of a sudden had a new problem isis. This and there's a logical question here if Iran had been able to work with Guida. Then why couldn't they just support Isis. Well I'll Guida was a little different than Isis Kaieda was not out gratuitously sleep beheading Shiites. The way that Isis was doing for the Iranian regime. Isis was just beyond the Pale will Islamic republic and Russia Guard Corps perceived this as a serious threat which could take away all their games from them posed a real threat to Iran Shiite allies in Iraq. Some point Islamic state was was was threatening back at the same time. I would argue that. Both Iran and the Assad regime in Syria actually utilize the Sunni jihadist prisons of such coach and inhumane enemy universally condemned as a terrorist organization. It was not such a bad thing from the Iranian side because they slumped republic which had hitherto difficulties explaining and legitimizing its military actions in Iraq and Syria suddenly had had a legitimate cause to engage in the fight against Harris on those occasions. Just at it did before you know in two thousand and one in Afghanistan. The United States and Islamic Republic cooperated with each other the United States air force was providing air cover to the courts force force operatives and Mr Sulejmani personally so that he could cleanse the city of to create of the soon radical elements and Islamic state at at that time in two thousand fourteen. Fifteen the what's force and Mr Sulejmani. Both of them for on the list of designated terrorists of the United States government. Right so you see strange bedfellows in a time of war and this is the moment when Ghassem Sony Manny became internationally known the Revolutionary Guard new his appeal his face. Ace was put on posters camera crews followed him as he visited soldiers and Syria. Music was made about him and all the way up to his death a few weeks ago he was successfully marketed. As kind of this Shiite Che Guevara I love the mother. This is footage of Qasim money. Speaking to Al Quds Force in Syria. It is actually pretty good job in a positive and and this is a song in Arabic made to honor him. mm-hmm the late Major General Salim money was was a man with at least two faces one face that is the face of a young man who left his little village to go to the front to defend and Iran against the invading Iraqi army in nineteen eighty that very same individual of course also had another face. That face is the face of a general who cynically attacked and killed American servicemen in Iraq since two thousand and three and also most unfortunately engaged or was complicit in warcrimes in Iraq and also in Syria these two faces that showed the complexity of the individual. MM-HMM I respect. I won the war hero. But of course I condemn the other face. which is that of workroom? MM-HMM I think I have a somewhat different perspective here than many analysts of Iranian origin. Because not only did I live in Iran on but I also lived in Beirut and I would travel every couple of weeks to Damascus for your and so when I see the destruction of Syria these the numbers are not just as detested for me that thirteen million people displaced in a six hundred thousand people killed I see US Sumani as being directly complicit and that horrific violence this is frankly my problem with a lot of erroneous on your comment on this because I feel like they totally lack self awareness about you know the the only view in the Iranian context and they don't give a shit about the role. He played elsewhere in the region. I tell people how would you feel as Iranian to watch of Iraqis morning. Saddam Hussein Lotta people commented about Soula. Money was that he was soft spoken. He wasn't someone who was like This fire-breathing radical radical and. I'm always reminded of this Persian saying about the clerics that if you look at the hands of the Mola's of the clerics Dystonia aucklander Ebony Myeloma each called necker cut Jedinak Amish. Their hands are always like perfectly manicured as if they haven't done any manual labor in their life I four or even known war the talk tough game but they've never served conflict and that was thing that's probably one reason why Selena was soft spoken. He didn't need to breathe rhetorical fire because everyone knew he had his elbows deepen blood. That's it for this week's show. I'm run that I'm running out of Louis and you've been listening to through live from NPR. This episode was produced by me and and me and Jamie York Lawrence. Woo Lane Kaplan Levinson. Luke Falk Hausky. Niger Eytan fact checking for this episode was done by Kevin Vocal. Thanks also to on your gunman either porous add an Austin Horn. Our music was composed by routine and his band drop electric. If you'd like something we heard you have an idea from episode please writers at do line. NPR DOT ORG or hit us up on twitter at Blue Line NPR. Also we'd love your your help with an upcoming episode. Tell us what does astrology mean to you. And what's your sign. Let us know by leaving a voicemail at eight seven two five eight eight eight eight eight zero five and you might just hear yourself on our show. That number again is eight. Seven two five eight eight zero five. Thanks for listening

Iran Iraq Revolutionary Guards United States Afghanistan Kacem Sulejmani Saddam Hussein NPR Islamic Republic of Iran commander Middle East Syria president Revolutionary Guard Islamic Republic Oak Guida Taliban Al Assad Money Ghassem Sulaiman
Under the Pyramids

Horror Fictional and True Stories

1:12:57 hr | 3 months ago

Under the Pyramids

"Under the pyramids put north with harry. Houdini and the footnote mystery attracts mystery. Ever since the wide appearance of my name as a performer of unexplained fees. I haven't counted strange narratives and events which might calling has led people to link with my interests and activities. Some of these have been trivial and irrelevant some deeply dramatic and absorbing some productive of weird and perilous experiences and some involving me and extensive scientific and historical research. Many of these matters. I have told and joe continued to tell very feely but there is one of which i speak with great reluctance and which i am not relating only after a session of grilling persuasion from the publishers of this magazine who had heard vague rumors from other members of my family. The hitherto guarded subject pertains to my non-professional visit to egypt fourteen years ago and has been avoided by me for several reasons. One thing i'm averse to exploiting certain unmistakably actual facts and conditions obviously unknown to the myriad tourists who throng about the pyramids and apparently secretive with much diligence by the authorities at cairo. Who cannot be wholly ignorant of them for another thing. I dislike to recount an incident in which my own fantastic imagination must have played so great. Apart what i saw or thought i saw. Certainly they did not take place but his rather to be viewed as a result of my then recent meetings in egyptology and other speculations and then this theme which my environment naturally founded these imaginative stimuli magnified by the excitement of an actual event terrible enough in itself undoubtedly gave rise to the culminating horror of that grotesque knife so long passed in january nineteen ten. I'd finished a professional engagement in england and signed a contract for a tour of australian theatres a liberal time being allowed for the trip i determined to make the most of it in the sort of travel which e interest me so accompanied by my wife. I drifted presently down. The continent and embarked at marseille on the pm does steamer malwa bound report saieed from that point. I propose to visit the principal historical localities of lower egypt before leaving finally for australia. The voyage wasn't agreeable one and enlivened by many of the amusing incidents which befall a magical performer. Apart from his work. I had intended for the sake of quiet travel to keep my name a secret but was goaded into betraying myself by a fellow magician whose anxiety to astound. The passengers with ordinary tricks attempted to duplicate and exceed is feet in a manner of quite destructive of my in continental. I mentioned this. Because if it's alternate effect. And i should have foreseen before unmasking to ship. Shipload of tourists of office scattered throughout the nile valley. What it did was to herald my identity. Whatever i subsequently went and the probably my wife and me of all the placid inconspicuous nece guy had sought traveling to seek curiosities. I was often forced to stand inspection of curiosity myself. We had come to egypt in search of the picturesque and the mystically impressive but found little enough when the ship edged up to portslade and discharged his passengers in small boats. Lagoons of san bobbing boys in shallow water and a journey european small town with nothing interest saved the great statue anxious to get onto something more worth our while. After some discussion we decided to preceded wants to cairo and the pyramids later going to alexandria for the australian boat and for whatever greek or roman that ancient metropolis might present. Railway journey was tolerable enough and consumed only four hours in the half. We saw much of the suez canal whose route we followed. As far as his malia and later had a taste of all egypt you know a glimpse of the restored freshwater canal the middle empire then at last we saw cairo glimmering through the growing dust. A twinkling constellation which became a blaze as we halted a great job but once more disappointment awaited s. We'd be held was european. Say the costumes. And the crowd's a prosaic subway led to square teaming with carriages taxicabs in trolley cars and gorgeous electric lights shining on tall buildings whilst the very theater vainly requested to play and which later attended as a spectator had recently been renamed. The american cosmo graph. We stopped at shepherd's hotel reached in a taxi. That's fed long broad smartly built up streets and amidst the perfect service of its restaurant elevators and generally anglo-american luxuries mysterious east and immemorial past seem very far away. The next day however precipitated us delightfully into the heart of the arabian nights atmosphere and in the winding ways and exotic skyline of cairo baghdad. Haroon rashid seemed to live again. Guided by vaguer we had struck east fast as bouquet gardens along the muskie in of the native quarter and were soon in the hands of a clamorous just aronie who notwithstanding later developments was a shortly a master at his trade. Not until afterward did i see. I should have applied of the hotel for a licensed guide. This man shaven accumulate hollow voice and relatively cleanly fellow who looked like a federal and called himself. I'll go race dog. None appeared to have much power over his kind though subsequently the police professed enough to know of him and to suggest that is merely a name for any person in authority whilst druckman is obviously no more than clumsy modification of the word or a leader of tourist parties dragon. I'll go let us among such wonders as we had before only read and dreamed of or cairo is itself a storybook and a dream. Labyrinth of narrow alleys redolent of aromatic secrets arabesque balconies orioles. Nearly meeting above the cobbled streets maelstroms of oriental traffic with strange cries cracking. Whips wrapping cuts jingling. Money and braying donkeys kaleidoscopes of polychrome robes. Veils turbans and tarnishes water carriers dervishes dogs and cats soothsayers and barbers and overall the winding of blind beggars couched alcoves and listen. Norris chanting of lessons from minarets lynn's delicately against the sky of deep unchanging. Blew the roof quieter bazaars. Were hardly less alluring spice perfume. Incense beads rugs silks and brass. Old mahmoud sulaiman squats cross-legged amidst his gummy bottles while chattering youths pulverize mustard in the hollowed out. Capital of an ancient classic column roman carinthian wraps from neighboring heliopolis for augustus stationed one of his three egyptian legions. Antiquity begins to mingle with exoticism. And then the mosques and museum. We saw them all and try not to let our arabian rebels. Come to the doctor. John a favorite onic egypt which the museums priceless treasures offered. That was to be our climax and for the present we concentrated on the medieval sarah senate glories of the calif who is magnificent two mosques former glittering ferry necropolis on the edge of the arabian desert. I'll go took us along the sharia mohammed ali. The ancient mosque of sultan hudson and the taller flying bad beyond which climbs the steep walled pass through the mighty citadel that dean himself built with the stones of forgotten germans. It was sunset when we scale that cliff circle the modern mosque muhammad ali and look down from the dizzy parapet over mystic. Cairo misty cairo. Paul golden with its carbon domes. It's a ferial minarets. And it's flaming gardens far over the city coward. The great roman dome of the new museum and beyond across the cryptic yellow nile. That is the mother of eons and dynasties the menacing sands of the libyan desert jalen and iridescent and evil with odor arcane. Ah the red. Sunset glow being the relentless chill of addiction does and as it stood poised on the world's rim like that ancient god of heliopolis directa the horizon son we saw silhouetted against its verbal holocaust. The black outlines of the pyramids of giza the paleo. jian tombs. there were horry with a thousand years when tutankhamun mounted his golden throne in distant thieves. Then we knew that we were done with cairo and that we must taste the deeper mysteries of primal egypt. The black cam of ray and on isis and a- cyrus. Next morning we visited the pyramids riding out in victoria across the great nile bridge with its bronze lions. The island of carr's era with his massive lubbock trees and smaller english bridge to the western shore down the shore. We'd go between great roles of la box and past the vast zoological gardens to the suburb of visa. Where a new bridge to cairo proper has since been villain then turning inland along the sharia l. How we crossed the region of glassy canals. And chevy native villages you'll before us loomed the object of our quest leaving the mists of dawn and forming inverted replicas in the roadside pools forty centuries as napoleon had told his campaigners there indeed look down upon us the road. Now rose abruptly. We finally reached our place of transfer between the cali station and the meena house hotel. I'll raise who capably purchased are pyramid. Tickets seemed to have an understanding with the crowding yelling and offensive veterans who inhabited a squalid Village some distance away and festive richly assailed every traveler for. He kept him very decently day and secured an excellent pair of camels for us himself mounting a donkey and assigning the leadership of our animals to a group of men and boys more expensive than useful. The area to be traversed was so small camels were hardly needed but we did not regret adding to our experience this troublesome form of desert navigation the pyramids down on a high rock battle this loop running next to the northern most of the series of legal and aristocratic cemeteries built in the neighborhood of the extinct capital memphis which lay on the same side of the nile somewhat south of giza and which flourished between three thousand four hundred and two thousand the greatest pyramid which lies nearest the modern road was built by king cheops or coup about two thousand eight hundred bc and sounds more than four hundred fifty feet in perpendicular height in the line south west from this are successively. The second pyramid built a generation later. Viking catherine and those slightly smaller looking even larger because set on higher ground and the radically smaller third pyramid of king. Missa reina's built about two thousand seven hundred bc near the edge of the plateau. And you east of the second pyramid with a face probably altered a colossal catherine. It's royal restorer stands the sphinx mute sardonic and wise beyond van kind and memory minor pyramids of ruined minor pyramids found in several places and the whole pack is fitted with the tombs of dignitaries of less than royal rang. These latter were originally marked by nastase or stone bench like structures about the deep burial shafts. As found in other members and cemeteries and exemplified by burnett's tomb in the metropolitan museum of new york at ease however all such things have been swept away by time and village and only the rock hewn shafts. Either stanfield cleared out by just remains what test their former existence connected with each tomb was chapel in which priests and relatives offered food and fair to the hovering car or vital principle of the deceased. The small tombs have that chapels contained in their stone. Must've buzz or superstructures. But the mortuary chapels of the pyramids where regal faeroes lay were separate temples each to the east of its corresponding pyramid and connected by a causeway to a massive gate chapel or profile on the edge of the rock. Bechtol the gate chapel leading to the second pyramid nearly buried in the drifting sands yawns subterraneans the southeast of the sphinx persistent tradition. Dubs it the temple of the spinks may perhaps be rightly called such if the sphinx indeed represents the second pyramid builder catherine unpleasant tales of the sphinx before catherine whatever it's elder features were the monarch replaced them with his own that men might look at the colossus without fear. It was in the great gateway temple that the life sized diorite statue of catherine now in the cairo museum was found a statue before which i stood in awe be held it. Whether the whole oedipus is now excavated. I'm not certain but in one thousand nine hundred ten most of it was below ground with the entrance heavily. odd night. Germans were in charge of the work and the war or other. Things may have stopped him. I would give much. In view of my experience and of certain bedouin whisperings discredited or unknown in cairo to know what is developed in connection with a serpent well in a transverse gallery where statues of the pharaoh where found in curious juxtaposition the statues of the boons the road as we traversed it on our cameras that morning curve sharply past the wouldn't police quarters post office drugstore and shops on the left and plunged south end east in the compete. Bend that scale the rock metal and brought us face to face. With the desert under the lee of the great pyramid past cyclope and masonry we rode rounding the eastern face and looking down ahead into a valley of minor pyramids beyond which the eternal nile listens to the east and the eternal desert shimmered to the west. Very close looms. The three major pyramids the greatest devoid of casing and showing its bulk of rate stones but the others retaining here and there the neatly fitted covering which had made them smooth and finished in their day. Presently we descended toward the sphinx and sat silent spell of those terrible on seeing is on the vast stone dressed we faintly discerned the emblem ray harakah for whose image the sphinx was mistaken in the late dynasty and though sand cover the tablets between the great pause we called what mo sista fourth inscribed with iran and the dream he had when prince it was then that the smile of the sphinx vaguely displeased us and made us wonder about the legends of subterranean passages beneath the monstrous creature leading down down to depths none mike their hint at depths connected with mysteries older than the dynastic egypt we excavate and having a sinister relation to the persistence of abnormal animal headed gods in the ancient nylon pantheon. Then to it was. I asked myself an idol question. Who's hideous significance was not to appear for many in our other tourists now began to overtake us. And we moved onto the sand joke temple of the sphinx fifty odds of the southeast which i have previously mentioned the great gate of the causeway to the second pyramids mortuary chapel on the plateau. Most of was still underground. And although we dismounted then descended through a modern passageway with alabaster corridor and pillared hall. I felt optical and the local german attendant had not shown us all there was to see after this we made the conventional circuit of the pyramid plateau examining the second pyramid and the ruins of its mortuary chapel to the east the third pyramid and is miniature southern satellites and ruined eastern chapel the rock tombs and the honeycombing of the fourth and fifth dynasties and the famous campbell's tomb. Shadowy shaft sings precipitously for fifty three feet to a sinister sarcophagus which one of our camel drivers divested of the covering san after every dissent by rope cries now assailed from the great pyramid but ones besieging party of tourists with offers of guidance to the top five displays of speed in the performance of solitary trips. Up and down. Seven minutes is said to be the record perception ascent and descent but many lusty shakes sense. Un's of shakes assured us they could cut it to five if given the requisite impetus of liberal They did not get this impetus that we did. Let abdul take us up. That's obtaining of you of unprecedented magnificence which included not only remote and littering cairo with its crown citadel background of gold violet hills. But all their men's of the memphis district as well abul-ghosh on the north to the dossier on the south saqqara step pyramid which the evolution of the low masta into the troop amid showed clearly and alluring in the sandy distance. It is close to this transition monument because the themed to of paranoia was found more than four hundred miles. North of a feeble and rock valley for uncommon sleeps again. I was forced to silence to share all the prospect of such antiquity and the secrets. Each hurry and monuments to hold and booed over filled me with reverence and sense of immensity. Nothing else ever gave me fatigued by our climb and disgusted with the importunate veterans whose actions seem to defy every rule of tastes. We omitted the arduous detail of entering the cramped interior passages at any of the pyramids. The we saw several of the hottest tourist preparing for the suffocating call through cheops mightiest memorial as we dismissed overpaid our local bodyguard and drove back to cairo with up to a race under the afternoon sun we have regretted the omission. We had made such fascinating. Things were whispered about lower pyramid passages. Not in the guidebooks passages entrances have been hastily blocked up and conceal by certain uncommunicative archaeologist would found and begun to explore them. Of course this was. Spring was largely baseless on the face of it but it was curious to reflect. Help assistant viv visitors. Were forbidden to enter the pyramids at night or visit the lowest boroughs and crypt of the pyramid perhaps in the latter case it was the psychological effects which was feared. The effect on the visitor of feeling himself huddles down beneath a gigantic world of solid. Masonry join to the life. He has known by the merest tube in which he may only call. And which any accidents or evil design my block. The whole subject seemed so weird and alluring that we resolve to pay the pyramid another visit at the earliest possible opportunity for me. This opportunity came much earlier than i expected that evening. The numbers of our party feeling somewhat tired after the strenuous program of the day i went alone with up to a race to walk through the picturesque quarter. So i had seen it five day. I wish to study the allies and bazaars in the dusk when rich shadows and mellow gleams of life would add to their glamour. Fantastic illusion the native clouds with thinning. But we're still very noisy. Numerous when we came up on a naf reveling bedouins in the soup and a hocine while bazaar of the coppersmiths their apparent leader and insolent youth with heavy features and sausalito cox. Todd bush took some notice of us and evidently recognized with no great friendliness. My competent but admittedly supercilious and sneeringly disposed guide. Perhaps i thought he resented that odd reproduction of the sphinx half smile which is often remarked with amused irritation. But perhaps he did not like the hollow and suppo- kroll resonance at abdul voice. At any rate the exchange of ancestrally appropriate language became very brisk and before long elise as i heard. The stranger called when called by no worse name began to pull violently. I'll goes robe and action quickly reciprocated. And leading to a spirited scuffle in which both combatants lost their sacred cherished headgear and would have reached an even dire condition had i not intervened and separated them. I main force my interference. At first seemingly unwelcome on both sides succeeded at last in effecting a truce sullenly each belligerent composed his wrath and his attire and with an assumption of dignity as profound as it was sudden the to formed. Julius pact of honour. Which i soon learned is a custom of great antiquity entitle a pack for the settlement of their difference by means of an internal fist fight atop the great pyramid long after the departure of the last moonlight sightseer. Each dualist was to assemble a party of seconds and the affair was the begin at midnight proceeding by rounds in the most civilized possible fashion in all this planning there was much which excited my interest the fight itself promise to be unique and spectacular by the thought of the scene on that hori pile overlooking the antediluvian natto of visa under the wan moon of appellate small hours of field to every fiber of imagination. In me a request found abdul exceedingly willing to admit me to his party of seconds so that all the rest of the early evening accompanied him to various dens. The most lawless regions of town mostly northeast of the as where he gathered one by one a select and formidable band. Congenial cutthroats as his pugilist Ground shortly after nine. Our party mounted on donkeys. Royal or tourist reminiscent names as roma's mark twain. Jp morgan and many hough edged through st labyrinths. Both oriental and occidental crossed the muddy and masks forested nile by the bridge of the bronze lions and countered philosophically between the lebedev's on the road to giza snipe. The over two hours. We're consumed by the trip for the end of which we passed. The last of the returning tourists saluted the last inbound folly car and we're alone with the night and the past and the spectral moon and we saw the vast pyramid at the end of the avenue ghoulish with a dim atavistic menace which i had not seen to notice in the daytime even the smallest of them held a hint of the gusty but was not in this that they had varied queen newtalk chris alive in the dynasty subtle green talk. Chris wants invited over enemies to a feast in temple below the nile and drown them by opening the watergate. I recall that the arabs whisper. Things have often talks. And sean the third theorem that certain phases of the moon. It must have been over her. That thomas moore was booting when he wrote a thing muttered about by memphis spokeman the subterranean nymphs that twelve mid sunless gems and glories. Hid the lady of the pyramid early as we were all easies and his party. Where ahead of us. We saw that donkeys outlined against the desert battle at catholic toward which squalid arab settlement close to the sphinx we had diverged instead of following the regular road to the meaner house or some of the sleepy inefficient police might have observed on. Halted us here. Filthy bedouins stabled camels and donkeys in the rock. Tombs of catherine's courtiers. We were that up the rocks and over the sand to the great pyramid up. Who's time one side's the arabs swarmed eagerly op door raise offering media assistance. I did not need as most travelers. No the actual apex of this structure has long been one away eating a reasonably flat platform twelve yards square on this eerie pinnacle. A squared circle was formed. And if you moments the sardonic desert moon lear down on a battle which the quality of the ringside cries might. Well have occurred at some minor athletic club in america as i watched it. I felt some of our less desirable institutions not backing for every blow things and defense. Bespoke stalling dumai not inexperienced. I was quickly over and despite my misgivings as to methods i felt sort of proprietary pride when it raised was a judge. The winner reconciliation was phenomenally rapid and amidst the singing fraternizing and drinking which followed. I found it difficult to realize. That quarrel had ever occurred. Oddly enough. i myself seemed to be more of a center of notice. The man's agonists and my smattering of arabic. I judged that they were discussing my professional performances and escapes from every sort of medical confinement in a manner which indicated not only surprising knowledge of me but a hostility and skepticism. Concerning my feet of escape it gradually donald on the elder magic of did not depart without leaving traces and the fragments of a strange secret. Lore and priestly cult practices have survived surreptitiously among the felaheen to such an extent that the policy of a strange. Holly magician is presented and disputed. I thought of how much hollow voice guide up to a raise. Looks like an old egyptian priests or favorable or smiling sphinx and wondering. Suddenly something happened which in a flash proved the correctness of my reflections and made me curse the dennis whereby accepted this night's events as other than the empty militias frame up. They now showed themselves to be without warning and office in answer to some subtle. Signed from abdel the entire band of veterans precipitated itself upon me and having produced heavy. Ropes soon had me bound as securely as i was ever bound in the course of my life either on the stage or off. I struggled at first but soon saw that one man could make no headway against the van of over twenty sinewy. Very in my hands are tied behind my back. My knees bent to their fullest extent and my wrists and ankles stealthily linked together with unyielding cords. A stifling gag was forced into my mouth and the blindfold fastened tightly over my eyes. Then as the arabs bore me aloft on their shoulders and began a jumping descent of pyramid. I heard the taunts of my late guide abdul who mocked and jeered likely in his hollow voice and assured me that i was soon to have my magic powers to a supreme test which would quickly remove egotism. I might have gained through triumphing over all the pests by america and europe egypt. He reminded me is very old and full of inner mysteries and antique powers not even conceivable to the experts of today whose devices had so uniformly failed to entrap me. How far are in what direction i was carried. I can tell what the circumstances were all against the formation of any accurate judgment. I know however that could not have been a great distance since my nerves. No point hastened beyond a walk. It kept me a loft a surprisingly short time. This perplexing brevity which makes me feel almost like shuttering. Whenever i think of giza plateau for one is oppressed by into the closeness to everyday tourist routes of what existed then and must exist. Still the evil abnormality. I speak of did not become manifested. First setting me down a surface which i recognized as sand rather than rock. My captors passed a rope around my chest and dragged me a few feet to a ragged opening in the ground into which presently lowered me with much rough handling or apparent runs. I bumped against the stony irregular sides of a narrow hyun well which i took to be one of the numerous burial shafts of the plateau until different digits. Almost incredible depth of it robbed me of all bases of conjecture. The horror of the experience deepened with every dragging second. That any dissent you. The sheer solid rock could be so vast without reaching the core of the planet itself or that any rope made by man could be so long as to dangle in these unholy and seemingly fathomless profundity never were beliefs of central task news that it was easier to doubt my agitated senses than to accept them. Even now i am uncertain for i know how deceitful the sense of time becomes when one or more of the usual perceptions or conditions of life is removed or distorted. But i'm quite sure that i preserved the logical consciousness that far at least i didn't knock at any full grown phantoms of imagination to picture idiots enough in its reality and by type of cerebral allusion vastly short of actual abuse the nation. All this was not the cause of my first bit thinking the shocking view was cumulative and the beginning of the later terrors was a very perceptible increase in my rate of descent they were paying out that infinitely long rope very swiftly now and i scraped cruelty against the ruffin convicted sides of the shaft. Shot madly downward. My clothing was in talkers. And i felt the trickle of blood all over even evolve the mounting and excruciating pain my nostrils to were assailed by scarcely definable menace a creeping older of them and staleness curiously. Unlike anything i'd ever smoked before and having faint overtones of spice an incense that lent an element of mockery. Then the mental cataclysm came. It was horrible. Hideous beyond all articulate description because it was of the soul. There's nothing of detail to describe. It was the ecstasy of nightmare and the summation of a fiendish the suddenness of it was lifted and demoniac one moment i was plunging agonizingly down that narrow well of millions to torture. Get the next moment. I was soaring on that wings in the gulf of hill swinging free and swooping through illimitable miles of boundless musty space rising busily to measureless pinnacles chilling ether than diving gasping to sucking. Nader's ravenous nauseous. Lower vacuous thank god for the mercy that shutout in oblivion those clawing fury's of consciousness which have unhinged faculties and for harvey like at my spirit that one respite short as it was gave me the strength and sanity to endure those still greater supplementation of cosmic panic that lurked and gibbered on the road ahead to it was very gradually that regained my senses. After that eldridge flights through stygian space the process was infinitely painful and colored by fantastic in which my bound and guide conditions on singular embodiment. The precise nature of these beams was very clear. While i was experiencing them but became blurred and my recollection almost immediately afterward and was soon reduced to the nearest outlined by the terrible events real or imaginary which followed. I dreamed that. I was in the grasp of a great horrible paw a yellow harry five clawed paw which had reached out of the earth to crush engulf knee. And when i stopped reflect. What the paul was it seems to me that it was egypt and aside. Eight change sites electric switch. This book is continued on the next cassette side. Nine days gone and other macabre tales by hp lovecraft continuing with under the pyramids on page two hundred thirty in the dream i looked back at the events of the preceding weeks and saw myself yard and enmeshed little by little subtly and insidiously by some hellish gould. Spirit of the elder niles sorcery somma spirit. That was in egypt before ever man was and that will be when man is no more. I saw the horror and unwholesome antiquity of egypt and the grizzly alliance. It has always had with the tombs and temples of the dead. I saw phantom processions of priests with the heads of bulls falcons cats and ibises fountain processions. Marching interminably through subterranean labyrinths and avenues titanic propylaea beside which a man is as a fly and offering a naval sacrifices to indescribable. God's stone colossi marched in endless night and drove herds of winning andro sphinxes down to the shores of illimitable stagnant rivers of pinch and behind it all as all the ineffable malignancy of primordial necropsy black and amorphous and fumbling greedily after me in the darkness to choke out the spirit that had dared to mock it by emulation in my sleeping brain that took shape a melodrama of sinister hatred and pursuit and i saw the black soul of egypt. Singling me out and calling me in inaudible whispers calling and lowering me leading me on with the litter around glamour of sarah senec surface but pulling me to the age mad catacombs and horrors of its dead and abysmal periodic heart. Then the dream faces took on human resemblances and i saw my guide up to a raise in the robes of a king with a sneer of the sphinx on his features and i knew that those features were the features of catherine the great who raised the second pyramid carved over the sphinxes face in the likeness of his own and built. Tonic gateway temple. Who married corridors. The archaeologist think they have dug out of the critical san and the uninformative rock. And i looked up the long lean rigid hand geffen the long lean rigid hand as i had seen it on the diorite statue in the cairo. Museum the statue they had found in the terrible gateway temple and i wondered that i had not shrieked when i saw it on outdoor race that hand it was hideously they coal and it was crushing me. It was the cold and cramping of secaucus the chill on constriction of unmemorable egypt. It was knighted. Nacro poyton itself that yellow paw and they whisper such things of catherine but at this juncture around again to a week or at least to assume a condition. That's completely that of sleep. On the one just preceding recalled the fight atop the treacherous bedrooms and their attack. My five full descent by rope through endless rock deaths and my mad swinging and plunging in a chill void redolent of aromatic tresses. I perceived that i now lay on a damp rock floor. And if my vons were still biting into me with unlicensed force. It was very cold. And i seem to detect the faint current of noise and air sweeping across me. The cuts and bruises. I had received from jagged sides of the rock shaft painting me woefully. There are saunas enhanced a stinging or burning cuteness by some pungent quality in the draft in the mirror. Active rolling over was enough is at my whole frame throbbing with untold. Agony as i turned. I felt it talked about and concluded that the real whereby i was lowered still reach to the surface whether or not the arab still held it. I had no idea or had any idea how far within the earth i was. I knew that the doctors around me was wholly or nearly total since. No ray of moonlight penetrated my blindfold. Both i did not trust my senses. Enough except as evidence of extreme depth sensation of vast eurasian which had characterized my dissent knowing. At least that. I was in a space of considerable extent. Reach from the surface directly involve opening in the rock. I doubt fully conjectured at my prison was perhaps the buried gateway chapel old catherine the temple of the sphinx perhaps some inner corridor which the guys had not shown me during my morning visit and from which i might easily escape. If i could find my way to the bar entrance it would be a labyrinth and wondering but no worse than others out of which i had in the past found my way. The first step was to get free of my bonds gag and blindfold and this i knew would be no great task since suffer. Experts in these arabs had dried every known species of fetter up on me during my long and very career as an exponent of escape get. It never succeeded in defeating my methods. Then it occurred to me that the arabs might be ready to meet and attack me at the entrance of on any evidence of my probable escaped from the binding cords as would be furnished by any decided agitation of the rope which they've probably held. This of course was taking for granted at my place of confinement was indeed catherine's temple of stinks the direct opening in the roof wherever it might lurk would not be beyond easy reach of the ordinary. Modern entrance near the stinks. If in truth we're any great distance at all on the surface since the total area known visitors is not at all enormous. I've noticed any such opening during my daytime pilgrimage. But i knew that these things are easily overlooked amidst the thing sands thinking these matters over as i lay event and round on the rock floor. I nearly forgot the horrors of the abysmal descent and cavernous swinging. Which lately reduced me to a coma. My present thought was only two out with the arabs and according to determined to work myself free as quickly as possible avoiding any top on the descending line which my betray effective or even attempt freedom this however was more easily determined then affected a few preliminary trials made it clear that could be accomplished without considerable motion. And that did not surprise me. When after one especially energetic struggle. I began to feel the coils of falling rope as they piled up about me and upon me obviously i thought the veterans had felt my movements and released their end of the rope. Hastening no doubt to the temples to entrance to lie murderously and wait for me. The prospect was not pleasing. But i had faced worse in my time without flinching and whatnot finch now at present i must first of all free myself of bonds then trust to ingenuity to escape from the temple unharmed curious how implicitly. I had come to believe myself. In the old temple of kevin decide the sphinx only short distance below the ground luckily was shattered. Every pristine apprehension of preternatural death and demoniac mystery revived by a circumstance which grew in horror and significance. Even as i formulated my philosophical plan. I have said the falling rope was piling up about and upon me now. I saw that it was continuing to pile. As no rope of normal length could possibly do it. Gained in momentum and became an avalanche of him accumulating mountainous lee on the floor and have varying me beneath its swiftly modifying coils soon. I was completely engulfed and gasping for breath as the increasing convolution submerged and stifled me. My senses tottered again vainly tried to fight off. A menace desperate and ineluctable tortured beyond human endurance. Not merely that life and breath seemed to be crushed. Slowly out of me. It was the knowledge of what those a natural lengths of rope implied and the consciousness of what are known and in the gulfs of inner earth. Must at this moment be surrounding me. My endless descent and swinging flight through goblins space then must must've been real and even now i must be lying helpless. In some nameless cavern world or the car of the planet such a sudden confirmation of ultimate horror was insupportable. And a second time. I lapsed into merciful oblivion. When i say oblivion i do not imply that i was free from dreams on the contrary. My absence from the conscious world was marked by visions of the most unutterable idiots. Nece god if only i had not read so much egyptology before coming to this land. Which is the fountain of all darkness and terror. The second spell of fainting field. My sleeping mind. A new with shivering realization of the country. And it's archaic secrets and through some damnable chance. My dreams turned to the ancient notions of the dead. And they're still jennings in soul and body beyond those mysterious tombs. Which were more houses than graves. I recalled in green shapes which it is. Well that i do not remember the peculiar and elaborate construction of egyptian sepulchres and the exceedingly singular terrific doctrines which determined this construction. All these people thought i was dead and the dead they conceived of a literal resurrection of the body which made the mummify it with desperate care and preserve all the vital organs and canopic jars near the corpse whilst besides the body they believed in two other elements the solo which it's weighing and approval by. Oh cyrus wealth in the land of the blessed and the obscure and four-tenths car or life principle which wondered about the upper and lower world in a horrible way demanding occasional access to the preserved body and swimming the food offerings buckeye by priests and pious relatives to the march chapel. And sometimes as men whispered taking its body. Or the wooden double always very decided and stocking noxious lee abroad on errands. Repellent but thousands of years those bodies rested gorgeous case and starring lesley upward when not visited by the car awaiting the day when cyrus should restore both cau- and so forth the stiff legions of the dead from the sunken houses of sleep. It was to have been a glorious rebirth but not all souls were food nor were all tombs inviolate so that certain protests mistakes and fiendish abnormalities. Were to be looked for even today. The arabs member of on sanctified con vocations and unwholesome worship in from nether of which only wing it invisible. 'cause and soulless mummies may visit and return unscathed. Perhaps the most blood congealing jains are those which relate to certain perverse products of decadence graft composite mummies made by the artificial union human trunks and limbs with the heads of animals in imitation of the elder gods at all stages of history the sacred animals were mummified so that concentrated bulls hats ibises crocodiles and the like might return someday to greater glory but only in the decadence. Did they mix the human and animal in the same mummy. Only in the decadence when it did not understand the right seine perogatives of a car and the soul. What happened to those composite. Mummies is not told At least publicly and it is certain that no egyptologist ever found one whispers of arabs are very wild and cannot be relied upon the even hint that old kevin he of the stinks. The second pyramid and the yawning gateway temple lives far underground wedded to the google. Queen knit talkers and ruling. Over the mummies that are neither men nor of these these of kevin and his consort and his strange armies of the hybrid. Then that i dream and that is why. I'm glad the exact beam shapes have faded from my memory. I most horrible vision was connected with an idol question. I had asked myself today. Before when looking at the great carbon riddle of the desert and wondering with what unknown deaths the temples so close to it might be secretly connected that question so innocent and whimsical then assumed in my dream a meaning of frenetic hysterical madness. What you gend. Loathsome abnormality was the sphinx originally carbon to represent i second awakening awakening. It was his a memory of stock hideous nece which nothing else in my life. Save one thing which came after and parallel and that life has been full and adventurous beyond most men's remember that i have lost consciousness whilst buried beneath the cascade of falling rope. Who's immensity revealed the cataclysmic depth for my position. Now as perception return i felt the entire weight gone and realize enrolling over that. Although i was still tied gagged and blindfolded some agency had removed comfy the suffocating hampton landslide which had overwhelmed me significance of his condition of course to me only gradually. But even so. I think it would have bought unconscious again. Had i not by this time reached such a state of emotional exhaustion that no new horror could make much difference. I was alone with before. I can torture myself with a new reflection. I'll make any fresh efforts to escape. My bonds and additional circumstance became manifest pains not formerly felt. We're wrecking my arms. And legs. And i seemed coated with a profusion of dried blood beyond anything. My former cuts and abrasions could furnish my chest to pierced by one hundred wounds as though some maligned. Titanic ibis had been checking it but shortly the agency which had removed. The rope was a hostile one and have begun to wreak terrible injuries upon when somehow impelled to desist yet at the time my sensations were distinctly the reverse of what one might expect instead of sinking into a bottomless pit of despair. I was stirred to a new courage and action for now. I felt that the evil forces were physical. Which are fearless man might encounter on an even basis strength of this thought. I talked again if my von's and he all the art of life to free myself as i had so often done amidst the glare of lights and the applause of vast grounds familiar major details of my escaping process commenced to and gross me and now that the long rope was gone. I have regained my belief that the supreme horrors were nations after all and that there had never been any terrible shaft measureless abyss or interminable. Why i after all in the gateway temple of geffen beside the sphinx and had the sneaking arabs stolen in to torture me as i lay helpless there and then i must be free that these stand unbound on gag and with is open to catch any glimmer of light which might come pickling from any source and actually delight in the combat against evil and petrous foes. How long. I took shaking off my encumbrances. I cannot tell it must have been longer than in my exhibitions performances. Because i was wounded and innovated by the experiences i had passed through when i was finally free. And taking deep breaths of chill damn eagerly spiced air all of them are horrible encountered without the screen of gag and blindfold edges. I found that. I was too cramped and fatigued to move at once there. I lay to stretch a frame bent and mangled one indefinite period and straining my eyes to catch a glimpse of some ray of light which would give any interest in my position. By degrees my strength and flexibility returned but my eyes beheld. Nothing as i stagger to my feet high peer diligently in every direction yet met only an ebony blackness as great as that. I have known when blindfolded i tried my legs ludden crested beneath my shredded trousers and found that i could walk yet could not decide what direction to go obviously off not to walk at random and perhaps to retreat directly from the entrance. I saw so. I paused to note the direction of a cold feted nathan scented air current which i had never cease to feel accepting the point of its source as the possible entrance to the vis i strove to keep track of his landmark and to walk consistently toward it. I had matchbox with me and even a small electric flashlight. But of course the pockets of my thoughts and tattered clothing were long since y'all heavy articles as i walked cautiously in the blackness. The draft grew stronger and more offensive lifting. I could regarded as nothing less than a tangible stream. Detestable vapor pouring out of aperture like the smoke of a jean-yves fisherman's jar in the eastern tale. The egypt truly this dark cradle of civilization was ever the wellspring of horrors and marvel's unspeakable. The more i reflected on the nature of this cavern. Win the greater sense of disquiet became for although despite its odor i had sought source as at least an indirect glued to the outer world. I now saw late that this follow emanation could have no admixture whatever with the clean air of the libyan desert but must be essentially a thing vomited from sinister gulfs still lower down. I then been walking in the wrong direction. After a moment's action. I decided to retrace my steps away. From the draft i would have no landmarks for the roughly level. Rock floor was devoid of distinctive. Configurations if however. I followed out the strange current i would undoubtedly arrive at an aperture of some sort from whose gate i could perhaps work around the walls to the opposite side of this cyclope and otherwise unnavigable that i might fail. I realized i saw. This was no park of catherine heatwave temple which tourists no and it struck me that this hall might be unknown. Even to akyol adjusts and merely stumbled upon by the inquisitive and malignant arabs. Let imprisoned me if so was there any present gate of escape to the known. Parts of the air but evidence indeed did i now possess that this was the gateway temple at all for a moment all my wildest speculations rushed back up on me and i thought of that vivid melange of impressions descent suspension in space. The rope my wounds and the dream that were rank -ly dreams. Was this the end of life for me or indeed. Would it be merciful if this moment worthy end academic none of my own questions but merely kept on till faith for a third time reduced me to oblivion this time. There were no dreams. The suddenness of the incident shocked me out of all thoughts either conscious or subconscious drifting on an unexpected descending step at the point where the offensive draft became strong enough to offer an actual physical resistance. I was precipitated headlong down a black flight of huge stone stairs into gulf of idiots. Nece unrelieved ever breathe again is attributed to the inherent healthy of the healthy human organism off. And i look back to that night and feel a touch of actual humor and those repeated lapses of consciousness lapses who succession reminded me at the time of nothing more than the crude cinema melodramas at that period. Of course it is possible that the repeated lapses never occurred and that all the features of that underground nightmare where merely the dreams of one long coma which began with the shock of my descent into that abyss and ended with the healing balm of the outer air and of the rising sun which found me stretched on the sounds of visa before the sadhana and don base of the great sphinx. I prefer to believe this latter explanation as much as i can. Hence was glad when the police told me that the various to catherine's gateway sample had been found on fastened and that a sizable rift to the surface did actually exist in one corner of the steel buried park. I was glad to when the doctors pronounced my wounds. Only those to be expected for my seizure line voting lowering struggling with bonds falling distance perhaps into a depression in the temple. Inner gallery dragging myself to the outer barrier and escape things on it and experiences like that are very soothing. Diagnosis and guess. I know that they must be more than appears on the surface. That extreme descent is too vivid memory to be dismissed and it is odd that no one ever been able to find a man answering the description of my guide. I'll go raise dog on the tomb. The guide look and smiled like king. Catherine i have to grasp from my connected narrative perhaps in the vain hope of evading. The telling of that final incident that incident which of all is most certainly an hallucination. But i've promised to relate it and do not break promises when i recovered or seemed to recover my senses. After that fall down the blackstone stairs. I was quite alone in darkness as before the windy stench bad enough before was now fiendish yet. I had acquired enough familiarity by this time to barrett stoically. Daisley i began to crawl away from the place whence the future wind came and with my leading hands. Celtic alonzo blocks of a mighty pavement. Blunts my head stuck against a hard object. And when i felt it i learned that it was the base of a column a column of unbelievable immensity whose surface was covered with gigantic. Chiseled six very perceptible to my thoughts calling on. I encountered other titan columns at incomprehensible distances apart then. Suddenly my attention was captured by the realization of something which must have been impinging on my subconscious hearing long before the conscious sense was aware of it from some still lower chasm and earth's vowels we're proceeding certain soanes measured and definite and like nothing i had ever heard before that they were very ancient and distinct ceremonial. I felt almost intuitively and much reading and egyptology that to associate them with the flu. The sound beukah the system and the temple them in their rhythmic piping droning rattling and meeting. I felt an element of terror. Beyond all known known terrors of earth adera peculiarly dissociated from personal fear and taking the form of a sort of objective. Pity for our planet that it should hold within its deaths such horrors as must live beyond these egypt. Panic cacophony the sounds increased in volume and felt that they were coaching. Then and they all the gods of all pantheon's unite to keep the life from my ears again. I began to hear faintly and a far off the morbid and millennial tramping of the marching things. It was hideous that football so dissimilar should move in such perfect rhythm. The training of on hallowed thousands of years must lie behind that much of earth's in most monstrosities having thinking walking stalking rumbling lumbering crawling and all to the horn discords of those mocking instruments. And then god keep the memory of those arab legends. My head the mummies without souls. The meeting place of the wandering. 'cause the hordes of the devil cursed dead of forty centuries. The composite mummies lead through the most onyx voids. Viking catherine and his queen talk chris. defending do nearer. Heaven saved me from the sound of those feet and pause and who was under pads and talons as it commenced to acquire detail down limitless reaches of sunless. Pavement as spock. Of light flickered in the melodious win and behind the enormous circumference of cyclops. Mccollum that. I might stay for a while. The horror that was stalking million folded toward me to gigantic hypo styles of inhuman dread and full the antiquity the flickers increased and the trumping and dissonant rhythm blues sickeningly loud in the quivering orange. Light is to saint louis for a scene of such stony awe that i guess from a sheer wonder that conquered even fear and repulsion basis. Of course who middle's were higher than human site near basis of things that must each. The taller to insignificance hieroglyphics carved by hands in caverns. Where daylight and the only a remote legend. I would not look at the marching things that i desperately resolve as i heard creaking. And nitrous wheezing above the dead music and the dead trumping. It was merciful that they did not speak. But god they're crazy. Tortures began to cast shadows on the surface of those stupendous columns heaven taken away. Hippopotami should not have human hands and carry torches men should not have the heads of crocodiles tried to turn away but the shadows and the sounds and the stench where everywhere then. I remembered something i used to do. In half conscious nightmares as a boy and began to repeat to myself. This is a dream. This is a dream it was of no use and that could only shut my eyes and pray. At least. That is what i think i did. One is never sure envisions. And i know this can have been nothing more. I wondered whether i should ever reach the world again. And at times would furtively. Open my eyes to see if i could discern any feature of the place other than the wind of spiced future putrefaction the topless columns and the formal Grotesque shadows of abnormal horror. The sputtering glare of multiplying torches now shown. And unless this hellish face were wholly without walls. I could not fail to see some boundary or fixed landmark soon. But i had to shut my eyes again. When i realized how many of the things were assembling and when i m certain object walking solemnly and steadily without any body above the waist a fiendish and you you'll corpse gurgle or death battle now spit the very atmosphere. The channel atmosphere poisonous with nafta and human blasts in one concerted chorus from the ghoulish legion of hybrid blasphemies. My is perversely. Shaken open gays for an instant on site which no human creature could even imagine without panic. Fear and physical exhaustion. The things had filed ceremonially in one direction the direction of the in wind or the light of their torches showed their vended heads all the vended heads of such as had heads they were worshiping before a great lack feet or belching aperture which reached up almost out of sight and which i could see was flanked at right angles lie to giant stack. Cases was ends. We're far away in the shadow. One of these was indubitably. The staircase i had fallen down the dimensions of the whole we're fully in proportion with those of the columns and ordinary house would have been lost in it and any average public building could easily have been moved in and out it was so vast surface that only by moving the i could one trace its boundaries so vast so hideously black and so are medically stinking. This yawning polyphemus door the things. We're throwing objects evidently sacrifices or religious offerings to judge their gestures chephren was their leader sneering king catherine or the guide outdoor race owned with a golden schimdt and intoning endless formulate with the hollow voice of a dead by his side melt. Beautiful queen talkers whom i saw in profile for a moment noting that the right half of her face was eaten away by rats or other ghouls and i shut my eyes again when i saw what objects were being thrown as offerings to the feted aperture or it's possible local deity. It occurred to me that judging from the elaborate -ness of this worship concealed deity must be one of considerable importance was it. Oh siris or isis horace for anubis or some vast unknown god of the dead still more central premium. There is a legend that terrible authors colossi were reared to an unknown run before the known gods worshipped now as i steal myself who watched the wrath and pokhrel aberrations of those nameless things. I thought of escape lashed upon me. The hall was the on. The columns heavy with shadow with every creature of that nightmare throng absorbed in shocking vectors. It might be barely possible for me to creep past the faraway end. One of the staircases and ascend unseen trusting to fate and skill to deliver me from the upper reaches. I was another new nor seriously reflected upon and for a moment it struck me as amusing to plant a serious escape. From that which i knew to be a dream boas i in some hidden and unsuspected lower realm of catherine's gateway temple that temple which generations have persistently called the temple of thinks. I could not conjecture. Resolved was send to life and consciousness. If with and muscle carry me wriggling flat thought on my stomach again. The anxious donate or the fourth of the left hand staircase which seemed the more accessible of the to. I cannot describe the incident sensations of that call. But they may be guest when one reflects on what i had to watch steadily in that malign wind blown torchlight in order to avoid detection. The bottom of the staircase was as i've said far away in shadow as it had to be to rise without a bend to the dizzy pirouetted landing above the titanic aperture this place. The last stages of my call at some distance from the noise heard so the spectacle chilled me. Even when quite remote at my right at length. I succeeded in reaching the steps and began to climb even been close to the wall on which i observed decorations of the most hideous sort and relying for safety on the absorbed ecstatic interest with which the monstrosities watched the foul breezed aperture and the impious objects of nourishment. They had lung on the pavement before it though. The staircase was huge and steep fashioned avast quiry blocks as if the feet of a giant. The ascent seemed virtually interminable grad of discovery and the pain which renewed exercise brought to my wounds combined to make that upward. Call thing of agonizing. Memory i had intended on reaching the landing to climb immediately onward along whatever upper staircase might from. They're stopping for no last. Look at the carrying a bomb. Nations that pause and genuflected some seventy or eighty feet below yet. A sudden repetition of the thunderous corpse gurgle and death. That'll chorus coming. As i have nearly gained the top of the flight and showing it's ceremonial rhythm that it was not an alarm of my discovery caused me to pause and feared cautiously over the parapet. The monstrosities were hailing something. Which ed goeke itself out of the nauseous aperture to seize the hellish fair property. It it was something like andreas. Even as seen from my height something yellowish and harry and endowed with a sort of nervous motion it was as large perhaps as a good sized if a bottomless but very curiously shaped it seemed to have no neck but five separate shaggy heads springing in a row from a roughly cylindrical trunk. I very small the second good size. The third and fourth equal and largest of all and the fifth rather small not so small. As the first out of these heads dotted curious rigid tentacles which seized ravenously on the excessively great quantities of unmentionable food place before the aperture once in a while the thing would leave up and occasionally it would retreat into its den in a very odd manner. It's locomotion was inexplicable. I stared in fascination wishing it would emerge farther from the cavernous layer beneath me. It did emerge it did emerge and at the site. I turned and fled into the darkness up the higher staircase that rows behind me lead unknowingly up incredible steps and ladders and inclined planes which no human site or logic guided me and which i must ever relegate to the world of dreams for one that any confirmation it must have been dream all the dawn would never have found me breathing on the sands of giza if others donning don flushed face of the great sphinx great spinks god that idol question. I asked myself on that sunday morning before. What you and loathsome abnormality was the stinks. Originally carbon to represent a curse. It is the site. Be it in dream or not revealed to me. The supreme horror the unknown god of the dead which licks its colossal chops in the unsuspected of this head idiots muscles by solis absurdities. That should not exist. The five edited months to that emerged. That five headed monster as large as a hippopotamus the five headed monster and that of which it is the nearest for pau survived. And i know it was only a green.

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Che Fare Quando ti Blocchi in Chat?

Comunicazione Emozionale con Ema

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Che Fare Quando ti Blocchi in Chat?

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