35 Burst results for "Sub Saharan Africa"

South Africa halts AstraZeneca vaccine rollout

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:57 min | 3 months ago

South Africa halts AstraZeneca vaccine rollout

"South africa has halted its rollout of the oxford astrazeneca vaccine just a week after the country received. Its first million doses. It seems the vaccine offers limited protection against a new variant of the corona virus. That's now dominant in the country. Salim abdul karim co-chair of south africa's ministerial advisory committee on covid nineteen spoke to a world health organization briefing yesterday. We don't want to end up with a situation where we vaccinated million people too. Many people would have vaccine that may not be effective in preventing hospitalization and severe disease in total more than one point. Two billion corona virus doses have been allocated for the continent. But it's not clear when all those jobs will arrive. The longer any region remains unvaccinated. The greater the chance that more variants arise vaccines though can be tweaked in a formulation of the oxford vaccine targeted at the south african variant could be going into arms by autumn. What scientists cannot address is the long run damage to africa both in human and economic terms so far continent to have been spared from the worst case scenarios predicted early on in the pandemic but the longer term picture remains bleak many ways the impact of the pandemic and africa is worse than it appears on the surface around the official numbers. Kenley salmon is one of our africa correspondent based in dakar. It is the case that having a young population has to some extent protected the continent from the virus africans and died from it that americans europeans but the true scott of infection. Death is really hard to gauge. Studying sudan recently showed the perhaps only two percent of all the covid desk for a quoted in the official tally and the economic impact is worse than it looks last year. The region's economy shrank for the first time. In twenty five years tourism has been badly hit as have commodity exporters things like oil in nigeria and taken together. Gdp per capita fell below twenty ten levels last year so things are perhaps not quite as bad as some other parts the world but certainly still very tough and things may get tougher house. What are the particular challenges to africa. Africa faces quite a number of challenges in the next few years as it tries to recover from the pandemic but the biggest i of the really is vaccines. Some african governments have perhaps failed to grasp the urgency of the situation in tanzania for example the populace president john food even casually cast out with a vaccine work but i do forgive aside claiming the postman precautions such as steaming nation were better than vaccines and even added that if the white man was able to come up with next nations then. Vaccinations for aids. Malaria and cancer would have already been found. So it's not so much a question than of supply. I mean given that quite a few vaccines have been essentially booked at the stage. A number of vaccines have been booked but the big question is when will they arrive because right now there aren't anywhere near the number of axes required forever on in the world and rich countries are of course the front of the queue for those vaccines have been produced africa's going to need perhaps two point six billion doses to vaccinate everyone and those are not being made locally so they have to rely on supplies elsewhere for the moment so that means joining the queue. All this means that whereas rich countries aim to vaccinate most of their people by the middle of this year the african. cdc a public health. Bali in africa's aiming for sixty percent of africans to vaccinated by the end of next year. But even that may be too optimistic. For the poorest countries. The economist intelligence unit sister organization estimates that in most african countries most people will not be inoculated until mid twenty twenty three or even early twenty twenty four and there must be serious consequences of it being that long until the continent is on average vaccinated. Africa is likely. It doesn't get those vaccinations into suffer. Further waves of the infection while after the disease may have amped in the rich world. And that of course will cause more death and more suffering. Doesn't risk that. Having the virus transmitting between people frequently africa could allow new variance to evolve. We've already got the south. African variant and these new variants could endanger people even in rich countries if they prove to be resistant to vaccines and then finally of course not having vaccines could force. African policymakers to continue with these very difficult economic lockdowns curfews even after many other countries around the world set free of those kinds of restrictions and if the public health concern lasts that long then surely the economic concerns will last at least that long. That's right in many african countries facing pretty severe crises at the moment just getting finance to pay their bills. Africa has very limited fiscal space on average countries in sub saharan africa. Spending more than thirty cents on every dollar. They raise and text revenue paying their debts. And that's up from twenty cents on the dollar before the pandemic on the debt side to over half of low income sub saharan african countries are now classed as in distress or at high risk of distress. According to the imf and what about countries with bigger economies the two biggest economies in africa nigeria and south ever both in pretty deep trouble nigeria for example was described by the world. Bank is being an unprecedented crisis. Recently the bank is not normally quite so blunt in nigeria. There has been a legacy of management for a number of years and pandemics really accessible that quite badly. Now focused suggested by twenty twenty three. Gdp per capita may go back as low as it was in one thousand nine hundred eighty time when the oil price was some high on so africa too is in trouble that have been in recession twice in the last three years before the pandemic hit of course now is dribbling itself with a particularly heavy toll from the pandemic so both countries in fact are facing a difficult road out of the crisis. And what about outside help in terms of financing has been quite a bit of outside help although the crisis of course is very big but in twenty twenty the imf for example provided sixteen billion dollars in loans most of that came with relatively few strings attached and this help frigging countries to respond to the pandemic to avoid some of the liquidity crises that were looming the world bank also dispersed another ten billion but many countries got that funding to if the imf under emergency allocations that came quickly and relatively easily and those allocations for many countries will soon be exhausted. The rich world has been trying to help when it comes to debt. They've provided liquidity to countries through some bits of suspension initiative that basically allows poor countries to put off debt repayments until july. Twenty twenty one. This is of course helpful but the trouble is that those payments just suspended and they have to be paid back with interest in about five years time so as the chief economist for africa the world bank put it to us. It may just be kicking the can down the road to. How do you see this playing out. Then how high could the human cost of all this be while the stakes are pretty high. The pandemic has already done lower damage to people's health and africa. it's hitting their economic prospects and they wealth and it's also affecting education of course. Hundreds of millions of students in africa have been affected by school closures. This increases the risk of dropouts and reduces the prospects for africa's largest every generation so overall the costs here really quite significant. There are some reasons for optimism. We may see vaccine rollouts accelerate. There's also hopes that commodity price rises could give africa real boost as the global economy recovers been on balance. The evidence probably points to at pretty difficult road ahead with several more waves of the virus hitting already struggling health systems and perhaps a form of economic long covert in africa. So you know africans have come through this showing remarkable resilience but it may be toughest years are still to come in. Thank you very much for joining us. thank you

Africa Salim Abdul Karim Co Ministerial Advisory Committee Kenley Salmon Nigeria Oxford South Africa John Food Astrazeneca Dakar Saharan Africa IMF Sudan Tanzania Malaria CDC
Solar-powered battery packs offer cheap electricity in Tanzania

Climate Connections

01:20 min | 4 months ago

Solar-powered battery packs offer cheap electricity in Tanzania

"Dr anthony leiserowitz and this is climate connections in sub saharan africa. Over five hundred million people live without electricity for lighting many of them use kerosene a fossil fuel that contributes to global warming emits toxic fumes. And can start dangerous fires so we started looking for a low cost way to provide electricity for an entire village. That's jeff schnur. Ceo of jazz energy. The company figured out a way to meet that goal without conventional power plants and a distribution grid in tanzania has an energy has built about seventy five solar hubs small buildings with solar panels on top. Two women from the community staff each hub. The women use the solar power to charge battery packs customers. Rent the packs and use them to power lights charge cell phones and for other small electricity needs. Schnur says it's cheaper to rent a battery pack that it is to buy kerosene so the approach not only helps protect the climate. He can save people money and improve their quality of life. The hub operators we call jazz stars. The women running locations are literally lighting up house by house in their community. When you sit down in here directly from someone how it's just a dream come true. It's pretty transformational.

Dr Anthony Leiserowitz Sub Saharan Jeff Schnur Schnur Africa Tanzania
UNAIDS calls on countries to step up global action and proposes bold new HIV targets for 2025

UN News

01:17 min | 6 months ago

UNAIDS calls on countries to step up global action and proposes bold new HIV targets for 2025

"Should adopt ambitious new targets to tackle hiv aids to avoid hundreds of thousands of additional infections and deaths from the disease linked to the covid nineteen pandemic the un said on thursday citing data showing the pandemic's long-term impact on global hiv response. Un aid said that there could be up to nearly three hundred thousand additional new hiv infections between now and two thousand and twenty two and up to one hundred and forty eight thousand more aids related deaths. This collective faded to invest sufficiently in comprehensive rights-based people. Scented hiv responses has come at a terrible price. Said winning be anemia executive director of you and aids. She added that the only way to get the global response against hiv aids. Back on track was by tackling the inequalities on which epidemics thrive although countries in sub saharan africa including swan and ezra teeny have achieved or even exceeded targets. Set for two thousand twenty. Many more countries are falling way behind urinate said in a new report called prevailing against pandemics. Its proposed targets for twenty twenty five focus on a high coverage of hiv and reproductive and sexual health services together with the removal of punitive laws policies. Stigma and discrimination. If these targets are met the world will be back on track to ending aids as a public health threat. By twenty thirty the agency

HIV Aids UN Anemia Saharan Africa
Special Edition Echo Red Available

Voice in Canada

01:27 min | 6 months ago

Special Edition Echo Red Available

"As you may know coming up this week is world. Aids day and amazon is getting in on the action to raise money for this Very worthwhile cause and how are they doing this well. They have just launched an echo device. The new generation won the fourth generation. But it is a red one so the fabric is read. It's a limited edition echo red and it's to help Bring awareness and raise money for a couple of Great causes In particular If you buy one of these devices the red one amazon will donate ten dollars from the sale of every one of those devices to the global fund to support covid nineteen response and hiv aids programs in the sub saharan africa. So this is wonderful so if you want to get a special edition read echo and support a very worthwhile cause at the same time. Then you may be interested in picking up one of these now. Here's the thing because it's actually black friday week if you will. They're actually on sale as well. So the regular price of these are normally one twenty nine ninety nine hundred thirty bucks but right now. They are on sale for ninety. So it's forty dollars off. If you want to go straight to this particular device you can use. My phillies link a. l. e. x. Eighteen canada dot ca slash echo red and. That'll take you right to the

Amazon Saharan HIV Aids Africa Phillies Canada CA
Let's Talk About Toilets

Why It Matters

04:31 min | 6 months ago

Let's Talk About Toilets

"So world toilet day is coming up and the response to hearing that there is a serious. Un sponsor day for toilets might make people laugh or feel a little iffy on discussing it. So why would we need a day like that. Well what would you do if you didn't have a toilet a fair point. This is brooke yamaguchi. She's a water sanitation and hygiene specialist at the united nations children's fund also known as yuna south based in new york. She knows a lot about toilets. I mean the ability to manage our bodily functions and these things that we frequently don't talk about but are so core toss bodily functions of urination defecation for half the population menstruation. Really at the core of our dignity. it's also a foundation for health without a toilet that contains waste and then separates it from people coming in contact with that waste. We would all be exposed to harmful pathogens that cause many different illnesses and diseases and it doesn't stop at the toilet either so without waste being safely transported away from our toilets and from our homes and treated somewhere we would all be surrounded by wastewater and our neighborhoods and in the environment so in terms of the numbers. Can you give me a wide angle view of toilet access as global issue. Will there are three main things that we measure the global level. This is tom sleigh maker. he also focuses on global monitoring of drinking water sanitation and hygiene at unicef headquarters in new york. He sees the big picture of how this plays out around the world. He spoke to us on a rainy day from london to one. Is the population here. Practice open defecation. So that man's added kind of told us a tool a may just is that bush's fails beaches little. Walter crosses the other thing that we measure is the population with basic sanitation service. So means that they have. Some kind of hygienic toilets but is not being shad with other people. It's not shadow the household and then the next level of service up is what we call safely managed sanitation. I'm not means that you not only have a hygiene twins but you also have a mechanism in place to ensure shaming west. That's produced is then being treated on despised safely before being discharged pakistan arm and how many people fall into each of these categories so the global level resell have six hundred. Seventy three million people practicing cash there about two billion people still lack even basic level of service wanting people worldwide and if you look at the population without sanitation that's more like four point. Two billion people that is more than half the people on earth and runs the risk of getting sick every day. Do we have an idea of how many people die as a result of this problem. Whol have estimated globally around one point. Two million deaths could have been prevented through access to cat drinking water sanitation hygiene. The problem is particularly acute for young. Children are very vulnerable. And so i think we estimate there around three hundred thousand children under five who die each year as a result of not having bicyc- water sanitation and hygiene. So when you look at a map where do you see this happening. While some regions and countries have much further to go. If you look out you'll say that particularly sub saharan africa asia and will say ice yanni of civic have much lower levels of coverage of sanitation. And this is polly today with greenwich stages of developments in my slate core countries. But even if you move up the ladder you start to look at issues of treatments and disposal of waste even in europe and north america and australia and new zealand. We're still only at about three quarters of the population that has high says site. All countries have further to go in order to improve sanitation but obviously by roles starting at different positions.

Brooke Yamaguchi United Nations Children's Fund Tom Sleigh Unicef Headquarters New York UN Walter Bush London Pakistan Saharan Greenwich Asia Africa North America Europe New Zealand Australia
As Tanzania Votes, Many See Democracy Itself on the Ballot

Monocle 24: The Globalist

08:18 min | 7 months ago

As Tanzania Votes, Many See Democracy Itself on the Ballot

"Tons Anita went to the polls yesterday to vote in an election overshadowed by opposition complaints of irregularities such as ballot box, stuffing President John Maga. Fully who is accused of stifling democracy seeks a second term in office alongside fourteen other candidates talk to Dan. Padgett is electoral politics at the university. Of Aberdeen, he specializes in political communication through mass rallies and populist and nationalist ideologies in Tanzania and joins me on the line. Now Don Tanzania's long been thought of in the West is a a haven of stability within east Africa but I mean this isn't necessarily the case and I. I wonder if you could sketch out the political dynamic there, the ruling party's been in power since nineteen sixty one. Yes that's right. It's is the longest ruling party in sub. Saharan Africa. The political dynamic in Tanzania has been one of the ruling Kanzi, CCM's decline over the last fifteen years. Reaching a low point in two thousand fifteen where it where the margin of victory was. The fittest is ever been. Since then President Michel, Foodie, it came to kyle and that's election has led Tanzania. Very shot an increasingly extreme offered Harry. Intern. And we weren't sure how just how? Radical that authoritarian agenda would be and the election this we're just getting results from now suggests that it is as bad as any of us feared as so the opposition allegations of vote rigging, etc do stand up. Well. So. Of course, normally I would turn to international election observers. Attorney to arbitrate these claims to decide which to give credence in which not to give credence. Unfortunately, we can't almost no international election observers. Were invited and those that were invited were. Invited at our so Given that and given the advantage of the opportunity that this creates the ruling party the elections it's hard not to give at least prima facie credence to these opposition claims especially given the the wide range of anecdote to. Video and photographic evidence that I've seen an which which I've been collecting these last twenty four hours, and of course, zipping a social media crackdown various restrictions on the press. Has Been, a crackdown all over and and for the last five years. So in many ways, the the rigging receipt which we've been seeing apparently seeing of the next twenty four hours. Is. Really just the icing on the authoritarian cake. There's extreme. Media Censorship rallies have been banned and consider route the rally. The most important means of communication tends to emotional time about seventy percent of people attend local meetings on a regular basis and attend election campaign rallies they were they were abandoned twenty sixteen and indeed the opposition at large have. Hottest. Struggle underneath. Almost constance. Of States and extra state harassment in includes trumped up court cases but also extrajudicial. So extra state attacks. Unknown assailants that have arrested some abductors killed. And in fact, one of the main challenges has recently returned to the country after recovering from gunshot wounds. That's right. So tenderly series is. Presidential. Candidate is the largest opposition party in Tanzania. and. So that's Experience of being of surviving attempted assassination attempt has has given. US already in very impressive political figure a sort of a sparkle. Some people referred to him as a living miracle. But of course, we don't know the results. Yes. But we all seeing violence particularly in Zanzibar. Zanzibar the autonomous. ARCHEPELAGO's Zanzibar, which is a federally devote area of 'em. Into UK. Has has often seen electoral violence. We saw it in ninety five and two, thousand and thirteen, thousand, five and twenty fifteen and actions by varying degrees. So in in some ways, this is a return to form It's not. The recurrence of violence is is. Seems to be because the opposition has probably one in sensabaugh almost every time. But they've never officially one out one means or another has always been used to not in the that's the that's the the scholarly consensus on. Politics what's different? This time I think is that there's violence on the mainland as well. So this is no longer an issue of contained physical violence in Zanzibar. There have been a series of incidents including. What appears to be an attempt to a to attack the chairman of the leading opposition party on the eve of the elections. So that's one difference the other is considered. No money there is. A. Sporadic protests violence and in return state brutality, police army heavy-handedness in putting down those protests that the protests have often been. Constrained and sporadic because they have not been condoned led. By, by the leaders of the opposition there, there are indications that this could be different this time one of the reasons for that is. The, the rhetoric is different. The leader of the opposition in Zanzibar say amount has been say had has been saying that in the past he's held his supporters back. He's been of restraint, and at this time he he won't urge restraint to newly sue has said that he will. Bring people out onto the streets and consider the state of the opposition behind because it seems like this might be the last stand in a sense that vikings they can make, and so they they don't have that say incentive to hold back this time and say the keep up how to drive the next time. Just finally before we go, do you think that this is part of something that we're seeing across parts of Africa there is a younger demographic. They were all born after independence that not prepared to accept authoritarian rule the just coming to the age where they are protesting we're seeing it in Nigeria within saws and in various other places could this be the the Africans spring. My sense is if there is African spring to come, it will come off and an Wiki will extend. Mexico an authoritarian winter. The trend on that strikes me is that a number of leaders are emerging in an intense Aena in Zambia. In other parts of the consonant, which bear a striking resemblance to this sort of authoritarian. Developmental. Nationalists of is so The there's a young population I are angry. But in fact, I think the trend seems to go the other way. And results. When can we expect those? So the first also are already dripping in and they show. That a series of opposition strongholds, there's places that you would never expect or or at least likely. To expect to go to a to the ruling party are being won by then by margins of three to one, which suggests that the the the rigging. Being worried about maybe taking place typically a Tanzanian election result takes three or four days that was related end and announced especially with the presidential elections but. So far. This is actually has been crisis already.

Tanzania Zanzibar Don Tanzania Saharan Africa East Africa Padgett DAN Aberdeen Anita President Trump John Maga Africa Aena President Michel United States Intern Harry
Study: Air Pollution Contributes To 500,000 Newborn Deaths A Year

90.3 KAZU Programming

00:57 sec | 7 months ago

Study: Air Pollution Contributes To 500,000 Newborn Deaths A Year

"Researchers report that air pollution contributed to the death of about 500,000 newborn babies worldwide last year. NPR's Michaleen Duke left has more Each year about 2.4 million babies die within the first month. Now. Researchers at the University of California, San Francisco, say that about 20% of those deaths are related to the mother's exposure to air pollutants during pregnancy. Even in small amounts. Chronic air pollution raises a mother's risk giving birth prematurely or having a low weight, baby. Both of those conditions reduce an infant's chance of survival. The problem is most of year in sub Saharan Africa in southern Asia, where many families burn wood or coal to heat their homes. Even in rich countries, like the U. S. Some families are exposed to unhealthy levels of air pollution when they live near highways, airports or other sources of

Saharan Africa Michaleen Duke NPR San Francisco Asia University Of California
Protect & Assist - An Interview with the Head of the Australian Cyber Security Centre

Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

03:41 min | 7 months ago

Protect & Assist - An Interview with the Head of the Australian Cyber Security Centre

"As you've said, I hit the styling Sada security security center. Now am missions pretty. But it's also pretty simple. It's to Mike Strategy of the safest place to connect. Online and do business online and out at prime responsibilities really to protect old parts of the Australian economy from the beginning of business to government critical infrastructure provides small medium enterprise and individuals and. Families get on with life online, which as we know in Grad example is the way that wearing gauging today is an increasingly important very much. In Lock wise I agree with we wouldn't normally have reached out to you. So readily you've come from that mentioned a bit about your background you've been in the role to six months and you came from the National Bushfire. Recovery Center of go committee ought not to show that the Prophets Dada was, but you've come from a, is it across? into. What we obviously absurd at the same time as I saw across the. Up Tyke in Saada crime and saw active duty during covid nineteen has the right thanks I fire. I'm assuming you're Ri- You're enjoying it or you're funding it the challenge that was made to be it's I have to say the people that work here who mice distractions. made to ever speak to some of the most incredible human beings having encountered by in terms of their incredible. Personal drive towards that mission and really advancing Australia's interests but also the technical capability which is second to none. You. You mentioned I had come from the National Bushfire Recovery Agency, actually not a dissimilar function in the sense that you're trying to engage h very different sectors of of the community who've been affected by That's materialized and assist them to get back up on their fate again, actually to build resilience, it's just the context he's. Prior to that I was the head of the national. Security Division Prime Minister and Cabinet had some timing critical infrastructure. Yeah. In High McVeigh's and. Inaugural Chief Risk Officer for the Department of Homeland Phases Wales. Postings looking after Europe and sub Saharan Africa region it sounds like a WIG background but look the headline is this a love a good crisis? Could us a find that the same skill set? Of Translating. Deriving problems into their various segments responding to each one of ours always having a plan or campaign or or an operational approach assists in obviously having a a a defense background helps that way and and and of course, the May you quite rightly point out. I don't have a long technical history but. I said twenty million constituents across the economy. The vast majority of dying Ada semi bottom line is if I'd. It how customers and I think that kind of balance swelled.

National Bushfire Recovery Age National Bushfire Saada Department Of Homeland Phases Security Division Mike Strategy Prime Minister RI Chief Risk Officer Saharan Africa Australia Mcveigh Europe Cabinet
2 million stillbirths every year, pandemic might worsen toll

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:33 sec | 7 months ago

2 million stillbirths every year, pandemic might worsen toll

"And new Tonight, the World Health Organization and partners say there are about two million stillbirths every year. That comes from its first ever global estimates of this, the U. N Health agency says tonight that last year three and four stillbirths Still took place in sub Saharan Africa or South Eastern Asia. The report warns that the ongoing pandemic could go could worsen the global toll hear it estimates that a 50% reduction in health services during the pandemic could result in an additional 200,000 still births in the next year in developing nations

World Health Organization U. N Health Agency Saharan Africa Eastern Asia
Coronavirus pandemic disrupts HIV treatment in many parts of the world

Morning Edition

00:57 sec | 11 months ago

Coronavirus pandemic disrupts HIV treatment in many parts of the world

"U. N is warning that the corona virus pandemic is causing serious disruptions to HIV treatment in many parts of the world. As NPR's Jason Beaubien reports. Medications are in short supply and dozens of countries with their cargo and shipping routes restricted or closed. The World Health Organization says 24 countries are reporting their supplies of antiretroviral drugs have reached critically low levels or been cut off entirely due to the Corona virus pandemic. Nearly 50 mohr say that they're at risk of running out of the life saving medicines, flight cancellations, border closures and scaled back shipping schedules have upended global supply chains. Local lockdowns and further complicated dispensing antiretroviral says patients have been unwilling or unable to travel to clinics, other clinics that closed or been converted to covert 19 wards. Yuen's AIDS agency warns that the Corona virus pandemic could lead to a doubling of AIDS related deaths this year in sub Saharan Africa.

Jason Beaubien Saharan Africa World Health Organization HIV NPR Yuen Mohr U. N
COVID-19 imperils AIDS progress, UN warns

Morning Edition

01:00 min | 11 months ago

COVID-19 imperils AIDS progress, UN warns

"U. N is warning that the corona virus pandemic is causing serious disruptions to HIV treatment in many parts of the world. As NPR's Jason Beaubien reports. Medications are in short supply and dozens of countries with their cargo and shipping routes restricted or closed. The World Health Organization says 24 countries are reporting their supplies of antiretroviral drugs have reached critically low levels have been cut off entirely due to the Corona virus pandemic. Nearly 50 mohr say that they're at risk of running out of the life saving medicines, flight cancellations, border closures and scaled back shipping schedules have upended global supply chains. Local lockdowns and further complicated dispensing antiretroviral says patients have been unwilling or unable to travel to clinics. Other clinics have closed or been converted to Cove in 19 wards. The U. N aid agency warns that the Corona virus pandemic could lead to a doubling of AIDS related deaths this year in sub Saharan Africa. Jason Beaubien NPR

Jason Beaubien Npr Jason Beaubien NPR Saharan Africa World Health Organization HIV Mohr Cove U. N
The Urgent Need to Make Disciples - Matthew 28:19

Pray the Word with David Platt

05:41 min | 11 months ago

The Urgent Need to Make Disciples - Matthew 28:19

"Matthew Chapter Twenty Eight. I nineteen. Go therefore. And make disciples of all nations. baptizing them in the name of the father and of the son and of the Holy Spirit. So much, we can talk about here so much. We could pray based on just that that one verse in the Great Commission but I want us to pray. Based on one truth. And what? We just read that I think many people often miss. So when Jesus says, make disciples of all nations. That is not a general command to make disciples among as many people as possible. No, that's a specific command to make disciples of all nations Ponta ethnic of all the ethnic groups. Of all the peoples of the world. So Jesus told us to go to every ethnic group. Every people group in the world and make disciples there. So what that means is, if we are not working in our lives, our families and churches to take the Gospel. To people groups ethnic groups places where the Gospel is not yet gone. Then we are disobeying the Great Commission. Disregarding what Jesus is us to do here. And the reason this is so important because. We already. And our lives and families and churches even in our churches. We spend so little on missions. Taking the Gospel to other places, but then even out of that which we spend on missions. Did you know? That ninety plus percent of missions resources in north. American churches so resources we're spending on. Missions are actually going to places in the world where the Gospel has already gone. Where churches have already been planted. Many churches even Christians when we think about missions. We think all over Latin America. We think all over sub Saharan Africa. When reality is by God's. Grace The Gospel has gone all over Latin America. All over sub Saharan Africa Yes. There are small pockets in these places, these regions where the gospels now gone, but for the most part the Gospel has gone disciples of in May, churches have been planted, and it's not wrong by any means to come alongside our brothers and sisters in these places to learn from them to work together for the glory of God, no question at the same time. We're fooling ourselves if we call that emissions when the reality is were still not obeying the mission. When ninety plus percent of our resources are going to places where the gas was already gone, and Jesus has commanded us, not suggested not implied he is crystal clear commanded us to make disciples take the Gospel, the good news of his love to people. Groups places where the gospels not yet gone. So this is why I know why. We radical started urgent, just identify the places in the world, the groups of people in the world, even the countries in the world, where there's the least access to the Gospel and to mobilize resources to go to them. It's called urgent. That's what initiatives call like. Because there's urgent need, there are people dying and going to an eternal hell who've never even heard. Nobody's even brought the good news of how they can go to heaven through Jesus to them so I just wanted to lead us to pray accordingly. Jesus we. We want to obey your. Command. We want to make your grace and your glory known among all the nations. So we pray. That you would. Open her eyes. Inner Churches to see where the Gospel is gone and to work to take the Gospel, their and our lives, and our families, and our churches to go, and to send, and to come alongside brothers and sisters who are in these places, a few brothers and sisters. I think about that we're. Partnering together with these places in the world, God help us to get behind him and work with them. For the spread of the gospel of never heard gotta we pray you think about all these countries that we're focused on an urgent like Syria God for Your glory in the Megan disciples in Bhutan North Korean. Across India and Iraq and Afghanistan and Iran Laos Lebanon Nepal and some Malia and Yemen Jesus Make Your glory known in those places and use us to do it. Don't don't let us sit back. Content to hold onto the gospel or just to take it where it's already gone God, help us to work us our efforts to take the Gospel whereas Never Gone So that disciples made in all the nations. Just as you've called to do for Your glory for the glory of the name of Jesus in all nations. We pray these

Jesus Great Commission Inner Churches Saharan Africa Holy Spirit Latin America Iran Laos Lebanon Nepal India Malia Iraq Afghanistan
The Big PhD Pause - postgraduate students, COVID-19, and the next brain drain

Science Friction

07:05 min | 1 year ago

The Big PhD Pause - postgraduate students, COVID-19, and the next brain drain

"Across Australia graduate students are always on taught deadlines to deliver a major work of original research. But now they're all important. Experiments are suspended or hanging on a precipice locked out of their labs or unable to travel to their field research sites. Many of lost the part-time jobs that pay rent or feed their families and some now also wondering what the future is for jobs in science in a post pandemic world. Could this pandemic trigger a as next GEN? Brian drying something that people don't realize about a PhD is that it's very isolating. You're like your. I'm in an office with other people for sure but we're all working on very different things and very niche things. Yeah it's really hard to to not feel learn in this when you've got that initial stress the initial problems that come with doing a PhD and then you wack pandemic on top of this is really Problematic for most of us being in a PhD being so isolated in this line of research. Which is why we get into it. We want to be independent research. Is We want we? It's our own body of work you know it's professional but it's personal and emotional. It's this thing that you divide basically three or more years of your life to and the idea of more isolation. I wasn't immediately helming but as as the month of gone on it's been it's been quite difficult. Scientists get this ID. We have the stereotype of being quite stoic and emotionally removed. It comes from the idea that we the work that we do is at. Its core unbiased survey of the world around us. Become at anything bias. What you're observing. What you're experimenting on So in creating a dialogue around it being okay to tell people what. You're feeling personally without letting gory. This old preconceived notion that talk about your feelings as a scientist today passionate young scientists open up it is a well established fact that went into PhD Students. Experience distress and one in three are at risk of a common psychiatric disorder. The focus the hours a PhD demands a damn hard at the based times. But how are post Grad students holding up in this pandemic and what Judy of k? Do strutting universities and the Australian government have to support them. I stepping up really daunting and obviously now during this pandemic when there's a lot of uncertainty facing aspect dot mental health issues just getting worse Ramana Ri- abuse of each is doing her. Phd At Curtin University investigating molecular mechanisms of aggressive pancreatic cancer to help develop more effective treatments like many students who crucial lab experiments have been halted but she also has the needs of the entire nations post. Grad students on her plate as national president of the Council of a strategy and Postgraduate Associations. Capa but I cannot believe that I inherited the Cup national president's position during a global pandemic. Got It thinking. Forty Years COUPLA existing. They has ever been a pandemic like this. They're doing pay is not like an Undergrad degree. It's MOLUCCA A job. It's the crucial foundation for your career. In Science. In fact it's the stage when many Nobel Prize winners of done some of their k. Work but this pandemic is already forcing Grad students to make really tough urgent choices. The thumbs students have already withdrawn and as a result some international students have already gone back. Herm other students Yet is T-o-n how long this situation will continue. We have a situation now. graduate Looking at what's enough or day. Students circumstances are so different depending on the project. They're doing what they're up to in the three and a half years I've got to finish. Universities are really going to need to respond to this crisis case by case Taylor roads and I'm a third year each student at Latrobe University. And I'm doing my PhD. In a lab that focuses on Christie says over blindness which is a neglected tropical disease caused by a worm. Basically this illness is found in sub Saharan Africa and it can lead to blindness in its worst kind of bombs. Epilepsy developmental delays. It's really a bad thing to how high low is genetically analyzing samples of the parasitic worm. Take him from African communities to understand its evolution and spray it we found the transmission radius is actually a lot larger than what the W. H. Pat originally hypothesized answer. L. Analysis is kind of informing the carrying out of Mass Drug Administration throughout Africa and all these areas to actually eradicate the worm or even control it. What is this pandemic donning? In terms of what you can and can't do. Now I would have been sequencing more ones to get at bigger sample size for some of the analysis. I want to publish at least in the state of Victoria we on able to go into a facility and US out lab facilities. My University universities very strict on this. Or you have to prove that the work you're doing is absolutely essential. Anton sensitive in my work doesn't come under the umbrella. Sir. I'm not able to access the lab and I'm not able to access my computer in the office but I have my laptop at home with me so I'm able to do some work on that right now. I'm just coming through the daughter. I already have and seeing. What kind of story I can make with that Dada? I've it in a publication which is your pending. More daughter Nell yes. I'm Kinda just trying to fill time with whatever I can do. That will be somewhat productive. But I wasn't the merced affected by this. There are people who were on a really long time course. Experiments with moral animals hats euthanize. All the animals basically just pick up and pack up and Gar in the middle of a three months costs which would have been terrible sir trying to keep my inconvenience in. Context

Scientist President Trump Brian Curtin University Australia Australian Government Africa Saharan Africa Nobel Prize Latrobe University Nell Judy Merced GAR Capa United States Christie Postgraduate Associations W. H. Pat
"sub saharan africa" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"sub saharan africa" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Anti HIV measures of the U. S. government was funding and taking in sub Saharan Africa that's this is something that media you don't hear very much about that's absolutely true millions of lives saved by the United States government by George W. bush in Africa and you know H. I. V. when it progresses to full blown aids we now it's a horrible disease you get is incredibly painful isn't just the worst the worst millions of human being safe from that god bless that effort and god bless all those folks were able to live long and and healthy lives as a result of those efforts we know world hello world health organisation where where are they on this and why should we why should we think that it's not right it's all right to ask questions about you know this doctor this doctor Ted rose who I mean do you really think Ethiopian government's corrupt I got news for you he's yielding governments very corrupt okay all all you go you leave the the countries of the first world I mean you you leave you know America Canada Europe Australia Japan South Korea you know you leave and you go into a lot of other regions the world and corruption is everywhere everywhere all across the Middle East all across the former Soviet Union unite and the headlines in the Daily Mail China's doctor who I think that says a lot this was a huge mess those of us who are critics of international institutions like the United Nations point to this and say maybe we shouldn't be told how much we have to listen to to these so called experts and maybe it's time to recognize that an American America first policy should also apply to our view of how much we can trust international institutions that think that America and China are in anyway on a similar moral plane let me just say it whether it's Donald Trump as president or Barack Obama's president or if it turns out to be Joe Biden's president our government with any of those leaders these orders of magnitude more decent more trustworthy and better than the songs you run the Chinese Communist Party including Shizhen paying that's just reality I wish our media would pick up on that and I wish your international institutions would reflect that but that's that's never gonna happen never going to happen.

Saharan Africa George W. bush Middle East Daily Mail China America Donald Trump president Barack Obama Joe Biden Chinese Communist Party Shizhen United States Ted rose America Canada Europe Australi Soviet Union United Nations
Africa should 'prepare for the worst' with virus, WHO says

UN News

01:16 min | 1 year ago

Africa should 'prepare for the worst' with virus, WHO says

"The African continent has been a wake-up to the Kobe. Nineteen epidemic and prepare for the worst particularly countries whose populations immunity has been reduced by HIV. Malnutrition that was the message from U. N. Health Agency Chief Speaking in Geneva on Wednesday although latest World Health data shows under two hundred confirmed cases of new corona virus in sub Saharan Africa and four deaths. Tetreault said there were likely many more on reported infections. He won't that. The experience of other countries was for the virus to accelerate after reached a tipping point. So the best advice for our guys to prepare for the worst and prepare today. It's actually better if these numbers really true to cut it from the bud. And that's why we're saying we have to do the testing we have to contact tracing we have to do is all eating isolation and cut it from the bud and with regard to must gathering and so on. It will help if we avoid that. And W just a combination is actually must gatherings should be avoided and we should do all we can to cut it from the bud and I think Africa should wake up Mike Continent. Should we

Saharan Africa Tetreault Kobe U. N. Health Agency Geneva
Health crisis becoming economic crisis as virus cases spread

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Health crisis becoming economic crisis as virus cases spread

"The World Health Organization has boosted its risk assessment of the virus spreading worldwide to very high at global level with a number of nations hit nearing five dozen first case of car not virus disease the night just confirmed in Nigeria it's now reached to sub Saharan Africa Mexico New Zealand and isolator among other nations reporting their first cases some appearing with no obvious source with government scrambling to contain the virus the health crisis is turning into an economic one with travel warnings factory shutdowns and event cancellations Geneva international motor show no how about you including one of the car industry showcase events U. S. stocks are heading for their worst week since October two thousand eight Sager met Ghani Washington

World Health Organization Nigeria Mexico New Zealand Sager Ghani Washington Saharan Africa Geneva
Warren Buffett & Berkshire 2.0; Market Sell-Off

Squawk Pod

08:20 min | 1 year ago

Warren Buffett & Berkshire 2.0; Market Sell-Off

"Get right to the markets because the Dow just at its biggest point drop in history falling eleven hundred and ninety one points. That's thirteen hundred points this week alone. That's a drop of more than eleven percent and in fact the Dow is down almost thirteen percent from its highs the S. and P. Five hundred had its worst day since August of two thousand eleven and by the way. This is the fastest correction a ten percent drop from the highs in the history of the stock market happening. Just about six days. Let's provide a little bit of historical context. Role is like this does not happen very often. look back at similar four day routes in the Dow show they are usually tied to an event usually very specific event in nineteen ninety. Eight was the collapse of the massive hedge fund long term capital and the Russian financial crisis. The Dow then lost a thousand sixty three points or twelve percent in two thousand one. The September eleventh attacks resulted in twelve hundred point. Drop also a twelve percent drop then then the big one two thousand eight. The financial crisis led to a four day decline in the Dow more than fifteen hundred points and today it is the corona virus in a four day loss now of more than thirty two hundred percent. That was a big one for for some people but the big one was nine thousand. Nine hundred seventy wasn't really precipitated. By any specific event other than portfolio insurance combined with the Vortex Future selling twenty two percent in a day twenty two percent today. But I want to make a point about all of these In virtually every instance there was a firewall and when I mean by a firewall was there was some kind of action that was taken to end the route. The Fed announced plans Treasury in case two thousand eight and now seven plans back. During long term capital plans were made. There were things that there was a new piece of news which seemed to Provide some semblance of confidence back into the market and so the question in this instance is what could that piece of news be or do we continue to go south and told that piece of news emerges or on a Friday the Dow going to walk into this weekend to hold onto stock because it could be a thousand cases that happened over the weekend and I don't want it to be worst this week but I've already gone. I've already gone past that and I've decided that this market has discounted a lot already. That's what I'm saying even on a Friday we are now. I mean we're we're looking at the possibility of of having a negative GDP near-term not sometime in twenty twenty and in China. Maybe a flat zero. I said that it was if you really think. That's look I can give you lots of optimistic that it wasn't a distance what was I wasn't mild symptoms. I read that was like that should be good now. I know it's spreading it and that's the problem is if you have something that has very severe symptoms it burns itself out because it's the mortality rate that we're looking at. We're not looking at with thirty. Five Percent Merson agree with SARS. You had a ten percent. What's out Ebola's ninety percent singing? Look I agree and put some money into the S. and P. Five hundred yesterday because I thought okay. This is a big selloff but I also think what happens if you start to see school closures. I mean it's the human reaction don't you think I think we're anticipating market already reflect. You know you're going to see school. Closures don't close. They're going to be on the line. So the whole protocol is you have to have a protocol so boats going out to corporations all over America saying non essential international travel ixnay non-essential domestic travel. No good so then. The question is when does that kind of News Role? Oh I hear from the health of it when when you brought up long term capital. It's like a hedge fund goes belly up we're talking about a global endeavor. Coming seems so much more and there is no magic bullet. I mean I could get some type of some kind of some kind of therapeutic but I'm trying to look at rates is not going to do it. Probably not by definition if you go twelve percent from the highs in the quickest time ever the market is discounting something really quickly nick and also. I'm not looking for silver linings. Although I think we shouldn't be all all gloom and doom necessarily but short sharp corrections typically are ones that are eventually settled by pockets gaming. Absolutely there's a hockey stick to this. At some point. The question is your. I'm worried about a big you. I know I'm no worry about that. Actually looking for me you. Just tell me what he along a hockey. Tell me what is the thing? That's going to flip it. That's what I did you ever know what the thing was before. No that's tough right now. Really in hindsight. You're you're acting like we knew something that was happening. There was real fear eighty. We had no idea how that was going to play itself out. I mean when you see all the Dow points single digits. That day I was looking at American Express at four dollars a share my screen. You weren't right now. We're in high school. Whs Anders Joke. What what how does it compare to nine hundred twenty nine? I was not there for twenty nine but I was there as a stockbroker just soil in my wares in nineteen eighty-seven under my desk. It was horrific and every time we go through that you don't know the Black Swan Event and don't know the the white dove Avec some updates on corona virus and the market selloff around the world in Europe. Travel disruptions have hit airlines thin air and I aged which owns British Airways have issued. Profit warnings in Germany's government has reportedly quarantined thousand people in town in the western part of the country in South Korea Hyundai Motor closed one of its factories. After a worker tested positive for the corona virus the total number of cases. There is above twenty three hundred Tokyo. Disney will close this weekend through March fifteenth. Japan has suspended all elementary junior high and high schools in the country for most of March New Zealand has confirmed its first case of Corona virus and Nigeria confirmed the first case in sub Saharan Africa and in China where this whole story began the total number of reported. Cases is nearing seventy nine thousand. Do we believe China when they say that that it looks like the severity is is less than he is leave. China's you believe medical expert who we had on yesterday. Who said look as they send people back to work? It's going to pick up again if people China did the right thing by shutting things down and sort of eighty thousand if you stopped at somewhere near eighty or one hundred thousand in a country with one point two billion people. I think the measures China took helped tremendously by really seriously shutting things down but now they are worried about the economic impact of that and sending people back door. I'd certainly I went to the gym yesterday and I told a guy that I know there who works I said. I hope you've saved some money because you're no one's going to be here in two weeks in my own line. I'm afraid and I'm discounting the worst case scenario and I'm not sure that comes to pass I I asked you know all all the machines sweating on machines. You think people are GonNa go there looking at the lunch. I think you're right but I also have already discounted. Maybe the market has discounted right. You don't head of this new stuff going to the gym to go based on yesterday just said but seriously I mean all the weights people. I couldn't help but think if you were there you'd be like you need things down but at the same time it's like this too will pass people here headlines like this and they get concern particularly as they headed to a weekend. A lot of this stuff is not the individual investor saying. Let me sell everything. I have a lot of this stuff is de leveraging where you have trigger effects with the counts that have to sell mass selling program orders. This is not the individual sitting home. Saying I don't want to own stocks anywhere right not seeing that. The first thousand point day was very unsettling. And then

China DOW Hockey FED Ebola British Airways American Express Disney Europe Anders Joke America Nick Tokyo Japan Hyundai South Korea
Novel coronavirus sparks massive stock market losses as cases spread worldwide

Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

03:37 min | 1 year ago

Novel coronavirus sparks massive stock market losses as cases spread worldwide

"Well this week has been frankly a blood buff for markets the stock route looks set to continue as we heard from Caroline so one of the biggest market move today thanks Roger as you say it's just not looking very good for markets right now you mentioned the the the the the kind each in the markets and Japan says closed the topics had entered a correction phase yesterday and we what we I say so in the other markets the key we fell one percent after back country found his first case of the corona virus treasury treasury yields a set new record lows and traders are betting that they'll be at seventy five basis point cut in fed rates this year Deutsche bank's chief economist told us that the speed of the client over the past week even beats the black Monday episode in October nineteen eighty seven wow that some historical tax isn't it I'm without concerns there over the economic impact of the virus and you know you're driving sentiment love what what's the latest when it comes to the outbreak you know it is about sentiment about anxiety mood in the markets as much as the economic impact to unfortunately we're not seeing him any any positive news we've had a number of developments I've night is mention USILA reporters for this case there's a fan the virus in Nigeria and that's the first one for sub Saharan Africa the more cases in Italy Iran and Kuwait and you know the the the name fictions in in South Korea suppose two thousand over here in Japan where I am that the government yes they said they're gonna shut schools down for a month and take your Disneyland will close for two weeks yeah and the the Africa case I think is one the three setting alarm bells ringing just because the state of the health facilities that exist on that constant but that way that the one very interesting thing I wish we had Guggenheim CIO Scott Minerd he's been really talking this up saying central banks in fact com do very much to mitigate the impact other yeah it is saying the fed is fairly impotent his chords to to to blunt the impact of this virus he says the outbreak is possibly the worst thing he's seen as a money manager if he does say the fed may lower rates in March but that that will try to avoid stirring for the fees if if if the if the virus spreads in the US he reckons that stocks could fall as much as forty percent from the peak yeah of course although the number of cases in the US still very low and even in Europe you know you I think we should be alarmist about on the other hand you know that that also there is still sort of tied to deal with things but let the turmoil in the markets is also really galvanizing AIPAC officials they've got that meeting next week in Vienna we understand that Saudi Arabia is actually pushing now for an even bigger production cuts explained that's right so all prices have been suffering and and you know it's supposed biggest weekly loss since twenty eleven is down about fourteen percent this week they have a a pick and his allies have a meeting in Vienna next week and the sickly general has said that the H. the the the parties involved are showing a renewed commitment to reach an agreement for production cut we face I said analysts such as a C. B. C. saying that any production cut right now maybe just too little

A Look Back at HIV

2 Docs Talk

08:31 min | 1 year ago

A Look Back at HIV

"Before we jump in. Let's clarify what exactly HIV and AIDS are good call. Hiv stands for human immunodeficiency virus which is a virus that causes Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome or AIDS. Yes so HIV is a retrovirus which means it is an rn. A virus that is a cellular machinery from the infected cell to do a reverse transcription of itself a DNA version which is inserted into the cells on DNA when the cell becomes active. It will make new copies of the virus that go out and continue the cycle and this is important because the drugs that we use today to combat HIV a variety of antiretroviral agents target different points in the cycle. The right combination of drugs can keep the viral load solo that it isn't detectable exactly so HIV infects a specific immune cell the CD four cell and over time the virus kills a CD foresaw which being part of the immune system plays a critical role in the body's ability to fight infection as de decline. The body becomes susceptible to opportunistic infections. Right these are often infections caused by pathogens that are normally present in on or around the body but a healthy immune system recognizes them and keep them in check someone with the depleted immune system however is susceptible to unusual infections. That healthy folks don't need to worry about. Plus they're they're susceptible. To all the irregular infections even healthy people get okay so an untreated course of goes something like this. A person is infected with HIV. The virus being transmitted during sexual activity directly into the bloodstream during childbirth or breastfeeding or a blood transfusion at this point the virus makes its way to the lymph nodes where has access to lots of CD. Four cells and replicates like crazy? This goes on for about three weeks three or four weeks. The patient may experience a viral type of illness during this time period. Fever swollen glands rash but not everyone experiences this yes and it feels like a regular just viral infections. So you don't really think about that. That might be what it is but after about two weeks the viral load in the blood is at a peak and CD four levels fall. This is a period of time where it is really easy to transmit the disease to another sexual partner because the viral load is so high after about six months the viral load and CD. Four count stabilized to set point and the chronic phase issue begins. This can last a up to ten years without treatment during which HIV gradually destroys CD. Four cells at some point the CD four count gets low enough. That opportunistic infections are possible. Yes and that's how we define AIDS either the CD. Four count is below two hundred cells per mil or the patient has an AIDS defining conditions such as retinitis from cmv cytomegalovirus or invasive cervical cancer or many many others so this was the typical course of disease for people early in the epidemic. Did you amy? That AIDS was around before the Nineteen Seventy S. That's when the epidemic began but it is believed that the virus jump from chimpanzees to humans in the Democratic Republic of the Congo in one thousand. Nine hundred and sporadic cases were reported from then until the mid seventies when the epidemic got its legs. Very interesting now. It wasn't until Nineteen eighty-one that we really understood what was happening in. La There were five young gay men who develop Mrs to screen pneumonia PCP which is now new. Mississippi'S VICI pneumonia. I know I can never get used to that. I still call it. Pcp Yeah. I'm sure a lot of school. It was pretty much standard at the time right. I mean that was like defy so defining but anyways another group in New York in California who developed Kassy's sarcoma which is an aggressive cancer caused by the human herpes virus eight that wouldn't normally happen without a suppressed. Immune system right both of those diseases. And by the end of that year there were two hundred seventy cases of severe immune deficiency among gay men and nearly half had died. Yeah that we knew so fast forward. A few years by the end of nineteen eighty five. There were over. Twenty thousand reported cases coming from every region of the world. The virus was officially named in Nineteen eighty-six and in nineteen eighty seven A. Z. T. was introduced. The this was the first antiretroviral drug this drug worked by inhibiting the initial reverse transcription of the virus into DNA. This was a very exciting development because the epidemic was growing quickly. Now there were three hundred seven thousand reported AIDS cases worldwide compared to the twenty thousand. You mentioned just fine. Harsh prior and two hundred and seventy just nine years prior to that. It's impressive how. The pharmaceutical industry kind of ramped up so quickly research development. Yeah and those remember. Those were the reported numbers so they estimated that there were actually a million AIDS cases in another eight to ten million living with HIV worldwide. At that point. So if you're younger just in med school residency right now. It's hard to explain. How unsettling this was that how fast it was spreading right. Yeah and these patients were so sick and dying in such large numbers and there didn't seem to be in and site to the expansion of the epidemic. So there's a lot of fear and misinformation out there the had a policy to not allow those infected with HIV into the country and it was still viewed as a gay disease. So that created a lot of stigma for the LGBTQ community so by nineteen ninety three. There were two point five million AIDS cases globally the US Congress dug in and voted to continue the travel ban. Things are not looking good even with easy. T- which wasn't really panning out as everyone had hoped. And the fact that it was approved at all was questioned by many. Yeah so but in one thousand nine hundred things really started changing. This was kind of a turning point. The first price inhibitor was approved these inhibit the protease enzyme. Which is important in the translation of HIV v? Virus back into Aurigny. Yeah and this was the beginning of Heart H. A. RT highly active antiretroviral therapy and it immediately dropped deaths from AIDS related diseases by at least sixty percent but still there were thirty three million people living with HIV by nineteen ninety nine and fourteen million people had died since epidemic began. Those are huge as is to be expected the UN had to step in and negotiate prices to make antiretroviral therapy available to the people who need it The World Trade Organization that announce the Doha Declaration allowing developing countries to manufacture generic versions of drugs. Go See Fire Dallas buyers club. Yes also yeah so in the two thousands people who needed it weren't getting treatment aids. Was the number one cause of death in sub Saharan Africa. That blows my mind by the two thousand ten. A lot of goals had been set to get treatment where it was needed and have the spread of HIV an organization such as the UN and the World Health Organization and individual government agencies are getting involved at this point yeah the US finally lifted the travel ban for people with HIV treatments that decrease the chance of spread were discovered pre exposure prophylaxis or prep was shown to reduce transmission between male and male sexual partners by about forty four percent. Yeah in two thousand. Eleven research demonstrated that early initiation of antiretroviral treatment reduce transmission to partners by ninety six percent. So this is a real game changer. Because until this time the antiretrovirals weren't started until HIV was had started advancing and causing aids. So this is when they started the treatment early after the infection was discovered and it really changed things as far as transmission. Yeah as related. Deaths fell thirty percent from the peak. Year two thousand five and thirty five million people were living with HIV dramatic slowdown in the spread of the epidemic compared to previous decades. Yeah Okay but now we may find yourselves at a standstill here. We are twenty twenty because the immediate crisis of the wildfire spread and almost certain death is well behind us. Attention has waned key populations that account for over half of new infections are not receiving access to combination therapy and the gap between resource need and provisions as widening. The funding is is shrinking. It's pretty typical right. Yeah as a species. Humans aren't very good at thinking long term. If it's not an immediate threat it's not threat right well. It is a threat to those populations. So there's clearly still stigma that has marginalizing

HIV Aids Nineteen Seventy Partner Pneumonia Immunodeficiency Us Congress Retinitis UN Congo AMY Saharan Africa California MRS Mississippi New York Aurigny
"sub saharan africa" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"sub saharan africa" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"Been suggested. Sure. Yeah. There are like tonnes of trade routes that connect your Asia and Africa in really the rest of what people call the old world at this time. There is like a release thriving Indian Ocean trade that's bringing goods and people and presumably diseases all between the Middle East. India southeast Asia Africa, east Africa, there's very expensive trends Heron trade routes. These are like things that are quite well known. It's just like nobody had thought that the plague could have travelled this way will what about one other line of evidence that you mentioned a think it's in your story. I know that it was part of the search for visuals to go with this. He's a saints that are showing up in Ethiopia that are associated with the plague in Europe. How did that happen? Does anyone know nobody really knows yet? The to sort of key saints here are called Saint Roque and Saint Sebastian their association of plague is a little bit folkloric, and and piecemeal but lots of European plague victim. James in suffers and people just worried about it or praying to these saints penetrating the fifteenth century, maybe a little earlier, and at some point Ethiopian start praying to them to why the sudden interest at the same time that this black does strain of the rut potentially arriving the saints would also arrive like that that's pretty of oxidative. Besides just looking for that ancient DNA that this is the bacteria were looking for in a skeleton from the exact time that we want. Is there anything else that researchers are going to be looking for to try to tighten up? This very ancient DNA would really be the silver. Will that would clinch this case, it would be undeniable that plague was causing these societal changes in medieval sub Saharan Africa. In the meantime, what archaeologists are trying to do is to see how plague might have affected these societies. So like there's this fourteenth century event. Whether that's playing something else that they don't know yet. Clearly, there's some kind of before and after and what are guests are. Starting to do even in the absence of this conclusive DNA proof that it was plague is starting to explore exactly what the effect was on societies. What did these societies look like after this? What appears to be quite a traumatic event. All right. Well, thank you so much. Thank you, Sarah. Lizzie wait as a contributing correspondent for science. You can find a link to her story at science MAG dot org slash podcasts. Stay tuned for Megan..

plague saints Middle East Saharan Africa Africa Saint Roque Asia east Africa Asia Africa Saint Sebastian Lizzie Ethiopia India Megan Sarah Europe James
"sub saharan africa" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

03:21 min | 2 years ago

"sub saharan africa" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"Welcomes the science podcast for March two thousand nineteen I'm Sarah Crespi and this week show. I talked with contributing correspondent was he weighed about new evidence that the same black desk. The devastated Europe in fourteenth century, also swum down and hit sub Saharan Africa and Meghan Cantwell. Talks with custodial petits about evidence for humans hunting and butchering giant ground sauce more than twelve thousand years ago in Argentina. Now, we have contributing correspondent Lizzie way to talk to us about a completely different story than we discussed last week this time, we're going to talk about the extent of the medieval plague most of us know about the black death in Europe. But turns out the plague may have gone a lot further than researchers had thought highly. Hi, Sarah would has up until now been accepted extent of display during the fourteenth century. So most of us know about the black death from these mass graves in London, and it really affected all of Eurasia sending from at least Russia over to the British Isles down to Egypt and North Africa around the Mediterranean world. But once he gets to Africa, it encounters this big environmental barrier, which is the Sahara desert, which is obviously a very extreme trying climate and sense. The plague travels in fleas infesting wrote on populations history. Had just sort of assumed that it had made it across the Sahara desert that it was too hard. Thus the societies in sub Saharan Africa had been spared this tragedy. Right. There was even some archaeology or lack of archaeology that back that up, right? There was no written record of plague hitting sub Saharan Africa during that time yet there are very few mentions of diseases. Well, there are very few written records from medieval sub Saharan Africa to begin with other. There are some some of them have some kind of mentions of epidemics diseases. But that doesn't really tell you what microbe is causing them. Right. And these plague pits haven't been discovered the big advance recently, of course, in the study of the black death in Europe has been engine DNA. You can actually find the DNA of the micro organism. That causes plague in skeletal remains of people who died from it. And that hasn't been found in African so far. I was going to say what is the new evidence? Why are we? Talking about whether or not the plague made its way across the Sahara, Sam historians and archaeologists have just been rethinking this a little bit sub Saharan Africa in particular has been envisioned as disconnected from the rest of the world during this period. This medieval period, European traders weren't going there yet people just thought it was often its own doing its own thing, which is kind of a colonial way of looking at things and people are sort of reevaluating the story about how Africa sub Saharan. Africa was connected to the rest of the world finding lots of links through trade and other other ways and so- plague came up as one of these possible ways because in the fourteenth century this is late thirteenth hundreds just as the plague is striking London. And all these other medieval European cities. There's also this big change in many sub Saharan African societies..

Saharan Africa North Africa Sahara desert Europe Sarah Crespi Africa London Meghan Cantwell Lizzie Argentina Egypt Russia Eurasia Mediterranean twelve thousand years
"sub saharan africa" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:39 min | 2 years ago

"sub saharan africa" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"So Jon, Bon cards, welcome to you. Thank you. So what do you make of of what of John Ibbotson and Darrell Bricker here are saying that, you know, they talked to some demographers who believe this and traveled around the world. Are they right in saying that were not gonna hit that eleven billion Mark in twenty one hundred? We cannot say for sure what will happen, but we can listen to the best experts on this topic. And those are people at the United Nations population division, they make projections for decades. And there's projections have turned out to be quite accurate. They've teams of dozens of experts who consult with countries to get the numbers, right and their best. Guess is that it will be eleven billion. And I would say the large majority of the demographic community around the world accepts these results. Now that is not decided that we don't have out lies people who sing it is even more which even less. And in this case, the author of the book have talked to a few demographers who believe it's less. I find that argument persuasive, and I don't see any scientific arguments. Supporting the numbers that are provided doesn't really provide any. The white because they're saying that we're already seeing a reduction in in improperly Shen growth rates and birth rates of around the world. So why do not see the evidence there? An very important point two declines infertility. Do not translate immediately into declines in population. We have a continent sub Saharan Africa where data one billion people. Most of the continent's has still very high fertility and the UN predicts four billion people that three billion more people than today. Africa at the moment has very difficulty. Feeding his reputation a lot of food is imported enormous poverty show to water shortages etcetera, and the UN expects to be three billion more. Now, even it's two billion or could be even five billion. There's going to be enormous gross in that region, and the UN I sink makes the right assumptions assumes that facility will decline in sub Saharan Africa. Which is everybody agrees that it will happen. But if you compare the fertility trends in Africa was does in Asia, you find that the declines are slower than they were in Asia. Nothing America in the seventies. And eighties. In fact, there is a new phenomenon that has been discovered in the last two decades and that is stalling facility. So if you take Kenya Kenya? Fertility decline started on nine hundred seventy at continued through on ninety ninety and the projections. Everybody's oh. This is great it. We'll continue. No it did not fidelity then stalled for almost two decades. And it's not resuming until Kline. So they are similar pauses infertility Klein in sub-saharan Africa that have not been observed in other region of the world and does make d- slowest sumptious may slow decline. So yes, but not as fast as as some people believe. So if I may let me just get a chance to give Daryl and John and opportunity to respond here. Would you like to say John bond guards seems to say that your your take? Here's quite flawed. No, I I would suggest that I we have a pretty strong argument to make it on. I'll tell you why the UN puts an awful lot of weight on Africa by their own admission their data from Africa is not very good. And which is one of the reasons that the people who put together the Lancet article that came out in November decided to do with they were doing because they disagree with the way that the UN is put together their data. In fact, we interview the person who is the head of the UN population division. His one message to us was if you can do one thing through the course of this book, could you please tell people we need better data out of Africa. So Africa is an interesting proposition. I think that the data is still outstanding on that on for example in Kenya. You know? No, I went there myself am I interviewed people in Kenya? And I can tell you that their population their facility rate has dropped by a whole baby where the space of the last ten years..

Saharan Africa UN Kenya sub-saharan Africa John Ibbotson Jon United Nations Darrell Bricker Asia Kline John bond Lancet America Klein Daryl John two decades ten years
"sub saharan africa" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

04:58 min | 2 years ago

"sub saharan africa" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"Historically has four is pep far is the president's E emergency program for HIV aids. It was started in two thousand three and now treats more than which Bush was President George W Bush was president it now provides treatment to fourteen million people in sub-saharan Africa for each V8.'s. Historically, it really just addressed HIV aids. And this has been true for many other global health programs, which just address the single disease the challenge with that is that you have people showing up at pep far clinics. That are obviously hypertensive meaning they're they're suffering from early stage heart disease, or what may lead early stay chart disease. There. Diabetic. And there's we didn't we haven't historically monitored. That not only have we not monitor that there's nothing to be done for them in those programs that needs to shift and it needs to shift both because the program seemed to be more effective in trying to address the health of the population. But ultimately, the US government does not want to be in the business of running a healthcare system and pep far funded countries forever. So the only way for that to happen is if we shift these platforms to being actually useful to those governments. And that means a dressing the broader needs to the population. Not just the ones that strike us as pressing in the United States. So that's the kind of shift. We have to see we also have not invested in, you know, educational quality. We as you mentioned rightly because some of the faith based concerns we've been really inconsistent on our our support for volunteer. Gary, family planning. So we need to recognize that we're a net where Nadan inflection point the world. Bank says between now and twenty fifty low and middle income countries. Developing countries will add two point one billion people to the workforce at current economic or current employment rates that means nearly nine hundred million people looking for work. It also means the these health challenges that we've talked about on noncommunicable diseases because it's not even that we're just not preventing people from getting sick. They're also presenting late, which means they show up with late stage. Also, raided breast tumors as opposed to early change much. Fairly slim and your chances for doing much are are fairly slim. So we need to see a shift that starts to address this very large young adult population that's happening there, and that's to the benefit of these countries to go back to new sheer example. So that they can be the same engine of economic growth that you saw new nights states and in China, but it's also because the alternatives are either you see the the types of desperate migration that you've seen from that. You're seeing at higher rates from sub Saharan Africa or you see people not being able to leave which leads to a large young adult population looking for work, and that's a recipe in some senses. Trump flicked and social now play on an exacerbate tribal religious, national ethnic divisions. As we see in lots of places immeasurably eight will interact with. Other environmental challenges we're witnessing climate change. And what they may do for the ability to raise food and the like, that's exactly right. And what's been heartening about this book? Is you know, you write these things a couple of years in advance as you know, and we're at a moment. Now, we're actually the broader global, health and development community gets it. The Gates Foundation is talking about the risk of high rates of population growth, undoing all the progress that has occurred on poverty in sub Saharan Africa. The World Bank is talking about the need to invest in human capital. How do we make this young adult all population more competitive, so people are starting to to to get these issues, but we haven't seen the resource flows change to address them and just to be clear, you're not making argument just to the US government or two US-based philanthropies. It's four other countries that are providing foreign aid as well as to the. The countries themselves while the choices that they have to make it surely striking how interconnected all of this is because among other things should we talk about noncommunicable diseases, and certainly one that can be quite significant is lung disease, which can come from having pollution in the air and pickling crowded cities, where people don't have access to clean energy in that brings together a whole nother set of challenges decisions to be made these are all in some sense interconnected..

US Saharan Africa President George W Bush president lung disease sub-saharan Africa World Bank US government Gates Foundation V8. China Nadan Gary Trump
"sub saharan africa" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"sub saharan africa" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"It's an enormous improvement, and that's been driven by the fact that over that same time they had a seventy three percent reduction in child mortality under five mortality. So those are enormous health improvements. They've also had a reduction infectious diseases by more than a third over that same time. All good news. The challenges is that new year today is poorer than it was in nineteen eighty the government spends just seventeen dollars per person per year on healthcare a child can expect to receive just five years of schooling in these share which is tied for the lowest amount in the world out of the hundred and ninety countries. United Nations ranks in. Human development, new share ranks one hundred and eighty ninth second to last so face with those circumstances. Young adults inisia- share are doing what you were. I might do they're leaving. And they're leaving increasing numbers. And it's not just needs share nineteen ninety fewer than a million migrants per year left sub Saharan Africa for a we CD wealthy nations in two thousand thirteen that rose to six million per year. According to the International Monetary Fund's projections, it's going to rise to eighteen million in twenty forty per year and to thirty four million in twenty fifty. That's a problem. Not just because you know, this desperate rate of migration is leading to social, instability and unrest in western nations. Like the United States, it's a problem because in the past a growing young adult population, that's the future and Africa's future sub Saharan African nations future is increasingly leaving. And then is an indication of. Of what people living there see as the prospects of the nation, but also undermines its potential to grow in the future. I want to be clear here being in reading your book, and obviously having chatted with you all of the efforts that have been put into improving longevity lifespan in countries around the world in combating infectious diseases. They've all been valuable absolutely not only aired they've been valuable. We should continue in invest in them because we shouldn't assume that while infectious diseases, not the main cause or leading cause of death that doesn't mean it's still doesn't cause substantial numbers of death. Or that those problems could worry if you came up against if you if you feel to continue to vaccinate people, you got diseases that were resistant to the drugs we have. That's right. There is still thirty five million people worldwide living with HIV six million people each era, get to Burke, yellow SIS, there's still a risk of epidemics seeing one currently of Bulla in Lubbock of Congo. But the specific. Bulla please this is in the Congo. And I was reading just the other day some concern that the scope of the outbreak there now may be something that can't be contained in you will have to deal with a bowl as being endemic in the population. There can you translate for us what that means. And how people should think about that particular issue. Yeah. So a bullet was first identified in nineteen seventy six prior to the outbreak. Everybody knows which is the twenty fourteen outbreak in west Africa. It's a disease that typically happened in rural areas and in forty years had killed fewer than two thousand people tended to burn out in small outbreaks that what's happening now in the Democratic Republic of Congo has some. Some echoes of what happened in two thousand fourteen in the sense that it's going to more urban areas, which means that people are more easily getting these contracting the disease, so greater numbers are getting it. But what's different about what's happening now in the DRC than in west Africa is tapping in an active were, sewn, and that means that the ability of international health workers to reach those areas. Even with a new experimental vaccine that could make a big difference, even with these new, tools and people's new appreciation of the risk..

Saharan Africa Congo Democratic Republic of Congo west Africa United Nations International Monetary Fund DRC United States HIV Bulla Burke Lubbock seventy three percent seventeen dollars forty years five years
"sub saharan africa" Discussed on World News Analysis

World News Analysis

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"sub saharan africa" Discussed on World News Analysis

"For large time. Make sure they have passively to say about the property lot. These NGOs concern, this is a government of concern. This is also are condemning circles conceal we are doing some research. Try to on a fan of the MS cheap to maintain with ten ability approach elevations out that's very on the topic. That's move onto a global perspective. Anew. World Bank report, argues power tea, is becoming more entrenched in certain parts of the world and not. Just in Asia, particularly in sub Saharan Africa and also some conflict affected countries. So puff from talking about this acccess full stories in Asia like in China where India how worrisome is the situation in those places. Why now a day the global many places that you know, world of people suffer lock problem over TV global wide the problem. China had been more have been very successful because while recognized globally, not boast by the world organizations by academic circles. What key to answer China's success. It's a rollover type. The political view and come on put the law after come on the let toga for other Potter world. Resolve them both to find every table. Practical system quality, Eddie ration- is a luxury agenda to Lucca three..

China Asia World Bank Eddie ration Saharan Africa Lucca MS Potter India
"sub saharan africa" Discussed on After The Fact

After The Fact

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"sub saharan africa" Discussed on After The Fact

"So you talk about all these flows are just some examples of where you have some of these big arrows, but Africa and the Middle East or the two places that are sending people the most worldwide at the moment. Sub Saharan Africa that seems to be poised to become the really one of the really dominant places that we need to watch as as a as a people sort of outflow. What are what was some of the data that you you've been exploring what are some of the signs? We should be looking for. This is the big question among policymakers in Europe who and how many might come from Africa and will Europe be their destination and some surveys that we've done we've asked migrants in countries like Ghana, for example, in Tanzania Senegal and South Africa and Kenya and Nigeria if he had the means an opportunity to do. So would you leave your country for another country, and we found for example, in Ghana seventy five percent of Ghana adults said, yes, they would leave if they had the means opportunity to do. So we also asked would you do it in the next five years, and we found that in Ghana again about forty five percent almost half said that they would are they planned to leave some time the next. Five years you ask where they wanna go. What's your top destination? And we found that the United States is often the top destination followed by Europe. And then of course, many of the places in the world, but the US in Europe or the two top destinations our country. The United States is always been viewed as a country of immigrants. We've we can look back at waves in history here. Whether it's the Irish the Germans, we're where do what's going on now fit in historically like that in terms of numbers and impact? So the US has had large waves of migrants before for example in the mid nineteenth century was largely an Irish and German wave of migration of maybe about fourteen million people the migration wave that were currently in in the United States. It started in nineteen sixty five when the US changed its immigration long created the current system that we have since about fifty nine million people have come to the US. Now, the US is a much bigger country today in terms of population and migrants make up about thirteen thirteen point seven percent of the US population. According to the most recent statistics from the census bureau from twenty seventeen that puts us not at a record, but approaching record and the record was set in eighteen ninety when we hit almost fifteen percent of the US population foreign born so in terms of the share of the US population. We're not at historic number jet that were very close in terms of the number of people living in the US immigrants. We've never had as many as we have. Now, this is a lot of people. It's a lot of people. It's a big country. Yeah. You have this. Great. Thanks to this. Great job. You have global per tried. You get to look back and see what are you going to watch? What are the transit? You're most closely watching say over the next two decades that most of us are going to live through and see some impact from. There are many trends that are worth looking at keeping an eye on the first, of course, is the big questions about who are and where will big sources of new migrants. Be that. It seems to be Africa and the Middle East that are the two most poise partly because of demographics and at high fertility rates and relatively young populations. I think also there's many questions to be asked about international policy. Our country's going to address migration are they going to continue to want to attract migrants. And how will they attract migrants think about Japan and the kiss of Japan? The the Japanese government has opened the door some to migration allowing workers to come in through various programs and keep in mind that it has a very has an aging population. And it has a demographic challenge yet. Many of those workers are not allowed to bring their families. So Japan has opened the door some to immigration, but hasn't opened the door entirely. United States say are like the UK. So how countries respond is another big trend? I think that's worth considering. Finally, I think is the question about what happens to these migrant populations in the countries where they settle will. See story of integration..

United States Africa Ghana Europe Middle East Saharan Africa South Africa Tanzania Japan Japanese government Nigeria Senegal Kenya UK seventy five percent forty five percent fifteen percent seven percent two decades Five years
"sub saharan africa" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"sub saharan africa" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"All ready and the major major driver future climate change is going to be China, India, and to a lesser extent sub Saharan Africa, where there's sort of scheduled to be a massive population, boom for the next century and China, you know, it's interesting since Trump pulled out of the Paris. Accords China has sort of seized the mantle of rhetorical leadership on climate in the world. I think that's the kind of geopolitical opportunity there, and they've also done a lot of a lot of really great stuff on climate. They've been especially focused on getting, you know, cleaning up their pollution because also poses a huge public health issue for them. But when we talk about, you know, climate change generally, I think that a lot of Americans even a lot of sort of western Europeans have mistaken idea that what we're dealing with is the legacy. Of several centuries of industrial activities, so tracing it back to the beginning of the industrial revolution. In fact, you know, more than half of the carbon that humanity is omitted in the entire history of the planet has been omitted since Al Gore published his first book on climate like twenty five years ago, and almost all of that activity has to do with the industrialization of the develop developing world China, especially. So when you hear from people like Steven pinker and and you know, there are a lot of a lot of kind of Optimus out there who say, like the last twenty five years. The are of globalization. It's it's pulled so many people out of poverty. It's it's almost eliminated infant mortality, and that's totally true. I mean, you look at these graphs and the world is much much much better than most of us in the west. Really appreciate because the standard of living in the developing world has kind so rapidly. But almost all of that almost all of those gains were bought by this process industrialization that has also brought us to the kind of brink of planetary. Catastrophe. So going forward a huge amount depends on on those countries. I mean, China, especially India. Secondly, and the countries sub-saharan Africa as a sort of third order interest and and the US is important in the in the way that the US is, you know, still global economic leader, global geopolitical leader and can really set agenda and bully people into signing up to commitments they might not otherwise wanna make, but in terms of what we're doing within our borders, the truth is we are where much less consequential in terms of what's going to happen. Then some of these other countries which I think is a little bit actually have an uncomfortable feeling. A lot of Americans who both wanna feel like you know their stories, global story, but also wanna be able to vilify filling is the American right? And the fossil fuel companies who are to be totally clear, like obvious in the story they've done, you know, climate in Ireland. Been absolutely horrible, but it it really is only a very partial explanation for where we are, and it has almost nothing to do with like how scary things are going to get. All right. Well, that is both scary and then sort of with an added layer of terrifying because. That? Well, I mean to the extent that because I want to tell you wrote a piece. You know, I guess it was. I can't remember maybe at the beginning of the year about how did the end of the world become old news. I guess that was over the summer and maybe just couple of months ago and the the idea that you know, I mean, it certainly I know on this program, we talk about climate change far less since November, eighth of twenty sixteen. Then we did prior to that because there's a real sense of like, doesn't matter. I mean, not that climate change doesn't matter, but no matter how much we talk about it. There is nothing we're going to do to move a Republican controlled congress and a Republican president and now, and we should maybe touch on this briefly to. A Republican or right wing controlled supreme court would breath Cavanaugh coming on, who is, you know, to the extent that one can put up roadblocks to anything positive happening that you know in terms of the apparatus that already exists, he is sort of the poster child for that. But if..

China India Saharan Africa Cavanaugh Steven pinker Al Gore US Paris Trump sub-saharan Africa Optimus Ireland congress president twenty five years
"sub saharan africa" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

03:25 min | 2 years ago

"sub saharan africa" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"So what I did was entirely consistent with American history. Going back to the eighteen hundreds. What happens when a vacancy occurs in the middle of a presidential election year, and you have one party in the White House and another party and control the son of the Senate majority leader also said GOP senators were quote, literally under assault during the confirmation process for Brett cavenaugh McConnell said some demonstrators met, well, but others were trying to almost attack them in the halls of the capitol. The International Monetary Fund is downgrading its outlet for the world economy, citing rising interest rates and growing tensions over trade. The IMF said Monday, the global economy will grow three point seven percent this year down from the three point nine percent forecast in July. It slashed its outlook for the nineteen countries that use the euro currency and for central and eastern Europe Latin America. The Middle East and sub Saharan Africa. The IMF expects the US economy to grow two point nine percent this year that would be the fastest pace since two thousand five and unchanged from the July forecast. European and Asian markets are mixed after the Monetary Fund lowered its outlook markets in Asia were mostly lower futures here at home pointing to a pessimistic opening benchmark crude rose above seventy four fifty a barrel. The dollar slipped against the yen it gained against the euro. Minnesota public health officials are puzzled they say several children have been diagnosed with a rare polio like disorder, and they're wondering about the cluster of the Minnesota department of health has received a half dozen reports have kids with these severe condition yourself official. Chris harassment on the situation of my latest is a serious, but very rare. Illness, and it affects the nervous system, mainly the spinal cord, gray matter and it results in muscle weakness. So the first symptoms are, you know, a weakness in the limbs so arms and legs. That kind of thing it has been linked in some cases to a preceding viral illness, but not in all cases. And so it's that viruses may be part of the cause. But it also may be genetic and environmental. So, unfortunately, there's there's a lot of gaps in complete understanding. They have all been hospitalized. And the age range of the cases is less than ten years of age. So it's you know from toddler to up through ten years of age and the cases have come from different parts of Minnesota son from the metro some from central Minnesota sound from northeastern Minnesota. So when we talk about a cluster of cases, they're clustered in time. Meaning that they were all reported on within a short span of time. But they're not really clustered in the sense that they all came from the same school or they're all from the same community. So we don't have that commonality it can be very severe. But I think one thing that's important to keep in mind is that it is rare. And so when we're looking at, you know, the national data this is less than a one in a million kind of situation. Arison says parents are urged to follow normal procedures for reducing illness. Transmission a regular hand, washing keeping kids home when they're sick and.

International Monetary Fund Minnesota Illness Brett cavenaugh McConnell muscle weakness GOP Minnesota department of health Senate Middle East assault White House US Asia Chris harassment Arison polio Saharan Africa
"sub saharan africa" Discussed on talkRADIO

talkRADIO

05:23 min | 3 years ago

"sub saharan africa" Discussed on talkRADIO

"Talking about multi million or, billion how much are we talking, talk you're you're talking absolute billions And of course You're talking billions and trying to invest more money than the, other direct country but doesn't mean it's the largest investor due to the fact that there are private. Companies as well So It's not the, majority but it is larger than any other. Country and in terms of trading is largest trading block four sub Saharan. Africa So? It's absolutely, massive and vital to, Africa yes and they do an there were. So many pies that China has its fingers in aren't the oh yes You're looking at China has got massive trade and is building, infrastructure throughout? East Africa With Kenya Uganda There's just Goes on to be honest. With you it's an, entire program and maybe there should be an entire program as to who is investing. In Africa what's interesting, in Africa So it's it's absolutely amazing and then the amount of money which which. China flows into into, Africa and then there's always a debate as to what do African countries got out. Of it as well Yeah it's it's the the point is get something out. Of it at the beginning but as we know there is no such thing as a free lunch The problem isn't it it's about what happens down down down the road let's talk also about when we talk. About, trade, a heart drug sold globally and this is a common blood pressure and. Heart drive manufactured in, bulk by Chinese company and their issues with it There's concern that, the, Chinese so first of I didn't realize is that China and. India produced two thirds? Of all drugs who greedy and Trotta of trucks. In the world so the chances are that if you're taking a drug the. Active ingredient has come from China India and China India but the the bulk of actually does come from from China So in two thousand twelve Hot joke where it seems as if they've been impurities and there's a possibility in theory that. It, could be cost genyk now the problem is. So much is costing genyk so no one actually knows or no one has actually calculated the exact risk as. To what this means Bert It has highlighted the problems specifically by the European medicine agency there inspection, is not, up to par when they're inspecting drugs made overseas so you need random inspection as well and so this came. Up, just Utah random inspection okay and just to. Tidy up the China News we've got a story about Hollywood and about how many films are imported into, China Yes sir looks like it's going to increase right now China Yes Strict limits as to how many Hollywood films will. Import so it's currently thirty four and the rumors that is going to go up to forty. Four, namely I think one this affect me watching films in London or wherever you are in the. World the reason it affects you is that you're talking about all the big blockbusters and when Hollywood and China is the largest was not about to become the largest audience market in the world and for Hollywood films want to get in there and they want to large. Audience and so when you watch a film like not to give too much with the plot, away so if you haven't watched Martian turn off your radio. Now There's a Chinese element in it and many people think that was inserted quite cynically to Kelly Fave. With Chinese audience and so people think that many films will start to put in more Chinese, elements might have Chinese heroes and, what have you might see It. Might change the films that your, that you're watching so it's not just to do with the fact that Hollywood will. Make more money is about you and when you're watching it in your multiplex in in the UK your. Feelings might start become more Chinese Let us move over. To the Philippines then and this is a story of the president Rodrigo deter t who is rather. I think is an understatement to say that he's outspoken and he, is like Trump is outspoken is that Yes I well I think dirties times too. Isn't he But he, does issues there with an, Australian none Yes so it's a seventy one year old nun and she's made international news actually because she being, deported Basically deter to his crackdown. On. Dissent he's imposed martial law on pas the country and the central one year old Australian non has Spoken up at..

China Africa Hollywood China India China News East Africa Trump India Philippines Rodrigo Kelly Fave Utah Bert president UK London seventy one year one year
"sub saharan africa" Discussed on KPNW 1120AM Newsradio

KPNW 1120AM Newsradio

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"sub saharan africa" Discussed on KPNW 1120AM Newsradio

"Just they boggle the mind and the distance it when they came into into spain in valencia that was like a thousand kilometer journey where they were just off the coast of libya to start off within a lot of people have pointed out they could easily have just brought them to tunis in tunisia and the port there was safe it was definitely somewhere that they could have gone you're supposed to let's be clear when they blew up qaddafi and ruined all that infrastructure he'd built it open it all up to central africa sub saharan africa in a huge migration lanes to bring him right into europe and he did warn that that would happen ahead of time another interesting development is that mateo salvini has been in libya meeting with libyan government offering to incentivize them to build migrant holding centres detention centers in the south of libya not even at the at the coast to keep them from evening reaching some of the the port i must be clear that's a good thing to do because africa's populations about to double its already astronomical pull up the latest census on africa guestimation we could take five hundred million it wouldn't do anything it's just insane this will only collapse everything we have to stabilize africa absolutely if you've watched the gumbo presentation that that tells you everything you need to know about how it's totally impossible to mitigate the the issues of third world without staying strongest countries on our own end numbers usa i believe so it's the right one we should get numbers usa back on because that's what's crazy read the global is a report and fortynine to his majesty the british had a commission and they should we go into stabilize industrialized countries and the only have two kids because we believe it overpopulation it's happened in some areas instead they go no we're just going to balloon their population than use a machine labor then later a weapon against the west and reverse colonization they've done everything they can when you've got people starving in a country not give them their own science to feed themselves but you just feed people then they double then you've gotta feed double then you've gotta feed double again it's it's impossible and what they do to these neighborhoods they completely changed neighborhoods i mean we've seen there's no go zones all over the place and they're growing in number and they get downplayed as in no nogo zone because you can technically you could walk into them but you don't want to i i was just in one in in italy and it was i wanted to walk through to get some some footage and it just didn't feel comfortable entering our crew got death threaded continually i mean.

spain valencia libya tunis tunisia mateo salvini libyan government qaddafi africa europe italy thousand kilometer
"sub saharan africa" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

03:48 min | 3 years ago

"sub saharan africa" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"Knees hello i'm marion marshall with the bbc news aides to the polish president said the country's chief justice will step down at midnight in line with the country's new laws but a spokesman for the police supreme court's president malgorzata guest dolf said the head of the court will go to work on wednesday defying the government's new law requiring judges to retire at sixty five his atom eastern since taking office in november two thousand fifteen pollens governing party has passed legislation increasing its control of the judiciary it's appointees now dominate the constitutional court and the body that nominates judges in poland more than one hundred and sixty ordinary court heads and their deputies have been changed in a few hours time almost forty percent of supreme court judges could be forced into retirement a presidential aide confirmed this afternoon that the chief justice would be replaced on wednesday for voire jimmy is rebel a supreme court judge still some years of retiring the changes undermine judicial independence malaysia's former prime minister g brazil has been arrested in connection with the disappearance of billions of dollars from government investment fund it'll be officially charged on wednesday as michael bristow explains allegations have been made against mr for several years but it wasn't until he surprised defeat in general election two months ago that investigations against him beginning ernest the allegation is that what impact our he helps steal several billion pounds of government investment fund called one md mr nejib z came as no surprise the new government in malaysia is being sane for some time that it has an almost perfect case against the former prime minister mister nejib has consistently denied the accusations tomorrow he's due to appear in court when there should be a clearer picture of the charges against him a new report says crop production in sub saharan africa is set to increase by nearly a third in the next decade the united nations food and agriculture organization at the organization for economic cooperate nation and development said meat and dairy production would also grow mary harper reports the agricultural outlook report for the next decade says crop production in africa is set to increase by thirty percent meat and dairy production is predicted to grow by twenty five percent but increased consumption needs mainly due to population growth mean africa will still depend on food imports the report says agricultural production will also increase in asia but at the slow rate of seventeen percent it's due to decline in western europe the middle east is predicted to face food and water shortages due to conflict climate change and poor policy a judge in rio de janeiro his sentence brazil's former richest man to thirty years in jail for corruption the judge said i bet easter had paid sixteen million dollars in bribes to a former governor rio state to secure lucrative contracts the his company's mr battista rejects the allegations world news from the bbc the israeli military has accused the palestinian militant group hamas of trying to hack it soldiers mobile phones israeli officers said one of the militias apps invited uses to track scores in the football world cup once the phones were infected with malware hackers could steal data and spy on their victims using the devices cameras and microphones let's be no comment from hamas in response to the claims google has removed the bogus arabs from its place all the indian government is asked a messaging service what's up to take immediate steps to prevent the secularization of force tax and provocative content that have led to a series of lynchings across the country of south asia editor embarrassing at rodgen has the details the indian information technology ministry said the messaging platform owned by facebook cannot evade.

marion marshall president bbc sixteen million dollars twenty five percent seventeen percent billion pounds thirty percent forty percent thirty years two months
"sub saharan africa" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"sub saharan africa" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Dropped but then the nineties basically nobody had any kids at all now they're having kids get not quite enough for the population to grow but vietnam is in the middle of a big one so one of the really interesting questions looking forward in the world is the one region of the world where birth rates haven't really fallen dramatically is sub saharan africa and basically if they continue i mean the way the un is projecting now whole bunch of the world's biggest countries will be in africa thirty years from now but they population forecasts of never been very good at predicting when facility rates suddenly take a drop like the brazilian plunk brazil has about the same birthday as the us now which i don't think anybody would have forecast thirty or forty years ago those countries always able to make the most of those demographic no no but india is one that lot of people suspect that it's not gonna fully take advantage of it in part because they have so much trouble incorporating women into the workforce but still india is growing really fast so it is taking advantage of it i mean yeah you can fumble it but it really helps a lot and so there's this interesting what's going to happen in africa over the next thirty years is either an ethiopian is the big african country that seems to be on the pace to actually get this dividend it'd be a few decades in the future but other countries like nigeria kenya maybe democratic republic of congo is such a mass that they don't think so it's this either these countries are gonna keep brewing.

un brazil us india kenya congo vietnam africa nigeria thirty years forty years
"sub saharan africa" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"sub saharan africa" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Now an influx of migrants from elsewhere in sub saharan africa has heightened tensions in this area nights just falling and i've come to an area of south tel aviv which has a very different feel from the rest of the city you maybe see one black face in ten but here almost everyone is there are restaurants advertising sudanese food there are signs in error train scripts and african music blaring out of shops and that's because this is home to some tens of thousands of non jewish migrants who've come here to seek a better life in israel there is a image i think an unjustified image that these people are responsible for crime i think that it's hard for people many people to distinguish between those or hear from raya and sudan as opposed to those who are coming from uganda there this all blacks the same all blacks gonna caused trouble and i don't know if that's a prevalent attitude amongst his rallies i suspect it might be but it certainly as i see it a prevalent attitude in the interior ministry which has been for the last few decades with few exceptions in the hands of the shos ultra religious political party is it there to say that the religious establishment here in israel is if you like pulling down the shutters a little bit about who might come into judas i don't think there's any question about that and it's one of the reasons that they have fought us tooth and nail in the supreme court and have tried to introduce legislation that would give exclusive authority to the official robbins it's term.

saharan africa uganda israel us sudan official
"sub saharan africa" Discussed on KFQD News Talk

KFQD News Talk

02:54 min | 3 years ago

"sub saharan africa" Discussed on KFQD News Talk

"Okay now let's talk about the neanderthals you've done a lot of pioneering work on that first of all when did the neon die out were they our ancestors or did we coexist with them in in europe neanderthals are bring big brains humans brains just as big as people today and they were just as tall as people today and they live in europe and western asia between about four hundred or three hundred thousand years ago and about forty thousand years ago and they basically disappeared rather rapidly around forty thousand years ago they coexisted over this time with anatomically modern humans people who skeletons who look like us and first of all in africa in sub saharan africa and most likely even in east africa possibly parts of north africa and so these two big brains humans were living sidebyside in different continents for hundreds of thousands of years after about fifty thousand years ago modern humans began expanding very rapidly and impressively out of africa than the east and encountered neanderthals wet during their expansion and within about fifteen thousand years after this big expansion the nfl's where disappear so the big question that you helped answer is was there genetic mixing between homo sapiens and the neanderthals that's right there are amazing sites in europe in for especially where there's evidence of neanderthal to modern humans living side by side even learning from each other occupying the same cave at different times and so these were clearly encountering these people were encountering each other neanderthals were very impressive people they need perplex tools they clearly had culture and even belief systems that the conceit from the materials they left behind it's sort of inspired a lot of fiction actually writing for example there's a a novel called the inheritors by william golding doubt the end result in modern humans mixing there's been a jean auel cave bear earth's children series is also dramatizing this interaction which we know from the archaeology do human groups separated by half a million years meeting each other and what would that interaction mike but the question was always whether those two groups interacted to the point of having children whether even those children contributed the ancestry of some people living today beginning in the eighties nineties it became very clear that modern humans expanded super intense rapidly out of africa after about fifty or sixty thousand years ago and it became clear that the vast majority of.

neanderthals nfl europe mike africa saharan africa north africa william golding forty thousand years three hundred thousand years fifteen thousand years fifty thousand years sixty thousand years million years
"sub saharan africa" Discussed on WCHS

WCHS

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"sub saharan africa" Discussed on WCHS

"In in europe neanderthals are bring big brains humans brains just as big as people today and they were just as tall as people today and they live in europe and western asia between about four hundred or three hundred thousand years ago and about forty thousand years ago basically disappeared rather rapidly around forty thousand years ago they coexisted over this time with anatomically modern humans people who skeletons who look like us and first of all in africa in sub saharan africa and most likely even in east africa but possibly parts of north africa and so these two big brains humans were living sidebyside in different continents for hundreds of thousands of years after about fifty thousand years ago modern humans began expanding very rapidly and impressively out of africa than the east and encountered neanderthals wet during their expansion and within about fifteen thousand years after this expansion than the nfl's where disappear so the big question that you helped answer is was genetic mixing between homo sapiens and the neanderthals that's right there are amazing sites in europe in for especially where there's evidence of neanderthals and modern humans living side by side even learning from each other occupying the same cave at different times and so these.

neanderthals nfl europe africa saharan africa east africa north africa forty thousand years three hundred thousand years fifteen thousand years fifty thousand years