24 Burst results for "Sue Johnson"

"sue johnson" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

04:53 min | 9 months ago

"sue johnson" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"Want to receive that check it out just to four hour. Workweek dot com. That's four hour workweek dot com all spelled out. And just drop in your email and you'll get the very next one if you sign up. I hope you enjoyed this. Episode is brought to you by head. space head. Space is your daily dose of mindfulness in the form of guided. Meditations an easy to use app. Now you might ask yourself very reasonably. There are two thousand plus for meditation. Why would i use head. space head. Space is one of the only meditation apps advancing the field of mindfulness meditation through clinically validated. Research it's basis backed by twenty published studies on its benefits six hundred thousand five star reviews and more than sixty million downloads. So people keep telling you to try meditation and you're like what would i do that when i possibly have time. You check out head space. If you have ten minutes head space can change your life. Hit space offers a really lift and a lot of features to keep you going. Which is part of the reason that i've used head space for years. Though so whatever the situation head space can really help you feel better overwhelmed..

"sue johnson" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

05:09 min | 9 months ago

"sue johnson" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Out work. Okay and i just. I got obsessed with the fact that we from my point of view this science on all our work had created this enormous possibility for people to have much better relationships much more secure families better mental health and and somehow people weren't getting the message. I just became so disconcerted by that. The i said we got into a whole. We've got an online program we got this is underway. It's gonna reach people so my colleagues bless their hearts by seem to have this ability to go in and say insane ideas and then people pick them up and suddenly. We're working for about four years on this huge project so we created this. The online program is it's got little talks. it's got three couples going through the process. You see the three couples working. It's got little bits of music Exercises it's customized. Put huge amount of work into it. I don't know of any other program like it out there especially not based on tested interventions anna clear science of love relationships or 'bout we get very good feedback on it. I'm very encouraged by the military. The us military. I believe and the canadian military using it. Now and the government of british columbia. Where i live on the west coast of canada has just bought a number of them. I think they're gonna give them to first responders whose relationships are having a hard time. The haw institute is talking about creating an online program because they have alive programme in the hospital now in ottawa. So i'm very encouraged by the institutions of picking up. But it supposed to take the hold me tight book and turn it into a live engaging online program that you can do with your partner and the some research on the educational program based on hold me. Tight does no research yet on the online program. But we're still working on it. We want to for example. The three couples who agreed to be filmed through this. We just took the i three couples that came into the studio in ottawa. Did it with me. Did those conversations with me in a very snowy winter. So when i look at them now it looks little dated those three couples as a young couple. A couple of facing all kinds of other difficulties on an older couple. This still useful. You can still see but we've added. We started to add conversations like we have a black couple right now with a black facilitator talking about latin talking about issues with racism and how that impacts relationship with trying to put new conversations in you can see a couple go through it. You can hear me talk about it. You can learn about it. You can hear the stories about it. You can do exercises minutes really designed to lead you into being able to have your own. Hold me tight conversation and i think while. I'm a bit crazy about this book. Your we need books. some we need online programs. We need to educate people about relationships. It's insane that we have all this science and understanding and that we are not sharing it and putting it out so that we can have more positive loving cooperative. Relationships are most secure families from my point of view. It's insane so we created the program on we're gonna keep adding to it and hopefully institutions. We'll keep picking it up and for a while we did it. An online wasn't popular and so it just sat there. And i thought what do i have to do to get this stuff out there. But it has picked talked quite a lot people hearing about it. I think this conversation will help at least the full of people. So that's the hope and this has been so much fun. Doctor sue johnson. You are blast to talk to. And i will of course as bad show notes with links to everything and people can find you it. Dr sue johnson d. r. s. u. e. johnson j. o. h. sos doctors who johnson dot com. They find the whole tight online program at hold me tight. Online dot com. You're on all the social linked to those in the show notes and people can find you on twitter at dr. dr. That's at dr underscore. Sue johnson is there anything else that you would like to say any closing comments any requests of my audience. Anything at all that you'd like to add before we closest i very enjoyable conversation for me. At least i'd want to speak for you. The only thing that comes to me is to say on a personal level that one of the enormous realities of my childhood was that i.

haw institute ottawa government of british columbia anna west coast canada Sue johnson Dr sue johnson johnson j us dr underscore johnson twitter
"sue johnson" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

01:38 min | 9 months ago

"sue johnson" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"On sometimes you have to couple relationships to slow everything down. Give people time to listen to a new thing that not used to hearing or can't take in. You have to slow it down. You know you can't just do all this stuff foss so then heiko oli oh got it. And then he says right they says now follow it and i turn this all the time the parallels in relationships and they were the same so i go to tango lessons and get completely enthralled. Intellectually emotionally physically. I adore tango. But i have to say probably shouldn't say this on air. Do i find. Mostly i find it's easiest don'ts with women there on many women leaders an iconic figure out why that is but i think it's because women have had to learn to choose into other people in order to survive socially over the years. They've had to do that. So maybe it's a little easier for them. But i find with women leaders often will make you feel a little safer with women leaders. Maybe that's what it is. I don't know but often i find it easier to dance with women. Although i've had some amazing male partners to one of the big arguments in my marriage was we started. Don't see tiger within. My husband said he wasn't going to do it. He didn't like it. So i won't tell you what sue johnson said to. That was a positive.

heiko oli sue johnson
"sue johnson" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

06:19 min | 9 months ago

"sue johnson" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Your winnie. Somehow he knew he found a way to reach for her and she responded enough that he had this secure connection because they were british british shop close so they still slept to separate bedrooms which is just kind of weird but any from me for my point. But they did that now. My class consciousness is coming out here. So do you have any favorite books or if you were to recommend a resource for a book or a place to start for people interested in learning more about winston churchill. Do you have any suggestions as wonderful. I think is the loss lion. It's a biography in three volumes of winston churchill. But it takes it from childhood until in dying and it's fascinating fascinating. I'd love it in terms of books. I just read will happen to you. With oprah winfrey and bruce perry and bruce perry both of them a splendid. I love bruce perry. He's a child nonetheless psychiatrists so he comes attachment science in a slightly different way than me his dovetails with us totally brilliantly and he says all the same things about how emotional isolation is traumatizing. And how sensitive we saw and how to grow human beings. He says all the same things. That's one recent one that i just read. You know it's funny. I just came home and literally. That book is sitting on one of the dressers. My girlfriend just bought that book. So it's it seems like she. And i are having top explorations at the moment which is great and the book that you named. You actually got it right. The last lion by william manchester the last line box set it is a three volume set and has average of five stars out of five on amazon. Two hundred and sixty reviews so seems to be. Well liked what i love about it. I think i love winston churchill. Because from my point of view he was successful human being in that he he was always honest to himself. He was always winston. He was always. He took huge risks even though some of those risks medi massively unpopular. There appears time he was hated in the house of commons. No his peers despised him criticized him. He was creative. He was honest he was always who he was. Your i love the he used to go up in the blitz. Everyone else used to go into the shelters. He has to go up on the roof. It was happening okay in the first world. War all his upper-class colleagues if they were in the battle they were way behind the lines in a nice hotel somewhere. Winston gave up being a member of parliament and asked to go into the trenches. He said he wants to see them. He wants to see what they were like. He wanted to be there in the trenches. And mind you. He took his butler with him. Which most of the men in the trenches of blah blah nevertheless. i would love to hear the conversation with the butler on that decision. So i'm talking about the to go into the trenches. But he was a risk taker. He had huge integrity. It was passionate. He stayed with that passion. Even though the reluctant periods of time he was completely rejected socially he was true to himself and he was passionate. And i think he was one of the hugh human beings who could have led england through the second world war and made it. I don't know who else could have come forward to do that. So i find it fascinating. I find figures like him have courage and stand for something and even when the prevailing winds are going the other way I always find that fascinating. Do you still dance tango. Is that something that you still pursue. I still does tango and cove. It has been so awful and of course. The parallel with couple relationships is obvious. When i first started to learn tango my tango teacher would be teaching me. I sub me say things like stop. I gotta write that down because it would be relevant for therapy mean. Tango is about achievement and so is love. Tango is about standing up moving with somebody changing weight with somebody tuning into somebody and there's a safety check there. There's a can i find you. Are you going to respond to me. Are you there. Can i feel you and then if the answers yet if sometimes you go through the motions the answer is no and you go through the motions. You do the steps. But if it's a good dance you find the other person and it's like you are they. Oh i can feel that and we tune into the music at the same time and we start to play and there's a synchrony there that is happens in hold me tight. Conversations happening good. Sex happens in its play and synchrony and it's to human beings impacting each other responding to each other. Sending cues tuning into the cues. This is in talks accounting about it. So when i realized the parallel i was not good at it. I want to tell you my teacher who was not big on empathy said something like come. Why why do you want to teach tango your uncoordinated. You don't have any balance. you're not twenty two. i sent. Thanks very much. I'm in my late fifties actually so. Thanks very much for that comment at the time. I learned tango right. Should your you know this is going to be very difficult for you. And i said we'll shop assault teaching me. 'cause i'll work harder than everyone else. That's all he said. Why do you want to do it. I said because there's something here these these little tiny moments.

bruce perry winston churchill william manchester oprah winfrey house of commons winston Winston amazon butler england
"sue johnson" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

05:41 min | 9 months ago

"sue johnson" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"Your winnie. Somehow he knew he found a way to reach for her and she responded enough that he had this secure connection because they were british british shop close so they still slept to separate bedrooms which is just kind of weird but any from me for my point. But they did that now. My class consciousness is coming out here. So do you have any favorite books or if you were to recommend a resource for a book or a place to start for people interested in learning more about winston churchill. Do you have any suggestions as wonderful. I think is the loss lion. It's a biography in three volumes of winston churchill. But it takes it from childhood until in dying and it's fascinating fascinating. I'd love it in terms of books. I just read will happen to you. With oprah winfrey and bruce perry and bruce perry both of them a splendid. I love bruce perry. He's a child nonetheless psychiatrists so he comes attachment science in a slightly different way than me his dovetails with us totally brilliantly and he says all the same things about how emotional isolation is traumatizing. And how sensitive we saw and how to grow human beings. He says all the same things. That's one recent one that i just read. You know it's funny. I just came home and literally. That book is sitting on one of the dressers. My girlfriend just bought that book. So it's it seems like she. And i are having top explorations at the moment which is great and the book that you named. You actually got it right. The last lion by william manchester the last line box set it is a three volume set and has average of five stars out of five on amazon. Two hundred and sixty reviews so seems to be. Well liked what i love about it. I think i love winston churchill. Because from my point of view he was successful human being in that he he was always honest to himself. He was always winston. He was always. He took huge risks even though some of those risks medi massively unpopular. There appears time he was hated in the house of commons his peers despised him criticized him. He was creative. He was honest he was always who he was. Your i love the he used to go up in the blitz. Everyone else used to go into the the shelters. He has to go up on the roof. It was happening okay in the first world..

bruce perry winston churchill oprah winfrey william manchester amazon winston house of commons
"sue johnson" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

04:20 min | 9 months ago

"sue johnson" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"I say it's not dangerous. It's just a bit. This gentleman said i loved him. He said it's disconcerting. I said oh it's disconcerting is very disconcerting understand. Say let's go over this again. So the i over it again when you do this year this in her voice and then your body does and it's disconcerting something here disconcerting. Could you help me. you don't know what to do and no matter what you do. It's not going to be right. He says yes. When i feel that way. It's a little bit long isn't it. He says yes. It's alarming so when you feel this tightness in your chest you need in the point. Is you leave them into their emotions. The point is i know were going a so. Does every empty therapist. I know where i'm going. Because i've got a map and so attachment gives us a map to how we danced together with the people. We love where those don't go. In terms of outcome it gives us a matter own vulnerabilities and emotions. It tells us how supremely sensitive y'all to signals of rejection abandonment by other people and the this sensitivity is wide end. There's nothing we or strange. Or we've framed these vulnerabilities in very strange ways. Very unaccepted in ways. Some of the ways we've talked about love of being so misleading but when you help people have the words and their own that many words that many core emotions their on that many ways to dance with a loved one. You can face the reach from them. When you're vulnerable you can shut down. Shot them out or you can out the n. T. and get anxious demand or kinds of responses. Trolling that's about it. There the main moves in the dance of love and they can be useful times. But if you get stuck in one of the negative ones like blaming and pushing in demanding an upping the ante to try and get the other person to respond or shutting down withdrawing that generates adults that ends up in disconnection and more anxiety and more problems for both of you. What would be an example of upping the ante. I understand the freezing as it applies to poker. But could you give an example of the anti is what i did with my description of my husband and me where instead of turning and saying i'm missing conversations i say i guess you're tired again. Are your your tunnel these days. I guess you're retired. Listen to me. I'm pushing foolishly. I want is for him to tone and say oh well have. I left you alone. I'm so sorry. Yes i do want these conversations but of course. I'm using a club so i'm smacking him to get him to respond. And the trump that went is the smacking pushed him further away. And that's one of the ironic things as human beings that sometimes when we love people with so unable to really reach for the know how to reach for them the way we do try to reach we person further away. How do you work with or help. Someone work with anger. So you have couple and you're working with them. One partner says whatever they say and then the other then you ask the the other partner how that makes them feel when they hear that and they're like pisses me off. I've heard this one hundred times. God damnit when are we going to be open. Shut case or whatever it is a take a million forms. What most people start their. So i say so. Could you help me when your partner says this hard for you to hear. That doesn't really make sense to you. And you just say he would go again and yuga angry and then i'll stay with that because underneath the anger before the anger there's some sort of threat. There's some sort of a threat going on right. It pisses me.

"sue johnson" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

03:20 min | 9 months ago

"sue johnson" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"I thought yay lady you know. She bought her baby into the puck. That takes gots. I think so good for her but boy. I can't even imagine that happening. I'm obviously you can hear i'm are going to say. I've heard stroppy from my friend from new zealand. But you don't seem to have a kiwi accent nor do seem to have an auto or canadian accent. I'm from england. I came to canada twenty two but you never kind of lose the accent. I cannot imagine even today. A woman. Prime minister walking into the british problem for the baby. And you're holding i. I would love that. I think that would be. That would be progress for britain for me. That ain't right but never mind. Sorry off that was this. Poll pod guesses about freely going off track when when when necessary. I would like to ask a very specific question and it may be a dead end. I don't know. But i was doing a bit of reading on. Eft and there was a phrase that stuck out to me which related to micro interventions. So the of this. So the wording of this is micro interventions from reggie burien models of therapies such as asking questions now i like evocative questions so this drew my attention. What would be an example and what are micro interventions from jerry and models of therapy such as it. Could you questions exactly talkative questions focused on the process of how you're experiencing not the content. So i would say to you tim. What happens to you when you sit and do interviews crazy. People like dot to sue johnson. She tells you stories is the have you move into your own soft feelings. What is that life Tim and you might say oh. I don't know what happens in your body him. Can you tell me a moment when you felt that rush of emotion you say oh well. It was when you said this. Oh so that's the trigger. And i'll help you put your emotions together with evocative questions in reflections on. Also when you heard me say this. That was important view that stood out and you start to feel the love of feelings. Can you help me. What happened in your body to owen. I felt this tightness across my chest. And i felt like i wanted to cry And then what did you say to yourself. I said to myself my goodness. That's just how i felt. When i remember fitting the way when i was three years old and i say on to stand tall reflect again or hold it for you. I'll specify all ask evocative questions. I'll get you to stay with the experience then. I'll say what you want to do when you feel that way and you might say i want to stop it. I want to get out. I don't wanna feel any more of right now. I want to shut it down. I want to stop the feeling. Okay so you want to run. Yeah and we've put your emotion together in a safe specific safe way. People can deal with emotions that when they make sense when they're acceptable to win. There's another human being there accepting them when they made.

reggie burien sue johnson new zealand britain england canada jerry tim Tim owen
"sue johnson" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

05:39 min | 9 months ago

"sue johnson" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Nobody will come from my view. That's a bloody disastrous lesson for any child to learn so i have a huge bias against now again. It depends on how it's done and it depends on what else is happening. So let's not get too judgmental here but why not. Let's get judgmental. i think. I think it stinks. So if that's a religious war. I'm on the attachment side because it seems to me sleep. Training thing fades into a myth that we have that is so dangerous. The myth is about self sufficiency and regulating our own emotions. And the bottom line is the only self sufficient human being is either numbed out on some drug or dead. we're not for self and shutting down. A nominal is a fragile strategy. You can't keep it up for your whole life shatters under any kind of pressure. So i'm saying glibly because this is an interview. I just said to you i can give you research studies to the upper cam. Just saying it so no. I don't think sleep training. A on the other hand i can remember. I adopted my son. He was premature and he came home. He was the tiniest little thing he scared the hell out of me. He was so tiny and he had something wrong with his digestive system for the first eighteen months of his life. He would wake up every two hours. At least maybe sometimes nineteen minutes and the only thing that would help is one of us would go in and sing to him and talk to him and rock him for ten fifteen minutes. I'm put him down and we got into the habit of that and we did that and we accommodated to that we thought about having him sleep between us but we usually slept that point. We adopted him very soon after we got together which we will credibly lucky so we adopted him about a year after we got together and so we slept pretty entwined so we didn't really think it was an also. He was so tiny at. I didn't think putting him in the middle. I felt. I'd call him gonna crush him if i turn it so my husband's a big manner. Oh we're gonna crush it this one so we didn't do that and then it changed and it was fine. My daughter was totally different. Very shortly. After she was born she went to sleep regularly. Went to sleep same time at night. Slept through after a few months providing you gave her all kinds of hugs in the morning. She was this happiness little clam so it was different. So i understand. The parenting can be hard. I think for me. It's the hardest thing i've done for one thing. Parenting moving target. You're comma date to your child and your child changes you say. Wait a minute. Like i just figured out a now. You're changing you become good. Lord you become an adult lesson. I don't know what to do with this. You know my son turned from wonderful. Bubbly charming delightful little being into this. Stroppy judgmental moral person who was portugal. How wrong we were about everything. I thought this is supposed to win. This guy come from so parenting hard and if you take the social implications of attachment science we should be supporting. Our parents like crazy. We should be teaching. People have good. Secure relationships should be teaching them about relationships. Educating them we should be having me for parents we should be supporting the basic unit of our society. Which is our family. We don't seem to be that keen on that we seem to be more keen on supporting economic security or corporations. So i don't think we support parents enough and maybe that needs to change. Maybe our understanding of supporting human families needs to change. I mean attachment has changed parenting. It's changed the way we see. Children is changed the way we see their emotional needs. We understand that to be emotional. Loan traumatizes a child. We need to apply that to adults. Because in that sense we never grow up. Attachment goes from the cradle to the grave. Just very basic things. Like i talk in one of my book somewhere about the. I think it's lob sense there's a movement cold. Nobody dies alone where people get together in certain cities and their commitment is to go in with somebody who's dying and who has no human fica to be there with them and sixty be with them but their most vulnerable moments and for me that speaks to the fact that maybe one day we could have something called a civilized society civilized society would not let anyone die alone. Civilized society would support families and support parents. Help us learn how to parent so. I don't think it's just the couple who stressed. I think it's the demands of our society. You have to go back to work at a certain point with your parent or not. There's no accommodation in most workplaces for parenting. Was it the prime minister of new zealand. Who bought her baby into the parliament..

portugal new zealand parliament
"sue johnson" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

04:40 min | 9 months ago

"sue johnson" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Be me this something. We're always me. i'm just not lovable. And she weeps when she does that partner riches for her naturally her partner reaches for her and says this vulnerability when you really help people move into it. With safety evokes caring compassion. It just does so then. The pump moves in and supports and gradually gradually the other person's able to open up. It's not something that you do once you. It's not something that you can do mechanically you have to be involved in it and for some of us if we've been desperately hut when we were niddle and we learned that that kind of openness was desperately dangerous. It's like jumping off a cliff and you have to respect that you have to respect. Emotions are in no way logical. That's one of the big mistakes. Remain psychology no way logical. They have their own logic there. A supreme information processing system that wise us to see the world in a particular way to move in a particular way and we haven't taught people how to understand them to listen to them and how they make sense they always make sense if someone's terrified of that kind of openness. It's because they have very good reasons to be an often. They haven't told the partner they haven't told upon anything about it so they pop has no idea. The papa says you just don't want to be close to me you just don't want me. No i do desperately want you just terrified to let you see me in psychology. We're very good at looking at the behavior on the problem. And sometimes i feel like we're not so good at what we are supposed to be experts in which is looking underneath the behavior in the problem and seeing the emotional realities that push that problem forward and keep people stuck in that help. Don't refi answer tim i. There's so much to talk about here. I tried to ask. You did know you. And i mean the. The examples are just heartbreaking. And i think they're heartbreaking. I mean i was feeling myself getting really emotional is because they resonate. I think with so many people resonate with me. You should say. But i suspect that these types of situations are really really common but when you're experiencing them i think it's so easy to view yourself as uniquely flawed in some ways. It's so common it's so common. It seemed so calm. At least i mean you'd be more qualified to speak to it. I think it is common on. I think the power of attachment sciences. It tells us who we are. It tells us that we are social beings wide for connection. We need safe. Connection with others. To survive and thrive dependent became a dirty word somewhere throughout history and we all fell in love with the image of the lone cowboy riding over the range. The eagles song desperado. I love that. Saw is my favorite song. Because it basically takes the image of the lone cowboy and basically says buddy. You better find someone to love you because you're in deep trouble so it takes his strong image and says not you're in trouble dependency. Became this dirty word. And i think what attachment science says we are interdependent. Human beings wide for connection with others from the cradle to the grave. And when you present that to people not the way i just said it riches abstract unit when you move people into got reality and you acceptance of course this is who we are as human beings and we all get start care and we all need this people go. Oh oh you mean. i'm not crazy. Bad deficient defective unlovable. No no you know you just two human being who needs that connection with another human being and who is terrified of rejection abandonment. And the reason you're terrified of rejection. Abandonment is because those are pure danger accused. Your mammalian brain danger cues are young vulnerable for longer than any other species. I'm well brain is developing. We know perfectly well on a visceral.

tim eagles buddy
"sue johnson" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

04:01 min | 9 months ago

"sue johnson" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"Would love to ask more about the hold me tight conversations and i'll share a bit of the context from which asking this so i we don't necessarily get into details. We could. But i had quite a bit of a severe early childhood trauma two to four and have not only felt largely alone entire life but have created isolation. It's been constant for me. And so what you're saying about these conversations helping to create the feeling of bonded nece and sort of counterweight. Perhaps some one historical tendency to isolate feel isolated is really appealing. I would love to hear if you're open to sharing perhaps another hypothetical hold me tight conversation or other freezes or questions that are helpful for people who want to get a better understanding of what this might look like in real life when we start with couples many of whom have experienced being alone most of their lives traumatized or not where we start. Is we help couple. See the danzig courtney. Love is adults. We help couple see the dance that coating we help. Couples see the negative patents. The most popular one of all is i become aware of the disconnection between the two of us. I get worried about. It makes me anxious. And i don't feel safe enough to turn and release him vulnerability so i demand i blame. I tell you where all you. What i'm really saying is where all you were are you. I can't find you in the alarms me. But what i say is things that you don't talk to me enough or you know you never tell me how you feel or you know. If you're a man you'll say you never tell me you wanna make love you. Don't ever show me you want me. What's wrong with you. I so we turn to our partner resource wrong with you. So we help couples see how they scare the hell out of each other and create even more insecurity and stop each other from being able to vulnerable in risk when they start to see that. It's the patents. The problem the this problem and the fact they don't know how to do a more positive dance. They start to blame the dogs rather than each other and they start to be able to say. Hey stuck in that thing. We stuck in that thing. We do where. I shut down and shut you out and you must be getting along right now and the other processes yes. I'm starting to freak out. And they say oh. Let's not do that. Let's try and help each other. Feel more safe so we create that platform. I but then you have to start with people all the sometimes the whole conversation with somebody who's been very traumatized and has all the reasons in the world not to trust another human being with the softness of their heart all the good reasons in the world. You have to stop there. I've worked with lots of traumatized folks and you have to start with somebody. Saying i understand now the patents and how we've been caught in this dawn's lie understand that you all always trying to hurt me or have me prove myself to. You proved me wrong. But i wanna tell you the idea of really opening up to you and showing you who i am just feels impossible. I don't know how to do. It is impossible. I don't think i can do it so you start with people you don't get people to do it. In spite of how they feel you get them to trust their feelings. Mike experiences someone will say that. And i will say could you turn tell your partner. Please don't think i can do it..

Mike
"sue johnson" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

03:45 min | 9 months ago

"sue johnson" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"This danz is innately rewarding. It creates joy in peephole. You don't have to persuade people to keep doing it like going to the gym or meditation or their communication skills. People will do this once they know how to do it. They'll keep doing it. And that's why. I think we could follow up results because once you start having these conversations and it's very moving sometimes to see people's response like people will stop to cry and say things like when they discover these. Hold me tight. Conversations people will say thinking of one man who said. I never knew that you could talk to somebody like this. I never knew that you could ask for these things and the she wants me to be vulnerable to her. I never knew that. I never saw that growing up. I didn't know people that. And then he wept and he turned to the therapist and said. I've been alone. All my knife at attachment science tells us is that emotional isolation is toxic for human beings. We found out that in the pandemic but we still don't get it. I wish we would get it on a different level. it's toxic for human beings is not who we are and when people start to have these hold me tight conversations kinds of amazing things happen. They don't just understand how relationships can be higher shape relationships. Don't have to just have them happen to you. You can shake love. They understand something very deep about themselves. Couples grow each other in safe relationships. Couples grow each other. I watch severely traumatized people learn to trust another human being by having these homey type conversations with their partner and it changes everything because they have a secure place in life for the first time they feel seen they feel accepted they fill held. And once you feel. Seeing accepted in held is a natural human growth process that happens. Attachment assigns is all about development of the personality is a natural growth process. So we choose into that natural process in the hold me tight conversation on those conversations predict over study after study after study after study. Those conversations predict success in. Eft they predict more secure bonding. They predict the sex mall sexual satisfaction in couples. They predict any sort of measure of good positive functioning. You can imagine those bonding conversations predict all the good results we get in the f. t. and they predict results follow up just a quick thanks to one of our sponsors and we'll be right back to the show. This episode is brought to you by layered superfood founded by big wave surfer laird hamilton and volleyball champion. Gaby res layered superfood. that's l. a. I r. d. delivers high impact. Fuel to help you get through your busiest days. And i know these two people. They walk the walk. I love their new aloha haute. Mac you heard me right. Aloha haute max superfood creamer. I use the unsweetened version made from real plant based ingredients including organic oats macadamia nuts. That's where the mac comes from avocado oil. And aquaman aquaman is a natural source of seaweed. Dr.

danz Gaby res laird hamilton volleyball Aloha
"sue johnson" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

06:15 min | 9 months ago

"sue johnson" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"This altitude. I can run flat out beforehand. Start shaking question now. It anti messiah organism living show interest to zero. Hello wasn't girls ladies and germs. This is tim ferriss. Welcome to another episode of the tim. Ferriss show my guest. Today is dr sue johnson. You can find. Her on. Twitter at dr underscores sue johnson. She's a leading innovator in the field of couples therapy and adult attachment. she's the primary developer of emotionally focused couples and family therapy known as eft which has demonstrated affective nece in more than thirty years. Appear reviewed clinical research. We'll talk about this. Sue has received numerous awards in recognition of her development of not including the american psychological association's families psychologist of the year and the order of canada. Her bestselling book. Hold me tight with more than one million copies sold. That's very hard to do has taught countless couples to enhance and repair their love relationships. The book has since been developed into a relationship enhancement program called. Hold me tight online. Her most recent book for clinicians attachment theory and practice delineates the promise of attachment science for understanding and repairing relationships is the founding director of the international center for excellence and emotionally focused therapy suit. Trans counselors and worldwide and provides guidance to eighty affiliated centers. She consults for the us and canadian militaries and is a popular presenter in speaker for the general public you can find more on sue and her work at dr sue. Johnson dot com. That's dr sue. Johnson dot com dr johnson. Welcome to the show i. Hey i'm delighted to be with you. Tim thank you for inviting me. I am also thrilled to have you. And we have an abundance of questions in front of me. We may cover some of them. I don't i don't get too attached to trying to cover them all because we'll run out of time. But i thought we would start with something that was mentioned in the intro interest my audience and that is the peer reviewed clinical research research depending on where you happen to be in the world you speak the actual science and research related to your work. This now over twenty outcome studies outcome studies in psychotherapy are very hard to do. And there's a lot of noise in the system. There's lots of things going on in people's lives. Life gets in the way so you have to work very hard to get results and follow up is the real the real thing that matters and we are the only couple intervention as far as i know that has the size of results we get the impacts people. The way redo knows why we get these results. I can tell you exactly what needs to happen in turkey to get the results. And that gets fantastic follow-up we can work with a couple of four fourteen to twenty sessions. We can look at the end of therapy. We can see that they are happier. More secure will securely bonded. their sex life is better. They feel less depressed as individuals and we follow them up three years later and the results hold which is just so everyone knows bruce astounding the latest one where during his. We've got a great big one with the hottest to treat in ottawa. Because the cardiologists realize that actually if their patients have good relationships with their partners they're much less likely to have another heart attack. They take their meds. They go to the gym so then they said. Could you do something and we said okay. You're kidding real design a sixteen hour program for you and we'll research it so we're doing that but to be honest. I do the research because we learn because it's our way of testing what we think we know. But it's not what really turns me on in the end what turns me on is washing. These couples learning from them and watching the make huge changes in lives. I've been doing it for thirty five years. And it turns me on like i don argentine tango. It turns me on like the best milonga ever the best partner. Okay so many follow ups of course as questions just as a side note i lived in argentina from two thousand four to two thousand five and went probably five or six times. A week did a lot of tangos. So we have that in common and if we focus just for a few more minutes on the research because this'll be the away of backing into defining. Eft for folks. i think so. I've read that. If t has something like seventy three to eighty six percent success rate in stays with distressed couples. I would love to know what or how success is defined in these studies. I think that'd be helpful for people listening and then later will return to the durability of effect. Because that's incredible that you're doing follow ups three years later and seeing that. Persistence of fact is really incredible. But how do you define success with distress couples. That's a good question and it depends on the study. But in general we define it with a measure of it's called marital adjustment and it basically looks at the couple's take perception of the marital satisfaction. It's a bit more than satisfaction because it has different elements to it so we use a scale. That's been used in all kinds of research. That's got all kinds of validity. But we've also used all kinds of measures. The one that i think's the most interesting is that we did a big study a few years ago looking. Not just at whether you we can help you. Change your marital satisfaction your adjustment. The way you see your pa we can help you..

dr sue tim ferriss dr sue johnson international center for excel sue johnson Johnson american psychological associa dr johnson Sue Twitter canada Tim turkey ottawa heart attack bruce us argentina
"sue johnson" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

02:58 min | 9 months ago

"sue johnson" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"This altitude. I can run flat out beforehand. Start shaking question now. It anti messiah organism living show interest in two zero. Hello wasn't girls ladies and germs. This is tim ferriss. Welcome to another episode of the tim. Ferriss show my guest. Today is dr sue johnson. You can find. Her on. Twitter at dr underscores sue johnson. She's a leading innovator in the field of couples therapy and adult attachment. she's the primary developer of emotionally focused couples and family therapy known as eft which has demonstrated its effectiveness in more than thirty years. Appear reviewed clinical research. We'll talk about this. Sue has received numerous awards in recognition of her development of not including the american psychological association's families psychologist of the year and the order of canada. Her bestselling book. Hold me tight with more than one million copies sold. That's very hard to do has taught countless couples to enhance and repair their love relationships. The book has since been developed into a relationship enhancement program called. Hold me tight online. Her most recent book for clinicians attachment theory and practice delineates the promise of attachment science for understanding and repairing relationships is the founding director of the international center for excellence and emotionally focused therapy suit. Trans counselors eft worldwide and provides guidance to eighty affiliated centers. She consults for the us and canadian militaries and is a popular presenter in speaker for the general public you can find more on sue and her work at dr sue. Johnson dot com. That's dr sue. Johnson dot com dr johnson. Welcome to the show i. Hey i'm delighted to be with you. Tim thank you for inviting me. I am also thrilled to have you. And we have an abundance of questions in front of me. We may cover some of them. I don't i don't get too attached to trying to cover them all because we'll run out of time. But i thought we would start with something that was mentioned in the intro interest my audience and that is the peer reviewed clinical research research depending on where you happen to be in the world you speak the actual science and research related to your work. This now over twenty outcome studies outcome studies in psychotherapy are very hard to do. And there's a lot of noise in the system. There's lots of things going on in people's lives. Life gets in the way so you have to work very hard to get results and follow up is the real the real thing that matters and we are the only couple intervention as far as i know that has the size of results we get the impacts people. The way redo knows why we get these results. I can tell you exactly what needs to happen in turkey to.

tim ferriss dr sue johnson dr sue sue johnson international center for excel american psychological associa Sue Johnson Twitter dr johnson canada Tim us turkey
"sue johnson" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

02:00 min | 9 months ago

"sue johnson" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"You by head space head. Space is your daily dose of mindfulness in the form of guided meditations in an easy to use app. Now you might ask yourself very reasonably. There are two thousand plus apps for meditation. Why would i use head. space head. Space is one of the only meditation apps advancing the field of mindfulness and meditation through clinically validated research. Head spaces backed by twenty five published studies on its benefits. Six hundred thousand five-star reviews in more than sixty eight million downloads. So if people keep telling you to try meditation and you're like one would i do that. When would i possibly have time. You check out head space. If you have ten minutes head space can change your life. Hit space offers a really light lift and a lot of features to keep you going. Which is part of the reason that i've used head space for years now. So whatever situation head space can really help you feel better overwhelmed. Head spaces three minute. Sos meditation you need. Some help falling asleep head. Space has wind down sessions. Their members swear by and for parents even has morning. Meditations you can do with your kids head spaces approach to mindfulness can reduce stress improve sleep boost focus and increase your overall sense of well being and it really starts with very very simple practices and if you look at my case for instance i just went through one of the basics today with the co founder andy. I think it's become could put a comb. I'm not sure but former monk turned into founder of head space has the most soothing hypnotic voice imaginable and. I did a three minute meditation. Something like that. It's easy it's fundamental and it always puts me in a better space so i'm going through the basics even though have meditated for years. I'm going through the basics once again. And i would suggest to anyone that they consider starting their head space. Makes it easy for you to build a life. Changing meditation practice with mindfulness. That works for you on your schedule. Anytime anywhere we all want to feel happier. We all want more peace.

monk andy
"sue johnson" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

01:38 min | 9 months ago

"sue johnson" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Crowd favourite. I mean people were just raving fans of this. So i used it and here. We are at the pod pro coverage your current mattress and start sleeping as cool as fifty five degrees fahrenheit or as hot as one hundred and ten degrees fahrenheit. It also splits your bed half so your partner can choose a totally different temperature. My girlfriend runs hot all the time. She doesn't need cooling. She loves the heat and we can have our own bespoke temperatures on either side. Which is exactly what we're doing now for me. And for many people the result eight sleep users fall asleep up to thirty two percent faster reduce sleep interruptions by up to forty percents and get more. Restful sleep overall. I can personally attest to this track. And all sorts of ways. It's the total solution for enhanced recovery. You can take on the next day feeling refreshed and now my dear listeners. That's you guys. You can get two hundred fifty dollars off of the pod pro cover. That's a lot simply go to eight. Sleep dot com slash. Tim or use code. Tim that's eight all spelled out e. g. h. t. sleep dot com slash. Tim or use coupon code tim. Ti eight sleep dot com slash. Tim for two hundred and fifty dollars off your pod pro cover. This episode is brought to you by head space head. Space is your daily dose of mindfulness in the form of guided meditations in an easy to use app. Now you might ask yourself very reasonably. There are two thousand plus apps for meditation. Why would i use head. space head. Space is one of the only meditation apps advancing the field of mindfulness and meditation through clinically validated research..

Tim tim
"sue johnson" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

The Virtual Couch

03:10 min | 11 months ago

"sue johnson" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

"What that connection looks like the truly be able to express themselves and feel heard feel. Okay let me go back to an example that i give often. This example is one where someone comes into my office and In the scenario let's say that the wife has a a large amount of anxiety and so there are times where she may be overwhelmed or overcome with these anxious thoughts and feelings and she may not even be aware of it. So i'll get that couple. That will come into my office and the husband will say. I don't know what to do with that when she's spinning or she is out of control or she's feeling this anxious. I'm not sure what to do. And so i've told her she needs to figure that out before we can have a conversation in that is again. I can even say this from bless his heart. Because i can understand. It's hard when you don't know what to do. But what i see in that scenario is somebody that saying. Hey i need to be able to control how My wife is going to approach me for a conversation. Even if it's something that she needs help with and so when you are telling someone who has a tremendous amount of anxiety to get your anxiety in control before you come and communicate with me. That's actually gonna cause more anxiety. It's just gonna cause more of that. So back to the sue johnson quote were designed to deal with emotion in concert with another human being. So what does that look like. If i have a couple of come into my office and she says i just start to feel anxious or let's even go this route. If he saying what's one of the challenges i have is. Is i worry that when she gets one of these anxious moods that i'm not sure how to communicate with her and now can drop this right into my four pillars of connected conversation pillar one if i'm talking to the wife in the scenario assuming good intentions so he did not wake up and think i will get to that therapist office..

sue johnson
"sue johnson" Discussed on Learn2Love Podcast

Learn2Love Podcast

05:07 min | 1 year ago

"sue johnson" Discussed on Learn2Love Podcast

"Bit. And then like sure okay sure, you know like enough to support you. Remember we talked about this and teamwork. It's not the partners job to solve all their Partners problems as often get some feeling kind of stuck and like they don't know what to do when their partner comes for them comes to them and says honey have this problem. They just walk away, but that's not that's what you need. Okay, you actually just have to listen to them. That's all they want. They don't want you to solve all their problems most of that time. They just want you to listen them and be on their team take their side make them feel like at least another person is there for them and cares about them okay off another q that often leads to conflict is when we feel lonelier when we feel scared and I think we pick this up in childhood. Like when we feel scared that the cute to get angrier that's a cute age draw. That's a cute to be stressed. That's a q that leads to our habit of getting angrier speaking in a way that we're going to regret later or doing things that we later regret. Okay, so if you're dead You is feeling scared. You have to ask yourself. Well, what what are things that you can do to help you feel better? So often and Sue Johnson talks about Dimension hold me tight a huge way. And remember we talked about this earlier and conflict resolution that a great way to feel relaxed is by holding. Somebody holding you the most basic package that we calm down are the same that we use in childhood is a piece. Okay holding rocking and thank you know I'm with you. It's okay, you know, like when a parent home mom says to a baby like mommy's hair mommy's here. Okay, we can do similar things with our partners we can hold them. We can rinse out of rocking you can stroke their cheek, you know, gently, you know lovingly stroked there are or something and to say I'm with you..

partner Sue Johnson
Washington state sues Johnson & Johnson over opioid crisis

America in the Morning

00:32 sec | 2 years ago

Washington state sues Johnson & Johnson over opioid crisis

Washington state sues Johnson & Johnson over opioid crisis

Joe Walsh

00:17 sec | 2 years ago

Washington state sues Johnson & Johnson over opioid crisis

"Washington state suing Johnson and Johnson claiming the company was negligent when it used deceptive marketing to say the drugs were effective for treating pain and were unlikely to cause addiction in November a judge in Oklahoma finalized an order directing Jane J. to pay state foreigners sixty five

Washington Johnson Oklahoma Jane J.
Can Boris Johnson deliver Brexit?

The Daily

09:36 min | 2 years ago

Can Boris Johnson deliver Brexit?

"On the daily you told us the story of populism in europe <unk> over five parts and now it feels like that story is very much back in the news so we've gotten used out of the u._k. We've gotten used out of italy. I'm sort of just waiting being for the other countries to sort of implode yeah. It's been quite a week so let's start with the u._k. Remind us where we were when this week started good evening from dining streets where boris johnson one of the most controversial politicians of modern times has taken over as prime minister from theresa may <music> standing in downing street for the first time as prime minister boris johnson promised british people that brexit will be dealt with in ninety nine days and he's promised is to take out of the e._u. On october thirty first with or without a deal at all ministers deleting on this date whatever whatever the circumstances and to do otherwise would cause a catastrophic loss of confidence in our political system okay so the situation is that boris johnson needs to deliver brexit. Finally we've got a deadline toba thirty. I you know the deadline was extended. Twice is this now seems to be the hard deadline and he's got nine weeks to deliver this promise to take britain out of the european union. Basically there are two ways of doing that. Either you cut a deal with brussels with the other twenty seven countries in the european union and figure out a way to make this kind of work seamlessly asli or you don't cut a deal in which case you kind of crash out of this block meaning that you have a situation off total chaos this nodia brexit that scenario is basically something that most lawmakers want to avoid right and that's why there were scenes of theresa may trying and failing going to pass a deal brexit to parliament over and over again and he's really embarrassing stumbles correct. She failed three times and then she resigned and now while boris johnson has made it very clear that he stands for a brexit on october thirty first doer diets he put it and we're going to fulfill filled repeated promises of parliament to the people deal or no deal. I'm come out to the issue of the thirty first. That's his objective narrates knives or buts so this was kind of the situation we were in. Everybody was wondering what's he going to do with this and then he you did something that nobody expected. He suspended parliament. It is a move that will make it easier for johnson to force the country's exit from the european union without a deal in place place. Critics say this is a constitutional crisis but supporters say it's standard practice. What does that actually mean so he's dealing with the parliament that it not only hasn't been able to agree on anything. There's no majority for any deal that has been proposed. He's dealing with a parliament that tried to oust him at one point and he's dealing with the the parliament where very opposition parties and finally making common cause to basically pass legislation to stop a ordeal brexit from happening which would limit his options and basically risk for him not to be able to deliver on his promise which is brexit come what may so. There's this thing called proroguing. It's a very british thing you perot parliament you basically suspended temporarily and he's basically you cut down the time that parliament has in session to debate brexit from five weeks to less than three weeks by cutting the timetable timetable johnson is making it much less likely that these people will actually come to an agreement and get in his way and get in his way in ways made it almost impossible awesome for anyone to challenge is promised to leave the european union october thirty first sue johnson is trying to severely limit the role of the legislative creative branch of the british government in what is arguably the most consequential process. It has gone through in decades. How on earth is that possible crazy thing. It's totally possible. Most people think it's entirely within the bounds of britain's famously unwritten constitution and got it approved by the queen and then allowed him to go ahead so that's all it takes. Ask the queen suspend parliament. That's all it takes to. The queen supports this plan. No it doesn't mean that she supports it. It's basically a formality in britain that part is normal but what isn't normal is the timing and the way that he sort of did with this in a way that looks very much politically motivated and you know this is not necessarily illegal. There may be legal challenges but a lot of people think you'll get away with it but it's sneaky and it's kind of undermining trust in the institutions and reinforcing the sentence that democracy is not working <hes> and that could become a self-fulfilling prophecy so he's kind of playing with fire. It's extremely brazen reason and i wonder how people especially people who serve in parliament have responded. They're not happy people basically accused him of staging a coup shutting down parliament in order to force through and hoodoo brexit which will do unto who'd and and lasting damage to the country against the wishes of m._p.'s is not democracy. It's dictatorship. They say he's acting like a king. He's taking away fundamental democratic rights and disabling parliament suspending parliament is not acceptable. It's not all while the prime minister is doing. A sort of smashing grab on democracy. People have been marching in the streets. The bottom line of all of this is that people are saying this is deeply undemocratic own elected prime minister to found the elected to rump fluid. No deal has no democratic monday. I mean the scale of what he's doing. Strikes me as the equivalent of the president united states in the middle of the immigration debate for example something as divisive brexit just somehow suspending congress and putting his plan plan for a border wall and action and saying i need you. You're in the way. It's not a bad analogy because johnson is saying. I'm not an mccready you guys are and i suspect that's probably what trump would say. He'd say the people voted for me. I promise the wall so this is democracy. Well johnson is is basically saying the people voted for brexit so i'm the man to deliver it and if parliament is going to stand in the way that parliament is undemocratic socratic it has become clear there are pessimists at home and abroad who think after three years of indecision that this country has become the prisoner to the old arguments of two thousand sixteen at in this home of democracy. We are incapable of honoring a democratic mandate. It's pretty classic basic popular stuff. Actually the elites are not standing for the people but here. I am the man to represent the people and so i'm standing before you today today to tell you the british people those critics are wrong. The doubters the doomsters the gloomsters they outgained to get it wrong again the people who bet against britain again to lose their shirts but this one's going to restore trust in our democracy so so johnson is saying you're calling undemocratic for me to block parliament's ability to do my job but i say it's undemocratic for parliament to get in the way of music realizing what the people voted directly for which is brexit exactly and ultimately. That's kind of where we're at. It's like what's your definition of. Democracy is a democracy people voted for brexit and nobody's been able to deliver it. Is it democratic to disable temporarily a legislative chamber that is sort of at the core of representative democracy right the people vote for these representatives stanford their interest but there's this rift right now and this is kind of at the heart of the issue of rising populism realism across europe that we touched on june as well as the people don't trust their representatives anymore. There's this crisis of representative democracy and in britain the oldest democracy in the world. This tension is now really come to a head right. It's one of the reasons. The british people voted to get out of the e._u. The the first place this idea that the european union was not properly representing them and this is where in some ways the irony lies because boris johnson argued in favor of brexit precisely with the argument that it would reinforce the british parliament. They say you have no choice but to bow down to brussels. We say are woefully underestimating this country what it could it would. I'd be patriot powers. It would make the british parliament more powerful and more democratic. I mean he basically argued when he was arguing. In favor of brexit the brussels was

Boris Johnson Parliament British Parliament Britain European Union Prime Minister Brussels Europe Theresa Italy British Government Representative M._P. President Trump Congress Ninety Nine Days Three Weeks Three Years Five Weeks
Oklahoma judge to rule in $17 billion opioid lawsuit against J&J

Lee Matthews

00:38 sec | 2 years ago

Oklahoma judge to rule in $17 billion opioid lawsuit against J&J

"Up a ruling expected today in Oklahoma's lawsuit against pharmaceutical giant Johnson Johnson who the state accuses of fostering an opioid epidemic Kevin brown reports the state of Oklahoma has been suing Johnson and Johnson and their drug making subsidiary Jansen claiming the company's knew the risks of opioid abuse among patients and continue to push the drugs for use by doctors and pharmacies unlike other cases with other pharmaceuticals this case was not settled out of court and the trial resulted in a trove of evidence in the form of usually private drug company data and communication being made public Johnson and Johnson denies any

Oklahoma Johnson Johnson Jansen Opioid Abuse Kevin Brown Johnson
Dogs being trained to detect ovarian cancer

The Lutheran Hour

10:25 min | 4 years ago

Dogs being trained to detect ovarian cancer

"The studio ovarian cancer symptom awareness is the name of the organization Valley I wanna get to what ovarian, cancer symptom awareness is what the organization is about an event you have coming up but I am not going to bury the lead and the. Lead is, dogs are. Being trained quite effectively as it turns out to. Detect cancer so that's I'm gonna I'm? Going, to start in the middle there ex- explain explain what that is all, about well our organization has a partnership at the, veterinary community and through that partnership we. Formed a great relationship with Dr Cindy Jato and the pin. Bet working dog center and she, has a team of four dogs that are sniffy now the odor inside ovarian. Cancer we've been supporting. Her for the last five years and they're very close to Determining the sense of ovarian. Cancer that will be transmitted to an, electronic knows. That will all now you're confusing so explain so. The dogs let's do it one step at it's the dogs are actually being trained by Dr. Otto that the university, of Pennsylvania school of veterinary medicine to actually determine that one is ovarian cancer and that one isn't yes okay so that's happening yes and it's. Happening effectively, yes all. Right so because there isn't going to be though. I like the idea a dog in? Every, exam room in America right what would be the use of these dogs, and I think that's what you were getting to, when I said whoa explain that so. The dogs are identifying the odor ends and they're taking that. Data, and giving it to Manila. Chemical company is working very closely with Dr Otto and her team and they Are the dogs have been ninety nine percent accurate in determining ovarian cancer cell lines and so that information is being transmitted and turn electric knows and the the ultimate. Result. Of. That will be? A. Blood test and that? Will. Be given. To women that will identify if they have ovarian cancer all right so let's do this again step by step. So. At some point in the not too distant? Future we're helping so at some point relatively soon yes not decades, away, I suspect. But years away yes because it still has to be approved by the government I mentioned okay so. You'll be able to go to your doctor's office and then what, will happen They you it'll, be. A blood blood tests now and then the problem now with ovarian cancer and lots. Of other kinds of cancers is that by the time the blood test says here's some bad news you've already had ovarian cancer, for some time and they don't find it until stage three or four typically that's. Correct all. Right so the way to salvo Varian cancer. To treat it better like a lot of things is simply defined. It earlier cracked this will help. That, to happen yes. It'll be a blood test. That, will determine immediately if there is over in cancer in. In the. Blood. And which and that could be stage one which is ideal ideal gonna find yeah So I mean it's a a blood, test now that you know we have our blood tests that determine our you know. Our kidney levels are what it'll be, that kind of testing that will be an, alert an early alert simple blood test or a part of the blood panel I suppose, women yes that's the. Hope insurance would pay for it is the, hope hope yes and and then the blood panelists sent. To? Wear mo-. Nell chemical. Company is the organization that has created this electronic knows that. Will review doesn't view the test does it literally Mimika, dogs. In some ways yes so the. Idea, it sounds crazy so if valley if you would have thought that you would be telling me this fifteen years ago I suppose you wouldn't have thought, you'd be ever telling anybody this. Now No but my father was a veterinarian and, I believe all things possible in the veterinary world so the dog's nose A. Dog's, nose is. So. Incredible that these dogs, are finding ovarian, cancer and this is a replica of that dog's nose yes sort. Of yes and and this replica? If, you will this. Computer generated. Will. Be able to determine whether ovarian? Cancer cells are there early on early on yes in early detection save? Lives, yeah so talk about that is what what's the difference between finding ovarian cancer stage one. Compared to stage four They it's is, there a short answer the person lives essentially potentially yes but it's. It's good to know that there? Are, thirty three different. Kinds of. Ovarian. Cancer at different levels yeah you? Can have a stage one that is as serious as a stage four So. It's, you. Know if you have a family, history and you have any of the symptoms. For two weeks or more don't ignore them go see your doctor and we'll talk about what symptoms are because the mission of your organization I believe. Is to educate people yes, yes so we'll. Do some, education. Here but. It's quite amazing what dogs can do all of, this started, in part because of a? Friend of mine who, has? Since, passed away and a friend of sued Janssen who's on the phone sue Johnson writes about companion animals as. Well, good morning sue good morning thank you for getting up so early for us So tell us what. Our mutual friend and your, dear friend dare. Lean art, and. Did before. She passed away of ovarian cancer of all things He was a certified animal behavior consulted dogs and cats She was a writer Had several books she, did a radio show so she would periodically be on our show and sometimes poor. Thing. Beyond her show exactly Yes yes so she said I understand the interrelationship here between people dogs and the ability of, dogs noses to find things that we couldn't even fathom finding actually had that foresight a. Couple of years ago and created a fund and you have an announcement to make having to do with all that Exactly I Wanted to do something to continue her. Legacy And to continue to honor and. The work that she was so passionate about so I am creating a funder starting this fun too Gift To the ovarian cancer symptom awareness group in order to continue their outreach, program veterinary outreach, program and the dog sniffing program that will hopefully eventually lead to early detection which will lead to saving lives I mean this this is, quite incredible and we're talking ovarian cancer valley but Dr Otto herself the researcher. Who you know I know. Has told me I'm, more than one occasion gee, if we could do this for ovarian cancer I think we've opened up the genie's bottle, and now we have the super-secret these are not her words I can assure you he's. Not, her. Scientific words, but we, have now the secret and we can replicate this, for other texts of cancers particularly those like stomach cancer uterine cancer bladder cancer are typically not found until later. On right exactly and that's you know we're focusing on the ovarian cancer piece of, it but our entire team is so energized that the thought that it could lead to early detection for other cancers and when sue talk to, you off the, air days and days ago and said I'm coming in for your event which you can talk about she Another announcement as well. Correct Yes I she's we're delighted that show becoming to our dog walk on September. Ninth To LeRoy oaks forest preserve in Saint Charles and she's. Coming in from, Kansas and we're thrills she and I have. Never met in person so I'm very very happy to welcome her to Saint Charles? And, she's going, to talk about the fund that she is supporting Darlene to memory Yeah and you know helping us with an ongoing fund that can help us not only support Dr Otto's work but get out there and get the word out on the silence sometimes you know sue I know you were dare leans dearest friend in the world and, this must mean a lot to, you to know that these dollars that you continue to raise. That the ovarian, cancer symptom awareness organization continues to raise are. Really making a difference in a way that might even go beyond with Darlene envisioned Oh absolutely I it's it is really thrilling and I, just excited to be a part of it well I'm sorry that. I can't see. You. Out in San, off somewhere I don't even know where I'm going to be I think Myrtle Beach speaking, at a conference and then onto Portland somewhere but I'll be somewhere. Other, than here, unfortunately, but I'm glad you're coming here and I thank you for, your help with all this yeah we'll talk more about the benefit in detail when we come back and what ovarian cancer symptom awareness is what the organization is what they do and much more on WGN.

Cancer Dr. Otto Uterine Cancer Sue Johnson Dr Cindy Jato WGN Darlene Kansas America Leroy Oaks Forest Manila SAN Saint Charles Pennsylvania School Myrtle Beach Janssen Writer Portland
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