4 Burst results for "Suge Mcgahey"

"suge mcgahey" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

05:50 min | 3 months ago

"suge mcgahey" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

"11 races, including that Virginia Derby, the grade three, which has a full field myelin and 8th on the turf, what a day of racing and nobody is more excited than Joe Byrne, who is with colonial down. She's the vice president of racing operations, and she is with us now on HR and Jill good morning. Good morning. How are you? I'm great. I'm fired up for a huge weekend and it doesn't end as it typically does. We don't have to wait a whole nother week for great racing because we get to experience it Tuesday at colonial. That's right, yeah, and the Labor Day weekend, all kinds of great racing all across the country, but kind of fun that it doesn't end on Tuesday. So post Labor Day, everybody has some fun with a great colonial downs race card, like you mentioned, 11 races, 6 stakes races, just kudos to our racing office and Allison Deluca and her team for putting together just incredible card on Tuesday, really excited for it. The Virginia Derby itself is just outstanding. Our reference the fact earlier that really, this has turned into Graham motion's playground in recent years. He's won each of the last three runnings if you go back to when it was the Commonwealth, which was run at Laurel. He won that race in 2017 with just Howard, the race was not held in 2018. He came back in 2019 with English B and of course because of COVID, we didn't have the race in 2020 and then last year he wins it with woot and asset. He can make it four in a row coming up on Tuesday. Hey Ken, you know, he's always he and his entire stable have always been great supporters of colonial downs and especially since we reopened. But this race has been his and he's got a fantastic course in royal patronage running in it this year, but he has some competition. So we're not just handing him the trophy right now. At nor should you, and I brought this up with Debbie Easter when she was with me in the first hour of the program. Of course, we spent a lot of time talking about the incentive programs in Virginia as opposed to diving into some specifics with the races. But you look at his competition and you see names like suge mcgahey and Michael Stidham and Todd pletcher and Chad Brown. And Mike maker. The big names have turned out in droves for this card on Tuesday. Yeah, and again, you know, I think that's a testament to a lot of things since we've reopened colonial downs in 2019 under the management of Peninsula Pacific entertainment. You know, it's a great deal of pride for me to see that these stables and trust us, so to speak with top quality horses and the riders and the owners, breeders, trainers, recognizing what a phenomenal facility we have to great track surfaces in our secretary at turf course, our beautiful dirt track. So it's a real sense of pride and accomplishment for our team of what we've done in a very short period of time. And it shows with the kind of horses that are showing up at colonial downs. Jill, what kind of special wagers will be associated with the card on Tuesday, if any? Yes, I'll kinds of fun way here out there for our patrons, including our all turf stakes pick 5. And that will start with the thoroughbred after Caroline's kitten's joy and race 6. And that's that low takeout that we have of 12%. So that will end with the new Kent county, Virginia Derby on raised ten. We have a pick four in the middle there, countless couple pick fours, pick threes. So lots of opportunities for everybody. But I think that all turf stakes pick 5 will be pretty fun. Especially when you have a 14 horse field in the Virginia oaks, 11 in the Virginia Derby, and wide open races. So we're looking forward to really just some fun offerings for our wagering patrons out there. It seems like so often Jill racing fans and horsemen are complaining about the short fields that we see in big races. But that, as you just referenced, is not the case at colonial on Tuesday. Why do you think you've been able to fill these races? I know you gave credit to the racing office and rightfully so they do a great job. But beyond that, what do you think it is about racing at colonial and on that turf course? It's allowed you to be able to attract these big fields. Yeah, I think it's kind of what I mentioned in that when colonial downs reopened, you know, a lot of horsemen and out there see names that they recognize in the racing office and including myself. You know, other people that are on our team that and we're such a melting pot of people from all around the country that are part of the racing operations team at colonial downs. So I think that's kind of helped with really being able to hustle those horsemen out there and they have a confidence in the people that they're dealing with. But certainly the reputation of the two track surfaces makes a big difference. And just the offerings, what we can do is the turf course and run so many races on it. It's the widest in the country, so we can run on multiple lanes. We change the rail settings every week, so you're always on a fresh fresh course, the jockeys just rave over our turf course. And the dirt course as well. The dirt course kind of been the hidden gem of colonial down since it's reopened. And it's really been popular, especially among people training there. So I think as we've just gathered the steam of a reputation that they're comfortable with, but it's still a struggle. Everywhere around the country, it's a struggle to fill these races. There's so much racing in the summer, especially so much racing in the mid Atlantic. So again, I can not say enough about our team and how they get these fields filled. Taki with Joe Byrne, she is the vice president of racing operations at colonial downs you'll hear exclusive radio coverage of the Virginia Derby, the Virginia oaks, as

Virginia Derby Joe Byrne Allison Deluca Graham motion Jill Virginia Debbie Easter suge mcgahey Michael Stidham Mike maker Peninsula Pacific entertainmen Chad Brown Todd pletcher Virginia oaks Laurel Howard Ken Kent county Caroline
"suge mcgahey" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

08:00 min | 5 months ago

"suge mcgahey" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

"On major podcast platforms each. And every week. Well, with Saratoga opening the doors to their 2022 meet tomorrow, I could think of no better guest than someone whose family has played a major role in the lore, the legend, the mystique, of that historic race track in upstate New York. Trainer James Bond James Bond, if you will, the man who displays 007 on all of his saddle pads has settled nearly 1200 winners in his career. Some of his most memorable coming at Saratoga, including will's way, taking the 1996 traverse, and then the 97 Whitney. And tis way, who rolled to a three length victory in the Whitney in 2011. A couple of weeks ago, I had the chance to visit with young Blake Cox who works alongside his father Brad as an assistant. Today, on this eve of the Saratoga meet, I welcome yet another young assistant trainer learning from one of the best. That is Ryan Bond who along with his older brother, Kevin, worked with their dad to ensure the stellar reputation of Bond racing continues into Saratoga and beyond. Ryan, it is an absolute pleasure to have you with me on this week's edition of trainer talk presented by phasic tipton. Good afternoon. Happy to be here. Yeah, you know, when you hear the name Saratoga. What thoughts come to mind? Home for siege. History kind of all the best heuristics in one. Just great weather. The fans are just unbelievable here. You just don't hear like the rower of the crowd like you do. On those race days and it's really special here. Your dad goes by 007 with that James Bond name. He kind of embraced it. How about you? What's that make you? I guess I'm O 8. Maybe double OO 9 after my brother, I'm not sure. Right, right. Well, listen, you are getting ready for this Saratoga meet. And I know it is special. I mentioned your dad's accomplishments. And there have been more. I just hit some of the highlights and we'll talk more about those. But as a family, being there in Saratoga, being home and doing this with your dad and your mom and your family, what's that like? It's everything. It really is. We have a farm just on the other side of Saratoga Lake, about 15 minutes from the actual race course. And it's just between that and the racing barn and everything and working together as a family. It's a lifestyle for sure, but it's a very beneficial one. Tell me more about the farm. I believe he bought it after 2000 and then a ton of work. We have two large barns now over probably a 130 acres and said the home breds have just been kind of getting better and better over the years. It's so great to be able to have your own farm, right? To do things there, as opposed to just having to be set up at the racetrack or have to utilize a facility that isn't yours, to be able to have that farm in that facility has to be a huge advantage. It is, it is, yeah, any horse that needs a break physically or mentally, it's just it's great to have. You can ship a horse out there after they run for a few days and let them get some grass and kind of be a horse again, instead of just going around in circles every day. So it is we find it very beneficial for us. Let's talk more about your dad and what type of teacher he might be. I know that you kind of had no choice to grow up in a racing family, right? You had to have some interest in racing whether you worked in the sport or not. So take me back and tell me about growing up in that Bond family. Oh, yeah. We're always around the barn as we were as we were young and my brother, whether it was pace and park or palmettos or even up here at the old annex field patient barn. But we've always been around the barn. He actually, his rule was for both of us to the only way we could work for him is if we both went out and got four year degrees. And if we didn't find anything else when we, like I said, along that journey and getting our degrees, if there's nothing else that really struck our interests, then there was always a spot for us back at the family business with him. But it's not in the really never put any pressure on us. Young to kind of join him or anything like that. He actually pushed us kind of in the opposite direction. You did get that degree. You got it in finance back in 2013 when you graduated from Florida, Atlantic, was there ever a moment when there was something else beside working with your dad and horse racing that tempted you to go that direction? A little bit. I mean, dealing with numbers and stocks in that. You look other directions, especially the way the industry is kind of is today. So he always kind of pushed me to do something different, but I didn't see myself being very happy in sitting behind a desk in my 30s and I just I've always been drawn to the horses and it's always just kind of got me going in the morning. Your older brother Kevin, he's three years your senior. Where did he get his four year degree? He actually went in Boca Raton as well right down the road from where I got my degree. He went to Lin university. Okay. What was his degree in? Business management. All right, so you both come at it from a business perspective. And as you start looking ahead to maybe one day, I don't know, taking over the operation. I don't know if that's the plan or not. But if that were to happen or you go out on your own, that business background for both of you has to be huge. It is. Yeah, it is. I think we try and help pops and cut costs and do different things, give him different ideas for our business, where we can. We're so diversified with the farm. We have our own trucks and trailers to ship our horses in. And like I said, our own private barn at Saratoga. So there's a lot of moving pieces to our operation. So we try to give our input where we can. Yeah, it's interesting. You bring that up because I love to tell this story when I have somebody on that works with their parents in some form or fashion. I worked with my father growing up as well. He had the family business and the plan was to take that business over. Well, we kept butting heads. It just wasn't going to work for the two of us. I think we were too much alike. You say you brought some ideas to the table. Has your dad always been open to those ideas or have there been times when he said, hey, look, I've been doing it this way for a long time. Ryan, this is how you do it. There's no doubt that he is old school in some aspects. But no, as the years have gone on and as some of my ideas have been a good idea, I guess he's accepted more of them and you have to adapt or you die. So it's one of those things where he's I learn more than he could know about from him and how he does things on a daily basis, but we always just the three of us actually the four of us, my mom included, we are always bouncing ideas off each other to see what works or what might work down the road. You use the term old school to describe your dad. And that's a term we hear a lot with trainers that have been around a while, like suge mcgahey, for example, or Barkley tag or Nick edor Wayne Lucas. They're kind of a little bit old school in their approach to training horses. What does that mean? When you say somebody's old school.

Saratoga Trainer James Bond James Bond Blake Cox Ryan Bond phasic tipton Saratoga Lake Kevin James Bond Brad Ryan Lin university New York Raton Atlantic Boca Florida suge mcgahey Nick edor Wayne Lucas
"suge mcgahey" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

06:03 min | 7 months ago

"suge mcgahey" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

"Course, podcast on major podcast platforms all over the world each and every week and really appreciate everybody tuning in. However, you're listening to trainer talk here on this Wednesday afternoon or maybe even a bit later listening on the podcast. Well, throughout the history of thoroughbred racing, there have been some incredibly successful partnerships among trainers who have taken private jobs for owners in the business and names like suge mcgahey and the FIPS family immediately come to mind. Neil Howard and his magical run with the Ferris family and lane then, and then you had Kira McLaughlin in the maktoum family and that relationship that worked so well for so long. Well, my guest on today's show isn't ready to count himself among those legendary pairings just yet. But he's also just getting started in September, he took over as private trainer for Katie rich farms in midway, Kentucky. He has saddled 6 winners from his first 26 starters. That's not a bad start. And at just 27 years old, the sky certainly appears to be the limit. As a matter of fact, how about this, in his first 8 months on the job, the native of Lexington, Kentucky, has made such a powerful impression that George Barnes, the president of Katie rich farms, took time to email me and had nothing but praise for their young trainer. Please join me in welcoming trainer Daniel leach to trainer talk presented by phasic tipton. Daniel appreciate the visit. Oh, I appreciate you guys calling me. Fun. You know, in his email, George made it a point to say that you've done a fantastic job and the team at Katie rich is convinced that you have a really bright future. It sounds like the perfect marriage. Oh, I mean, I love everybody out there and you know, they've given me an opportunity of a lifetime and you know stuff like this don't happen to people like me every day and when you get opportunity like this, you got to run with it and you've got to, I mean you got to make everything possible happen and if it does it's good, it's all good if not figure something else out but I just get in a really good opportunity and I love everybody over Katie rich and they're like family to me. When did you or what do you remember about the moment when you got the news that you were going to be promoted to head trainer? Well, it was kind of all in the work within probably four years, 5 years. So I started taking horses for Mark with the old trainer and I started shipping horses around for him like the Ohio to Virginia to just different little tracks that would needed to run and I'll run in for him, satellite and then bring him back and then I wanted to start doing more and more and so I got another job with ray handel down in Florida and I went down with him for a little bit and I wanted to stay with rape for a little bit longer, but they called me. They wanted me to come back and Mark was getting older and I just they wanted me to be around the barn more and help him ship and that. So I just decided to come back and it would just all going all good and you know it was you know I knew it was gonna happen but I just need to get my license so once I took the test and passed the test and actually got my license, I just figured it would be a matter of time before it happened. So you mentioned Mark and that's Mark Hubble who was the longtime trainer at Katie rich and he trained right up until last year. Is he training anything this year at all? No, he's not, he's actually retired. I think he's in he has also had the house in Colorado and breckenridge and I'm pretty sure he's out there right now. I've seen him every once in a while. He texted me after races every once in a while. He's like a father figure kind of and you know he helped me out a lot and I always loved Mark so he had some pretty good horses too for Katie rich. I think he saddled well let me see, I looked it up on echo base. It looks like 275 career winners more than $5.2 million in purses. So Mark Hubble was around some pretty good horses too. There was that one, I'm trying to think, was it your round? Was that the name of the Katie rich horse that he trained that was so good? Yeah, he had your round. He had missed Mary apples. He had misread delicious, which those are a part of the same family. Yeah, those are the better ones that he had, yeah. What things did you learn from Mark that, you know, that you're taking with you now is you're the head guy. Just a horseman, a lot of just a lot of horsemanship. Marquis, he always figured, you know, if the horse did want to do it, or just figuring out the horse and figure out what the horse liked. That's what I've learned a lot about that from Mark. How do you do that? You know, if they go, I mean, if they're going out, if they're going out and training and they're come back happy, I mean, they like it. And if they come back with their head and between their legs and they don't seem to give their refusing or if they're going on the track, spinning around and that they don't, you know, they don't like it, something's going on. You got to figure something else out, some to do something different with them. Is that something you can figure out relatively quickly? Or does it sometimes take a little time to do it? No, it's just all about the horse if it's whatever the horse likes to do. If the horse is training really good then keep on going with it, if not, then you gotta figure something else out. You know, you mentioned the name ray handled too and ray has been on this program, this trainer talk show. Tell me about working with ray and what you learned from him. Ray, he's also a really, really good horseman. And I've learned really just pick your spots with horses. He's.

Katie rich suge mcgahey Neil Howard Kira McLaughlin George Barnes Daniel leach phasic tipton Mark Hubble Mark Kentucky maktoum ray handel Ferris midway Lexington Mary apples Daniel George breckenridge
"suge mcgahey" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

04:38 min | 7 months ago

"suge mcgahey" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

"What's the point of doing that? Is it just simply to get him acclimated with the starting gate here at Churchill? No, it's just, you know, to make him remember, you know, it's just a little practice. Trainers do that more now than they used to. In the old days, what's the horse started racing trainers didn't take horses to gate that much, but nowadays everybody schools their horses in the gate, especially time. Most of them go to the mile in the quarter shoot, but safi chose the mile shoot today and maybe because it's quieter down there. Sometimes at the mile and a quarter shoot, you get a lot of action horses are working out of there. There's no works over here out of this gate. Maybe you wanted it to be a little bit more quiet. You started talking about messier and how good he looked and he has. He's made a great impression in the past couple of mornings that we've been able to see him. The horse that beat him in the Santa Anita Derby last time out. I think he is kind of the forgotten horse in this year's Derby. I don't hear a lot of chatter about Teva. Maybe it's because he only has the two lifetime starts, but they've been brilliant. He was out there this morning too. And Bobby, he's just not a big horse. He's a little peanut of a horse, but he has some talent. He has a lot of talent. How can you win the sand and Derby and just the second start of your career, have coming off a maiden 6 fur long win if you don't have talent and by the way it wasn't like you beat a slouch when he beat messier in the Santa Anita Derby and messier had a perfect trip that day. Tava is the forgotten horse. I'm wondering when it comes to both messier and taba. How the wagering will be affected with the fact that they're not technically trained by Bob Baffert for the Derby. They're trained by it's a good point. Somebody who does not have the resume that Bob Baffert has. And that's not to say anything negative about Tim yakin. He just almost nobody has the resume that Bob Baffert has and especially when it comes to the Derby wagering wise I wonder if that makes taba and messier a tick higher in the odds than they normally would be. Well, I think as far as messier's concerned 8 to one on the morning line is pretty generous. Now if baffert was training him, he'd probably be half that. As far as tabe, I think the fact that only one horse in the last 139 years has won The Kentucky Derby with two previous races and I think that that may hurt. You're saying there's a chance. There's the chief. I'm seeing there's a chance, but very slim. And as you mentioned, he's kind of a diminutive little guy, obviously talented, but he's never run against 20 horses before. It's going to be a little culture shock for him. But I don't think he can worry about who's training him at this point. He's all been done and they're going to run their races and Tim certainly is a fine trainer. He's worked for Charlie William. You did Bobby, he's worked for bob. So he knows his way around good horses. He's been around plenty of. We took different paths. Yes. Yes. Yeah. He's still stepping in dirt. I'm not alone. I'm not allowed to. I'm not allowed within 500 feet of the park. Well, we have a very busy show coming up. We're going to get to our first commercial break momentarily. After that, we will welcome the Hall of Fame trainer suge mcgahey, who doesn't have a horse in this year's Derby, but he does have a really good one in the Kentucky oaks and Kathleen O we're going to talk to him in just a few minutes. Sean Byrne, who is the director of the equine industry program at the university of Louisville, business school will be with us as well. Tom Ryan from SF bloodstock and racing. He is the co owner of the aforementioned messier. He'll stop by right around 8 50. Safi Joseph junior will be here at 9 O 5 and at 9 25 Christoph lamer, the man who will be aboard crown pride. We'll join us in really looking forward to that conversation. We don't often get a chance to catch up with Christophe. Yeah, I know that's going to be fantastic. And maybe he'll give us some insight into the training of the Japanese horses and why they've had so much success this year. Yeah, it's been a wild ride for the Japanese sources. They have just been on fire since that breeders cup last year when they came to the United States and won their first not just their first breeders cup, but their first two and then to see what crown pride has done and we mentioned we saw him on the track this morning as well. Suge McGee he has arrived. We'll get to a break. We'll come back with shook next. This is the Derby countdown on the horse racing radio network presented by hillendale.

messier Bob Baffert taba Tim yakin safi baffert Santa Anita Derby Santa Anita Bobby Teva Charlie William suge mcgahey Kentucky Derby Sean Byrne university of Louisville, busi Safi Joseph Christoph lamer Kentucky oaks Tom Ryan