18 Burst results for "Sturgill"

"sturgill" Discussed on Popcast

Popcast

11:40 min | 2 months ago

"sturgill" Discussed on Popcast

"Nonsense. I don't think it's fully nonsense. I think it's annoying when artists try to gaslight you into saying, well, this is his country as anything. That's what the band Perry tried to do when they made their whole switch up. And it's definitely though more a labeling issue than it is in music issue. I think it's just frustrating sometimes. But I get it. And I understand it's pedantic and annoying. If we have to look like three years, 5 years in the future, are you seeing Zach Bryan on the CMAs? Oh, I highly doubt that. I think maybe what you said about something in the orange kind of the where else are we going to put this is pretty true. It's just such a giant phenomenon that's happening. It's still getting bigger. Still moving up the Spotify charts. And it's not even like those kind of 90s country sounds. I was just describing, very, very far outlier within the pastiche of radio. But it's one of those things where it's so big that radio is going to want to be a part of something that is just that huge. Now, whether Zach is going to want to be a part of something that is just that huge. I don't know that we have a lot of evidence to say that he definitely does. So okay, so a few I'm going to throw out a few reference points. And we can tackle whichever one seems interesting. Obviously, sturgill Simpson as a touchstone. Both in terms of musical approach and also music industry refuse Nick approach, right? Yes. Okay, that's one thing. We're just going to put these things on a plate and we'll look at them afterwards. When I think about quote unquote roots music or like roots adjacent music that also was very popular, lumineers, early mumford. Yes. There is a path towards Z 100, which is like the pop station in New York. Z 100 type ubiquity making music that is rootsy in nature. Okay? I don't think he makes songs like that, but it does exist. That's on the plate. I have talked to a number of people about Zach Bryan, who are fans who say that he reminds them actually a lot of a lot of indie rock, more so than a folk or country performance. That's on the table. Obviously, Springsteen on the table. To my mind, some of the more interesting sides of Eric church. That's on the table. Also a band I love the gaslight anthem. There's a New Jersey kind of like garage punk band. Zach Ryan reminds me a lot of early gaslight anthem. In terms of detail and emotional acuity, obviously the musical arrangements are a little different. But just in terms of like blue collar poetry, I can't believe I just said that phrase. A blue collar approach to poetry. I felt like they have a lot in common. Those are all in my mind, potential pathways for him. I would throw Casey into this conversation. Oh, sure. Casey musgraves, just of becoming this sort of in the mainstream, but not in the mainstream at the same time, country star. And I think what all of these people, especially sturgill, even Tyler Childers with this new album, there is an intense resistance to predictability or to anything that feels contrived. And I think it's probably in the nature of artists like that to, you know, as soon as the CMAs come calling as soon as Ford wants you to stand in front of a truck and sing a song as you head out to a commercial, they're gonna run a hundred miles in the opposite direction just to be defiant. And that's what makes them so interesting. Also sometimes confounding or frustrating to certain fan bases. Like there's that one Instagram account called where the sturgill Simpson, and it's always just anyone that's filed search over a long time knows. Any given day he may or may not have any social media if he's decided to delete it. And Zack said his phases with that too. Isn't that just turtle's wife? I don't know. Kind of kind of. Look, I interview a lot of people you want to read a lot of people. And I interview a lot of people who are on opposite sides of this particular conundrum. I interview people who are just like, I've waited my entire life to get to the dance. I'm at the dance. I'm a dance. Like, I'm doing whatever. I'm with whatever. I'll do the Ford ad. This is what I've been waiting for. My family is going to eat. My kids, my grandkids are going to have a college fund. Like, yes, I showed up and not have any ambivalence about it, especially in the 2020s. We're like outmoded ideas about selling out and so on and so forth. Just don't really how most people think anymore. And then you interview the occasional person like Zach, like, whoever, who are just like, I want no parts of this. Like I genuinely want no parts of this. And I will say, in a lot of my conversation with Zach, it was really leaning in to how opposed to all of this he was, the purity of the act of songwriting, how important that was to him, how crucial it was for him to remain relatively speaking, independent, to make music on his own terms. This year we did 70 or 80 concerts next year. We're going to do 30 because he wants to go back to school to finish his bachelor's degree and to get a master's degree. Sometimes you hear people talk like that and in your heart you know that they are really not about that life. But I left those conversations feeling extremely convinced that Zach Bryant is about that life. He just was like, I'm gonna do what I'm gonna do. And that's it. That's the extent of it. And that's why there are so many quotes in this story that are basically fundamentally skeptical quotes ordinarily when I'm introducing an artist, like writing at this phase of an artist's career. A lot of the quotes are much more triumphant, right? I finally made it. I can't wait to do more. My dream is to be bigger, things like that, because that's how people tend to approach the early moments of their fame. There's none of that in like the multiple hours of conversation that I had with him. There's none of that anywhere in those conversations. And it's so striking. It's so pure. And it's frankly so 90s. Right? It's so 90s. What do you mean by that? I don't understand. Okay, I mean, you think about the anxiety of the Kurt Cobain crossover moment. Corporate magazine still suck. And the tension between leaving and independent label for a major label. And what does that mean for your sound? What does it mean for the financial burdens and expectations placed on you? That's the last time and this was true in hip hop culture as well. People anxiety about, oh, you sampled a Donna Summer record, you sold out. You made a radio hit. No one talks like that anymore. It doesn't exist in hip hop. It doesn't really exist in rock, rock is irrelevant. Sorry, Karen. But it doesn't exist in any of these genres. Everybody is content. It's like, oh, if I happen to pop off on TikTok, no big deal. If I happen to a commercial wants to use my music, probably it's fine. Whereas in the 90s, those were still active tensions that a lot of musicians emanating from quote unquote subcultural scenes felt. I almost never talked to a person in the 2020s. Or even in the late 2010s, who feels even remotely tense or stressed about that. Now that's interesting because I feel like I have such a different experience. And I feel like who you're talking to, probably. Maybe so, yeah, I feel like that is, that's probably the main tension I care about when it comes to music is and that's certainly a lot of my viewers and I think a lot of the country audience seems to care about. And it's probably cyclical, just given the decade that country music had, and we are talking about peak bro country and all that stuff. And I'm actually not anti bro country in and of itself, but it was the only flavor available every single song every single album was just like trucks and girls and beers and all that stuff. And it became a punch line because it was true. And I think when you maybe have what feels like such a plasticine moment that is so mass produced and just feels so hollow, there has been a real drive to kind of get back to good music to get back to nuanced lyrics to kind of dive into people that are doing it without the mainstream because I think a lot of people feel the mainstream sold us out and why I wasn't giving us anything good and I think a huge part of passion behind artists like Zach is the outsider nature. They are skepticism of the kind of corporate music world. I think people trust that. And it matters to them. Does that make sense? It does, but I wonder you perceive in the category of musicians that you cover thoroughly, do you perceive this degree of anxiety about the purity of the art? Maybe I'm maybe I'm the sell out. Well, look, we're coming from different places. Like, I'm here on a New York Times podcast, but I left the media and probably have like some chip on my shoulder to what I do. You're like Zach Bryant. You're the Zach Brian of country music YouTube. Maybe so. I think that is, it's interesting to me that he wanted to come on the channel. And that is very much kind of been my perspective. So I don't know. I think that I think it is a growing sentiment in music. I certainly don't think it's the main driver of most artists, but I definitely hear it in the words of a lot of these people that our country adjacent. I think that's a good term. There is that built in anxiety about not wanting to sell out, not wanting to, and I don't think it's actually just in country music at all. I hear a lot of the TikTokers, a lot of whom have nothing to do with country, expressing something similar of like, why would I give away my masters? Why would I sign with a big label? I have my own audience. Okay, yes, I think there is a lot more awareness of the power of independence and financial independence. But I wonder if the difference is a lot of these people maybe have not had to directly reckon with a financial windfall. They're not courting audiences of several thousand people a night. I think it's one thing to kind of live on the margins and advocate for living on the margins. It's another thing to barrel straight into the centrist headwinds and still be advocating for life on the margins. And yeah, maybe that's what's interesting about Zach is because he's doing both at the same time. Like doing a big feature, that's like that's a step in a willingness to kind of play ball. There is a way in which I think artists as a coping mechanism almost have to maintain their skepticism have to maintain the bubble of wonder around them when they are skyrocketing through the atmosphere. Or else it would just be too much to handle when you're getting that famous that quickly. And even when you are starting to participate in some of the machinations of the industry, you certainly don't want to embrace them outright. Let's talk a little bit more about as we're kind of getting towards the end of the conversation. I feel like we haven't talked loads about the music, surprisingly. Give me a song off heartbreak that you really like. Oh, well, I mean, exactly what we're talking about is if she wants a cowboy. Oh yeah. Oh yeah. Oh, yeah. All right, let's get it in. If she wants

Zach Bryan sturgill Simpson Zach Zach Ryan Casey musgraves Zach Bryant sturgill Tyler Childers Eric church Ford Corporate magazine Springsteen Perry Zack Casey Nick New Jersey Kurt Cobain New York Zach Brian
"sturgill" Discussed on Popcast

Popcast

07:34 min | 2 months ago

"sturgill" Discussed on Popcast

"Oh, the dev that I've been after a cruising all the laughter. I guess that's just what makes us who we are. He's in the navy. I'm not sure if he was on deployment. I can't quite remember where that video was filmed. But he's in the navy, you know, working 8, ten, 12, 14 hour days. He works with ordinance, with weaponry, and at night is coming home and writing these songs and filming videos and like, as you mentioned before, posting them to Twitter and then suddenly that pops off out of nowhere. Twitter are very bizarre path to success. Really for anybody in 20 what was it 18 or 19 when that popped off? Very bizarre. No one's really popping off on Twitter, musically. But maybe that says something about the country music audience. Honestly, I don't even know. I think it's random because he was also putting stuff on, I think, SoundCloud that no one cared about and those YouTube videos go way back. So I think Twitter is just where it clicked, but it's funny to even think about putting videos on Twitter, but certainly worked. And all those guys out in the red dirt world, like all the co wetzels and the even Parker McCollum, there's this style of Twitter where you just kind of almost treat it like free form poetry or something. You just say these kind of one liners into the ether. Like if you're out at a bar, you might say, I don't know, you might write a tweet that says, I'm lonely in the stars are so blue. And that's just your whole tweet or something. For whatever reason, that scene does like Twitter. I didn't know that that was like a systemic thing with that scene. Oh yeah, for sure. So that's where Zack's picking up on it because obviously, I mean, we might as well just dive right into it, right? He's red dirt adjacent. He's like turnpike troubadours and Oklahoma group, a Jay-Z's from iluka, Oklahoma. I hope I have pronunciation on that, correct? Which is about 30 miles from Tulsa, and maybe the money question is despite what he insisted to me in our interview, he's country adjacent. I'm curious to hear what you have to say about this because I think maybe there are changes or evolutions in what it means to be quote unquote country in this specific moment 2022. Where that's maybe a complicated thing for him to claim. On DA on his breakout album, line one of song one is we could find a porch to hold us where we could all scream Childers. Referencing Tyler Childers. And so I think that's telling of kind of what scene he might consider himself in or is influenced by and there has been this sort of alternative country scene that it's like a weird alliance. I think of Appalachia and kind of Texas Oklahoma, the red dirt scene. It's almost more divided along the lines of independent versus the mainstream country. Because now at this point, I feel like people talk about artists from Kentucky and West Virginia in the same breath as guys from Texas, but yeah, I think absolutely Zach is informed by all that stuff and even early on when he was breaking out. He wrote a song kind of for Evan felker when he was doing poorly and kind of in and out of rehabs and his marriage was falling apart and all that stuff. And some turnpike fans got frustrated by that, but it was this very sincere plea of like, hey, we need you back because we love your songs basically. I certainly would put him in that world and definitely I think he is sharing a fan base with these kind of outsider populist heroes of the country world, whether it's whisky Myers or Tyler Childers or sturgill. It's the same type of people that love those types that are also obsessed with Zach. And he spoke very affectionately of struggling of Tyler Childers. He mentioned Gregory Allen it's a call who's a little bit separate from this, but like sort of living in this space a little bit as a songwriter, Grady, we've talked about this both on pop gas and also just outside of this, which is like, there are some for whom being labeled country as like a four letter word. And the struggle that I noticed in reporting Zack story is, there is definitely a segment of the audience, there were Joe Biden chance in between the opener and Zack set. And maybe even one case kind of popping up during Zach set. He says he wants to shut that down. He's trying to say, don't bring that in this house. That's not what this is about. But I think there are some part of the fan base for whom whatever Zach is doing as nuance as it is might be indistinguishable from what a more conventional right leaning center is country stars doing. I personally don't view it from the spectrum of kind of right and left. I would view it more as kind of like establishment versus independent. I really think that is the spectrum that most country fans that I interact would seem to care about. And it's more the idea that Nashville is almost if we're going to put it in political terms. Nashville is almost the Washington D.C. of that sort of metaphor where people are like, oh, if it's coming from the big corporate established labels in Nashville that are just pumping out factory trash, then it's not good country and I don't want anything to do with it. That's how I see a lot of fans reacting and definitely it's probably my kind of anti establishment bias myself. I can understand why any artist wouldn't want to be thrown into one little box to strongly. It's almost like you have to keep, even if you don't mind the label, it's like you have to keep resisting the label so that you can feel free to do what you want down the road because I definitely see him especially as it seems like in the last few years he spent more time up in New York, almost more like this Joni Mitchell era. I see this kind of broader classic American Springsteen Joni Mitchell ish thing kind of brewing in his music and his music I will say, I still think it reads quite country and when you look at his band, I mean, he's got amazing steel. He's got amazing fiddle. There's all these country instruments in it. And yet, it's also brought in a lot more kind of heartland rock field with a lot more percussion than was present on his first couple of albums. So I saw Zach play twice this week. And the reason we're recording it now is I wanted to record this episode after I had seen these two shows. And I saw him play, you know, like a normal SciShow at pier 17, which is like an outdoor venue on the top of what used to be the south street seaport here in New York. It's a little bit, maybe a little too fancy for its own good, not connected to Zack at all, but just like a kind of slightly over polished venue, I think. But then he played a small acoustic show at the bitter end of venue I had not been to in 20 years for maybe fan club people. I couldn't quite tell who the audience was. And basically, the accompaniment on that show was, I think, lap and fiddle, maybe like one additional guitarist on a couple songs. And in that context, especially not that I have any trouble hearing the quote unquote country Ness of his songs and other contexts. But certainly in that context, to emphasize that to lean into that, it really felt potent. It almost felt like a statement in a way, really wonderful show, if anybody bootlegged it, please send me the MP3. I would love to have a copy of that. For my personal archive, going back to the dean era, actually let's listen to godspeed. So godspeed is kind of like maybe the after condemned, which is sort of the breakout Twitter head. Godspeed is like the first signature Zach Bryan hit. So

Twitter Tyler Childers Zach Zack Parker McCollum Oklahoma iluka navy Evan felker whisky Myers sturgill Gregory Allen Nashville Childers Texas Appalachia Washington D.C. Tulsa YouTube
"sturgill" Discussed on Popcast

Popcast

05:22 min | 2 months ago

"sturgill" Discussed on Popcast

"To miss you in the morning. That's like Brian introducing Zach Bryan to 98% of the people in the room. Phenomenal. Okay, so Zach Bryan is a singer from Oklahoma who is, I would say country adjacent. I feel like I'm maybe the only person in the room that listens extensively to contemporary country music. Any Bailey Zimmerman fans out there? Yeah. Wow. Oh, great. Very excited to talk Bailey Zimmerman with people later tonight. People who are not myself in the mirror. So Zach Ryan's had kind of an unexpectedly big year. He's had a 35 song album, debut in the top 5 of the billboard chart, and then an EP that he put. He recorded in four days, also debuted somewhere near the top 5. By the time this episode comes out, there may be more about Zach Bryan that I have put out in the world. We shall see what the timing is like. But Jackson interesting. Karen grits her teeth. Yes. I don't know yet? Yes, I don't know who's looking at it at the other with a little bit more skepticism. So what's interesting to me about Zach Bryan from a genre perspective is I think there is this thing that's happening where you make music that sounds like that and then country people are kind of claiming you. And saying, no, no, no, he's one of us. But I can tell you having spent a fair amount of time with him over the last couple months, actively rejecting that, wanting to move more in like a singer songwriter, like sees himself in a Springsteen vein, not in a contemporary country vein, and almost to the point of not understanding why people would think of him that way. You're drawn to guys like that. And it's even Sam hunt a little bit. Can we just all clap for Sam hunt? I've never I've never said a more meaningful thing in my entire life. That's incredible. I pray every day for Sam hunt that he does something as good as montevallo. I really do. It's the first thing I think about every morning. So if you listen to the Zach Ryan album, which as I understand no one has, which is fine, it's very interesting how it limbs genre. And I think it's going to be a real challenge for him moving forward because the urge will be for radio stations. They're going to make their Staples. They're going to put yeah, they're going to try to put him somewhere. And I can tell just that that's already chafing. And it was actually sort of refreshing. I mean, you mentioned sturgill. I've interviewed sturgill a few times over the years. Obviously I'm drawn to people who kind of chafe against this kind of stuff. And I can tell that he's already chafing, which I think will make for a fairly fascinating next 12 months. You know, it's funny you say that. They have not met, but they're both very similar backgrounds, both spend time in the navy. And both are idiosyncratically pushing against what they want. Surgical is too busy trying to win an Oscar. Yeah, well, that's a thing, sturgill is off grid right now. You know, texts are going to green. It's a different energy right now. But I imagine the eventual Zac Bryan sturgill Simpson duet is going to burn. Let's talk about Karen. We'll talk about mine. Yeah. We all came prepared. So as you may know, I write one story a year. Because that's how much time about a diva. Yes, usually Clarkson hives stand up. Sam hunt, Kelly Clarkson. It's like right there. No, no. Right there. Oh, come on. For you, for me? Yeah, for me. Yes. No. Kelly Clarkson Christmas album though. Okay. All right. We're not going to do that. By the way, so I came prepared to talk about a woman. Great. Yes. And all the blogs have been writing about her, so I'm sure you've all heard blond shell by this point. Yes. Yes. Yes. Okay. It's not there yet. I feel like it's right on me. I feel like it's not fair. It is nearly engineered in a lab for music critics in my demographic. As a young woman in her 20s. What demographic would that be? I can't even critics wearing operation IV t-shirts. Yeah. That Democrats. That's a very specific demographic. So you might remember 5 years ago now, 2017, we did that package on how women are the future of rock. Do you remember? Who's been with us since the girl punk package? Yeah. I think the pelvis were on that podcast. Shout out Jen pelly, shout out lose power. Oh yeah, that was a great one. Yeah. Amazing projects, spearheaded by Joe who got into contact with all of these artists and really made it happen. Then we had this magical day where we hung out with all of them. But anyway, the point of this is blond shell would fit in perfectly in this package. So if you were looking for an aesthetic guidepost, her name is Sabrina teitelbaum. She's in her mid 20s. She obviously listened to a lot of grunge and alt rock from the 90s, but her songs are not derivative. They're definitely just like, they bear the print, but they are not copycats. I'm going back to hell.

Zach Bryan Sam hunt Bailey Zimmerman Zach Ryan sturgill Karen montevallo Zac Bryan sturgill Simpson Oklahoma Brian Kelly Clarkson Jackson Oscar Clarkson navy Jen pelly Sabrina teitelbaum Joe
"sturgill" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:33 min | 2 months ago

"sturgill" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Trying to help alleviate the pain. Saying, we're going to impose a cap on the price of electricity or of gas that can be charged to consumers, but we're going to compensate the providers of those electricity services for the differential. This price relief for one winter would be a way to keep families from going bankrupt. Goldwyn says the high price for oil and gas is helping build up Putin's war chest and gives him time to inflict more pain on Europe. But golden says Putin is running a risk with this strategy. Europe was Russia's biggest customer for natural gas and it's already slashed its imports. Goldwin says the Kremlin's talk about selling that gas to China instead is just a pipe dream. Leaving aside how long it takes to cut a deal with the Chinese, the construction of that pipeline, and those fields, you're talking, you're talking years, if not a decade. Georgetown's Gustafson says now, even if the war in Ukraine ended tomorrow, it's unlikely Europe would change its course on Russian energy because Putin's moves have tarnished Russia's reputation as a reliable supplier. The Russians worked very hard. Assiduously for 6 decades to build a gas business in Europe. And now Putin has ripped it apart. It will never recover. And that is absolutely baffling. That's if Europe can stay united and make it through the next month without Russian gas. Jackie northam, NPR news. This is NPR news. It's morning edition on WNYC at 7 43 of Michael hill, President Biden declared the pandemic is over. Is it the U.S. Surgeon General explains what the president meant by that? Today on the brine layer show at ten this morning. Right now, John shaffer has today's giggler. Angel Olsen's music is often had the Technicolor pop sound of the late 50s and 60s, but lately she's also been weaving classic country elements into her music. Now, she's done a new version of her song big time and rather than singing the whole thing herself, she's turned it into a duet, with the multiple Grammy winner, sturgill Simpson. Another musician who is often approached country music from a slightly oblique angle. Here's their duo

Putin Europe Goldwin Goldwyn Russia Jackie northam NPR news Gustafson President Biden Georgetown golden Ukraine John shaffer Michael hill Angel Olsen China WNYC NPR U.S. sturgill Simpson
"sturgill" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:54 min | 2 months ago

"sturgill" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Natural gas and it's already slashed its imports. Goldwin says the Kremlin's talk about selling that gas to China instead is just a pipe dream. Leaving aside how long it takes to cut a deal with the Chinese. The construction of that pipeline and those fields, you're talking, you're talking years, if not a decade. Georgetown's Gustafson says now, even if the war in Ukraine ended tomorrow, it's unlikely Europe would change its course on Russian energy because Putin's moves have tarnished Russia's reputation as a reliable supplier. The Russians worked very hard. Assiduously for 6 decades to build a gas business in Europe. And now Putin has ripped it apart. It will never recover. And that is absolutely baffling. That's if Europe can stay united and make it through the next month without Russian gas. Jackie northam and PR news. You're listening to NPR news. On WNYC, it's morning edition at 5 43. President Biden says the pandemic is over. Is it? The U.S. Surgeon General explains what the president meant by that today on the brine layer show. It's coming up this morning at ten. Right now, John shafer has today's gig alert. It can't wait angel Olson's music is often had the Technicolor pop sound of the late 50s and 60s, but lately she's also been weaving classic country elements into her music. Now, she's done a new version of her song big time and rather than singing the whole thing herself, she's turned it into a duet, with the multiple Grammy winner, sturgill Simpson. Another musician who is often approached country music from a slightly oblique angle. Here's their duo

Goldwin Putin Europe Jackie northam NPR news Gustafson President Biden Georgetown Ukraine John shafer China angel Olson WNYC Russia U.S. sturgill Simpson Grammy winner
"sturgill" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

06:27 min | 5 months ago

"sturgill" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"Bad in your mind. He's not good with college. He babbles. He doesn't do anything. I want to know because this is what I do. This is my livelihood. What did he do? This is not your purpose. You know, Beatty is your second say it. You can say it. I don't mean this as an insult to Braden, but I was not around a radio these last two weeks. I don't know why you would be. If you were fortunate. You were fortunate. Okay. Well, I'll tell you that. I'm telling you, Paul, I didn't listen to the radio. I didn't listen to the show, except a few minutes, and they finally said something crazy as hell, Thursday. Friday, I just said, I got to tell this guy how bad he is. Okay. So you did listen to him. Okay. Okay, Jim, I think we will continue this. We're going to try to be a little more hospitable to brain before he leaves, but thanks for the call. I'm surprised that the show is still here, actually. After I well, I was a little worried. One day I looked down, I was like, I think pretty big city, walking down the street and trying to Dodge cars and Jim was like on this rant. Did you catch some Twitter shrapnel? Yeah. I was just, I started to call it jamari but it was I decided I'm not going to bother your Mario brands during time off. You never know they might say you better get back here. Are you anywhere near an airport? Well, I apologize about the casualties on the twittersphere. Yeah, but I just I was really worried. I thought it was particularly interesting too, Braden, how quickly Jim found somebody other than you to be the best sub host of all time. Well, again, will not argue with the listening. Nobody's disputed. No argument there. We appreciate her, but she did call me in December. I think I filled in for you back around Christmas time. And he called me and had equally nice things to say. During that week as well. So the show is still alive. It's still here. It still happened. I am taking a leave of absence. After this week, I'll be here through Thursday and I'll be taking the rest of the summer off to get a few things taken care of here. I'm getting cosmetic surgery. And we're going to bring, we're going to bring them back in. All right. We're going to go for 8 hours every day. Instead of just four. Listen, the colors are the colors are what that's the part I love, man. You want to call in and talk ball. Let's do it. Somebody called in and asked about music, started talking about Tyler Childers and sturgill Simpson, so I had to start talking about country music to prove my southern bona fides. I like the sound of that. Okay, I'm I got so it became so enraptured in that I lost my call screen here, so I'll try to get to the next caller. That would be peacock. In mobile. Peacock, good afternoon. You know what? That proves the old adage. You can't follow Jim on this show. That's very important. And by the way, I just realized we weren't trying to, I was just, I didn't really intend to do that. I wanted to wrap up with you because I wanted to talk about Brian Kelly's accent. And some other things and, you know, he caught a fish. Did you hear that? I heard his, I heard his golf joke. I did not hear that. Somebody has to know about Notre-Dame. Expansion and he goes, I've been working on trying to get rid of a slice for the last two weeks. And I was, I happened to be by a television. I looked at it and I go, oh, golf. Right. Funny. He said he went back backwater fishing in fushan, Louisiana. I believe is how you say it. I want to make sure I'm getting that correct. As I love the wonderful food and people of Louisiana and he said he caught a fish for the first time in his life. I don't remember off the top of my head how old Brian Kelly is, but I want to say 61. 61. That seems like an odd age to catch your first fish. I don't know my opinion. Hey, I don't fish. But I caught a fish when I was about 7 years or 8 years old with my dad. That seems like a normal age. Yeah. He loved fishing, and then we went deep sea fishing once, and I called a tuna or something. Like an 80. They helped me bring it in. I want to see Brian Kelly in waiters about chess deep going noodling to try to pull a hundred pound catfish out of the bank. That's what I want to see. Just reaching. And once he does that, he can do the famous and overused what's the difference between a catfish and a lawyer, joke. I'll let you finish that one. Well, it's one of the oldest jokes in the world, and it's told constantly and one is a going to do it. Maybe not. I'm not doing it. I'm not doing it. I think the joke is one is a scum sucking bottom feeder. And the other one is a fish. There you go. It's not the joke. I think that's about right. Maybe not exactly how it goes, but pretty much how it goes. Yeah, I think that's how it goes. Anyway, Braden, we'll let you get back to the big room, the small room. I will thank you again. is, I am indeed indebted to you for stuff. You're go on. Dealing with Jim. I'm just reading that. That was him. That was a live read. Yeah, you know, I'm like one of those. How do I go to those politicians where they just hand me a card with state of mind again? They hand me a card and I try to read it. Braden, thanks so much. Great to see you. No problem. We're going to come back. And we will get to your phone calls for a few more minutes. Not a lot of time this week for calls, but we will try to squeeze you in. Right now at 855-242-7285. You are listening to the

Braden Jim jamari Brian Kelly Tyler Childers sturgill Simpson Beatty fushan Mario Louisiana Paul golf Twitter Peacock chess
"sturgill" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

05:05 min | 5 months ago

"sturgill" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"Oklahoma state ego. This was the Texas Texas a and M thing. It was all political and all ego. Well, you're going to go to the SEC. We don't want to play you. Well, you're in the big 12. We don't want to play you. Like it's all just ego. Iowa and Iowa state have never had this problem. And some of the SEC schools have great rivalries. Kentucky and Louisville, South Carolina, Clemson, Florida, Florida state, Georgia Georgia Tech. These are great games and they happen because people choose to make them happen. The powers that be could choose to make sure that Oklahoma and Oklahoma state continue the bedlam series, which I believe has been played every year since 1910. As a 112 years in a row, why would you break that up over what? Ego, your feelings getting hurt because Oklahoma left for a better conference. I mean, I know that's a tough pill to swallow. But why cost the fans an opportunity at the most important game of their entire season? That one I don't understand. It sounds a lot like Mike Gundy's in his feelings a little bit. Not that that's ever happened before. Gandhi, I love you, man. The gift that keeps on giving. Although I am now 40. So now I can say that I am too also a man. I turned 40 last week. Nathan in Tennessee, Nathan, welcome to the Paul Feynman show. What's up, dude? What's up? I guess I called it the right time because you were talking about my man sturgill Simpson and I think he came straight out of wave when Jennings you can not change my mind. I love me some surgical Simpson. I also like guys like Charlie Crockett. I don't know if you listen to him. Charlie's got a new album drop in at the end of the first week of September. Sturgeon was a western he lived on the he worked on a railroad out west, much like Merle Haggard did. So he's got a lot of merle in his game. It was in Baghdad too. I mean, I was working at Amazon and I would literally be listening to this on these things in the middle up back in the tank. It made me feel a lot better about going to get bent over by Jeff Bezos every day. But I called because I was sitting here watching a YouTube video on my lunch break about UAB, like how their program came about and then disappeared and then it was back again. LSU is one of the most swift on teams in the SEC. I saw a poll and I don't know if it was the coaches or what it was. But there are people that really think LSU will finish like 13th in the SEC. I've been an LSU fan for over a decade at this point. I don't see how the hell that happened. Kay Sean Butte got his number 7 today. We've got a deep quarterback room. We've got a hell of a bunch of dudes in the trenches. I don't see what other people are looking at. With LSU and think we're going to go 6 and 6. We're not going 6 and 6. You know what I mean? I tend to agree with you. Nathan, I appreciate it. And yeah, that first sturgill record is very different than all of the other ones. There's no question about that. I'm with you, man. I think LSU is better than people think. I think Brian Kelly alone is worth the structure and organization that he brings as a professional adult head football coach. I just think that you can not have that much talent and put it together with a pretty solid, well established Hall of Fame level coach and then just be bad. I don't think that's going to happen. So I don't say it either. Yeah, no, again, again, appreciate the call, Nathan. I think I want to say it's 6 and a half, right? I think the LSU total for Vegas is 6 and a half. I would take the overall day. I would hammer the over on that. With your money. I just think the quarterback situation is solid. There's a lot of options there. I think Jayden Daniels is the best player. I don't know if he's going to win the job. They've got star receivers, big time playmakers. Again, Brian Kelly is an adult. He is a professional football coach. This is what Josh did Tennessee. Tennessee needed a professional adult in charge. And Josh was that because the guy before was not. And that's clearly the case for LSU. So I think they get much better much quicker than people think. My question about LSU and Brian Kelly is what is their ultimate upside? He's recruiting really well right now, 8 or 9 commitments in July, up into the top ten class, like they're crushing on the recruiting show right now. But my question for Brian Kelly and LSU is not about this year. And getting good quickly. I think they will get good quickly. The question is, do they get to 9 or ten wins pretty fast? Maybe one or two years. And then after, can they take that next step? That's my question. Like he showed us he could win ten 11 games at Notre-Dame, but he couldn't beat the teams with the best players. Alabama, Clemson. Like he couldn't beat those teams and championship situations. Now you're going to have to do that just to win your division. And so the question is, can he out recruit Jimbo Fisher Nick Saban? Kirby smart and get those level of players the way we know you can get it, LSU. I think they're going to be good, real fast, and then plateau,

LSU Oklahoma SEC Nathan Georgia Georgia Tech Paul Feynman sturgill Simpson Iowa Charlie Crockett Brian Kelly Texas Florida Mike Gundy Kay Sean Butte Clemson Tennessee sturgill Louisville Merle Haggard South Carolina
"sturgill" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

06:27 min | 5 months ago

"sturgill" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"Mike Gundy all in his feelings, officiating making stupid decisions. All these things as well as the predicted order of finish in the big 12 will get to all of that momentarily. However, the open championship. The 150th open championship from saint Andrews, Cameron young, 8 under. I guess I should say earmuffs if you've got it recorded and you're going to go watch it earmuffs. Cam young, 8 under 64 today in first place, Rory McIlroy at 6 under, shot a 66 cam Smith from he shot a 67 at 5 under Robert Dinwiddie up there. At 5 under shot at 67 and then there's a whole host of guys tied for 5th at four under including couple amateurs, but Lee Westwood in there, Dustin Johnson, Scott scheffler, who's on a tear, Ian poulter in there all at four under as well. Bryson DeChambeau, by the way, at three under 69 nice. So Xander schauffele in there at three under, let's see here. Yep, that's about. Other than that, Tiger Woods is the big name, of course, 6 over 78, 14 strokes back. He is 145th, I believe, out of 156 players. So Tiger Woods, it does not appear, will make the cut, but I guess he, I mean, barring a miracle tomorrow, he's going to have to play as he's got to play as out of his mind to make the cut tomorrow. So we'll keep an eye on what's going on over at saint Andrews over there across the pond. All right, so first of all, I was not trying to dictate to you guys what my music taste is. I'm just trying to tell y'all that if you like country southern Americana rock and roll music, then you need to listen to sturgill Simpson. You need to listen to Margot price. You need to listen to Jason isbell and Tyler Childers and Brent Cobb. You need to listen to these folks because I think you'll like them. That's all. I'm not trying to tell you one way or another about what to do with your life. I'm just telling you they're fantastic musicians and they're racking up Grammys selling out the ryman. I'm just telling you should go check them out. That's all. I got people on Twitter, yelling at me, dictating music taste. No, I'm just telling you what's good, what I think's good, go check it out. Go listen to sturgill Simpson and tell me you don't like sturgill Simpson. That dude is a genius. Absolute genius. The Baylor bears. First place in the media predictions. 17 first place votes, Oklahoma, second in the big 12, according to the media with 12 first place votes, Oklahoma state, with 9 first place votes, Texas at number four, with two first place votes. I'd like to know who those two people are. Kansas state at number 5, Iowa state with one first place vote at number 6. That seems far fetched, considering all that they lost, TCU at number 7, West Virginia number 8, Texas tech at 9 with new coach Joey McGuire. And of course, Kansas at number ten, after they beat Texas last year. I think Texas is interesting. I think they're going to be better. I think they're still just a solid team, 7 8 wins. I can't state team is really interesting with Adrian Martinez, Chris kleinman there. I really, I think West Virginia is one to watch. They will get a lot of big games at home this year with a chance to pull some upsets. I like that West Virginia team with JT Daniels, Neil Brown building a culture slowly, but surely a very good defensive team under Neil Brown since he left Troy to go up to Morgantown. They're building something good in Morgantown. I like that West Virginia team to over exceed preseason expectations. Otherwise, it's the top three and I think they're separate from everybody else. Baylor, Oklahoma, Oklahoma state. Those are the three that I think are better than everybody else. Oklahoma state will be as good as Spencer Sanders is. If he is protecting the football and he is healthy and on the field, Oklahoma state will be very dangerous. They lost a lot on defense, including their defensive coordinator, who is now at Ohio State, Jim Knowles did a great job. Bros guy there. As an award finalist, one of the best coordinators in America. He's now at Ohio State. How good are they on defense? Oklahoma now with Brent venables, Dylan Gabriel in charge of the offense. Are they going to be better on defense? Because Baylor right now has the returning quarterback, Blake shape and who stepped in when Jerry bohannon got hurt, led them to a couple of wins at the end of the regular season into a big 12 championship. They've got the defense. They've got the culture and the coaching staff. They've got the physicality and the identity that they have that very other very few teams in the big 12 offer. It's got an SEC type of vibe, right? They want to play big physical football. I'm not saying they could be good in the SEC. That's not what I said. I'm just saying we're starting to break down the walls of what a big 12 football team looks like. Oh, by the way, they're about to add BYU and Cincinnati. Both of whom play big boy defensive football. So I just think that the evolution of the style of play in the big 12 is really interesting to me. Because I think teams are realizing they're going to have to be bigger and better along with defensive line if they want to get into a playoff game and have any prayer. The only thing that separates Oklahoma from every team they've played in the playoff defensive line. The teams that are recruiting the southeast, Georgia Clemson, Alabama, and even that Ohio State team in 2014. That Ohio State team was built on southern players. Joey Bosa, Florida, von bell, Georgia. That team was built defensively, especially the defensive line was built on southern players. Oklahoma has not been able to recruit the same defensive lineman since basically what Gerald McCoy in 2008. That was when they were good enough to almost beat Florida. But not quite. Otherwise, the offense 8 that was never the problem. It's always going to be the defense. Speaking of Oklahoma state, Mike Gundy pitching a fit yesterday a little bit. I mean, maybe I'm being a little overreaction area here, but basically saying and I'm paraphrasing here. Mike Gundy the head coach at Oklahoma state basically just says, listen, the bedlam series has a couple more years left and then that'll be it. Because somebody else made a decision to leave. And I don't understand why that has to be the way it ends. Honestly, I don't know why that has to be the way things are. I assume that Oklahoma would probably want to play the game. And if they want to play the game, why are you going to let your ego get in the way, Gundy, of playing the game? Because the only thing that could stop that

sturgill Simpson Oklahoma Neil Brown Cameron young Cam young cam Smith Robert Dinwiddie Scott scheffler West Virginia Bryson DeChambeau Xander schauffele Mike Gundy Margot price Tyler Childers Brent Cobb saint Andrews Dustin Johnson Joey McGuire Ian poulter Rory McIlroy
"sturgill" Discussed on Popcast

Popcast

08:24 min | 5 months ago

"sturgill" Discussed on Popcast

"Level. But somehow at the story level, it does it quite. Again, the stew of American popular music from, say, the 1910s to the 1950s is extremely messy, very combustible, moving back and forth from black to white, white to black. There's a lot happening. The narrative in this film is a lot more taut and also kind of in a way that's meant to be depicted as reverend. I think the actual story is a lot messier, but I think bosler and things that he has stitched it up really nicely by basically having B.B. King give Elvis a pass to be like, yeah, sure. You could take all this. Do whatever you want. Nice car. As far as the soundtrack, I don't know if I totally agree with you. I do find it fascinating as text. I don't know that I found it effective. I do think hearing nardo wick wrapping on an Elvis Presley song was unexpected turn. I'm not sure really if it did what it was supposed to do. But it did play into the larger luhrmann idea, which is this film does not strictly exist in the 50s and 60s and 70s. This film exists literally in 2022, except it's taking place in your mind and memory. It's taking place like in the USB drive in the back of your neck. And that is what I think is most interesting to me about it. And in a way, it's not for me to say how successful it is at this. Because I think what it's trying to do is not embalm, as you're saying, is not embalmed, Elvis, or his music in the past, not saying, you know, this is somebody who your grandparents thought was cool, that we're going to teach you about, to make Elvis not an oldie, but to say, no, this is the same. The popular culture that we're in now, the music that we're listening to now, this is part of it. And this belongs to it. And there's a kind of present tense. And I think it's the same thing that lerman did with The Great Gatsby, which is, yes, this is the 20s, but this is also 21st century hyper capitalism. It's what he did with moulin rouge. It's yes, this is Paris in the 1890s, but this is also wherever we are in the early 21st century movie world. And I think that it's a huge gamble because I don't know. I only know anecdotally what the kids are into these days because I'm not one of them, but I live around some. And now this press is not it. So to bring him back into the world of the pop culture and pop music now is a really fascinating thing to attempt. Elvis is someone who's influenced has been so absorbed internalized and become de rigueur at this point that nobody points to Elvis. Maybe the only person I've ever really interviewed who said, ah, yes, Elvis is sturgill Simpson. But I don't know that I've come across loads of people who directly are saying, ah, Elvis is a touchstone for me. It's a touch point. But it is everywhere. It is everywhere, but like among his contemporaries, people are probably more likely to cite Johnny Cash who recorded at the same time for some records, but who seems like the more kind of live influence now, or Little Richard, or Chuck Berry. So yeah, Elvis has been absorbed into all kinds of places where we don't even see him anymore. But what was fascinating to me about this movie and what I think that it handled very well. On the question of race, as we've been saying, if there's some wishful thinking, there's some liberal sentimentality, let's say, but on the question of sex and gender, it is on the money and the first big concert when Elvis takes the stage in Texarkana. In 1954, the sense of danger and release and hysteria and also of all of the rules and norms he comes out in this pink satin suit with eye makeup on and a big pompadour and he is scrambling every code that exists and you feel that. That for me is the great scene in the movie because you just feel all of the power of that moment right now. This is a great baz luhrmann scene because what is baz luhrmann do? Baz luhrmann naturally is inclined towards that sort of scrambling. And it could be a race, sex, gender, politics, region, you know, he's not beholden to a fixed idea. So he's ideal subject is a scene an individual a moment who is pushing back against the expectations of the circumstance. Like that's what this movie embodies in whole, but that's what this scene embodies in specific. And specifically, the dimension of terror of loss of control. You know, because the women are mobbing the girls and they are going crazy and screaming their heads off. And Elvis mother is there. And don't let them hurt my boy. What are they going to do to my boy? And it really is, there's a kind of, I think, deliberate classical reference there to Orpheus, the singer being torn apart by the followers of backus, by the mainnet, which is the example in kind of western mythology of the power of art to disrupt and destroy and consume the artist and to unleash passions and desires and lust that is uncontrollable. And he gets the terror of that, which I never thought, you know, because he was here about it. Oh, and you see old footage of fans screaming when Elvis walks by, but that sort of puts you there in a way that I never experienced before. You mentioned Elvis mom, and I will say another part of the film that I found a little bit jolting or another recurring theme in the film was the intimacy between all of this and his mother, which I thought in a couple of places early in the film, was depicted as quasi sexual. And I was wondering, did that scan for you as well? And I can't speak to the accuracy of it, but it did feel like the smothering love of his mother being replaced. As you say, the intoxication of art and then the smothering love of the fans. I kept expecting Tom Hanks as Tom Parker to say it's you. It's you. You love him. He loves you, and he kind of half says it. In a way, it moves on from the family pretty quickly. But I did think it established some of the touchstones of the Elvis myth, which was that he was one of a set of twins, the other of which died in infancy or in childbirth and was haunted by that and was very close to his mother. Went into the recording studio for the first time to record something for his mother. As a gift because that was something that Sam Phillips was doing kind of on the side to make a little extra money for sun records. So Elvis and Gladys, that love story is part of the Elvis lore. But as with a lot of things I felt like and you can't really blame it, it's a very long movie that's trying to cover a lot of ground and also include a lot of music and performance. So a lot of the psychology is shorthanded in a way. And certainly Elvis later adult sexuality is just not dealt with pretty much at all or very, very circumspectly so that the age difference between him and Priscilla is something that when they're courting you don't even realize that it's only much later when he says, you know, something about well I when I turned 50 and you turned 40 and you're like, oh wait, so he's ten years older and he was like 24 when they oh you know but you walk right by and blink and you'll miss it. And actually I felt like there was a little bit of like a slight of styling going on during the scene where she leaves him for good when she's packing her stuff and leaves graceland for good, which apparently is pronounced graceland, which I did not know. Everybody in the film pronouns is a graceland. But she's leaving graceland for good in that scene. I thought, and this is a point of choice, she looks older than he does. They have matured her in a way where she has quite literally outgrown him. And he is not corpse up yet in the full sense of like late Elvis, but he has been kind of like preserved. He's like still very sweaty, but he's kind of like preserved in amber a little bit and she has leapfrogged him in maturity

Elvis Baz luhrmann bosler B.B. King give Elvis nardo wick sturgill Simpson lerman Elvis Presley moulin rouge Little Richard Chuck Berry Johnny Cash Texarkana Paris backus Tom Parker Tom Hanks Sam Phillips Gladys Priscilla
"sturgill" Discussed on TuneInPOC

TuneInPOC

05:37 min | 6 months ago

"sturgill" Discussed on TuneInPOC

"So Margot, where can people? What's next for you? They use this as a little plug. Where can people see Margot price in 2021 and 2022? What's the deal? We kind of passed over the fact that you're on the road with sturgill and Willie Nelson and family. Is that correct? Yeah, I'm going out with both of them and I'm going out with Chris Stapleton and Nathaniel rateliff. I am one of the dudes sometimes, whether I like to be or not. And you've known sturgeon for a long time, right? Yep, yeah. He produced your last album. That's a rumors get started. He did, yeah, we had a really great time in the studio and it was nice to be able to work with him on something after just knowing him as a friend. I mean, we always sat around and picked together and he played a couple of gigs with me as my lead guitar player back in my very early days of the price tags and stuff. That's what I heard. But I mean, he's such a good friend and a mentor and he's just one of my favorite people. I couldn't say enough good things about him. So yeah, it's been great to be out on the road with him and Willie and we've been getting up there and singing gospel songs with him each night has been really really special. Well, I can't say that I'm not feeling a pang of jealousy for this game. Well, maybe we'll see each other at another festival. I know I'm going to have tentative plans to go back to Europe, which is where I first met y'all. Was it the CDC festival? And I remember we were very high. I think I remember stealing some of your tequila. I gotta get out to one of those shows because that sounds like the coolest lineup ever, so. Well, let's play let's play some shows together in the near future because we had such a blast getting to watch you play. You all killed it. We love what you're doing. We love the unique voice that you and the space that you feel in country music and I think country music is much better off for having Margo price and I'm happy that Jeremy convinced you that we are what we create and not what we behold and own. Well, I'm paraphrasing. I'm sure he said something more. That was a little more eloquent than I mean, that's it. I mean, you heard it, we said it straight. Margo price did in fact sell her car and her wedding ring to finance her breakthrough album. That's gangster. And to quote Paris Hilton. We always quote Paris Hilton. We try to shoehorn that in. What a legend. I actually have one last question for you before you sign off Margot. Do you ever see that car around? Dude, you know what is so crazy is that every time I see that car, it's at like the most, I mean, just someone driving a car like that. It's always at the most serendipitous time. I remember being in the black SUV driving to SNL and seeing a cream mini Cooper and I was like, there it is. Weird. Yeah, it's a sign, man. It's a sign for you to stay in touch with that. I mean, your rebellious nature has kept you on the straight and narrow to get to this point. And you have made very few concessions with your music, which is why people understand that. They hear that whether you have the opportunity to set it straight here or not. It comes through in your music, you know? And that's why people understand authenticity. It's a subtext. I believe in that. It's the same thing why Tom, it's why Tom Petty was, you don't need to know his story. To understand that that guy was no bullshit when he heard his music, you know? And the same thing is with you and we really do appreciate you coming on our show to set it straight, but also giving us the time to hear your story because we are just in fact bottom line to fans of yours and Jeremy's. Feeling is mutual and I'm glad we all got to sit down 'cause I think every other time it is in transit you know you're like trains in the night and I do remember hanging out in England and having a great time and trying to figure out where I would have got the weed but it doesn't matter. Maybe Loretta gave it to you. Who knows? We were in Dublin, I think. Maybe it was for me. There are some more rumors myths and legends here. Yeah. Oh, right. Exactly. Well, look, we'll endeavor to continue creating myths and legends together. Thank you, Margot. Thank you so much. Thanks, Margot. All right, I'll take care of you guys. Thank you. Give our best to sturgill and to Willie and everybody. You got it. And Jeremy. See you all down the highway. And Jeremy. Thank you. Take care. Later, set it straight myths and legends is produced by Carter little and Jordan detmer. The editors are Troy Dixon and Josh isaacs, written by Travis Nicholson and Schuyler Wilson, narration by Travis Nicholson, music provided by Midland and epidemic, special thanks to the team at Amazon music, especially Eliza mills, Stephanie wacken, Morgan Jones, Vanessa rebert, Trevor McNeil, Alice Zoe, Shea Simpson, Chris Graham, Emily ha Croft, and Kelly rich for more tall tales and great guests, follow us here and listen to every episode of set it straight on Amazon music..

Margo price sturgill Margot price Margot Chris Stapleton Nathaniel rateliff Willie Nelson Paris Hilton Jeremy Willie CDC SNL Europe Tom Petty Travis Nicholson Tom Loretta Carter little Jordan detmer Troy Dixon
"sturgill" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

01:34 min | 8 months ago

"sturgill" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Traveled to Kentucky to visit family Later in life he moved to Tennessee and that's where sturgill Simpson remembers meeting his hero At prine's Nashville recording studio I took a break you know hit the space bar and turn around and he was just sitting there and I'll never forget it because he was wearing plaid pants And like a periwinkle blue linen cotton sport coat I just had a couple of kids so my house was full of energy and noise And he had a little office there in the studio and he said you know he had a set of keys made at the same time a new place So we shared that room for better part three years but I never once we were never in the room at the same time and all the time I could see signs you've been there and likewise when you usually like flip my drums upside down or move them around or something but yeah when I got the news that he went into the hospital I just sort of standing outside and just kind of accepted the fact that I probably was never going to see him again I made I was me that way I can't help it despite his stardom John prine had a reputation for being kind Just let bluegrass icon Allison Krause tell you You wouldn't find a more humble kinder gentler person Just this week Krause told.

sturgill Simpson prine Kentucky Nashville Tennessee John prine Allison Krause Krause
"sturgill" Discussed on Fore Play

Fore Play

04:49 min | 8 months ago

"sturgill" Discussed on Fore Play

"Like he'll start like the harmonica and then he'll hit the thing and then the harmonic will play and then he'll play the fucking kick drum and that'll play and then he'll just play the guitar to it. He's a one man band and his songs are fucking amazing. So Jerry cinnamon go listen to him. I've been listening to that like oh my God, it's been nuts and then I've been listening to stir to like crazy. And actually sturgill has now entered my karaoke world where really? Oh yeah, you can watch the song. You can have The Crown or you can wear The Crown. That's a great one, yeah. Is that you can have the crowd? You can have The Crown up here. You can have The Crown has now become maybe my second go to karaoke song. Wow. Just because I know every word to it, I know the fucking rhythm and it goes, man. People that may not have ever heard this on there like, wow, what's this little country tune that Frankie singing? I did it the other night. We've got a karaoke machine at the house. My dad's the only thing the first thing my dad wheeled into my house was this ridiculous karaoke machine. It's 6 feet tall. It's got three huge base sound speakers on the bottom and then a huge 20 inch screen that you can search Facebook, YouTube, and all these apps so that you can actually see the words come up on the screen with wireless mics. And then you turn the lights off and it just shoots out lasers all over your room. So you feel like you're in a fucking club. So I've been singing that a lot. But what's your number one song just for the record? Don't let the sun go down on me by Elton John. It brings the fucking house down. I had to know number one. I think people wanted to do it. Yeah. So, all right, so we got some music recommendations. I'm telling you guys, go listen to Jerry cinnamon. He's got that Scottish accent. I fucking love it. It's really cool. I think you're gonna like them. Okay. The only thing I've been listening to recently, and this is probably not something that you guys would be that into, but it's just boldy James and west side gun. These are rappers that Coley Mick turned me on too. I don't know. They're rappers, and the type of music that I just fucking love just that type of hip hop is amazing. To me. So check out those guys, Bo Jackson is an album. Pray for Paris is another album. If you want to get into that, but that's not really for you too, but anybody else can be. From time to time. Downstairs when I go downstairs and I just like want to hang out in the kitchen or whatever. I start playing music down there. First guy that I've been turning on recently is just action Bronson. I always just start. I start my day off for some reason in my new house. I like to start my day off with baby blue. I don't know why. There's just something..

Jerry cinnamon sturgill Frankie boldy James Coley Mick Elton John YouTube Facebook Bo Jackson west side Paris Bronson
"sturgill" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

04:45 min | 1 year ago

"sturgill" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"How do I phrase this? Might be a little bit higher above the curve than everybody else. As far as positioning themselves for championships, national championships. Everybody else is kind of a one hit wonder earning their way into their occasionally. I might make that number a little bigger, I might go like 12 to 15, but yeah, your point is that there's a top. There's an elite class. The one percenters in college football, and we all know who they are, right? USC, Alabama. Yeah. And that's not the main in anybody else. And certainly not making their fan bases above any other fans because their fans love their schools and you were talking about stoops. When in 9 games and fan base being happy. And they will, because they're competing in their successful and consistent basis. And you're talking about the middle tier of the SEC, it seems like every year that new coaches come in, there's a wow factor. And some of it doesn't work out, but it's not because they're not trying. It's just not the right time and place for those folks and they do something else. But I'm always amazed by coaches that are in there. It's always it's mind boggling how good these guys are. And you're exactly right about the South Carolina job. Why would you leave that go somewhere? She may not win the national championship every year, but I'll tell you what, when you play the best damn football in the best conference in the country against the best competition, it just doesn't get any better than that. And that's the bottom line. These guys were all competitors. And going back to Kentucky, I mean, you know, it's not important that they get there every year like some of these elite teams we were talking about. This is the fact that you're competitive. And your show and improve. And you have to play here. You've got to play that day and you get what you get for that 60 minutes. Now you know that we've talked football and got all that out. What are you doing in your spare time? Listen music that kind of stuff. I have a 5 year old to three year old daughter. So that's most of my spare time. Oh, well you got your names for. But no, I'm a huge music guy, yes. I spent a lot of time. Well, I liked what genre stuff you aim towards. As I've gotten older, I'm Allison to everything from grunge metal to hip hop. But I lean towards a Nashville Americana outlaw country, so I listen to sturgill Simpson. Oh yeah. Jason is Bill and Margo price and that's sort of who I listen to right now. I want to say, man, I just want to taste base. What do you say hello? And I'll be talking to you tomorrow. Thank you. I appreciate it. I'm in there, of course, everybody. Yeah, I think the haves in college football and we're going to have this conversation tomorrow on the show. Which is going to be there are 7 teams in the SEC that are very clearly halves and 17s that are have nots. And that does not mean that the have nots are not good programs. But there's a very clear line of demarcation. And we will talk about it a lot more tomorrow on the show. But I think there was also a problem with the coaches in the conference. Maybe 5 years ago. I think we looked across this league and Saban had essentially destroyed everyone's career. And we had to make big changes across the board. And almost every team in this league changed coaches. And the response was hiring Jimbo Fisher in Texas Ana. The response was hiring Kirby smart. Firing Mark Rick, by the way, who was winning ten games a year and recruiting the number 8 or 9 or ten class in America every single season. They had a tiny, tiny bullseye to hit Athens when they fired when they moved on from Mark Rick. And they somehow did it with Kirby smart. But around that time is when the SEC was at its quote unquote lowest in the last I guess I'd say 30 years. And what the SEC did, they started hiring superstar coaches. And a couple teams took more than one crack at it, Tennessee, Arkansas. You know, you know, these teams have taken multiple shots at the bullseye here. But you look across the league and the star power and the talent of the head coaches in this conference. That is what's changed this league and why it has 7, 8, 9, ten teams that are very good. The 8th or 9th or tenth place team in this conference would contend in the Big Ten west or the ACC coastal or normally it would be the coastal. Maybe this year it's the Atlantic. I don't know. The PAC 12 both conferences. Almost would go out there and would win ten games. In the back 12. It's about the coaches. The coaches are what's different. 8 5 5 two four two 7 two 8 5 8 5 5 two four two 7 two 8 5..

football SEC stoops sturgill Simpson Mark Rick Margo price Kirby smart USC Alabama South Carolina Texas Ana Kentucky Allison Nashville Jimbo Fisher Jason Saban Bill Athens America
"sturgill" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"sturgill" Discussed on Here & Now

"Inuring ten serving a population of more than three thousand people for those looking for additional care the closest urban areas reno and carson city are over an hour away for two years now university of nevada reno. Medical students have organized these free pop clinics in rural areas including arrington providing services such as immunizations bloodwork and diabetes care. They coordinate with community organizations including the healthy communities coalition a nonprofit which helps people in rural areas struggling with access to health. Care and food insecurities. Wendy madsen heads up the coalition. She says she realized there was a vital need for dental care. During a conversation she had with volunteers. So our food pantry. Volunteers had come into serve And had shared the night before they had pull each other's teeth in their garage because they had infections in these painful teeth so really opened our eyes to what is happening. Why and what are we gonna do about it to address. This need madsen and her team worked to include dropping dentals mobile services as part of the pop up clinic. Madsen said the response was immediate. We put out the information for the appointments and it filled up in two hours We have a wait list. A page and a half long. A recent study in the international journal for equity in health found that mobile clinics can reduce barriers to healthcare in both rural and urban regions these clinics visit areas that are typically underserved and lessen the need for transportation mobile clegg's have a history of developing deep relationships and trust with communities molly williams co authored the study. She's a doctor of public health and the executive director of the family van a mobile medical unit. Run by the harvard. Medical school williams says mobile medical units. Do more than provide physical access to care when done ray win developed with the community over time. Mobile clinic. Operators can reach people who may not feel comfortable getting care through the traditional healthcare system and williams inclusion of mobile dental care which she says can provide additional health benefits..

"sturgill" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

06:17 min | 1 year ago

"sturgill" Discussed on Here & Now

"Pat alano in addition to being an artist is also a chemistry professor. He's always thinking about compounds so he says he was excited to read. The latest study published in nature magazine on the first major trial on the effectiveness of using india may to help treat post traumatic stress disorder. Researchers say the initial findings are promising but the study of md. Ama has always come up against cultural stigmas as a party drug back in the two thousands. Your doctor saw a dramatic increase in er visits but under medical supervision the authors of this study say md may could prove beneficial joining us. Now is jennifer mitchell a neuroscientist at the university of california san francisco and the lead author on this study jennifer. Welcome to the show. Thank you very much. Let's start with what this study's treatment looks like. It's important to note that it isn't just md ma on its own. It's paired with a therapist providing intensive counseling. Can you walk us through. A patient's experience sure so in short the subject the participant undergoes a series of preparatory sessions prior to ever being administered the md. main and then for a full day they take the md may in a treatment room. That looks a lot like a nice living room. And then they returned the following day for an integration session. And about a month later they repeat that process and then about a month later they repeated again and it's a particularly inner guided therapy process so it is manual and you're not prompting the participant a lot with questions you're not asking them to explore certain aspects of their pastor their trauma. You're letting the the the medicine and the participants lead the way. How efficacious was this. Study what did you find. We found that individuals that received nda in addition to therapy experienced significantly greater reduction in ptsd symptoms and also in their symptoms of depression. So they were not actually need to necessarily be depressed to enroll in the study but as a secondary measure we found that the md ama successfully Treated their depression as well well. Ptsd has a range of traumas. there's combat traumas. We talked about with veterans experiences but also racial trauma in childhood trauma. Hauer patients selected for the study they self referred to the study and and we took all types of trauma all different walks of life. One of the things that we were sort of most intrigued by perhaps most impressed by was the finding that md may was equally effective in some of those subgroups which are typically considered treatment resistant because their trauma. So extreme. Well let's talk more about that. Your study marks turning point in getting approval from the food and drug administration. For this kind of treatment there have been other studies of psychedelics trying to treat depression with magic mushrooms commonly known what is it about. Md ma that primes the brain for therapy. Well we do still need to do a lot. More investigative work in human models in animals. It's pretty clear that. Nda hasn't impact on a bridge called the middle where fear memories are typically stored and retrieved and so we we are assuming that there's a similar process going on in humans and that the mta may allows them access to memories that are very traumatic in nature and very hard to Address or or focus on perhaps without a lot of shame and a lot of fear and that somehow the md may is enabling people to take a look at those memories in a way. That isn't uncomfortable to them and that allows them to work with the therapy team to process and release them. you know. Part of all of this is overcoming the stigma and criminalization of psychedelics You know often. Mda often known as molly and ecstasy is is thought of as a party drug and a lot of people's minds although many places like oregon and dc has sought to decriminalize them and it has gone so far to do so. Where do you think your work fits into changing the cultural perception of these drugs. Well my hope is that this work represents a first step towards people perhaps being willing to consider taking another look at these compounds and perhaps a more objective. Look than than what happened. Back in the sixties and seventies in the united states. At least and that maybe it'll also opens the door to additional studies of other. You know psychedelic therapeutics. You find any downsides during this study any possibly groups of people who should not consider this kind of treatment. One of the issues with this study is that individuals had to taper off all of their other psychiatric medications to participate so that we could see what the md may was actually doing. And i think that was destabilizing for a lot of people that then couldn't that because there's a placebo arm in this study that they didn't get the md may and so thankfully the study sponsor is addressing that and were crossing those individuals over and they will have an opportunity to receive the active drug. Now the chemist that i spoke with venice beach went on to tell me how his father died of alcoholism and he wonders if his father had guided treatment like therapy. If his father would actually still be alive. I'm sure you've you've heard these kinds of stories. Before absolutely and their heartbreaking and that's one of the reasons why we're so determined to to come up with a novel therapeutics for ptsd. There's so many people that are suffering. I think we do better. That was jennifer mitchell neuroscientist at the university of california san francisco and lead author on the first phase. Three study on using. Md may to assist therapy and treating ptsd. Thank you so much. Thank you very much for inviting me canoe. Plash is one of the patients who participated in two thousand eighteen study while an undergrad at the university of connecticut he received the drug instead of the placebo and clashes going to take us through. What this therapy looks sounds and feels like and we wanna take note that could plash will be describing his experiences as part of this study. This is not an endorsement of the drug. Could plash tells us he signed up for..

Pat alano seventies jennifer two thousand One sixties united states jennifer mitchell first phase two thousands one first step first major trial about a month later nature Ama venice beach university of california san Three study eighteen study
"sturgill" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"sturgill" Discussed on Here & Now

"It's called a vampire bat because it lives solely off of other animal's blood. One species can transmit rabies and that's concerning agricultural officials because the bats liked to feast on the blood of farm animals. Now we have yet to spot them here in the us but because of climate change that may soon change particularly in areas. Like cattle-rich florida jessica meszaros from member station w. usf in tampa reports sh. That's what a vampire back holiday. Sounds like and this is is the sound of their prey Are there are three species of vampire. Bats that feast on the blood of large animals like cattle and only one species that can carry rabies. They reside mainly in latin america. Right now but tony. Piaggio a scientist with the us department of agriculture says. That could soon change what we is that. There's a clear signal of population expansion on the northern end of their distribution specifically in mexico. Piaggio says vampire. Bats don't typically migrate but rising temperatures from global warming creating more habitat for them to the north and an increase of development in their native habitats. Also has the creatures on the move so far there have been no reports of vampire bats in the us but experts believe the first place they'll show up is southern texas. Florida is also on the list. Piaggio says the bats could be blown in by storms or catch a ride on a shipping container is concern about vampire. Bats and livestock is the transmission of pathogens in specifically rabies in. This is a problem. In mexico and central american south american piaggio says the livestock industry in those areas can spend millions of dollars vaccinating for rabies. Louise lick warna is with the. Usda he's based in mexico city working with officials on wildlife diseases their risk of this mission of rabies to cattle is a huge and important impact in the economy he says if young unvaccinated animals become infected with rabies. They will die. Invite that is one of the main themes. Are the bars prison. In an aria and for some small scale ranchers livestock deaths could be financially devastating. Like wanna says. Mexico has launched national campaigns to vaccinate cattle and other farm animals in affected areas. He says they also have some monitoring and education programs in place about twenty years ago. Look one says vampire. Bats were recorded in twenty-five mexican states. Right now they are in twenty seven states including waveland which is close to the texas border back in september of last year. Tony piaggio says the. Usda held virtual panel of federal and state employees to start strategizing around the possibility of vampire. Bats entering this country. Everybody thought it was about sixty percent chance that within the next twenty years there could be a vampire bat documented but doesn't necessarily inherently mean anything. That is something to be concerned about the florida. Fish and wildlife conservation commission took part in that discussion in an email. Spokesperson says right now. It's unclear whether the creatures will make it to florida but agency officials plan to keep working with the usda and are open to establishing vampire bat monitoring programs if needed pasco county cattle rancher. Kevin bar has not yet heard about vampire bats within his circles but he says it's good. That officials are keeping an eye on the future. Health of the cattle industry as things continue to evolve in grow. There will always be new changes that we have to adapt to in order to keep our hearts healthy to provide a safe and healthy food supply for the consumer. So that's the story regarding cattle but what about people should. We be worried experts. Say no vampire. Bats aren't really interested in humans. There are exceptions. of course. just don't plan to sleep outdoors at night in areas with a high volume of.

Tony piaggio Louise lick warna mexico twenty-five latin america texas millions of dollars Piaggio waveland Florida piaggio twenty seven states first southern texas one Usda Fish and wildlife conservation three species one species twenty years ago
"sturgill" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

06:29 min | 1 year ago

"sturgill" Discussed on Here & Now

"From npr in wbz. You are telling moseley on rodale. This is here now. Less than two weeks after agreeing to a ceasefire with hamas militants in gaza israeli prime minister. Benjamin netanyahu is fighting for his political life a coalition of politicians working on a deal that would oust netanyahu from power and form a new government. His former protege neftali bennett has until midnight tomorrow to get it done near. Zilbert is a journalist and analyst with the washington institute for near east policy. He joins us now from tel aviv. An area where do things stand now. How close is the prime minister from losing power ahead of that deadline. Well he's quite close so the opposition parties are currently still negotiating the final details of this this coalition government. That's opposed to replace netanyahu. it's about eight pm local time right now and as you mentioned they have until tomorrow midnight. That's the deadline to get it done. They're optimistic they can get it done. They were hoping to get done by by today. It's looking like it's dragging a little bit. But it's really the final details for everybody believes will be a alternative government. Tell me more about naphtali bennett. In this coalition that he's trying to form which actually spans a pretty wide spectrum of political beliefs. So it's interesting. so bennett. Himself is hard right ideolog. He's the head of a pro. Settler party amina means right word as you mentioned. He started off as an aide to netanyahu and he went off and formed his own party several years ago and really have been been stalwart ally of the prime minister even though that relationship. oftentimes wasn't reciprocated by netanyahu. He's set to join with. Various centrist parties primarily led by. Opposition leader yasser lupita who is officially the one tasked with with forming a government currently as well as other right wing factions and even perhaps in arab-israeli islamist party so really from left pro-peace parties. Too hard right pro. Settler parties and everything in the middle. It'll be a very heterogeneous coalition. Unlike anything israel seen before but the one thing keeping them together and hopefully getting this deal done in their minds is the prospect of finally unseating yahu after twelve years in power right so what happened and how did it happen so quickly because it was really just a few days ago when the bombs were still flying between hamas and israel than analysts. Were saying that the conflict itself would help. Solidify netanyahu's political future doesn't look like that worked out to be true right so i even reported at the time and i think came on the show and said as much that really one of victor's from from the gaza war was netanyahu at least politically and that bennett in the midst of the fighting. Had actually taken the prospect of an alternative government Change government as they call it here off the table. He seems to have reversed himself in recent days primarily for two reasons. Number one really. Netanyahu didn't have the votes. Didn't have the numbers in parliament for alternative government. Right wing government That would have included in a felli. Bennett and number two bennett made a core promise publicly that he would do everything to avoid yet. Another election fifth election in the span of two two and a half years here in israel and he said does much on sunday gave a prime time address to the nation kind of outlining his thinking and he said we have to stop the madness. Stop this political crisis and that it was time to take responsibility even though politically. It seems like bennett will pay a cost amongst his rightwing base. Who is quite angry at least in large part that he's a he's actually breaking from out right and it sounds like. That's what netanyahu is trying to focus on here saying. That bennett is betraying supporters. On the right. And we know. If you've been following benjamin netanyahu for any amount of time you know he's not gonna go down without a fight. What is he doing to destabilise support for this. New government and yahoo is nothing if not a fighter at least for his own purposes and he. He's doing everything. Possible to apply pressure on bennett and bennett's party and other potential right-wing members of this future coalition to get them to two wilt to cave. He's been calling it Prospective government dangerous left-wing wing government for the future of the country. Various netanyahu allies mouthpieces. Have been calling bennett and others traders. No more no less. You had a parliamentarian from netanyahu's party saying this wasn't a transfer of power. This was theft of power stealing of power. Very reminiscent of of other political transitions in recent memory. So he's really trying to apply pope public pressure from the right when base on these various right wing. Politicians ahead of next week's formal swearing in in parliament of this potential government. Remains to be seen whether whether it succeeds. But it's really his only is only shot. We'll look if this new government does form and it includes so many politicians that would typically oppose each other. What would governing look like. Will anything done. That is the the good you know the big question that everyone is asking. I think in their minds and they've even set a publicly. they're trying to return some semblance of stability and normalcy to political life in israel tackle long-standing and deep seated issues but consensual issues so things like economy and passing a budget Things like education and health. What the likely won't touch on. We'll try not to touch on are more controversial issues. Like the israeli palestinian conflict and settlements in the west bank and even potentially in future and other gaza another gaza campaign But really they don't seem to have another alternative Other than coming together again for the sole purpose of of ending netanyahu's rain. What comes after they figure has to be better all right. We're gonna keep a close eye on this narrow zilbert journalist and analyst with the washington institute for near east policy. Thank you very much pleasure. Federal agriculture officials are monitoring type of bat and mexico..

netanyahu Benjamin netanyahu naphtali bennett benjamin Bennett yahoo yasser lupita Zilbert Netanyahu bennett today rodale gaza war gaza next week yahu pope fifth election two and a half years Less than two weeks
Cory Booker qualifies for fall Democratic debates

BBC Newshour

00:37 sec | 3 years ago

Cory Booker qualifies for fall Democratic debates

"New Jersey senator and presidential candidate Cory Booker will be on the democratic debate stage this fall Booker announced this morning he's crossed the threshold of one hundred thirty thousand unique donors he'd already met the polling requirements for the third democratic debate in September he's the seventh democratic candidate to be guaranteed a spot onstage along with former vice president Joe Biden senators Bernie Sanders Elizabeth Warren and Pamela Harris south bend Indiana mayor Pete but a judge and former congressman Beto o'rourke Booker is also slated to join the second primary debate this Wednesday along with senator cure Sturgill Graham and mayor de

Senator Elizabeth Warren Pamela Harris Congressman Beto O'rourke Book Sturgill Graham New Jersey Vice President Joe Biden Bernie Sanders Indiana