36 Burst results for "Sudan"

Fresh "Sudan" from PBS NewsHour

PBS NewsHour

00:37 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh "Sudan" from PBS NewsHour

"S top 165,000 tonight. The state's way howto handle the upcoming school year in New Jersey and early hot spot in the pandemic. Governor Phil Murphy cleared the way today for in person classes. He signed an executive order allowing public and private schools from kindergarten to college to reopen if they observe safety measures. We have held ongoing discussions with leaders throughout our higher education system, and we believe they are ready for this step come the beginning of the school year in September, plans are in place. To ensure the safety of all students and staff US budget deficit has had a record of more than $2.8 trillion.10 months into the fiscal year. Treasury Department said that is largely due to federal stimulus aid to help keep the economy afloat during the pandemic. It predicts that by fiscal year and the 2020 deficit will more than double any on record. Meanwhile, numbers out of Britain today reveal a pandemic induced recession that is worsening. Government statistics show its economy shrank by 1/5 in the second quarter. That is the worst contraction in 65 years of recordkeeping. Economists fear the UK is downturn maybe the deepest among the world seven leading industrial economy. To Scotland, where At least three people died and six others were hospitalized today after a passenger train derailed. It happened about 100 miles north east of Edinburgh, where severe storms triggered flash floods Overnight. Thick smoke billowed over the hilly feel. This morning, emergency crews struggle to access the site to rescue passengers from overturned train cars. In Belarus. Some 6000 people have been detained after the third straight night of clashes between protesters and police. Demonstrators insists the re election of President Alexander Lukashenko is illegitimate. Last night, police assaulted journalists and made widespread arrests today, Lukashenko called the protesters criminals. The core of these so called protesters are people with a criminal past and those who are currently unemployed. Those who don't have a job, walk in the streets and avenues. That's why unkindly urging everyone who is unemployed to get a job. Today. In man's nearly 200 women marched against police brutality and urged authorities to release those who were detained. Violent tribal clashes in Sudan has killed at least 25 people and wounded nearly 90 more. The fighting began Sunday in Port Sudan and the Red Sea province. Authorities deployed troops and imposed curfews. Tensions between the Benny on their tribe and the Nuba tribe date back to 2019 and stem from disputes over water and other resource is Back in this country. An FBI investigation is underway after an Air Force helicopter was shot at from the ground as it flew over Virginia. The incident happened Monday during a routine training mission from joint base Andrews near Washington. It was forced to land at Manassas Regional Airport in Virginia. One crew member was hit in the hand. And later released from the hospital. Stocks soared on Wall Street today, led by a rebound in the technology sector. DowJones Industrial Average Game 290 points to close at 9 27,077 The NASDAQ rose 229 points and the S and P 500 added 46. Ford Motors is recalling more than half a 1,000,000 of its mid size SUVs due to brake issues. The recall covers Ford Edge models from 2015 to 2018. And Lincoln M K X vehicles from 2016 to 2018 The automaker reported. Some front brake hoses can rupture and leak brake fluid, which could increase stopping distances. And billionaire media mogul Sumner Redstone has died from his family's drive in movie chain. He built an empire that included CBS, Viacom and Paramount Pictures and helped to shape the modern day entertainment industry. His final years were marked by corporate battles and legal disputes with former girlfriends. Some are ready for some inner Redstone was 97 years old. Still to come on the news. Our young people face the realities of covert as they account for a rising number of new infections, plus migrants from around the world risk death crossing the dangerous jungle between.

Sumner Redstone Phil Murphy Alexander Lukashenko UK New Jersey Virginia Port Sudan Sudan Manassas Regional Airport Belarus Ford Motors Scotland United States Executive Treasury Department Red Sea Britain
Mid-Air Collision - Alaska

Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

06:03 min | 4 d ago

Mid-Air Collision - Alaska

"Was a mid air collision of two airplanes near these sold DOT NA airport. On the Peninsula of Alaska near Anchorage. On Friday of last week, killing seven people including a Kaanai lawmaker. A single engine to have lengthy HCC to beaver was involved in the crash which carried six people fifty-seven-year-old Gregory Bell of soul, DOT NA. Forty year old Guy David Rogers of us and South Carolina residents. Caleb. hosie had their Halsey, McKay? Halsey. And Kirsten right according to the LASCA state troopers the only person in the other plane a single engine. Piper PA. Was Sixty three year old state representative Gary Nop of by troopers federal aviation officials said. Six people were confirmed dead at the scene while one person died on the to the central Peninsula hospital in an ambulance. federal NTSB was recovering the two planes and the NTSB Alaska chief. Clint. Johnson said. Well. That's what he said Saturday, the agency help to be finished with recovery efforts by the end of Saturday and the goal is to bring the two planes to secure location in the West Selah area by the way this is from. A local news outlet A D. N. dot com whatever that stands for. So High Adventure Air Charter on Friday posted a message on its website confirming that one of its aircraft was involved in the crash. At, this time high adventure air is working to support families involved in his working with the National Transportation Safety. Board, who is investigating the in the accident? Our thoughts and prayers are with all of the families involved in this tragic accident. Bell the beavers pilot was part of the family owns and operates high adventure air charter based on long near Lake in sold out now. The business offers fishing hunting, bear viewing and glacier tour trips as well as custom charters. The charter plane which was equipped with floats took off from Long Mirror Lake and was headed to the west side of Cook Inlet. The. Piper PAC twelve was equipped with wheels and took off from the sold in the airport but investigators do not know yet where it was headed. Interrupted your first second other pipers that onto quit with wheels the ones that have floats apparently Okay. I kinda struck me. Kind of struck me as odd as well. Must Pipers I think that's a fair statement. Most pipers have wheels. But apparently, because the the BEAVER was float. Float equipped beaver. They felt like they had to. Put that make that point. Okay. That's I could have just said that took off from the Saldana airport not the like. Ben. Anyway. Witnesses. DESCRIBE THE MID air collision, which they say produced a tooth rattling sound and sent debris flying. Alaska State Trooper said they began getting reports of the crash two miles northeast of sultanas airport just before eight thirty in the morning on Friday, most of the wreckage landed about two hundred yards from the road, which was closed briefly to safety concerns and Deborah's are debris. National Weather. Service. Reports from the Sultana airport for Friday morning show clear visibility with broken clouds at ten thousand and four, thousand, five, hundred feet. So anyway, they're still investigating why the collision occurred. and. That's all they have. So it's amazing. How often you get close to alluring craft Pakeha you haven't spotted them and most of these occasions just give everyone a bit of a fright when you get very close about. The advent of eighty s be for everybody is going to help these situations but quite honestly The best thing to do is just keep head out of the cup used them Wanna eyeball but of course, has limitations We all know that. Sudan you know we were. Really through. Our evolution sensory systems are is already designed to pick up moving targets and If you're on a collision course with someone, they don't actually move relative to you because you're a collision course if they moved then you'd easily tell are either gonNA in front of you behind you above you will below you'll whatever. So something that's completely stationary in your windshield pups just adult initially is she knows very easy victory for peripheral vision to pick up. So does it starts to move one direction or another that you attention is attracted to it. You can say if you look directly at it with the the highest acuity portion of your eye, which those is, you know it's about the size of your fist held on link. It's not a very big piece of your eye. Which is why it's important to scan the sky. All the time particularly in the areas when you'll vulnerable. To Collisions talking about three o'clock tonight. but you know it is possible papal creep up from behind you take a look out there occasionally and do so insect chosen to do. So with discipline so that you can cover the entire sky and bear in mind that it's very easy if you're looking into an empty sky, feel is to focus backwards towards you. And longer be stretched out at infinity. So there's less chance of your actually seeing the thing you're looking for. If you find yourself staring at the windshield, you'd be looking out the window too long glance out something that's more about video forty feet from you usually the ground or cloud or something, and then restart

Alaska Ntsb Peninsula Of Alaska Guy David Rogers DOT Halsey Gregory Bell Anchorage South Carolina Caleb. Hosie State Representative Long Mirror Lake Central Peninsula Hospital PAC Mckay National Transportation Safety Kirsten Clint Saldana Johnson
Siyabulela Mandela - Personal Lessons from History

Untangle

03:48 min | Last week

Siyabulela Mandela - Personal Lessons from History

"Siebel Villa. Thank, you very much. Ariana family me and thank you. For joining us, it is my sincere pleasure and honor. I would love to begin with you telling us a little bit about your own story and the inspiration for your current work. Thank. You very much. Really. I grew up in effeminate that was highly politicized and our shaved. By the history of the Feminine so-fi as its involvement in the struggle against apartheid resume colonialism in south, Africa, and in Africa in general and in the fight for the. Liberation of the black masses AFA people against the shuttle's off. Appreciate up on. Racism and all forms of injustice that degeneration of Mandela waged against our shaped by that kind of history and our shaped by those material condition, and it is the involvement of my family and my involvement of my great grandfather, Nelson Mandela that has inspired me to anti into the food dolf intensive relations particularly focusing on issues that were made peace confluence, Aleutian and human rights in South Africa. Andy. Africa's when the world more generally, and at the moment, my final stages of my doctorate studies which averages stepped on that Nelson Mandela University in Africa and partly, half of my research was done in the United States at George Mason invested to scorn of conflict, resolution and analysis. Dot Potential Training has opened opportunities for me. I'm currently based in Juba South Sudan where I work as a team, lead the country director for the Subsidy Program for an organization whole geneticist for human rights. So that is the way that I'm currently doing in south, Sudan. Patent puzzle supporting the Peace End. Development Agenda since the end of the civil war in this part of the was. So that's the kind of work that I'm doing, and that's what I'm engaged in at the moment. I'm sure people are curious about a little bit of your direct experience with your great grandfather. What is a memory that you might have and a piece of wisdom that you've learned from him that you'd like to pass along? A very few memories of. Microsoft. Grandfather Nelson, and among those memories was always division that instilled to all of us and something that we all learned from him and even the past generation the past it to him that. Occurred to importance to treat people quantity godless of their social status in society when you begin with rich people. Equally. You begin to understand and begin to know who people are for people would be willing to talk to. And people will be willing to listen to. That Nessin did. If you look at the entire store, you would have conversation with his prison. And he was highly regarded and respected by his prison for he treated that particular individual symptoms spent that they will lead to the president of Salafi, Cadet and. Someone that comes from. Hubble, begins. And when you begin to imagine from the kind of a background is individual new, get to recognize that we are only important it regardless of social status in society,

Grandfather Nelson Nelson Mandela Africa Juba South Sudan South Africa Nelson Mandela University George Mason Siebel Villa Nessin Ariana Microsoft Andy United States President Trump Director
Siyabulela Mandela - Personal Lessons from History

Untangle

04:32 min | Last week

Siyabulela Mandela - Personal Lessons from History

"This week I have a special guest, sea. Ebola Mandela. WHO's the great grandson of Nelson. Mandela. Lilla is a PhD in peace and conflict. Studies, in continues his grandfather's legacy of advocating for human rights and shares his perspective on the stomach nature of racism with us. He recently wrote a chapter in the book for the sake. Of Peace. African perspectives, on. Racism? Justice. And peace in America. Sibylla will also share with us his perspective on what we can each do to decolonize our own minds and the lessons that he learned from his grandfather's character. He speaks to us today from south, Sudan where he works. Welcome Siebel Villa. Thank, you very much. Ariana family me and thank you. For joining us, it is my sincere pleasure and honor. I would love to begin with you telling us a little bit about your own story and the inspiration for your current work. Thank. You very much. Really. I grew up in effeminate that was highly politicized and our shaved. By the history of the Feminine so-fi as its involvement in the struggle against apartheid resume colonialism in south, Africa, and in Africa in general and in the fight for the. Liberation of the black masses AFA people against the shuttle's off. Appreciate up on. Racism and all forms of injustice that degeneration of Mandela waged against our shaped by that kind of history and our shaped by those material condition, and it is the involvement of my family and my involvement of my great grandfather, Nelson Mandela that has inspired me to anti into the food dolf intensive relations particularly focusing on issues that were made peace confluence, Aleutian and human rights in South Africa. Andy. Africa's when the world more generally, and at the moment, my final stages of my doctorate studies which averages stepped on that Nelson Mandela University in Africa and partly, half of my research was done in the United States at George Mason invested to scorn of conflict, resolution and analysis. Dot Potential Training has opened opportunities for me. I'm currently based in Juba South Sudan where I work as a team, lead the country director for the Subsidy Program for an organization whole geneticist for human rights. So that is the way that I'm currently doing in south, Sudan. Patent puzzle supporting the Peace End. Development Agenda since the end of the civil war in this part of the was. So that's the kind of work that I'm doing, and that's what I'm engaged in at the moment. I'm sure people are curious about a little bit of your direct experience with your great grandfather. What is a memory that you might have and a piece of wisdom that you've learned from him that you'd like to pass along? A very few memories of. Microsoft. Grandfather Nelson, and among those memories was always division that instilled to all of us and something that we all learned from him and even the past generation the past it to him that. Occurred to importance to treat people quantity godless of their social status in society when you begin with rich people. Equally. You begin to understand and begin to know who people are for people would be willing to talk to. And people will be willing to listen to. That Nessin did. If you look at the entire store, you would have conversation with his prison. And he was highly regarded and respected by his prison for he treated that particular individual symptoms spent that they will lead to the president of Salafi, Cadet and. Someone that comes from. Hubble, begins. And when you begin to imagine from the kind of a background is individual new, get to recognize that we are only important it regardless of social status in society,

Grandfather Nelson Juba South Sudan Nelson Mandela Mandela South Africa Africa Nelson Mandela University Nessin Lilla Sibylla George Mason Siebel Villa Ariana America Microsoft Andy United States President Trump
Philadelphia-educated South Sudanese political prisoner returns to US, recounts experience

KYW 24 Hour News

01:04 min | 2 weeks ago

Philadelphia-educated South Sudanese political prisoner returns to US, recounts experience

"Educated South Sudanese peace activists who was arrested for criticizing the government there and spent a year and 1/2 in prison is now back in the U. S. As we hear from Kevin Abuse Tima menace he fled Africa fearing for his life. Peter B. R. A. Jack was released from a South Sudanese prison in January, then made his way to Kenya for safety recently that safety was gone. For the last five weeks. I've been basically living hiding as sort of a conservative Jackson The president of South Sudan wants him captured or killed. So with the help of human rights attorney Jared Genser and U S officials, he got an emergency visa so he and his family could stay in the U. S. Where he first sought safety nearly 20 years ago. I fenced came here in 2001 as a lost boy when I was 16 year old and now I'm coming as a 36 year old and when the time is right, he says he'll visit his second home and I kind of wait to be back in Philadelphia. Be back south and Central high school. To give them my thanks. In the meantime, he's calling for sanctions against the South Sudanese president and for free and fair elections in his home country.

Peter B. R. A. Jack South Sudan President Trump Jared Genser Kenya Kevin Central High School Africa Jackson Philadelphia Attorney
Sudan finds mass grave likely linked to foiled 1990 coup

BBC World Service

00:16 sec | 2 weeks ago

Sudan finds mass grave likely linked to foiled 1990 coup

"Grave has been discovered in Sudan containing 28 bodies. They're thought to be the remains of army officers executed for carrying out a coup attempt 30 years ago against the president At the time, a mile Bashir he had seized power in a military coup. The previous year.

Bashir Sudan President Trump
Why can’t Egypt and Ethiopia agree on the Nile dam?

Monocle 24: The Globalist

07:05 min | 3 weeks ago

Why can’t Egypt and Ethiopia agree on the Nile dam?

"Now. A reservoir behind a controversial dam built along the River Nile in Ethiopia has started to fill with water. If you open officials say, this is a natural part of the construction process, but neighboring sedan says it's noticed water levels on the blue. Nile have started to drop fast well. The damp has been a source of. Of huge disagreement among Ethiopia, Sudan and Egypt the latest round of talks on ensuring all three nations will get enough. Water fell apart on Tuesday well to tell us more I'm joined once again by the Janice Ruth Michelson she's covered this story extensively. Welcome back to monocle twenty four ruth at good to have you on the globalist, and there are satellite images of this reservoir. Tell us what they show. So the satellite images that came out this week show water gathering behind the dam as he said exactly I suppose as it would do if the dam. Were functioning and. Has Said well festival it said during all of the negotiations that have happened that it would fill the damn irregardless of the the outcome of the negotiations and it's also said that some of the the the exact words that the Ethiopian water minister used were the construction of the dam and the filling of the water. Go Hand in hand, so there's some kind of technical process I. Am not an engineer so I'm about to probably explain this badly. But there is a technical process that involves filling part of the water attesting to if the turbines, which is what Ethiopia wanted to begin now and so, what's happened this week is that it's unclear whether that process has actually begun and Ethiopia, simply doesn't doesn't want to say clearly whether this is just natural, build up due to the rain, and of course the satellite pictures will show us the water, but they won't show us. Why and the Sudanese have said that they have noticed that in. In effect is a direct consequence of the filling up of the dam. In Ethiopia, they are seeing less water. Were they'll? Absolutely, so one of the things that we're told about the dam is that. In in the woods, peons regulate the flow of the blue, Nile, which flows from. Hills where rainwater gathers in Ethiopia through Sudan. And up into Egypt and it's true that the Blue Nile does flood and so you know there is some There's some justification there for wanting to to regulate that flow, but it same time one of the things that's going to constrain this entire discussion in the functioning of the dam. Future is drought because that is caused by climate, change and climate change has been exacerbating and lengthening these periods of drought, so there are still floods, but there's longer and more frequent droughts, and so you know I, I actually visited Sudan and I went to Stand on. On the banks of the Blue Nile and talk to some farmers in January and even in the middle of winter, the water levels were already quite depleted. Obviously, this was something. That's extremely alarming. to people who who subsist on the water supply. There so this idea that this this damn is going to to regulate a problem is really only half of the understanding of the functioning of the Blue Nile. And how much are the other countries involved in particular Ethiopia, because it is damn. How much are they mindful of this secondary impact that people in Sedona being a feeling? What Ethiopia has said is that the dam will produce. Excess hydropower once it's once it started and they will sell Sudan a cheap electricity or that they will sit on electricite. Excuse me. So some important context about this is that about seventy percent of the population of Ethiopia live without electricity, so Ethiopia has said that this dam is is essential to the development of their country that they need the electricity that will come from it to function in terms of how this will affect Sudan. There are. Former Sudanese negotiators that I've spoken to who were one in particular. Who quit the Sudanese? Delegation because as soon as negotiations started in two thousand and ten Ethiopia said no matter what we're going to build the dam. And so this particular negotiator said well. What's the point in having a negotiation? Then what are we negotiating over and when he looked at the text? Describing how much electricity Sudan was supposed to get, he said well I. Just don't think this is ever going to happen. I don't think there will be this excess hydropower that you claim. Tell us a little bit more about other countries involved Egypt is closely affected by this. It's to its livelihood dependent on the Nile. And they have started to, I mean they have been integral to all the pushbacks and all the talk, so the in for the entire time. How have they reacted to this filling of the damage? So Egypt has come to view the damn. Stench Threat and there is some justification there because it will deplete the flow. Of the Nile water and the according to Egypt anaylyst. percent of its total water supply and so. They're just you know. This is a country that is struggling to react to the idea that it would have less water for for one hundred million people and so you know part of Egypt's reaction so far. We've seen I wouldn't say it was a confused reaction, but it was a reaction with questions, so the only statement we've seen was the spokesman for Egypt's ministry foreign affairs, saying that he requests urgent official clarification from the Ethiopians about whether they've actually gone to fill the dam and saying that they're following developments on this issue, but at the same time you know they've They've talked about how cutting off Egypt's water supply is a red line There's been. A lot of efforts by Egypt to try and find some external. That will You know help help their case. They took the issue to the UN Security Council at the end of June and the UN Security Council basically told the three countries that they needed to resolve this dispute between themselves. But this is an issue where in the past Egyptian. People in the government back in two thousand and ten have even discussed bombing the damn. There isn't necessarily a suggestion that they're thinking of doing that now, but this is the kind. It's a problem of that level that has been discussed even using violence, which you some idea of just how important this is to the Egyptians

Ethiopia Sudan Egypt River Nile Blue Nile Nile Janice Ruth Michelson Un Security Council Sedona Engineer Official
Real Madrid win La Liga for 34th time

ESPN FC

04:14 min | 3 weeks ago

Real Madrid win La Liga for 34th time

"Madrid are champions. Champions of Lollygag for a thirty four time this after they defeat be a real two to one. We're joined by Julian Iran and GAB MARCATTI JEWELS I'll start with you Real Madrid at the beginning of the restart. We said it was very likely they would have to win every single game to overtake Barcelona. They've done it and they've done it so easily clinched the league match still to be played. You're right and winds of ten, and there were two points behind boss, not when restarted Lalita. What six weeks ago, something and then they were just unstoppable. They may maybe not always the most. Pleasant towards attacking wise, but so efficient in both boxes so solid defensively. This is the best remedy defense for for the last thirty years, and that was always the plan from Sudan. Is Priority to win our league this season. He promised it. He delivered it and he did it in a very different way than the other titles before that club this this one was built on being very strong, defensively, being very well organized playing as a team and then relying on Wednesday march the goal. Benzene has been fantastic all season. And the defense has been fantastic or season to Wayne Gordon Veyron and says almost at the bag, the two full as well they've been. They've been pretty special I think and on these eleven heightened for eleven title in two hundred nine again. That's one i. told every Nineteen Games. He's putting credible down I don't believe you're all Madrid. Have trailed since the restart. How impressed with their? Performance. have been very good and I think even when people will flag up certain games where they got the rub of the green with with severe and whatnot by I agree with Jules, you look beyond that this is almost another level of around Madrid. It's almost as if when you think about it. The GALACTICO era is well and truly over in the sense that. Korean bedroom is tastic as he was he. He's an Galactico type as much as he is. A warrior hard hat tight you go through the team beaten hazard for most of the season Gareth Bale once again missing in action, other Michigan's on the bench. except for Tony Crows MoD modern as well off the bench a lot of the time we saw a lot of rotation. We saw a lot of grit. We saw a lot of efficiency we saw. I think aside of of Sedan, who previously was seen as just kind of like a a man manager, a guy who didn't necessarily get to involve not screw things up and just let the players play. We saw a guy who is actually very actively coaching when the injured guys came back. You've worked in back in and I. Think in some ways this might be the most satisfying. Of the of the titles that that's it down as one. Jewel so much has been made in recent days. Officials VR helping out Real Madrid even with your Barcelona ways. Will you discredit that argument here? Think, they were the best team all season really since the loss against my. Tober, I they. They've been on another level really in terms of. The results of course the way they were playing. Pretty much everything they did was almost perfect, and even with the pandemic and break they can by flying. As we said with those ten Wayne's, there were so well prepared far better prepare than boss or not folks up. What both fitness wise and tactically as well and I think Don deserves it off great. See Dan priority because he still feels that it doesn't get the credit deserves and what he did before in the past, lally, gainfully seventeen of research I'm visiting in a row that people never praised him enough really sort of our, but you've got Chris overnight. All you've got wet players and you've got a team that was winning before own that kind of stuff and I. Think this one for him will always be very special because he did it. Maybe as we sit in a very different way, but also him as a as a man as manager was very different, and the personal that you especially without Christianity was very different, and I think he will you take? I think far more prides in in many ways to of one this one especially considering that remedy warning since two thousand seventeen. The would always have a very special taste for him this one.

Madrid DON Barcelona Wayne Gordon Veyron Lollygag Julian Iran Lalita Gareth Bale Sudan Jules Tony Crows Tober Lally Michigan DAN Chris
UN says 2 aid workers, 4 others shot dead in South Sudan

WBBM Morning News

00:13 sec | 3 weeks ago

UN says 2 aid workers, 4 others shot dead in South Sudan

"The U. N says to aid workers have been shot dead in south Sudan for other people We're helping were also killed in the attack. At least 120 to humanitarian workers have been killed in south Sudan since 2013 including seven this

South Sudan U. N
After 13 Years on the Run, a Sudanese Militia Leader Appears in Court

The World

02:34 min | 2 months ago

After 13 Years on the Run, a Sudanese Militia Leader Appears in Court

"Today after thirteen years on the run a Sudanese militia leader faced his day in court Ali couche made his first appearance at the international criminal court in the Hague it's a milestone for the tribunal which has come under attack from the trump administration could shape is charged with war crimes and crimes against humanity committed in the Darfur region of Sudan the world to limit Conde brings us the story when we test them only thinks about his childhood and are for he remembers a quiet normal life he was born in the village of governor era in the mountainous Jebel Marra region he spent most of his time at school or on the farm then in two thousand three everything changed he was sixteen years old and then when the war broke out my family and I was separated because the village was destroyed the militia and R. four was known as the Janjaweed an Arab militias supported by Sudan's government gender we'd fighters burned and systematically killed indigenous Africans and R. for an estimated three hundred thousand people or more were killed and more than two million people were displaced from their homes including Ali and his family they are now living in in a displaced persons camp in north Darfur state only hasn't been back to the R. four since he fled Sudan's capital Khartoum after being arrested for criticizing the government eventually he made his way to Washington DC it was there that he heard the news that one of the alleged leaders of the Janjaweed known as on the cost side had been arrested and was going on trial at the international criminal court I was very happy because you know I think the six or eight you know surrendered himself to ISIS he is an important step to satisfy the victims of genocide she'd made his first appearance at the ICC today as part of a preliminary trial proceedings he was asked if he understood that the more than fifty counts of war crimes and crimes against humanity never miss a movie he said he was aware of the charges that they were untrue this is only the first step of what is likely to be a lengthy trial but it comes at an important time for Sudan the country is trying to move towards democracy and beyond the legacy of former president Omar al Bashir he was ousted from power last year after widespread

Ali Couche Sudan Conde Khartoum ICC Omar Al Bashir Darfur Jebel Marra Washington President Trump
Ethiopia and Sudan urge cooperation to stop border violence

Live Abundant Radio

00:23 sec | 2 months ago

Ethiopia and Sudan urge cooperation to stop border violence

"Ethiopia says a recent violence with a flared up along the border with Sudan should be addressed by diplomatic discussions about force of arms the statement by the opiates foreign ministry today comes after Samantha summoned Ethiopia's diplomat in Khartoum over the cross border attack last week it was allegedly carried out by a militia backed by Ethiopia's military at least one Sudanese army officer and a child were

Ethiopia Sudan Samantha Khartoum Officer Sudanese Army
Female Genital Mutilation Outlawed in Sudan

BBC Newshour

00:55 sec | 3 months ago

Female Genital Mutilation Outlawed in Sudan

"Rights groups have praised the burning in Sedona female genital mutilation anyone who performs the operation faces a three year jail term and a fine but if GM is widely practiced in many African countries as well as parts of Asia and the Arab world Africa editor is Mary Hoffa an estimated ninety percent of Sudanese women interior FGM usually in its harshest form which involves the removal of most of the external genitalia with the wound certain almost completely closed some say changing the law will not attend the practice has it so deeply ingrained in the country's culture some Sudanese states have tried to restrict or ban the practice in the past with little success the new government which has five female ministers has already repealed author Lewis related to women which dictated how they could dress where they could study and who they could mix within

GM Asia Editor Mary Hoffa Lewis Africa
Coronavirus in Sudan: Untold suffering awaits Sudan unless it receives a helping hand – Bachelet

UN News

00:51 sec | 3 months ago

Coronavirus in Sudan: Untold suffering awaits Sudan unless it receives a helping hand – Bachelet

"U N High Commissioner for Human Rights. Michelle Bachelet has expressed serious concerns about the crisis facing Sudan in the midst of the cave in nineteen pandemic. She said in a statement on Tuesday that terrible suffering awaits the country's people unless donors act fast. Her comments come barely a year. After the ousting of format President Al-Bashir who was replaced by a transitional government that was tasked with bringing economic and Social Development Democracy Justice and peace. All of this is now being threatened by acute resource constraints the high commissioner said while also highlighting that Sudan will not be able to break out of its cycle of poverty and desperation unless it is freed from sanctions that were imposed at the time of the previous government wants sanctions are lifted. The country would be able to attract investment and access funds available from international financial institutions. Misbash late explained

Michelle Bachelet Sudan Commissioner President Trump Misbash
Morey J. Kolber PT PhD CSCS- Covid-19 as a Physical Therapist

Moving2Live

07:59 min | 4 months ago

Morey J. Kolber PT PhD CSCS- Covid-19 as a Physical Therapist

"So maury. I know that you've had a big change in your main job right now. Which is teaching physical therapy students at Nova southeastern and I'm curious before all this came down. How much teaching of physical therapy students Nova southeastern was done in the online environment versus what we think of as the typical face to face environment of education all our program at Nova Southeastern University in Fort. Lauderdale campus is traditional teaching. So it is a face to face program. An each faculty sort of had a different way of approaching their courses. Some faculty had a mix of online prerecorded lectures in class laboratory. Others were one hundred percent in class. I I think it was somewhat variable but prior to all of this era traditional program. We have lecture class as we have lab classes. We have testing so the landscape of what we do. Moving forward is already changed. And it's GonNa continue to change and I know we were talking a little bit before I started recording. And you said that you had some impetus essentially a month ago that there may be some changes or to be prepared for some changes. And what was your initial thoughts when you heard that? Potentially you might be teaching courses in physical therapy program entirely online. I mean my initial reaction was panic because everything I do everything I've had setup is face to face that's the part of my job that I enjoy the most I think for some people. They probably saw a great thing for me. It certainly wasn't but there were some initial panic. Probably the first thing I did is stopped. All clinical visits adapt might have for various reasons one being the the threat obviously of Kobe. But the other was knowing that I needed to begin dedicating some hard time into creating modules and a change in my course which is currently ongoing. And I know you've been teaching for a number of years although courses changes knowledge changes and you try new things. How much of an increase in workload did you see or how difficult was to take some of these classes that until a month ago you were seeing students two or three times a week and now suddenly you're like okay? This all has to be delivered online in a synchronous or a synchronous manner right. It seems that something that would take five minutes in the classroom setting. We'll take fifteen minutes on his accession. Astrom said I'm sorry and I'm curious with the students that you've communicated with so far health familiar with most Zoom in online education versus panicked similar. To what you had a couple of weeks ago I mean fortunately for us in what it seems. Our students are probably a little bit more savvy than than some of us in terms of online learning. When I went to Undergrad we didn't have online learning. I imagine most of them did to some degree. Fortunately for us our program director had began pushing us into into exam. Soft which is a means of testing getting rid of paper and it wasn't because of this. This was last semester. So fortunately we transitioned into that software program to deliver our tests so we ready to go with that. Had We had to learn that at the same time it would have been a challenge in with that and the switch to online education with the students. What is the reaction of the students that you've talked with been so far? They've been excited about it. Just happy that they continue it or kind of a little bit of panic. Because it's something new. I think there's a little bit of panic with regard to testing because now they're they're being tested in an environment that they have to create that his private secure. There's a camera watching them. So that's changed. The ability to review exams is obviously changed due to security. You don't want exposure questions whereas when you have a setting where student comes your office you hand them a written exam they take a look at it. There's no exposure of that exam so now there's different considerations that didn't exist before you know. I'm always reluctant to to approach students. Say Hey how did you like the lecture? I just did on zoom because I think when you do that you know your you know your responses are going to say why I really liked it. I don't know that it's appropriate. I'm not big on just walking up approaching the students say hey. How did you like what I just did? Because students are generally kind been. We'll we'll say they liked it but that doesn't necessarily mean they did. I feel like our students have an expectation to in classroom teaching and laboratory sessions Expectations GonNA possibly need to change. Perhaps through the whole summer and I know I've been teaching for a number years at California University of Pennsylvania. Not In a physical therapy program but in exercise science program in our classes are a synchronous in other words we do narrated lectures and things like that where the students have a time period where they have to complete it with Sudan. Switch that you've had with your teaching. Are you doing this in a synchronous manner or their specific classroom times where students that you saw month ago in the classroom you our meeting with them on Zoom? So plan is moving forward to have both a synchronous synchronous so the plan will be for the summer. We were just wrapping up our semester. So there wasn't a lot of content but it was mix tasing fairness and synchronous moving forward into the summer. The students will be given a certain amount of time to do a review of a lecture. That's a synchronous. And then when they complete that then there will be a zoom session. Which will be synchronous where it'll be more focusing on cases questions and reviewing the content that they did earlier we have a media platform called counter. And that's what we use for our courses to prerecord certain lectures and I think from an efficiency perspective for them and us that's going to be strategy provide these cal- Torah lectures for the heart lecturing. Because if you think about it these students are going to be sitting in a zoom session. Three hours in the morning three hours at the end of the day it is going to wear on providing a synchronous cultural lecture. That's prerecorded and following up with a review. Overview zoom is going to be the way to go and I'm also interested in learning As physical therapy program. I know the American Physical Therapy Association has certain requirements. That students must meet. How communicated have been with you and with your program as far as recognizing that okay. This is something that really hasn't been done before we haven't had a pandemic and almost one hundred years so this is a significant change. What is their communication been with? You will our director and share. Have sort of been on the front line in terms of communicating with captain which is our accreditation body and at first there was this fear in debt. Changing our curriculum is a substantial change. It's GONNA require an application forms paperwork but Kathy did come down with some some documents stating that. There would be some flexibility based on this situation and with both changing models of classroom teaching as well as clinical hours and I suspect the most important thing about that is that when students finish their work at Nova southeastern. They'll have the ability to sit for the certification

Nova Southeastern Nova Southeastern University American Physical Therapy Asso Maury Program Director Lauderdale Campus Fort California University Of Penns Astrom Director Kathy Sudan
Coronavirus crisis could double number of people suffering acute hunger - UN

UN News

01:28 min | 4 months ago

Coronavirus crisis could double number of people suffering acute hunger - UN

"More than a quarter of a billion people could suffer from acute by the end of twenty twenty because of the impact of the new corona virus. Pandemic that's according to the World Food Programme. Wfp and other UN agencies. Which on Tuesday warned that caveat nineteen could almost double the number of people who are already critically hungry now in fifty five countries according to the global report on food crises produced by WFP and fifteen other humanitarian and development partners. Seventy five million children were stunted and seventy million suffered from wasting in two thousand. Nineteen the forecast. It's spike in the number of people at particular risk of curve in nineteen relates to one hundred and eighty three million people who were found to be on the cusp of acute hunger last year faced with the new corona virus. They're unlikely to withstand the shock to their food insecurity. The report suggests regionally more than half of the one hundred thirty five million people covered by the report are in Africa. Forty three million live in the Middle East and Asia eighteen and a half million from Latin America and the Caribbean. The key reasons for food insecurity are conflict where the extremes and economic turbulence in order of severity the ten worst food crises last year Yemen the Democratic Republic of the Congo Afghanistan Venezuela Ethiopia South Sudan Syria Sudan northern and Haiti together they constituted eighty eight million acutely food insecure people and accounted for sixty five percent of all people in acute need

World Food Programme Pandemic Middle East UN Yemen Haiti Democratic Republic Caribbean Africa Asia Afghanistan Latin America Ethiopia Venezuela
Workers dying in US factories in Mexico of coronavirus

KCBS Radio Weekend News

00:26 sec | 4 months ago

Workers dying in US factories in Mexico of coronavirus

"Mexican authorities have expressed growing concern over dozens of U. S. own export factories that remain open the official handling coronavirus information war that Mexican border cities are being hit especially hard at one factory in Sudan choir at across from el Paso Texas workers were told not to stay home despite an outbreak according to published reports more than a dozen from that plant died after being sent back to work

Official U. S. Sudan El Paso Texas
The New Nintendo Switch Update

Nintendo Voice Chat

05:02 min | 4 months ago

The New Nintendo Switch Update

"Let's start off with the intendo switch update ten point. Oh I think it jumped all the way from nine point two so there are probably a bunch of really tiny updates up until this point. But we've got you now re map your joy confidence you can move your data between your St Card and your switch hardware and there are some cool animal crossing icons as what are your favorite favorite parts about this. Update the favorite thing. My favorite update is that Nintendo's actively supporting people with disabilities. I think it's really you know being able to re map all the buttons joy con on the pro control. I think finally makes Games playable for people who couldn't play them before and as an especially games like animal crossing that aren't really action focused Can now be open to really big audience of people very very cool. Yeah I totally agree. There's obviously some limitations to it and that it doesn't work certain controllers but It's a giant step in the right direction for them. It's also interested to see what people do with it just generally speaking because I think there might be outside of quality of life stuff. I think there's also the ability to make games into single joy. Con Games like moving all the buttons to one side or the spire actually has that capability built into. It has a single controller boned. People were hoping people were hoping for smash Gamecube Controller. Customization didn't get that yet. can only official joy. Khan and the pro controller and of course the buttons already attached the tennis which light have the capability to remount the controller. And we'll you have the option to save five different configurations to switch to but then the the update for everyone of course is the the backup data management stuff which is long overdue. So it's great that we get in that. Yeah I'm Kinda bitter about that because I feel like I've done that process like three times now and it's so for me. It's it's kind of like I'm I'm really happy it's here because it's it's a game changer. For everybody but this is also this. This comes after everyone bought a switch for you. Know a maybe a second switch for animal crossing of got one over the holidays and stuff like that. I mean. There's never a wrong time to do this. I just wish it had been sooner. That said that process has been a big pain for me. Especially as like a Mac user. I know on. Pc It's a little bit easier But I'm an attitude. Yeah I know I will. Honestly I buy switchgear -pletely full right now. I just went to a game yesterday and I was like no. I keep having to archive and I think I need to get another microscopy. I think it's time for me to write. What would you guys would? What's your mic rusty cards? Currently I think I have a two hundred fifty gigabyte. Yeah I have a one. Twenty eight was like I'll never not fill this up or wait. Yeah I'll never fill this up. I'll never need another a microwave card. One hundred twenty eight gigabytes. This'll only today's generation. I know in hindsight it's idiotic but I haven't got a four hundred GIG and I fill it up constantly. I I have a five twelve this man. But here's the thing that that also I've I've transferred switches a couple of times because I- i- upgraded and bought the newer model and instead of doing the doing the physical moving of stuff. I just reload downloaded certain games. The Games that I actually needed on the machine. So that's why I'm not anywhere near running out of space to a pretty good job of of light putting stuff what did they what did Reggie like? Nah is cleaning the fridge. She called. I'm back in the back in the we. He was just like the storage solutions for that system. We're not six like somehow got to clean out the fridge and the aching thrown away put new baking soda. You just remind you on eight. He didn't talk about Baking Soda. That's where he did one was wondering thing about the button. Remapping remapping you can swap. You'RE A and B Buttons. So it feels more like you know your other jobs. A monster is what you're saying. Look sometimes switching back and forth between game switch and the game on the playstation is annoying because you end up the wrong button that you guys know where. I'm going to do that dark. Souls BECAUSE DARK. Souls is a port of Current and past ten games on the competitors consoles were those buttons are flipped and it constantly breaks my brain. I try to play it on switch so I'm absolutely going to do but it's so clear. Be Back as advanced. Exit Exits Sudan wise. Jump apart. I mean if you put it put it like that. I mean there's no

Nintendo Sudan Official Khan Reggie
The First UN 'Solidarity Flight' Is Bringing Much-Needed COVID-19 Medical Supplies to Africa

UN News

01:08 min | 4 months ago

The First UN 'Solidarity Flight' Is Bringing Much-Needed COVID-19 Medical Supplies to Africa

"The first of the UN's at new solidarity flights carrying urgently needed medical equipment has arrived in Addis. Ababa agencies said on Tuesday on board the World Food Program with World Health Organization Charter. Jet Are one million facemasks along with gloves goggles. Ventilators and other essentials. There's enough equipment to protect health workers while they treat more than thirty thousand patients across the continent. It's to be distributed in five other countries. Initially Djibouti Sudan Eritrea. Somalia and Tanzania said Well Food Program spokesperson Elizabeth this. This is by far the largest single shipment of supplies single stopped of the pandemic and it will ensure that people living in countries with some of the weakest F systems are able to get dressed and treated while ensuring that health workers on the front lines are crop elite protect. Wbz's flights part of a larger effort to reach ninety five countries most at risk from the new corona virus with medical equipment and humanitarian workers to do this. Wfp has appealed for three hundred fifty million dollars. It has so far only received a quarter of that amount

Elizabeth This World Health Organization Char Addis UN WFP Ababa Djibouti WBZ Somalia Sudan Tanzania
Melissa RoyDreams From Her Father

Counting Countries

09:13 min | 4 months ago

Melissa RoyDreams From Her Father

"Hey now I am bureau host ric and this episode with guest. Melissa Roy was recorded back in late February while there was ample concerned in regard to cove it at that time especially in a place like China in much of the world. Business went about as normal in fact. I left Bangkok on March. Second to start an eight week trip. That would take the Berlin for two conferences West Africa for a month and then a couple of weeks in Yerevan for my annual visit. All these plans were made in vain. My to conferences and Berlin were cancelled including travel massive form. As I was on my flight after Bruin then went and met my friends. Indycar for the start of our road trip on March fifteenth on her first day Gambia. We had a team dinner where we decided to cancel the trip into leave. Banjul the following day. While I was really disappointed in just several more days this look like in the stupid decision borders inflates began to close and cancel like dominoes. I'm now in Bangkok self quarantining. And of course social distancing prior to the STREP trip I recorded and finished episodes April May and June but made sense to re record this opening introduction to be more attuned to current situations. So I'm wishing everyone safe health. I encourage you to listen to fact Bay signed and I hope for a quick end to this virus which threatens many as well as the global economy speaking to like minded people like you. This is an odd time for many of us so often we're on a trip and if not planning for the next one this passion for expiration is part of our DNA and many for many of us. It's a tremendous personal frustration to be walked at home or even stranded in a foreign will cow. Whatever you can do try and make this time fruitful and productive in reach out to your loved ones friends and even strangers to lend a hand and now back to our regularly scheduled interview. I reached out to Melissa. Shortly after she announced her complement of traveling every country in the world social media traditional media began reporting that she was the first woman of South Asian heritage to complete this quest on cannon countries. I'm always looking for diverse voices whether that's nationality ethnicity religion or any other differentiator and it's great to get other perspectives. A reminder my monthly reminder coun- countries is part of Petri on you can be a great supporter like Steph road. Ted mims be some miles Ryan dashed or Stephen Rothwell and Adam Hickman. They get to listen to extra content like the extra interview. I did with Melissa only for them. Untamed borders is the sponsor of counting countries focuses on challenging locations for those chasing one ninety three James and I decided to replace the interview. We had previously recorded in regard to my visit to Afghanistan within updated interview on the current situation. Please listen then to James Wilcox founder of untamed borders James. Welcome back to counting countries This time we are having you back to give us an update and more challenging in dire times with Cova. Nineteen in your intro goal. Part of the travel community stream travel community. You're taking us to places which are really challenging locations so first of all I want to check in with you and see you're doing and how things are in the UK May personally I'm fine. actually been Last week so who knows what that actually What that actually is but as far as Healthwise the team The guy on the stuff that we use the countries who many people may have met whilst in in other circumstances of fine and obviously the you know the reality of the world has changed kind of shown travel leisure To be as important as it radiates in the in the grand scheme of life which is which is not that important but generally weight. Well I hope you'll your cash flow vic. Thanks James Yep am self quarantining and social distancing as we speak so this covert thing just seemed to really accelerate very quickly When things really started hitting the fan were any of your trips In action at that point. Did you have to close trips out early? Evacuate People What was the situation? Yeah exactly what I think. The the weekend of I think it was the fourteenth fifteenth of March around that weekend Things inching to accelerate very quickly. We had a good trip to Syria Which was due to start on that weekend and we we with. I think about thirty six hours before it started really had a couple of guests had arrived in Lebanon on that trip. We had a good trip to south. Sudan was finishing event that we can. We had one guest Continuing onto a national park in the far south of South Sudan and we had to call him back early to make sure he could leave Juba Juba F. O. Had a tip from someone from the UN that the EPA was going to close on Monday night so we had to get that person out at one of our team who was on that trip Is is accusing self contained in South Africa at the moment So yet that we can things did seem to. Things did accelerate Very quickly and as soon as we sold that we we did anticipate that travel was going to be restricted due to coke in nineteen With with total guests trips coming up at the we had concerned we wanted to in this situation but that we candidate accelerate very fast. As I'm sure you will what How was it with you around that time it? Yeah somewhat of a similar circumstance timeline wise. I was in Senegal Gambia. Over March fifteenth or so Sunday In after we crossed into Gambia on the evening of the fifteenth Me In the fellow. Travelers IS WITH. We kind of had a team dinner and we cancelled we build on our month trip to. West Africa and flew home on the sixteenth Monday and got a directly direct flight OUTTA Gambia to to Turkey and onwards to Bangkok James so just give us kind of a brief update of the trips that were already in place so to speak but How's this affecting untamed borders right now. What's what's this mean to the business. I mean the May decide Travel any description in the show. Possibly to medium-term is just not going to happen and when travel begins it will be you know. People start traveling again Who knows when that will start at who knows when that will stop being to some of the areas that we We guided so for the moment We people with upcoming trips. Having given the option to to cancel to move their trips to late nights. We've got people who've moved onto trips towards the end of twenty twenty meeting trips into twenty twenty one so we're planning We're hoping that we will be able to resume in the in the medium term but we Planning the tangle this will be solid enough and resilience enough to take a long pause out and ready to go it again. Um whenever trouble begins as you know. I've got extremism connection especially with Afghanistan Pakistan and when travel begins again will be will be guiding again It might mean that. Have to do some other. Bits and bobs and make ends meet and things like that in the meantime But we back. We will be guiding assumes. We're able to

Bangkok Melissa Roy Gambia James Wilcox Berlin Afghanistan Yerevan RIC Banjul Senegal Gambia West Africa Strep China Bruin Lebanon UK Steph Juba Juba F. O.
"sudan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:42 min | 6 months ago

"sudan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The world's newest country formed less than nine years ago but south Sudan has been gripped by a brutal civil war for more than half its existence and later today the national unity government is being sworn in after arch enemies president Salva Kiir and Riek Machar the former rebel leader decided to work together and to cement their working relationship my child becomes the country's first vice president what lies ahead our correspondent Catherine B. R. hunger send this report from the south Sudanese capital Juba expectation for south Sudan's new unity government all people are talking about hearing Joe by president Salva Kiir and his longtime rival Riek Machar have agreed to work together in a new unity government after five years of brutal civil war they'll be joined by someone up or position parties corporations already underway hi security has been stepped top leaders from neighboring countries like Sudan Ethiopia and Uganda should be here to witness this vitamins but also apprehension candies to men who fell to what together before and off to south Sudan's independence I actually do so this time a previous unity government was formed in two thousand sixteen but to break down offset here are my shots forces tenderness how the here in Juba the other questions about how they're going to share key ministries like finance petroleum justice and defense this is the world's youngest nation which sorry many people rooted for in this fight for independence but now the leaders accused of tearing it apart hi Liz I'm collections are the ones promising a better future Catherine the B. R. hunger that in Juba Iranians have voted in elections in an exercise widely expected to result in a more hardline parliament loyal to the country's supreme leader voting was extended three times now to voters were urged to boycott the process here are some of the opinions from voters outside one polling station in Tehran we want to continue on to nationally monies we come in both of his love for him in our country image of them out of them all you have to shut it down if they just tell the truth people will sympathize with the country's leadership but they don't I'm not voting I did before but I've changed there are many examples of the effects of sanctions if we all say we do not have medication the young unemployed and has become more expensive to live barman called Aussie is the BBC's Persian correspondent in Washington a little earlier he told me why the voting have been extended the government zero on wants to project this image of as so many voters and participating in the electoral process therefore they have to extend the voting time that is not news they've done it before but in this case it's really just to project this image of more people are coming out to vote the reality of the pictures and the polling and basically the mood of the election is the opposite is true and very very few people showing up to vote possibly mainly because there aren't really any real competition in in in more than seventy eighty percent of the seats and even in those who that there are competition a lot of people don't think the moderates can make any difference when in parliament because parliaments and statue in general has been downgraded by the supreme leader in the guardian council that doesn't really play a major role in the political decision making of the Islamic Republic anymore and thousands of motorists we here have been barred from running that is what makes this not much of an election and if we look at the turn out in previous elections in the years that given the political circumcircle stance the moderates we're allowed to run more of them were allowed to run there was a higher turnout in Tehran last election it was close to fifty percent the expectation is below twenty five percent so it is basically an election for the hard liners and the hardliners basis coming and voting for them the other sixty seven percent of population is sitting it out completely so what then is the net effect all of these elections briefly it's probably just that the hardliners will have more as a louder voice in the parliament and the entire countries moving towards more isolation given the U. S. sanctions and the violation of the J. C. P. already Iran deal by America and therefore they have the upper hand anyways but now they've officially control at one other aspect of governance in Iran I was borrowing capacity at BBC Persian correspondent soaking of elections putting stations aren't you to open shortly and presidential elections in the coastal west African nation of Togo the incumbent for Anya Singh base being challenged by six rivals including longtime opposition leader John P. F. opera a correspondent Mike Jones has more more than three point five million people register to vote members of the diaspora will be allowed to cast their ballots for the first time old only three hundred were able to register in a C. B. over the ruling union for the Republic is running for fourth term his family has ruled the country for over half a century former journalist and human rights campaigners on just five of the National Alliance for change he's running for first time after coming second in twenty ten and twenty fifteen five other candidates are competing including former prime minister give him the cell a billion cordial who represents a coalition of opposition and civil society groups provisional results expected sixties after polls close has money Jones at reporting on what's going on in Tokyo finally on the program today archaeologists in Italy say they have uncovered a sarcophagus in the remains of an ancient temple in Rome which may belong to the cities and legendary founder Romulus the study and treatment on with its secular alter dates from the sixth century BC rich Preston contestable it says two and a half times in year old mystery this might might have been sold the new thrones highest hill a small chamber containing a simple sarcophagus and Raymond stone block the team was first find under the Capitoline hill inside the old Roman forum at the start of the last century but was then lost Alfonsina Russo who is director of the Coliseum archaeological park it can be accepted into Catalan K. we've got a place in the precise location during these one hundred and twenty S. so for us to find it was a great discovery to find it exactly as described legend says Romulus son of god Mars find in the city of Rome in the year seven hundred and fifty three BC but it came at a cost in the battle for the city he killed his twin brother Remus but experts say we might be getting ahead of ourselves no bones were famed inside the tube Patricia fourteen is one of the archaeologists working on the project basic program on campus yeah we call it say is the tomb of Romulus we don't have any scientific evidence we only have a room inside that has been present in front of the queue area so the fact that it's being preserved it makes us understand that this is an important place in deadly if when that's your only earns depending on your beliefs Romulus was either transported up to heaven or torn to pieces by his own senators Alfonsina Russo again on the model no not hanging on check reminisces body is not fast we have to imagine this is a place of memory senator the city's first king for nearly three thousand years nothing more than a legend with a cult following now may be a physical memorial at lost to this ancient cities beloved if not possibly mythical finder awards from rich Preston.

Sudan
"sudan" Discussed on African Tech Roundup

African Tech Roundup

11:00 min | 7 months ago

"sudan" Discussed on African Tech Roundup

"And your mission as an organization. Fees strutted into southern. Anita's say when the piece was sign and everybody was into the aesthetic trying to participate in the development of the country. So around that time mm-hmm five enterpreneurs came up and putting their resources to start a solution understood very well by twenty thirteen. We already had four branches But unfortunately that's when the first conflict broke out and by two thousand sixteen we were forced to close three. Three branches were these. All in south Sudan Sudan all those south Sudan it was really very disappointing period because I think we lost not less than three hundred thousand. US dollars at that time boss because of inflation and because because most of our plans to call to to refuge and that's when we sat with the board and said what do we do. Do we close this to show we we keep it going. And the idea finally came in that lists follow up our clancy into Uganda and see whether we can provide them also financial services in such a setting so i. I traveled to Uganda and followed up a stressful. It was not that difficult difficult and by February seventeen. We are set up. Our branch of costume was a bit apprehensive. Because I mean if you talk to finance institutions nations providing financial services to refugees is north something that everybody wants to do. We fear that they could just leave that country and go to another one or because they do enough security to secure a loan so most likely they met before and it's nothing nothing much you can do but we had event to that the refugees we are dealing with some moved them way our clams and most of them. We understood where they're coming from so so the new US in south Sudan we knew them from south Sudan so sort of there was a link and there was understanding between us and Franklin Wrangler new stuttered way a bit apprehensive but just after six months realize that it was a market niche of that was really in and need of service and we have to mobilize resources for a fuss to make sure we meet this. This market niche so. Oh from ten to seventeen up to now we have been working with their effigies and right now actually a lot of financial institutions begin to realize that you can serve the refugee and they pay even as well as the local pass on so we still maintaining that and also contending our activities in in in south Sudan because all of us have hope that one day peace will come and definitely people will need financial services so right now we're maintaining operations in the main town providing the common businessmen have been talking about financial services especially especially loans in such an environment and then they're Davantage Lazlo walking into countries that there's always linkage because because they come from south Sudan and the AINU Ganda so it's very easy for us to even use a collateral that they have in South Sudan for them to secured loans in Uganda and they also families along the way who want to send money from south Sudan into Uganda to their relatives in the refugee settlements. I saw parentally even before again. What we have not planned for is something that will realize this happening? We are becoming a very good link for families and refugees and for other relatives who are back in the country in south Sudan essentially remittance service. Now Yeah exactly. We are especially from Juba to one of the settlements in a place called Perot arena. We have really been very very wherever much appreciated by their fees and even the business people because some business people want to buy certain woods from South Sudan which I know. They're in Uganda. So they can easily remit the money from our settlement and then withdraw it from from south Sudan. So they're really found it a very important service. I'm I'm curious to know. What gap existed? That allowed you to come up with. This idea was not a formal banking infrastructure. That was serving the people and if did was there. Why wasn't it serving the kind base you? Currently so in Uganda or in south Sudan in south Sudan so when you first launched in south Sudan and what was the state of banking infrastructure and at what extent was it making lending available to I suppose the business people when when we set it in two thousand eight there was busy Kelly the very fuel okay. We had some bonds and most of these thanks. We are way of foreign banks and of course they are just in the town of Juba. So you find out if you go to some of the outskirts or settings things. There was no financial service providers. And that's why we found out that it was necessary. Then due to financial EST may at the microfinance microfinance level that we also in south Sudan but also realize they're just within the town but the service that started with took them to the outskirts. We we started in a place called Kaji which was about to two hours drive from Juba and the people appreciated it because yes. It was something that they've never expected coming in. And of course we realize people needed it because everybody was the mystic about building the development all developing the country so some of them needed money to be able to do that and they found that our service of trying to provide loans at that time was was raided. The truth is most of them had never heard before so it also involve desk trying to do some financial literacy for them to understand ending and times about security and all that but ultimately it picked up and actually because of that effort we put in. That's why when we came to Uganda down the understood that we have really tried to help them and frankly we when we came in the some of them asked us why didn't do. Just what is it that drives you. YOU HAVE MITT losses in south Sudan and again following trying to come and provide services in in Uganda so people didn't understand but we have calling which is like a social calling because realized there was also in Uganda. That was under sowed so it was basically trying to be part of the team that is building the country that really drove these five inte- preneurs to start and grow the company. Moving into Uganda was sort of like desperate. Move because You've lost a lot of money but you said okay list also throw some money there and see what comes out but surprisingly as we talk now is being well in Uganda. That was going to be my next question. Inscription is clearly have you recovered from that loss. And the limits to altruism contend here to what extent is this is this a calculated for profit entity and to what extent are you perhaps willing to sustain further losses in the name of of the boarding your people. No I don't think we are not. We are not ready to sustain more losses losses. That's why we we actually right now as I talk. We decided to maintain operations in new gun in south Sudan at only two branches inches. We don't intend to expand or open those branches reclosed until we see that there is permanent peace and then the south Sudan is Spohn has really gained some value always a bit stable against the foreign currency. Well in Uganda of course is and then they. They don't see link Israeli stable against the local on foreign currency so this is a very big chance of expanding because even now in both countries we are sustainable bowl. Yes in Uganda Norwood being better now. We have four branches. We have three branches opening their force in February. So we have a high hope that I I built aspects much as again we are dealing with refugees and also some host communities is so much more high in Uganda at the moment then in south Sudan so his profitability in sight. Nice insight since I. How many people do you serve with right now? In Uganda we have who two thousand three hundred and fifty clans that we we are working with and the about seventy five percent of these refugees and then we have forced communities communities we not entirely targeting refugees but because we work mostly in the settlements the new final that a lot of our work is also going going towards serving serving refugees then in south Sudan. We have about one thousand eight hundred because most people move out of the country so as you said South Sudan Dan we are moving cautiously. We don't want to have our fingers bent for the second time saw really the strategy is to make sure the operations are continuing and then until final piece comes in. That's when we have ditch us now to expand and open the other branches that we're we're closed strategies also to make sure that when the refugees go back they can continue with the services that they have been getting from Uganda because when they come back they'll find NASA they and then we'll be able to continue to to provide them with services as an again them losing the services that have been getting and then taking go back to zero so we are trying to place that cross-border strategist to make sure that we provide the same services they go back. We're taking a quick breathe to tell you a little more about spark. The presenting sponsor of the series spark is a Dutch. NGO with a difference since being founded by two Dutch students a little over twenty five years ago the organization has grown delivered expert job creation services in fourteen of the world's most conflict affected regions including Libya Palestine nine and South Sudan. Spa Creates job opportunities for young people by.

south Sudan Uganda Sudan Sudan Uganda Norwood US Juba Anita NASA Perot arena clancy Wrangler Kaji Libya Davantage Lazlo Spohn Kelly
"sudan" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"sudan" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Today on the world after weeks of protests and violent sedans military rule is the greatest share power would be opposition until election can be held many in sudan doubt the generals will give up their power and many of them have to because they were part of this eighteen year regime of the sheer so they want to be empowered to protect themselves and they have also visited the museum of the palestinian people in washington and blogs from the white house and we want some people will dome and hot right to come in have an issue it doesn't matter if they're not the most important combination i'm marco werman those stories plug a preview of the women's world cup final on sunday all of that today here on the world i'm marco werman and this is the world celebrations in sudan capital cartoon today after months of massive sometimes violent protests pro democracy advocates in the ruling military party have reached a deal the two sides agreed to create eight joint council and share power for the next three years until elections were held an soya senior africa correspondents the bbc she says the deal comes after a long stalemate between the two sides so finally they agreed that each side would gave a five members to day suffering council i'm these and eleventh member who we understand would be a civilian but may or may not be a military leader has closed skepticism skepticism and a shoe they supportive of their position lance because they say he's a retired military officer so he's he fully civilian to who does he or she pledge allegiance so they have.

washington white house marco werman officer sudan africa eighteen year three years
"sudan" Discussed on Worldly

Worldly

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"sudan" Discussed on Worldly

"Back in January, we talked about protests and Sudan, now half a year later those protests, continue, and while demonstrators have seen some success events recently took a very dark turn. This is wurley a part of the vox media podcast network. I'm Alex ward hosting the show for the first time along with my co host friend, who you just heard. Woo, Jen Williams. The Zach is on his honeymoon, which may somewhere on earth, but someday, he'll come back to us and that's hopefully next week. In the meantime, Jen, and I are going to do our best to get you up to speed on the roughly seven months of sedan protests that have taken such a deadly turn recently. So before we get there Jen, do you mind giving us just a little bit of a backstory. Yep. So for those of you who didn't listen to our last episode on Sudan, we forgive you for this view, who didn't have just forgotten. We also forgive you. So, basically, in December twenty eighteen protests erupted in Sudan. Originally. They were over the price of food, but they pretty quickly turned into a protest about the country's really bad economy. And then they kind of spiraled into this protests about the leadership so about that leader. That guy's name is Omar al-bashir. He was in charge of Sudan from one thousand nine hundred eighty nine and the spoiler alert, he was not good, basically ran the country into the ground after he took it over in a military coup. You may remember the genocide of Dr four in the western part of the country, that was his brain child. Right. So there was a uprising in the western part of the country. He used a very brutal militia to quell that uprising and basically it's led to him being known as one of the world's most brutal leaders and even being referred to the international criminal court. So not the best guy, right? Yes. So he literally in the process of putting down that rebellion committed, or at least accused pretty credibly of having committed multiple counts of genocide work Ryan's in crimes against humanity. So brutal guy brutal dictator now these protests back when we covered it in January were new, and it seemed like a really big, and if new thing that was happening. We didn't know really wear. They we're gonna go whether they were going to be successful and they were really inspiring. So there's a great piece on box dot com about how there was a big contingent of women in the country who are leading the protest movement. There are all these like, amazing inspiring scenes of women and children and just all sorts of people into Dan from all walks of life coming out into the street like dancing, and singing, and it was a very positive movement. And, and Jen, I remember us talking about that in the newsroom and just thinking, like this is such a different sort of view. We have of these kinds of, of protests. These protests have been going on since December, and they've been holding onto the pressure and continuing the pressure on Bashir and the regime for quite some time and to the point that even like military members. Effectively told him to step down last April. So that's a coup, right? I mean. No, no. If ands or buts about it. It was a coup, even though he said he was never going to go. He's gone. And so, yeah. Victory, jen. Yeah..

Jen Williams Sudan Bashir vox media Alex ward Omar al-bashir Zach Woo Ryan Dan seven months
"sudan" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"sudan" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"Zero three is the number. I know some of you to my buffet manslaughter. Manny. You're getting real religious. Well, don't know what I've been through. You know what I'm going through? No. With leading. And guiding me at the moment. I am. In the midst of transformation. And I think that ought to be a part of everybody's life. I mean, you can't stay the same. If you do something wrong with you is about transformation this about adapt. Nation. Life is about. Showing one's intellect by being able to adapt to the different. Situations that you encounter in your life. So yeah, it sounds like a field. Like, I'm getting a little more spiritual Williams because I am. I bite you along. Because I believe that. Our our spirituality is our power. If you get anything in your life that you've got to engage that you need to overcome. You're going to need spiritual power to be able to do that. Just say. Four eight nine two two seven zero three you wanna know what's going on in the world. And I wanna share what it is that I have learned. I've talked to you last time. In the Sudan authorities in Sudan. Have ordered the release of all detainees held during weeks of anti-government protests. The release was ordered by Sudan's intelligence and security chief for LA gauche. The information ministry said in the statement, but no reason was given for the release of more than one thousand people who had been detained arrested during the protest which began last month in December. President Omar el-bashir has blamed the unrest on foreign agents and rebel groups in the far the four region. What was sure album shoe believes is that the same people who are behind the Arab spring are behind the protest. In sudan. But. Album has been the leader of Sudan for thirty years. It's time for him to go. Africa. The the continent. Is a young continent. There are like is like sixty seventy percent of the people, you know, less than twenty twenty years old and less, you know, it's a young continent and tired of the leadership of older people. And man, you got to know when to get on somewhere. Speaking of young people and children in Africa. Belgian authorities have asked for DNA samples of children adopted from the Democratic Republic of Congo to establish their biological. Parents are still alive. Why is that you may ask? Well. What they're doing is contacting the adoptive parents of some fifteen children to find out if the children were kidnapped from an orphanage prosecutors suspect that the parents thought that they were sending their children to a Kinshasa holiday camp, not an orphanage and from the orphanage the children were shipped to Belgian and given to white families. I mean. So that orphanage has been shut down. In investigation is underway. Deal. Into international vibe Venezuela's Supreme Court is barring opposition leader one Guay dove from leaving the country. The court also ordered guidos assets frozen the countries in the midst of struggle between Guido and President Nicolas Madura role the US call Medeiros election, you'll legitimate and along with several other governments is backing Guido as the interim president. You know, I did a little that's just did a little research. Why is the US so concerned with Venezuela? Well, because the US imports. Almost six hundred thousand barrels of crude oil.

Sudan Africa US President Omar el-bashir Venezuela Supreme Court Manny Democratic Republic of Congo Guido Kinshasa interim president Guay Williams LA gauche Nicolas Madura President Medeiros six hundred thousand barrels
"sudan" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

08:49 min | 2 years ago

"sudan" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"Sudan Good Industry You've got your Bank God bless you Wait You got Some Bag I've done my sentence Thanks June and. Everything Thank you Thirty five Weekends we rock and we'll rock on if we check best Joining anywhere fast we've got, problems on seventy eight both. Sides of the highway this morning eastbound side in new accident just can't do a couple of moments ago on seventy eight. East coming up to exit twenty four in through Whitehouse station. So delays there with two lanes blocked on the westbound side we, have construction just a little bit west of two eighty seven..

Whitehouse station Sudan
"sudan" Discussed on The Tiny Meat Gang Podcast

The Tiny Meat Gang Podcast

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"sudan" Discussed on The Tiny Meat Gang Podcast

"I he goes i don't wanna see you die and he liked gently grabs his hand on the barrel and convinces them to lower it i'm like no because the people who do that shit or like mentally so far gone like not to go even darker but i'm like i've ever watched the columbine footage know it's fucking awful i it's it makes me sick you know like i've made here's one thing i'll say is like after watching that made me not want to joke about school shootings in your like period okay maybe that's what it took i don't know not like you know what i'm saying is it's funny because that to me makes you makes me think like all my jokes before about skull sudan like that and that was the time where i'm where i made me wanna stop joking about school shooting because before every single joke man it was about school i had so many arsenal jokes sorry no bad language a whole arsenal arsenal jokes shooting kind of animated about this but like i don't know no it wasn't that it was just more like i i looked at that and i'm like now you know what now school shootings are just so far like they're now romanticized they're like the they're so far beyond like what they should be like before i would like right tweets and shit about it to try to be like your what hello flexes keep happening and like now it's the fact that it's that anyways finally they're making a fucking video game yeah it's just like sorry go with your final yeah my my just my final thought on all that is just like in columbine those kids were like antagonizing everyone and they had like intent and it was so obvious and i'm like yo you cannot put media out there that is like telling people like stand up to a school shooter and you know if you're gay and and and someone beats you up or like calls you gay.

sudan
"sudan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"sudan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"A lot of different south sudanese tribes who had never been able to participate in any kind of joint activity as a nation to come on stage and to do something together so the production that was put on was intentionally mixing the tribal dresses of all these different tribes and literally enacting a kind of unity that they were still having to work through and still all having to work through in a very real sense in the in the political domain but this was creating a story which was a story of nationbuilding and a story that was bringing all of the different parts of south sudan together so it it was an extraordinary autistic moment could you envision sitting with a at a at a venue filled with enthusiastic locals watching a shakespeare play in the local language and fell through dan what would this theme be live and i can just imagine the play having been adapted to the cultural struggles of this generation people just getting into it and whooping it up what would that be like if you happen to be able to witness that himself sudan yesterday did perform the production many times back in in juba after it had been performed at london they were largely outdoor performances although the strangest part of the stories that so central to the early part of south sudanese identity formation was this play the shakespeare play that there there was a plan it may still be in train to build a replica of shakespeare's globe would you can visit in london in juba in south sudan with slight south sudanese adaptations but yeah i mean it it's definitely a a production that draws you in you know those extraordinary moment in sibling when posthumous the male hero is is approached by imaging that heroin with whom he is deeply in love with who he's wronged but he doesn't recognize him and he he knocks down and.

sudan juba london shakespeare heroin
"sudan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"sudan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"This is one of these countries that is kind of the result of colonial border drawing generations ago which was a norring ethnic realities was at fair to say oh absolutely yes essentially the two british put together two administrative regions for their own convenience which shared very little in terms of a historic coach at the north is a very arabic influence place a with cultural influences from egypt and the middleeast whereas the south is filled with a much will bantu influenced culture that the look south so if we think of the most desperate struggling falling apart countries libya syria iraq sudan a lot of their problems do go back to careless selfish colonial line drawing century go don't they oh absolutely i mean i i think a lot of these places are are living through the consequences of decisions that will meda a long time ago so now we have this bold little country breaking away from the majority of the sudan because they are ethnically different and they have an affinity for shakespeare you know i would imagine you can take some of the themes of shakespeare's great plays swap out a few of them proper nouns and have something that provides for a communal identity is is that actually a part of shakespeare's purpose in south sudan is just helping people relate to the struggles they've had with colonial overlords just like combating forces did centuries ago in shakespeare's plays yes at one of the extraordinary things about this translation of of cymbeline which is really not very well known shakespeare play it's one of the the greatest hits was not only it's a story about the formation of british identity as britain's separates from the roman empire acid it's a story of rebellion the british rebellion against the roman empire so it's really a story that thinks about the violence of war and national identity and and and the relationship between the two but in putting this play on it was also beat an experience which allow.

egypt sudan shakespeare britain libya syria iraq
"sudan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"sudan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"It was quite expensive to hop into a taxi or quite expensive to stay in a hotel oh yeah i mean because the state in large part everyone there is on a a governmental expense account usually because the only travellers on development travellers so as a is so often the case in africa when a a new nation is being born in aid money is is flooding eytan there are small operators who are pretty kenny it turning up and providing the services providing taxi writes in hotels and even does abdullah supermarket which had a pretty wide selection of champagne magnums as long as you are willing to pay in dollars but for the average south sudanese if there was very good live the structure now do i understand english is the official language of south sudan english is now yes is the official language of southie don't and in fact as an extraordinary shakespearean story behind us in that one of the reasons that they chose english to be the official language it was obvious he impart a rejection of arabic the arabic language of of the north which had been the official language of the country for which they had left but one of the brigadier's in the south sudanese people's liberation army who was central to making this decision to move to english fell in love with shakespeare volume of shakespeare that had been given to him by a missionary when he was fighting as a boy soldier in the civil wars in in the 1980s our guest on travel with rick steve's as edward wolff and lee he's a professor of literature cambridge in the author of shakespeare in swaziland in search of a global poet his website is edward will finley dot com.

africa kenny shakespeare rick steve edward wolff professor swaziland abdullah official sudan
"sudan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"sudan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Dependence from the rest of the country in two thousand eleven and as one of the first acts as a country south sudan sent a shakespeare play performed by a troop from their capital juba to the globe the globe festival in london in 2012 having spent years looking at the meaning of the mixture between politics and history and culture through the lens of shakespeare in east africa i i was dying to see this happening in real time in the world's newest nation in south sudan so i i went out to meet the man who who translated cymbeline into ajuba arabic so you traveled to south sudan to researcher book normal tourist okuda south sudan do they were what did you find what was the like going there what does it take to go there yeah it was it was a pretty unusual experience in the south sudanese embassy was just a a rented office space in account of regional part of london and pretty much everyone else going was an aid worker or someone working for an embassy or a an ngo so when i got there there was almost no provision for tourists in order to be allowed in the country nor to get a visa you had to book into a tourist hotel but the tourist hotel was essentially a shipping containers uh with beds and air conditioning and satellite tv inside them again you'd have largely catering to to people who were there working for aid agencies and and development agencies so it certainly wasn't set up for your average tourist and you know juba is a town with very little infrastructure very few buildings more than a story toll one paved road and the the wounds from the civil war which had been being fought between the north and the south for decades were still very fresh in fact the only place you could buy a souvenir was a local croft project in which women who had suffered sexual violence during the civil wars made kroft products to be sold on and you wrote about how is actually in spite of how desperately poor the country is.

juba london real time sudan civil war researcher
"sudan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"sudan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Spirit cambridge he returned to east africa to explore how the writings of william shakespeare paid a defining role in the region from colonial times to the process of establishing new nations his travels included a stop in juba the capital of south sudan it's the world's newest nation born out of decades of civil war but whose challenges are far from over edward outlines what he found in his book shakespeare in swaziland edward wilson lee thanks for joining us thanks for having me on wrecked so tell us a little bit about your love of shakespeare in your connection with east africa so i grew up in east africa i went to boarding school in switzerland and then university in the united kingdom i fell in love with shakespeare during my teenage years nenette university in ended up teach in that but i didn't think until i stumbled upon the beginnings of this project that i'd be able to connect these two parts of my life growing up in east africa but um i found the beginnings of the project in this one of the earliest text presidents while he was a lation of charles and mary lambs tales from shakespeare so i went out to east africa to zanzibar to research that and just found from there that was a threat i could talk at an stories just kept coming and coming and it covers read the whole history of eastern africa from the mid nineteenthcentury to the present day in an has just an endless cost of colorful characters involved in it in your your book shakespeare in swaziland his reference to the language that spoken through most of east africa and sudan just barely makes that terrain talk about uh just briefly to set the stage the story of south sudan it's been in the news in the last decade yes o south sudan historically because of how the british divided the region up during colonial period and afterwards had been part of a single country with what is now just known as sued on but the northern part of the country is a very arabic influence an arabicspeaking nation whereas the southern part is much more bantu hsieh's much more with the countries to itself so the south sudan declared in.

cambridge civil war switzerland africa swaziland hsieh south sudan east africa william shakespeare edward wilson lee mary zanzibar
"sudan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"sudan" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"After five years travelling overland to every country in africa francis tap on has some amazing stories when i told them i wanted to go there and drive across had no way you're you're going through a war zone basically coming up we'll find out what kind of journey he ha fit balanced my car on fixing canoe when edward wilson lee went to south sudan he found that a local shakespeare production has had a big part to play in establishing their new nation it was an experience which allowed a lot of different south sudanese tribes who had never been able to participate in any kind of joint activity as a nation to come on stage and to do something together in here why the region of normandy as one of the favoured countryside getaways in france you see cows everywhere happy cows so we have lots of cheese an epic journey across africa finding shakespeare in south sudan and the pleasures of normandy it'll just ahead on travel with rick steep it's a favorite we can get away from pierce in the region comes complete with great scenery important historical sites and its own tasty specialties we'll explore what makes normandy such a great destination a little later in the hour ahead on today's travel with rick steve's and adventure traveler and filmmaker francis on checks in with us from the end of the road in egypt he's just completed his fiveyear long quest to visit every one of the fifty four countries in africa has joins us from luxor where he's been celebrating with a cruise on the nile in just a bit first let's explore how shakespeare's been playing a role in the decolonisation of africa as the new nation of south sudan forges its own identity we're joined now by an english literature professor who found that all the world love shakespeare even in africa's newest nations he grew up in kenya with american and british parents who worked as conservationists there today edward wilson lius a professor of literature who teaches shake.

france sudan rick steve francis luxor english literature professor kenya professor edward wilson lee normandy africa shakespeare edward wilson lius five years fiveyear
"sudan" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

PBS NewsHour

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"sudan" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

"Civil war is emptying huge swaths of south sudan the violence has uprooted four million people including two million who fled to neighboring countries in the last year more than a million south sudanese have poured into northern uganda alone crossing makeshift bridges like this one to flee fighting hunger and brutal attacks on civilians dis contribued fighting british rule midafternoon disputed our properties to defraud when similar pies family went to one of the refugee camps initially he stayed behind to look after the families most precious commodity their cattle he hit for a year to escape the violence the refugees carry whatever they can salvage mattresses parts clothes note folks remnants of once peaceful lives turned upside down pat's checkpoints ugandan soldiers searched their belongings for weapons before the refugees proceed to reception centres after entering uganda the refugees sign in a smaller way stations for many it's the first night spending safety after walking for days to escape fighting levy etiquette fled with his wife and four children new did not run aground sort started we lead under a tree with the former because there was nowhere else to hard we waited for the forty two style and then we gotta started walk into your garden uganda now shoulders most of the burden of africa's biggest refugee crisis managing a constellation of camps which require food water health care and policing at in that be camp now home to more than one hundred twenty thousand south sudanese new arrivals receive vaccinations hot meals and basic items such as seoul and plastic tarps to build a house the government also gives each refugee families a small plot of land about a twentieth of an acre where they can build attend shelter and grow crops to eat or cell but the land often proves to rocky for farming after completing the registration process the new arrivals will receive their plot of land.

Civil war sudan uganda pat seoul africa
"sudan" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

02:41 min | 3 years ago

"sudan" Discussed on WGTK

"They were able to mobilize people and in anger charged with this is the kind of a holy or and those who participated in it could follow the rules of heart which rules two i i'm feeling enslaving ravi on cows our go i'm kind of move movable property air including people and women and children were particularly i know school and they were all they were abducted into slavery in this route carried on until to war ended in two thousand five but the end the war didn't bring about the release of the slave so there are still by our uh as far as we can tell there are still some cancer thousand who on women and children killer who are who were left behind uh who were not liberated aden or soup order sudan with their their masters during this period of time of course they give birth so there are little baby slave crying we're born in the north had never lived in southern sudan and john why did the comprehensive peace agreement that was signed in two thousand five why didn't stop that practice it didn't quillot stop your practice in the sense that it stop the slave rating that was quantity a cheap and so do the rating of villages from the taking of slaves stopped but it did not bring about 'liberation end x creation of those who had been in straighten it didn't do so because the issue was too hot sensibly in a politically uh to handle a highly sensitive issue in sudan will throughout the arab uh islamic uh world and it'd be frank nobody so that these people were important enough to push the roof no further sensitive often as they were trying to reconcile onto the north and the south and to bring about peace so is this an issue that was pushed to aside because it was felt were brought back into a peace process it would unleash passions that might be railed a whole russia well and and because of the sensitivity but because of christian solidarity the internationals consistent work you guys have actually been able to develop a system by which these leaves can be liberated talk to us a little bit than for just a couple of minutes here about how that liberation process goes in what it looks like woah back.

aden sudan russia john frank
"sudan" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

SOFREP Radio

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"sudan" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

"A wall because right now they're not and said if put them on the concept line you just allow on all the room in the world for russia to cement victory and it will for sure i will moving on to another continent here i and another area of expertise for you with what's going on in africa this is our really under reported story from last month you sent me over this article from business rider south sudan rebels say us reporter killed by government for photographer photographing the fight chryst for allen a twenty five year old freelance journalist was among nineteen killed on saturday morning once again this is from last month when fighting erupted between opposition and government forces along the border between south sudan and uganda so they're saying that on that it was could that this man along with the nineteen eighteen others were killed by the government i there seems to be some discrepancy there uh but it's not something we've covered on the podcast yet even though this is an old your story said like to get into it and get your perspective i mean m first off jerusalem was was a good friend of mine oh wow air not i didn't i just knew that you sent me this article that i wasn't it's okay spoke briefly with that a gun on the body when he wrote to species i actually spoke to sahlin twelve hours before found out he was dead.

russia reporter sudan uganda jerusalem africa us allen twenty five year twelve hours
"sudan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"sudan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The icc can than interview and where it cannot if we talk about syria today syria is not a state party to the rome statute matter i mean you've you've got countries where they're not statement it is like the sudan and the president of sudan bashiti's has been in doubt because i say syria because people say that the selective justice in 2014 65 nations called for the syrian conflict to be referred to the court and it was vetoed let me just them mm back to the the fact that the un security council for the sedan case to the idea with the one about five million why we were example clarify the fact that in the sudan is not a state party to the statute and did not only we do not have territorial jurisdiction but saddam was referred to the icc in one of the ways that can be geared to collusion security council i wasn't sharon acid when sixty five nations called for the syrian conflict to be referred to the court held was into india this is what i learned but i think would ideally be asked of the un security cutting shows you that the selective justice and you are part of that framework means that were you upset that syria wasn't referred not i beg to differ that we are part of the process the fact of the matter is even though un security council under the rome statute country for cases to the icc but when these cases thumb we subject to the same test as we do by making sure that our crimes have been committed the allegations of and that is this within that all the legal requirements are met for us to open an investigation so it will fly the president sharon acid forces have not being guilty and this this this is far from what i say one thing is that even if a case for by the un security council as the saddam had been done under league libya we subject them through the same test.

icc syria sudan president sudan bashiti un security council saddam india libya rome sharon acid