35 Burst results for "Studio"

Jim Hanson and Amanda Milius Discuss the J6 Show Trial

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:00 min | 3 d ago

Jim Hanson and Amanda Milius Discuss the J6 Show Trial

"Hey folks, it's Jim Hansen. I have sitting here in studio. Oblivious to the fact that we just went live because I was talking to my good friend amazing filmmaker and one of the most culturally elite members of the America first crowd, Amanda milius. Welcome. Thank you. I'm so glad to be on in the new spot. Isn't this cool? This is like a crazy show. It is the coolest thing. I know. No, I almost am like not worthy. I would like like I said, I almost wore sweats. I know. You got to do that. On the bottom. You have to have the top here. Yeah, I'm used to just being able to pull it together on the top, and then everything else is like yoga pants, and I'm like, maybe I'll get dressed today. Yeah. Yeah, well, we did it. And we're on the late night TV talk thing. Now, I want to talk kind of production value. Because I don't know if you notice, there is a giant show trial propaganda fest for the invented insurrection going on. That was pretty, I mean, yesterday was, there are some really good memes created out of yesterday. Like if a day creates good memes. It's a good day. So yeah, it's us. It's our team winning. Yeah, there was this one where like, I think they had like shots from one of those White House down or something movies or and then they had, I mean, it was so with the beast. The grass, like, that's basically what she was describing. I mean, it was absolutely insane. And good on them. But I want to kind of get into your area of expertise because the left decided when they were going to have these show trials that they were going to hire a TV news executive to stage them. Tell us super cool. It tells you a lot. And then you've got legs zelensky going on like every meeting with every celebrity he possibly can. You're like, man, this guy's got a lot of time on his hands 'cause I'm just trying to run a production company, like not run a war. I don't even have time to do that. That's amazing.

Amanda Milius Jim Hansen America White House
How Did Christiana Hale Come to Write Her New Book 'Deeper Heaven'?

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:59 min | 3 d ago

How Did Christiana Hale Come to Write Her New Book 'Deeper Heaven'?

"I am extraordinarily excited to speak to my next guest because she has written a genuinely magnificent book on one of the most important subjects to me in the world C. S. Lewis. And so let me say first of all, her name is Christiana Hale, she hails spelled differently from Idaho. She is in Idaho right now. Just so you understand, while she was writing this book, she also teaches Latin and English to junior high school students, try to take that in ladies and gentlemen. At a classical Christian school, I am just thrilled to meet her and to talk to her about her brand new book. It's called deeper heaven, a reader's guide to C. S. Lewis's ransom trilogy. Christian Hale welcome to the Arctic show. Thank you so much for having me. Well, listen, we try to get you in the studio and our schedule was all screwed up. But I just want to say, when I read this book, I was just so thrilled because I love C. S. Lewis so much. And the ransom trilogy, the space trilogy, whatever it's called many, many people are not familiar with it. And that, of course, needs to change. And books like yours will help to I'm already helping it is helping to change that. Your book is helping to change that. So before we get into the book deeper heaven, I just have to ask you about yourself. How does a very young woman like yourself come to write a magnificent volume on C. S. Lewis's ransom trilogy? How did this happen? How did you where did you grow up? How did you happen? What's going on? Yeah. Sometimes I ask myself how it happened because it still surprises me at times that this is where life has taken me. But I grew up on C. S. Lewis primarily the chronicles of Narnia as many of us did. So a very young age. I was introduced in Narnia and just fell in love with those books. And it wasn't till I was probably in high school that I realized there's a lot more to see us Louis than just a children's fiction author. In fact, that was very small part of his life and his calling and what he did. So I remember reading or starting to read the ransom trilogy at a young age and I actually quite frankly didn't like it. I didn't get into it really. I couldn't understand it. But then I attended new Saint Andrew's college in Moscow Idaho and as a freshman rhetoric class, we had to read the ransom trilogy and at that point with a teacher who delve deeper into the especially the medieval cosmology side of things, which I think will probably talk about later. That just captured my imagination.

C. S. Lewis Christiana Hale Idaho Christian Hale S. Lewis Arctic Louis Saint Andrew Moscow
Sebastian Welcomes the Co-Authors of the New Book 'Created Equal'

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:48 min | 4 d ago

Sebastian Welcomes the Co-Authors of the New Book 'Created Equal'

"And we are so delighted to have in studio. The makers of a film that we have the poster of in our offices that we discussed when it came out. And now the co author of the book that celebrates that movie and that man, of course he is the great associate justice clarence Thomas, and the book is his life story created equal and we have in studio with us the filmmaker, the co author Michael pack and Mark pauletta. Welcome to America first. Thank you. Thanks for having us. Let's just have a reaction to last week's news. I can't stop smiling since then. It's like a rictus grin. It's involuntary. I think the left totally miscalculated with that leak. As we had Kevin Roberts in studio on Friday is constitutional experts have said to me, perhaps the most important decision of the courts history. Michael. Absolutely. I think you were right, sab to put the emphasis on preserving the constitution. I mean, these things are not about whether abortion is good or bad. It's about whether there's a constitutional right to abortion. If people had to watch their movie, they would have been and now if they read the book, they would not be surprised at clarence Thomas's decision. He's been very consistent. And we call our book created equal because it comes out of his lifelong dedication to the principles of the declaration and the constitution, which those principles underlie. And you see both in the book and the film to come out of his very dramatic life story coming from poverty in the Deep South against many struggles to the highest court in the land, not least of which the opposition of the left, everything he's done, now so it is not surprising that that continues today.

Michael Pack Mark Pauletta Clarence Thomas Kevin Roberts America Michael
Xi Van Fleet Describes Living Through China's 'Cultural Revolution'

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:07 min | 5 d ago

Xi Van Fleet Describes Living Through China's 'Cultural Revolution'

"You can read scores of history books. You can watch YouTube videos, but the most powerful weapon we have in pushing back against the new communists, what my wife called the next gen marxists are the stories of those who have suffered under communism. That brave woman was she van fleet, and she is in studio with us now. Welcome to America first street. Thank you for inviting me here. So let's start at the beginning. Where do you come from where were you born? And in your bio, it says on Twitter, Chinese by birth, American by choice, survivor of Mao's cultural revolution. So tell us a little about yourself and then what this cultural revolution was that you survived through. I was 6 turning 7 when the cultural revolution started. So I experienced the whole thing, ten years of it, and after that, I was sent to the countryside to be re-educated by the peasants. So I always say I have a full experience of that cultural revolution. And what was the goal? What was the parties? What was Mao's goal with the cultural revolution? What was the objective? That is a loaded question. And it takes a long time to explain. We have time. We have time. No. I think I think main reason is power. So Mao, after they got into power in 1949, they never stopped political campaigns. One after another, one disaster of it another. But one of the worst is the group, great leap forward. Because of that campaign, and the resulted the grief famine about 40 to 50 million people died. Because of that, he lost some prestige.

MAO Youtube America Twitter
Mark Fleischman Plans to Die by Assisted Suicide

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:55 min | 5 d ago

Mark Fleischman Plans to Die by Assisted Suicide

"I thought a lot about mock fleischman the other day because he's going to die soon. He's 80 years old. Actually he's going to die on July 13th. In Germany, but his wife of 27 years by his side. Some years after he stepped away from the insanity of owning nightclubs and restaurants, fleischmann understandably stepped away from the limelight that was the majority of his life. The last time I saw him was a little over two years ago. He invited me to a party that was throwing for the launch of his Studio 54 book. Is that some small joint in Beverly Hills? And the crowd was a mix of The Old Guard and the new. There was some New York City journalist dad too, namely my former nemesis at page 6, Richard Johnson. Fleischmann writing a book about Studio 54 was a good enough reason to get Johnson on a plane and out in LA to hang out. I said, the old man looks good. He said he sure does. Must been that good cocaine in the 80s and we both left. So smart fleshman came by and we posed for a picture. I wish I still have it somewhere. I got to find it. But he thanked both of us for helping keep the club and him and the column for years. It was a nice affair all in all, but I could tell this was one last gasp tomorrow. Like I said, I was closing in on 80. And so here we are. A couple three weeks away from July 13th. The day the music died from on fleischmann. And that's because several years ago, he became afflicted with a mysterious illness that would make him extremely dizzy at times. To his legs, sometimes flat out failing right beneath him. And over time, that illness could not be diagnosed by doctors and became worse and worse and more frightening by the day. As it is now Mark doesn't have any balance. He drops things and doesn't know where his body is in space. There was a time where a doctor is the very best doctor, by the way. Originally thought he had a form of Parkinson's, but it isn't that. Nobody knows what this is. He's suffering from. Once he heard that Mark knew what he had to do. One time he swallowed a bunch of Xanax, but doctors brought him back before he could overdose. When he was going to go buy a gun, his wife, Mimi, intercepted, and they had a long talk. Mark convinced her that he'd had a great life that he loves and now more than anything, but now what this mystery illness running his life, he said, it's time for me to say goodbye. Eventually, with his wife's support, they contacted a Swiss nonprofit group poll after multiple tests and psychiatric evaluations, it was obvious to see that Mark fleischman, a man who pumped so much life into New York City was now a candidate for assisted

Fleischmann Fleshman Fleischman Richard Johnson Old Guard Beverly Hills Germany Parkinson's New York City Johnson Mark LA Mimi Mark Fleischman
Are We Winning or Losing? Rep. Mary Miller Weighs In

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:39 min | 6 d ago

Are We Winning or Losing? Rep. Mary Miller Weighs In

"Miller, welcome to America first. Thank you. Thank you for having me. So you were supposed to be in studio last minute, you got to be on the floor. There's some kind of vote coming up despite the fact that the January 6th committee is droning on as we speak. Let's talk about your tweet. Let's talk about the fact that this let's talk about rhinos, conservatives, and the American people. Because you got 14 senators who want to curtail Second Amendment rights, put in Second Amendment, anti red flag laws, and they have the letter R behind their name. And at the same time, you've got clowns Thomas and a 6 judge justice majority in the Supreme Court bring down this decision about New York, your reaction to all of this. Are we winning? Are we losing are the rhino still in control? Well, this is a big win for the Second Amendment for the people for our constitutional rights. Thanks to president Trump for, again, fulfilling his promises. And for putting in constitutional justices, I just can't thank president Trump enough for that. But the battle will never end. I heard someone say the other day that evil never retreats on its own. Only when it's confronted by a more powerful force. And I have to say that one thing the Democrats have gotten used to is Republicans that don't fight if they do fight it's on the defense. One of the reasons we loved president Trump is he fought on the offense for the good of America and that we're going to continue that fight and

President Trump Miller America Supreme Court Thomas New York
Catch Gina Carano Live on 'Unfiltered With Dan Bongino' This Weekend

The Dan Bongino Show

00:45 sec | Last week

Catch Gina Carano Live on 'Unfiltered With Dan Bongino' This Weekend

"By the way I got Gina Carano on my Fox show this weekend Yeah Jim Gina Carano Big Gina Carano fan Just choose an awesome fighter in the UFC It's gonna be on my Fox show this weekend So that's gonna be pretty awesome unfiltered 9 p.m. Set your DVR if you can't make that line It'll be live in studio In studio up at NYC if they get a little solo trip up there so I don't know what's gonna happen It's a live show Kevin's saying Jim Dan budge in front of a live camera Could be trouble I can't I can't 5 more on Fox Fox nation people are calling up the CEO right I'm going to get step first get him off the Tom kercher billboard card I'm kidding You know the fact check

Gina Carano Jim Gina Carano FOX Jim Dan Fox Fox Kevin Tom Kercher
Biden Blames Gas Station Owners for High Prices at the Pump

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:26 min | Last week

Biden Blames Gas Station Owners for High Prices at the Pump

"He goes on to, I love this. Cut number two. To the company's running gas stations and setting those prices at the pump. This is a time of war. Global peril, Ukraine, these are not normal times. Bring down the price you are charging at the pump to reflect the cost you are paying for the product. Let's stop right there. It's the gas station owner's fault. He's not she's not supposed to make any money. They all company had not supposed to make any money. The price of oil in a worldwide market is driven by the supply, and the demand. People want to use gasoline. They want to go places. I'm in the way north. You got to drive, I'm up in Maine. That's where I am. I'm in Maine. And if you want to go anywhere in Maine, add an hour. I've learned that at an hour. And I've got great people that help me build this studio. Thank you, Ben. Thank you, Nick. Thank you, Troy. Thank everyone. Generalissimo came up here and got this thing done. And to get here, you can't get here from there. That's an old Yankee stain. Bert and I went out to Muskegon farm. And we were asked how to get to the winter first studio. You can't get there from here. The only bad thing about being here is Red Sox fans, New England Patriots fans and Celtics fans.

Maine Ukraine Generalissimo Muskegon Farm Troy BEN Nick Bert Red Sox New England Patriots Celtics
Catastrophic Security Failure: Joe DiGenova on the Events of January 6

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:12 min | Last week

Catastrophic Security Failure: Joe DiGenova on the Events of January 6

"Brad raffensperger many others appear in front of the January 6th. I'm going to use a phrase one of my code is used inquisition. It's either a star trader or an inquisition. Give us your take to date in the last few weeks, judge Jennifer in terms of your experience working as U.S. attorney for the district, working as a special counsel for the DoJ as a lawyer to date. Your description of this event. On January 6th, we were in your studio. Yes. When this happened and my immediate response after watching it was this was a catastrophic security failure. And everything to date that has come out of these hearings has confirmed that. It shows that they purposely did not want to be prepared. They had insecure fencing. They had insufficient number of police officers, no National Guard, no U.S. troops, the fencing that exists at the Supreme Court in anticipation of the road case, the Dobbs case is the kind of fencing that should have been up. It wasn't. What they had upward bicycle racks and all sorts of things. They had their civil disturbance, 50% of them were on leave that day.

Brad Raffensperger DOJ Jennifer U.S. National Guard Dobbs Supreme Court
Supreme Court Set to Rule on Abortion Rights

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:41 min | Last week

Supreme Court Set to Rule on Abortion Rights

"Well, you're welcome, Hugh I am live here from the relief factor dot com studios in Texas Ed Morrissey of hot air dot com and happy to fill in for you today. We do have power and we actually have heat. We actually have quite a bit of heat. But we've got all sorts of things here in Texas. And we've got a full show for everybody today. And of course, one of the big issues, we're going to be discussing a whole bunch of different issues. We're going to be talking about energy later in the hour. We're also going to be talking about energy with American petroleum institute, president and CEO. Mike summers, that will come an hour three, but we've got a lot to talk about about gas prices. But first before we go there, I want to talk a little bit about what today is because today is one of the few remaining decision days. At the Supreme Court. And of course, we're waiting on two major rulings. One of course being dobs regarding the Mississippi law on abortion. And the other is the brewing case in New York regarding the right to bear arms in the state of New York and how that applies. Neither one of those decisions have been handed down yet. We are waiting with bated breath on both of these, but of course most people are focused on the Dobbs decision, not just because it's an abortion decision. Not just because it may be the abortion decision where the Supreme Court finally disconnects itself from the abortion debate and hands it back to the legislatures, which is where it should have been all along, of course, but also because of all of the death threats that have been going on all of the protests, which are still going on in front of the homes of Supreme Court Justices, which is, by the way, illegal. It's against the law to do that.

Ed Morrissey Mike Summers Texas Hugh American Petroleum Institute Supreme Court New York Mississippi Dobbs
Miserable Karen Ruins Neighbors’ Wedding With Lawnmower

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:52 min | Last week

Miserable Karen Ruins Neighbors’ Wedding With Lawnmower

"This crazy TikTok story about a couple and they don't tell us where it was, but it looks like it was in the somewhat the country. Yeah. And they're getting married in the front yard. Yeah, it's just like an episode. It's just like the father of the bride movie with Steve Martin, my favorite movie of all time. There's your trivia question, but they get married, they get married their house, basically. They have the reception. And I have to imagine it's cheap. I mean, you're not going to fork over money for this or that. You know, you're just then user expensive. I can imagine. Thousands of dollars. I can imagine. We thought about opening up our news bunker. This would be a great location. There you go. Got good lighting. The studio lights. We have grass. For those photos. Perfect lighting, exactly. So anyway, they're getting married. And they got a big crowd there. You got the groom side and the bride side. By the way, which side was larger. On your who had more people there. I did, but it was only, well, no, actually my family was smaller, but I had more Friends. My husband had the bigger family, but less Friends. Oh, he doesn't have friends? No, he has friends. They just a couple of when we're supposed to come and then they couldn't make it. He doesn't have friends. That's okay. I understand. We'll work on that. So anyway, back to my story. So you've got this huge wedding on the front lawn of this house, and all of a sudden, you know, it is a dearly beloved you hear this God awful, lawn mower sound. And guess what? We are gathered together in the sight of God. I do. Do you have to love it? I do. I'm just like, I do. All right, this thing? It looks to get period of the back. What this is?

Steve Martin
Father Robert Sirico Describes the Acton Institute

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:37 min | Last week

Father Robert Sirico Describes the Acton Institute

"But today I have someone on that I really like and I find him fun to talk to. His name is father Robert surico. Yes, a Catholic priest in the studio to talk about economics because father surico is or was the head of the actin institute now he claims to have retired. I don't believe it. Father Rica, welcome. Good to be with you. Now, I want to talk about this because we're going to talk about you have a new book out called the economics of the parables. So Jesus parables and economics, okay. Your big into the free market. You have written a book called defending the free market. You wrote another book called a moral basis for liberty. I'm kind of big on that. When did you found the actin institute and what is the actin institute? So the actin institute was founded in 1990 with my friend and colleague, the cofounder Chris mauron, who is now the successor president, so it's a good Succession. And what basically as I saw in seminary, as you've seen in religious circles, that religious people have a soft place with socialism. And I think that comes from a lack of understanding of the importance of liberty in creating and allowing virtue and in creating wealth if we're concerned about the poor. And very often there are good intentions override sound reasoning. And so we tried to resolve that. It's an interfaith institute so we deal with people from all across the

Actin Institute Robert Surico Surico Chris Mauron Rica
Sebastian Is Joined In-Studio by the Love of His Life Katie Gorka

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:51 min | Last week

Sebastian Is Joined In-Studio by the Love of His Life Katie Gorka

"This is a very special interview. Why? Because I get to share with you my love of my life and to talk about the incredible work she's been doing, not only in the administration as a presidential point to the problem of Homeland Security, then the press secretary for customs and border protection where you worked with Mark Morgan, who's a huge supporter of the show. And then now, as senior fellow at the heritage foundation for civil society, but let's begin at the beginning. I've known you for quite some time. Yes, you have. And we met in Eastern Europe in Romania. I was working for the Hungarian government defense ministry after the fall of communism. You were working for a New York think tank helping in the democratization process in Central Europe. Share a little bit about your journey because when I met you, allegedly, there were only two charities you gave to. And 8 charity and a gun control chat. And gay men's health crisis. Gay men's health crisis and gun control ink. And I think your life has changed somewhat in the last 26 years. Yes, it has. Why? Talk to us your journey and how you look at this nation we live in now. Well, I think the important thing is that so many young people who got a terrible education overall, I did not understand this country at all. I did not love this country. I would not say I was a patriot. I remember growing up in a part of Long Island. I remember maybe when I was about 6, a 4th of July parade with the streamers woven through my bike spokes and the good humor ice cream and that's kind of the last act of patriotism. I remember, because you go to school, I mean granted, this was a while ago, but let's say this would have been, you know, I was growing up in the 70s. It was not a great time to be an American.

Mark Morgan Heritage Foundation For Civil Hungarian Government Eastern Europe Central Europe Romania New York Long Island
How Julie Hartman Met Dennis Prager

Mike Gallagher Podcast

00:34 sec | Last week

How Julie Hartman Met Dennis Prager

"Yeah, nice try. I bet you Julie Hartman doesn't agree with that. Julie Hartman is a Harvard grad young conservative. I love her story when she was a sophomore in college, she read Dennis prager's book still the best hope, she wrote to prager, shed how much his work influenced her. He invited her to the studios, a friendship was formed, and now the Dennis and Julie podcast has become a hugely wildly popular podcast on the Salem podcast

Julie Hartman Dennis Prager Harvard Prager Dennis Julie
'The Jordan River Rules' Author Robert J. Morgan Joins Eric in Studio

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:11 min | 2 weeks ago

'The Jordan River Rules' Author Robert J. Morgan Joins Eric in Studio

The NEW Salem Star Morgan Zegers on Her Fight Against Socialism

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:55 min | 2 weeks ago

The NEW Salem Star Morgan Zegers on Her Fight Against Socialism

"And it's none other than Morgan zagers of young Americans against socialism, Morgan. Thank you for popping by. Thank you for making the time. All right, so congratulations are in order on Friday, an hour before you arrived. You signed your contract with us with Salem so you are the freshest member of the Salem faculty and the newest podcaster. Yeah, I mean, it's really an honor. I've been having a personal podcast for the last year talking about politics, current events, and culture, specifically from a young conservative woman's perspective. So I'm really thankful that Salem would want me to join in. I was super excited. You are high energy social media individual, but you also do heavy stuff like your analysis of the federalist papers. We're going to talk about all of that. I don't know waste time with your story because I always ask you to tell it when you come on this show before. So in a nutshell, you met somebody at college. She was a communist kind of blew your mind. What do I say to a communist who's an American living in America at college? That's how you decided to better your understanding of how to communicate the evils of this ideology. Tell us, I want to ask you first a personal question. How long have you been doing this? So when you decide to be a young American against socialism, how many years ago? I started the organization in 2019. And I have been working for the last few years to fundraise and build a reputation and an audience around this concept of interviewing survivors of communism and socialism. And I'm really excited because actually June 12th was the release of our first episode that was long form. I've been doing a lot of gorilla style social media tactics where I've been doing selfie videos with survivors and whatever I could really with my capabilities, but we finally film in Dallas in a very professional studio surrounded by historic artifacts long, one to two hour conversations with people from around the world. So it's really exciting and that's on a channel called the freedom records every week as a new

Salem Faculty Morgan Salem America Dallas
Why Good Intentions Don't Matter

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:34 min | 2 weeks ago

Why Good Intentions Don't Matter

"In the elevator coming up to my studio, I shared the elevator with, I would say a woman of about 40. Maybe 35. She was going to work on her floor and I was going to work on my floor. And she was wearing a T-shirt and jeans. A T-shirt with writing on it, a T-shirt that was clearly not even a dressy T-shirt if there was such a thing. Just a T-shirt. And baggy jeans. Going to work. I know that for at least half the society that is completely irrelevant. Unnecessary to even comment on. And at least half the society is wrong. Clothing is of extreme significance. It's a great example, great example. Didn't use it in the video, but I recorded a video for PragerU. I do it. What do I do with four times a year? About the irrelevance of good intentions. I don't know anybody who thinks they have bad intentions. The whole concept is useless. That's why that road to hell is paid with good intentions because everybody, including bad people, thinks they have good intentions.

Left Wing Columnist Asks Meaningless Questions

Dennis Prager Podcasts

02:11 min | 3 weeks ago

Left Wing Columnist Asks Meaningless Questions

"Over the past few years, I've been asked one question. This is how it opens. More than any other. Now folks before I read further, I would like you to try to guess. What does this man of the left? He's not a liberal. What does this man of the left? Say he is asked more than any other question when he gives after he gives a speech. Oh, Joel, you didn't hear what the question was? So you're thinking? Yeah. Oh, good. So we actually have an in studio person to whom I can address the question. I don't think you would, do you think you would have guessed it? No. Yeah. I don't know if I would have guessed it either. The moment you hear it, my Friends, you will go, oh yeah, of course he speaks to the left wing audiences. Here it goes. It comes up at speeches, not just at speeches. At the dinners, in conversation. It's the most popular query when I open my podcast to suggestions. Time and again. I'm prefacing this with the statement. We live in completely different mental universes. There is nothing in common between left and right. Our values, our thinking, our priorities, our passions, we have nothing in common except the biological. We all eat to live, we drink to live, we sleep, et cetera. That's it. It comes in two forms the first should I have kids given the climate crisis they will face. Okay, what's the second then? Should I have kids knowing they will contribute to the climate crisis of the world faces?

Joel
"studio" Discussed on Talent Makers Studio

Talent Makers Studio

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"studio" Discussed on Talent Makers Studio

"Join now is always by my good friend area. Lopez aerial is the founder and ceo. Mac data driven talent platform area. Hey dan how's it going. It's going great. It's going great. We're thinking about interviewing. there's nothing. I like more than thinking about energy. Don't i know it yummy. What what are you seeing. What what trends are happening power companies creating better interview processes for your candidate is so long. Journey interviewing is hard and most interviews happen in a room by yourself with no oversight. No one tells you how often how to do it. No one else telling you if you did a good job or not. And so i have a lot of empathy for interviewers. It's not easy. But i think the difference between good intervene bad via the difference between building a great company and creating a real problem. So it's super super important. I know you fall out about interviewing about structured interviews. What are some protests that you might have for the best way to get really good interviews on. Yeah a thank. You hit the nail on the head. Most interviews happen when someone's in a room with euro direction on what should be interviewing for or how they should properly interview the candidate. Ultimately it comes down to having a framework in place on a huge fan of standardized and structured interview offices which means that someone took the time to think about what is actually needed in the role they. Sometimes you think about what that person's day to day is going to look like on some time to develop scenario based questions to get an idea of houses percents would act or become a problem solved those interviews that usually are ineffective the ones that don't get to the core of the job. You're asking someone about their favorite basketball team or where they grew up or all these things that really don't matter and zand scheme of things they can also be full of violence. And as you. And i both know. Everyone wants to avoid having bias in their interviews so i think have a strong plan have a strong framework. You're going to have a better interview experience with making sure you've asked the same questions of everyone. And you're being consistent fair helps you get better as an interviewer because you're hearing answers to the same questions over and over again as well. So it's a great way to calibrate awesome protect for me. I always think after you ask those questions the criteria that you talk about when you make your decisions is really important. People have a tendency to shift criteria. They fall in love with a candidate and then afterwards they try to justify why they like that candidate but if rei criteria ahead of time and then when they have a discussion really hard to stay on point and say well we said these. Three things are important. That's make decisions based on those same criteria super important to do very hard. You're absolutely right. Dan awesome always great to talk to you. I knew this would be a lot of fun. Thanks area please. Make sure to like subscribe and review our podcast and stay tuned for our next episode..

Lopez zand dan Mac basketball Dan
"studio" Discussed on Talent Makers Studio

Talent Makers Studio

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"studio" Discussed on Talent Makers Studio

"Persons of color. This many disabled differently abled. I want us to get to a point. Where equity and fairness and parody become second nature to these organizations and that they will be all the better for it because they'll see it as a true business imperative versus just simply the right thing to do well michelle year certainly more than holding up your end of the bargain. You're doing your part setting an example learning and leading for decades now. So we're so glad to have you on the podcast and for sharing some of your perspective and your wisdom. This.

michelle
"studio" Discussed on Talent Makers Studio

Talent Makers Studio

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"studio" Discussed on Talent Makers Studio

"Trust between the two teams. I've.

"studio" Discussed on Talent Makers Studio

Talent Makers Studio

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"studio" Discussed on Talent Makers Studio

"The recruiter said hey guys. I want you to know. This is going to slow things down in a meaningful way. Are you guys ready to do that. Daniels response was absolutely. We're willing to do it. But i also believe that you can do it quickly and i said no. No no no no and somehow through. Just collaboration we were able to grow the company fairly quickly and hit some pretty strong diversity numbers on our way to building the company that one welcome to the greenhouse podcast. Ira what's next. I'm daniel chafe. Ceo greenhouse in this series. We talked to industry leaders about diversity hiring we'll touch on many issues ranging from attracting a broader slate of candidates to reducing bias interviewing to building an inclusive culture and much much more. I recently sat down with daniel. You niece co founder and ceo and arthur yamamoto talent from checker. They are the business and talent leader. Duo who have been raising the standards on fair chance hiring each time saying it's not enough and we need to do more daniel and arthur welcome. Thanks for having us. Thank you for having as great heavy here really excited about this conversation. Background checks some thinking. Isn't that excluding people. Don't run back on jackson. They try to let the bad guy in so he used to by going. Checks is really a risk assessments solution it does potentially reject people and find flags in reports backgrounds that can be a risk to companies. It used to have a negative reputation refocused on yet rejecting people in blocking people from jobs we went into it with a fresh perspective. The company from scratch on background checks on the beginning. We wanted to be a positive solution that provide safety and risk mitigation as well to businesses but on the other side we also wanted to make it a great expanse candidates and make sure that it actually does block p porn and tries to include more people than in the past. I'm really interested in that. I mean it seems that you gotta take on it. That hiring practices can have a real impact on social justice and how that interacts with the us. Justice system can talk about that a little bit. He has really doing more research. We realized that overall the check process is quite strict and conservative. So many bad decisions are binary decision based on the fact. Does the person have criminal records on not ends if you look at statistics in the us shave about a third of americans who have criminal records in their backgrounds. Whether it's a minor records or the uae almost End so you can imagine. The people have a criminal record and every time there's a flag they almost get rejected from an elbow jhansi. That is very strict process in leaves. A lot of people are without goods job opportunities and that is a problem that continues that injustice and he's screaming nation and that is tied to the social justice system. We tried to break this negative cycle where people make a mistake pay for its whether the so sometime fines and then they are penalized. You know again a second time when they're trying to get a job. We work to develop software that led customers have more nuanced decision process when we have data that shows that having a more open background check criteria allows companies to get great talents to get access to more talent Good retention quality of employees in workers. So we were able to tie positive. Business outcomes for customers with fantasy the process in opening jeez with criminal records. Wow that's really interesting. I mean you might think so in might say. Hey you know all being equal. I'd rather have the person without the criminal record or background versus someone who does. But you seem to be saying no actually that limits your opportunities to get the right talent when you have a discussion with a person that might have made a mistake in the past and discuss their backgrounds. You can do. An assessment is to understand is dusty res court. Has the person really improved from this. Expanse and rehabilitated. Than i can share. You know examples. We have seen ourselves firsthand at chequers jacob. We decided to become a what's called a fair chance. Employers to practice fetch hands which means giving second chance season of which is to people with criminal records. We were able to hire amazing talent. We hired a friend employees who had some criminal records in the past when you get a chance to as an employer to someone who has a background and he's highly motivated. This is going to be a successful relationship. And we've seen it because people are really dedicated to the company. Great report obuchi and really wanna prove themselves to succeed in life overall we've seen higher performance higher retention very positive engagement in benefit to our culture when we started to give second chances to people to join our company is now a growing movement of companies especially companies who care about diversity inclusion belonging and once relieved to have a positive impact on society. Veterans hiring is really one way to have a diverse workforce to give back to the community and to get access to great thailand especially fishing industries. Where there's a war for talent.

daniel chafe Ceo greenhouse niece co arthur yamamoto daniel Daniels arthur jackson dusty res court uae chequers jacob us obuchi thailand
"studio" Discussed on The Dance Studio Podcast

The Dance Studio Podcast

12:47 min | 2 years ago

"studio" Discussed on The Dance Studio Podcast

"Hey everyone and welcome to impact the podcast so a lot of you are probably wondering why the name change a lot of other things if you haven't actually listened to episodes WPRO yet please go check out episodes zero because it's only a couple of minutes long tells you exactly why everything had to be changed in the new and improved mission aw hey andrew so we really wanted to talk about so if you haven't listened episode zero and you don't want to go back right now actually realized that the way that we do things a little differently last time I was actually doing more hosting and interviewing people now it's going to be more of like an open forum we're going to have topping and talk about it talk about some problems that you may or may not be going through and how to overcome it and the solutions of of anything that we do when it comes to mindset business the marketing life in general all of that fun stuff that we all do so today we wanted to talk about flexibility so we had to change that the podcast so we had to actually be flexible in how we did that so Brenda Greg what are your insights into flexibility when somebody comes up against something where something maybe doesn't always pan out and it doesn't go according to plan and instead of just saying well crap now I can and actually do this how do we overcome and become flexible and for me I mean number one the reason you need to be flexible is because you've had go on I think before you even think about how you're going to overcome the obstacle is actually doing something that a lot of people don't think to do which is celebrating the obstacle and I know it it's really weird like why would you celebrate the things that you run into they're getting in your way but here's the thing when you're sitting still you're not running into anything so I just celebrate the fact that you're even moving and coming up against obstacles that means you're actually up and doing something to get somewhere and it's just a a reason of course correct a little bit absolutely yes I like celebrating the obstacles that we come up against because that just means we're making progress we're moving forward in life we're going after what we want and so running into obstacles is something that actually is a good thing we look forward to those because those are become challenges that we can move past and they boost desk to the next level in so many cases okay so how can we celebrate it though like when when you're going through something and winston obstacle whether it's something really traumatic or if it's something that's just a little more frustrating how does one actually turn in and find the positives in that because I know a lot of times people may struggle may or may not struggle with finding the positives isn't something so how can somebody who may be struggling finding the positives in hr orange obstacle how can they actually find that positive thing I'd like to say that it's an an a simple simple thing and I think that's something that at least for me it was a process to get to the point in my life where that became just kind of second nature and it started with having to sit down and having coaches tell me hey look for this and helping me through that or talking to friends or advisors outside of you know me to help see because typically when you're inside the problem you can't see outside the problem and it usually took getting the perspective of somebody else to help me now I can jump myself out and get different perspectives on my own but that was something that I had to learn and that's that's why I love hanging out with you guys right because you guys are outside boxer you're outside my problem sometimes in some of the things that we do we share some of those problems sometimes or those challenges those opportunities but most of the time you got is are there to show me and teach me tell me hey there may be another way around this or there may be more to this than you can see and I love that and that all comes back to either having a coach or having somebody that you can turn to in those situations when you come up against an obstacle and say hey maybe you your seat maybe you see something that I don't see in this nice I like that what about for you I mean it depends upon what the situation is it depends on if it's if it's a business thing the way that I like to look at things is I don't ever have a lot of set expectations for how things are supposed to go because yes you WANNA have a goal and you want to get to a certain goal in all the things that we talk about in everything that we do about goal setting and stuff and we'll talk about that later episodes and everything but a lot of the times we always have this one expectation of this has to become true otherwise it can't succeed can't be something that I celebrate the path if it's not the path that's laid out then I can't celebrate that and I'm just going to get frustrated with that I've learned that for me at least I need to take away that expectation of this is the way that it needs to look and I need to see it life so that I can because I dabble a facebook ads and I do a lot of marketing and stuff like that and everything it boils down to testing so you can't actually say gonNa make a hundred sales without knowing the exact path to do it but sometimes do the exact same path to get one hundred sales may look differently than you may have different the situation that comes around that so taking detours and stuff and allowing yourself to celebrate the detours and sometimes at sex sometimes I you have to have ten heart surgery he's to figure that out I had to do that and it was hard in those moments of having to celebrate it because I I'll tell you I didn't want to celebrate it God why is this happening to me why why are you know why am I having to go through this experience and it took a long time took a couple years of finding finding out the real purpose of behind why it was happening and I was the only way that thing that got me through it was because I knew that a lot of the nurses we're struggling with the other patients that they had so I had to look outside of myself and say okay so the nurses are already having a hard time having to work in the icy you how can I make their lives better can improve their lives in that allowed me to find the positives so I can actually learn to celebrate what was going on through me because maybe without me being in that situation they wouldn't have had a better experience they might have had another patient that just made their lives a little tougher so that's kind of how to look at it when it comes to celebrating obstacles and sometimes the obstacles aren't fun and sometimes we just have to figure out okay what's what can I learn what can I learn from this situation and how can actually move forward and I love there were a couple of things that you said in there that Kinda cute mi in one of the things that we specifically teach when we're talking about how to set goals and outcomes that are achievable the last step that so many people forget about is letting go the form that part where you set the destination and then you let go of the exact path to get there if I know that we're making a road trip in November and we're driving up to San Francisco San Francisco is my destination but there are so many front ways that I can get there and there could be detour and it's not about will I have to take this road and this freeway and this in order to get to San Francisco it's as long as I get San Francisco and I think that letting go of the form of how we get places because it is about expectations and yes you want to know where you're going coming but when you release the expectations of what it's supposed to look like you actually allow universe to oftentimes step in with something so much better than you ever imagined and sometimes it takes those obstacles to kind of course correct you because the reason you ran into obstacles you kinda going the wrong way and you needed to get back on the course to actually get to something bigger and better and when you can start accepting Matt and that was definitely something I had to learn how to do I was definitely not a person who was able to think like this you know seven ten years ago before I started learning everything that I was learning looking back now it's so easy to look at all of those things and now because I can look back at the course corrections I've had and see why they were there or for what purpose they were showing up what I was needing to learn now I've translated that into when I hit those obstacles now because guys I still hit the option pickles now we definitely don't want you to think that you learn this in life becomes perfect that's it it's all about shifting your mindset on how you look at the things that are happening in life so now and be in the middle of chaos and destruction and what everybody else would call you know tragic or traumatic things and I can simply say for what purposes is occurring what am I supposed to be learning here find that positive except the positive peace and move on so I think for everybody listening we're in agreement that it does take practice life yeah we've known each other a while now and we know where each other has come through in if and it hasn't been all rainbows still not and it's still not and so on that journey on that path that we've taken to get where we are to this point in life we have had to practice we've had to come up against those obstacles and over time you train your mind you train in yourself to begin to see a way around it or see another possibility and let go of that that determinism if you will of its only going to be this way so practice practice makes perfect and have people you can rely on then as well to help you see around that officer cool I like that that's why like hanging out with you guys but I mean that's that's a that's a really big key to all of this is finding your tribe to start you on the path and then as you start working together you start coming in together and finding new relationships and when you go out to events in stuff networking events or personal development events or anything that you're interested in it could be even underwater basket weaving but you find the people hey that's fun Oh superfund okay there's things that you guys but you go find your people and I think that's a key thing that we tend to forget is when it comes to coming up against an obstacle a lot of the Times I know for me when I was going through what I was dealing with with my heart stuff I turn inward because I didn't want to bother people with my problems because everyone else is so positive I didn't want to bother them with it or be they could understand me and it's okay if somebody doesn't understand you because that's why so many that's what brings us together as humans is that they may not understand exactly what you've been going through at that current time but they've probably gone through something similar or something of equal trust nobody's life is is looking at it I think for personal stuff to having someone who has gone through something different so that they can bring a different perspective because I think there there is that echo chamber when everyone's only had the same problem because then they will bring from their past all of the coaching advice that may or may not be the most beneficial you know there's positive spirals and negative spirals neutral just kind of hanging out and I always strikes those positive spirals and that leading my life because I want that outside influence outside perspective in to get out of the echo chamber so to say I think I think definitely seeking outside outside sources to you know ask ask how can I how can.

andrew seven ten years
"studio" Discussed on The Dance Studio Podcast

The Dance Studio Podcast

07:00 min | 3 years ago

"studio" Discussed on The Dance Studio Podcast

"You can feel that energy from the judges table you can feel that energy from the audience and the people people may not know that that's what they're feeling but something feels different and it feels good when they there's that cohesive energy of a team versus eight nine twelve dancers all trying to be soloists on stage at the same time. So how can we get to that type of a group dynamic then within the studio. How can we make sure that we're foster environment that we can allow our children and the students that are there to get to that type of dynamic. I think there's a few different things number one. Everything always boils down to awareness. I think it's being aware of those things that are absolutely not team playing and making sure that that is addressed the second. It's it's known <hes>. I think that's one of those things that there's that that dichotomy or that struggle as a parent and as a teacher choreographers a studio owner. Yes you want to teach the kids and the parents. That's how to handle their own ish and yet at the same time. There's that need parents for a reason or teachers features for reason it's because we are supposed to still guiding so it's okay to step in and guide and i prefer to guide from the proactive side before the trouble trouble hits versus having to guide after the fact and in a reaction and all of a sudden. It's a class meeting or a team meeting or studio meeting. Because something fell apart. I would would rather set out. These are my team expectations. We set this out in our classes. We build that rapport and i think doing those exercises as with any new group <hes> even if it's the same kids they might have different goals this year than last year do a goal setting exercise with them. What big goal do you want for yourself this year so that they can be encouraging. One another or you know do polls who likes candy who likes chocolate. What's your favorite animal. Get to know each other build that team report because like when we're teaching we have people that come from all over who don't know each other at all so we start dirt our classes with who are you. Where are you from and why are you here and then you realize that everybody pretty much boils down to being very right like because it's so easy to see how you're different from other people sometimes it's hard to see how much you're alike and so- pointing that out and then fostering that absolutely absolutely and also i know we encourage like in classes that we do as you're getting to know people inside class. It's also important to get to know them outside of class and so same eighteen goes for the studio and i know our studio is very good about having you know group activities outside of the studio where the the kids get to be together in a non dance setting and they get to experience what it's like to just hang out and be you know a child it'd be a kid be eighteen whatever and just kind of play with each other and get to hang out and be themselves not in the dance environment but really what each each person is on a personal level and also for the parents i know even again in the studio the parents some of them tend to hang out outside of the studio and i think on that note though it's also needs to be stated that just because you're on a group or on team together doesn't mean you have to be best friends with one another because so often you hear all you have to invite the whole team to this or well. This person got invited in this. I didn't everybody should have been invited. It's just like school. You're all choosing to go to this dance school or to this class like we teach and you're going undefined. People who gravitate towards one another and you're going to find people who fit in that group and people who don't necessarily fit but they have another group and you're going to see that there's individual individual groups and that's o k and even though there are different groups. You are still supportive of one another. You're still kind to one another you. You build each other up. You cheer for one another and that kind of stuff because i would say like when we go to trainings. Are we friends with everybody like good friends friends with everybody know. Are we friendly. Yes all the time. Do we get along yes but are those the people that are going to be crazy with us over here. Not always right you find and your people and i think that's the thing is find your people in know who they are and it's okay that you have your people within the group as long as you are not being exclusive in a mean way to other people if that makes sense and that's that's a hard balance. I think for kids and parents. I've seen a lot of that over the years here's where they struggle. I'm one of those people that i just invite everybody birthday parties at my house y a because i have people who show up notoriously late and if i did it to our party place they'd miss everything. I have a lot of family and i like to invite the world but that's me. I know other people like very small intimate gatherings. They want ought to have the table settings and all of those things and so they invite smaller groups to things and i think teaching your children that you know what you don't always get invited added to everything and that's okay. It doesn't have to be the end of the world and my daughter has been one. That's not invited so i'm not saying miss because when my daughter was invited to everything so no she's been the one that's been excluded and it's okay. It's a life lesson and we go through life not always being included but you know what thank you group for telling me that i'm not you because you're helping me figure out who i am and where i do belong absolutely so i just wanted to say thank you for coming on the episode this time and i want to just do a quick recap because i was taking taking notes and everything because there was a lot to cover in this episode in there wasn't there's an there's not a ton of time to talk about this because it could be talked about for hours and hours and hours. I like to put things down into acronyms. We'll do we live. Hey acronyms so the one that i was kinda. Writing down while we were talking about this was the word act a. c. t. awareness communicate and then teamwork <hes> so those are the three main takeaways from episode was just the awareness that group that next are going to happen the ability ability to communicate instead of reacting just responding instead of reacting and then teamwork because you are part of a team working together as a team is incredibly important important and in order to move forward through all of the different group dynamic levels. It's important that we do it together as a team so greg and brenda thank you so much for joining me on the podcast this time around and we look forward to having you again..

greg
"studio" Discussed on The Dance Studio Podcast

The Dance Studio Podcast

12:55 min | 3 years ago

"studio" Discussed on The Dance Studio Podcast

"Deal with it at all and they may want to just push it away you cannot you can't get through it. If if you just continue to ignore it we like to use the <hes>. We like to use the phrase you know what you resist persists and so just pretending to ignore it pretending that it's not they're taking yourself out of any confrontational situation. Possible does not give you the power to address what's going on and also to communicate communicate to all the concerns or whatever it is causing that storming and help put that fire out and so even before we've been talking about you know when you recognize that the storm is happening. Would you rather put out you know small coal small burning coals versus an entire house burning down on a three alarm fire. You can wait till it gets that bad but then you're going to have to deal with you know an entire situation. That's that's it's up in flames versus spot checking small little fires and putting those out as they come up. I know what i would rather do and so it's like just go ahead ed and address that step up communicate properly one thing we were talking about in the communication role and is that why you said brenda earlier earlier you know all these people who are maybe having questions and talking about why they're why are they having the questions. What's it's coming up and the need for whether it's just you know more than data data their learning styles absolutely absolutely and i think that's something that's so easily missed is how do you communicate with people who have different communication styles and learning styles. <hes> i had my coach. You know the a couple of days ago asked me what's my preference you know and my visual auditory and kinesthetic and my answer to her was for what purpose and she kind of just repeated it to me and i said okay and why you for what purpose you asking. What are you trying to get from me. How were you wanting to use that and it really comes down to people have different learning styles. They have different communication styles. They have ways that they prefer to process information information. I am highly auditory which means i love music. I love to analogy. I love sing song odd. Little sounds will distract me. However when i'm learning i'm very visual and kinesthetic so i need information presented that way. If you just tell me something in passing unless i write it down odds are i'm not going to remember it yet. I know other people you say at one time and they will remember things word for word and it's being able to communicate with everybody on your team in a lot of different modalities so that you're covering. Everybody and i think that's something that's so often missed. Even in the trainer world that's something specific to the type of training that we went through is learning how to communicate and all these different ways learning how to meet people in a way that they process information <hes> so that what you are trying to say the message you're trying to convey is actually received on the other end because i think most storming comes down to a miscommunication of some type somewhere right and there's four styles of of communication at any given moment. You're speaking in your style and it's quite possible. You're leaving out seventy five percent of the of the rest of the room. They're not quite meeting meeting you where with what you're saying what you're speaking. They're not they're not getting the information and receiving it in the way you're intending it to come out so us being trained obviously to speak when we're at the front of the room in multiple learning styles communicate in multiple ways to that you do reach everybody in the room and you keep everybody's attention <hes> is amazing skill to have and also whether it studio owners the choreographers themselves or even even the parents within the groups they have and even the dancers <hes> so even the dancers who especially some of the older teens they can grasp this concept as as well in their leadership roles so two things. Are you saying that storming is going to happen in every class between every all the students and then all between all of the choreographer as as as a staff so there's gonna be multiple separate group dynamics in the whole studio throughout the whole year. I wish you were doing video because then you could just see my faces a response. You would have a nice visual theoretically. Yes it's possible because it's all different groups so you will have the teams themselves of the kids. Even within the dances it could happen now. If you've got really strong rapport. It may just be a quick little blip it might be someone says something someone says something back and now you're done and it completely happened without paying attention to it and they got through themselves chiefs and that's my ideal is when a group can actually get themselves for the storming period. I don't have to step in as a leader as the leader. Though you wanna be watching for that to make sure that you can step in. Should you need to and i think that's again where that awareness part comes in because yes the staff can storm because they're even if the staff doesn't change because the dynamic of the studio is now a new group it can affect it all different levels even with the moms. Are we really going to get into down small okay i. I don't think we need a reason as dance moms to storm but yes you could theoretically even just in shifts. There's always that powerplay dynamic. I think going in amongst dance moms because if you think about it were all impacted by everything we're experiencing so as a dance mom you've also got all your other mom stuff going on and you might be in another the group for brothers class or brothers sport or you know all these other shifts that may be happening and so that then changes your ability to <hes> maintain yourself in the moment in which case you may accidentally react in a way that you didn't mean to which could then start a storming <hes> <hes> and we can always go back to storming. Ideally you want to do the forming get through storming so you can get to norm and performing as a team and that last phase of performing as a team name is where you want to be and it can very easily drop back into storming the more and i've watched it and the more are your group has built their team. Were poor the more as a leader. You have been able to facilitate that even when you blip back into a storming ming period is just that it's a blip and you can move right through it so i have a question that i don't know if a lot of the listeners are going to have but there's a lot of information that was just thrown out there and i don't know how can i if anyone's listening and they have this they can because i i'm coming at it from a perspective. I don't have the training that you have so. I can't communicate in the different learning styles a lot of choreographers dance teachers or even parents. Listening may not know how to talk in different learning styles. They've never heard of that for <hes>. So does that mean that it's going to be hopeless to get through the storming period. If we don't understand those absolutely not it really comes down to just listen listen to the other person and if there is a communication breakdown instead of doing kind of the normal response of being accused of tory because well. I know i said this and i don't know why they don't understand. Bring it back to where you can actually be in control and you can be empowered in the conversation and you can look at yourself and then ask them. Where did the communication breakdown because this response getting from. You isn't what i anticipated so clearly. I did not deliver my message correctly. How can i better help. You understand what i was wanting to convey so that you actually get the communication. I meant to give because your response being something. I didn't expect means that i had a breakdown somewhere i can control how <hes> y respond and how i speak. I can't control their response but i can change how i speak to change response. If that makes sense yeah absolutely <hes> the last thing that you talked about though i think is something that's important that we needed to talk about because in dance everyone wants to a lot of the the kids and the parents are pushing towards solos. Yes and a lot of the things that's not always addressed in. The dance world is that it's actually a team sport absolutely so let's talk about teamwork a little bit because you said performing as a team so yes address that i mean what is it teamwork makes the dream work of simply showing it was horrible. I apologize and i for one. I love solos. My older daughter does to my younger daughter. Just started this last year. She wants to know i know mommy. Just can't four solos into kids makes me wanna cry <hes> and yes solar very important because that is where they work on their individual individual technical skills and i think they're highly important and unless you're dancing is an independent every time you step into a competition you you. Are there representing your team. You're probably wearing your team jacket. You're probably wearing your team logo and i think that's one of the biggest things is to remember that yes when when it is time to dancer solo you're there to represent your team as the best you can cause remember. You're representing your studio and your studios training. You are taking the stage wjr and how you act on stage how you act offstage how you act backstage all of that is representative representative of your studio jio environment or so we hope <hes> and in that you are there to represent your studio and your team. That's why they're studio awards. That's why sometimes there's a team sportsmanship award <hes> and i think that's something that a lot of the dancers depending on where they came from don't necessarily get and i think shows like dance moms and things like that where there are so many good qualities to them. I think because it's supposed to be interesting interesting tv. There's a lot of stuff that's written that kind of pits dancers against one another and i think sometimes studios emulate that not knowing any different and you're really there to support each other <hes> i one of my favorite things is when the girls are dancing a solo. Everybody else is out there watching and they're cheering waiting for them and vice versa that it's not a oh so and so's on stage in the rest of us are kicking over here or we wanna go relax sometimes. Yes we miss solos. There are times where i have have to tell my daughter. No you can't go watch the next ten solos in a row that our studio your solos in fifteen and i need for you to get ready so send them. Your love love. Give them hugs will support them back here and you also need to do your job to represent your studio but i think that team mentality of remembering remembering that one dance is not pitted against another dance that it's not about one dancer being better than another. How can you all bring everything you have into into everything. You guys do on stage so that your entire studio shots. They're all gonna stare at me. I think this came from that was actually funny. I wish that was on video and where this came from is one of our dancers does play a team sport and we had the pleasure of watching her play soccer a couple of days ago and it was one of the things that we noticed and i just offhand another the other mom to her mom made a comment. I wish all dancers had to play a team sport at some point like like soccer where they are actually communicating in their shouting to one another how they can all do better and win this and they're building each other up and they're queuing doing each other in and they're supporting each other. If something goes wrong and obviously you can't do that when you're onstage for the two and a half minutes. If you all of a sudden sit there and go point your foot it's going to work. We're but what can you do beforehand. This is something that my daughter tries to do and it's the group huddle. It's my favorite picture to take back stage. Every every competition is the group huddle and i love it when the choreographers bring it in and what i love is as my older daughter is eleven and so as she's kind of getting into that older her age when she or her friends initiate bring it in for huddle and they actually huddled up and they give each other pointers and they build each other up and then they actually take the stage as a cohesive unit..

soccer representative brenda chiefs seventy five percent
"studio" Discussed on The Dance Studio Podcast

The Dance Studio Podcast

07:41 min | 3 years ago

"studio" Discussed on The Dance Studio Podcast

"Hey everyone welcome back back to the dance studio podcast and sell excited to have brenda jones and greg stole with us back again just a couple of weeks ago. We were at the dance teacher summit and and dancer palooza. We've have a lot of exciting guests in the lineup coming up for you in the next few months here and we had a really great time brennan greg. Would you think those awesome. There's there's a lot of fun. I had a great time. It was really cool to walk around that whole arena and see all the cool designs and everything that's coming out for dancing the dance wear and different <hes> different vendors awesome yeah. It was a lot of fun especially talking to a bunch of the vendors. Brenda did a lot of the talking talking with all the dance where companies because we're coming into a new season so we're all fine costumes and get everything ready for the next competitive season and which means i wanted to or we all were talking about this just not too long ago and we wanted to bring it up on the podcasts which group dynamics brenda and greg as trainers. You understand group dynamics like noah. No one else does and i want to bring that to the awareness of studio owners kind of see what your knowledge is of group dynamics and how they can make sure that this next season is a positive one instead of one where they want to rip their hair out and just close their doors well. I can't guarantee that knowing about group. Dynamics is going to avoid that i mean there is still an entire season ahead so that's a thing <hes> but as you were saying coming into a brand new season i think group dynamics is something that until the i was actually specifically that for the purpose of training. I don't think i really understood it in the ways that it actually really works and that's me coming out of a psychology background still didn't really know how that that worked and i think for me right now. The biggest thing is as we go into new seasons even if your staff stayed the same even if no okay kids changed within your studio which let's be honest you probably got some new little ones and you probably had some graduating seniors the biggest thing about group dynamics that makes if you change even one person just one person resets an entire group and there are four phases of groups that groups have to go through in order to get to that kind of easy and effortless part of being a team or group and there's the scary stage so the first one is forming and for studio owners and choreographers. This is probably where you are right now and it probably feels really scary. 'cause you're trying to do schedules and you're trying to put together your different dances and figure out who's going to choreograph. What's the theme and what's the music and all of that but it's actually stage number two. That's the scary one as a trainer or as a leader of a group and that storming and it is exactly what you would think sounds terrifying and i think even this goes out to even just more than two studio owners. The paris's harasses well absolutely and so what storming is basically whenever a group i forms which is stage one. It has to go through a stage. That's called called storming and this is where people are trying to find their place in the group. Your old leaders may be vying to stay leaders. People who may or may not have necessarily been a leader last time who may have gone kind of under the radar might be vying for position and it's not that it's this battle of wills per se and it's not negative in any way it's just everyone's trying trying to figure out where they best fit in in this group in this moment and storming can be really really long and really really rough or it can be super quick and simple and it all comes down to the leadership and how they handle this this storming face you gotta have you gotta have active leaders taking proactive measures when storming takes place and that is strong strong leadership strong communication. I know we're gonna talk about that going forward but having those those people in those leadership roles be able to take the group through that as quick as possible so that they can exit out the other side and get on with the rest of the season exactly and i think you know and i've had plenty of different classes over the years where something had to happen. We've had students have emergencies partway through and i know that losing that one person in the middle of the class where we're going to storm and and as the leader of the group i can come in and decide. This is how it's going to work. Here's what happened and a lotta times. Storming is not only people trying to figure out where they fit but also when people just have questions and not everybody actually asks the questions that they have and so they sit and they kind of grew over here off to the side and are easily upset or easily frustrated by not having answers even though they're not asking the questions and so as a leader. It's not only recognizing the storming. It's also recognizing who is storming how they're storming and what it is. They need when they ask a question ed so that you can best give them that because the question isn't always about needing information in a data sense and a lot of us think it is. Oh if you have a question it's because you're missing information. No there's so many reasons that people have questions and it's learning how to really understand where they're coming from in having that question and then then being able to guide them through that as quickly as possible because like i said storming can last an entire season. I've seen it happen and storming can last thirty seconds and i've seen that happen as well so what are some tricks to get through it as quickly as possible because if it can take a whole season or it can take a day then what are tricks that studio owners or people that are managing the studio or even choreographers. Can they manage. The expectations can get through as quickly as possible. I think the biggest one is being aware of it and in that moment that you become aware of it. I think it's so easy to slip back into those those human reactions that we all get into because there's just so much going on in life that we want to just react or we want to just get upset or we people wanna point fingers. <hes> we were having a discussion the other day about why do we always see the negative and things and it's being able to positive moment and step back for a second figure out. Why is it happening. For what purpose is it happening. What's the structure picture of what's going on and then making a decision because storming can be for so many different reasons and in so many different ways. It's really looking at what is <unk> happening for you in that moment for your group and then tackling that as it goes but the big one being awareness and then being able to maintain your composure is your long enough to actually have a response versus a reaction or worse the pointing the finger wire you x y and z realizing that someone has take that role and it could be that person you least expect but somebody is going to take the role of the person who starts the storming. Thank it be grateful that that it started so that you can move the group through it because it has to happen and i think that's one of the misunderstandings that wolf. I just keep everybody happy that we never have have to do that. Then all is good. No groups have to go through it so you may as well get through it as soon as possible as quickly as possible so thank whoever starts it and then make sure you're the one who closes it up. Yeah we were talking about what it's like. When you have somebody especially in leadership roles who necessarily don't want to deal.

brenda jones greg noah paris thirty seconds
"studio" Discussed on The Dance Studio Podcast

The Dance Studio Podcast

09:31 min | 3 years ago

"studio" Discussed on The Dance Studio Podcast

"On if you're a choreographer you're dancing or perform or your mom your business all of those things you're probably one if not all of those for a lot of the time and so it's being able to notice that and all the more so being very conscious especially at the beginning to practice stopping taking a couple of breaths stepping back for a moment and if nothing else thank you for your feedback and move on with your life because when it comes down to it someone's opinion of me is not about middle. I can hold onto that. That's where I get to control the power of the conversation. I like that piece of stepping taking a step back. There's definitely and I've used this one many times in my own life life that is when I was at that point previously I would actually begin to take my breath and breathe but I would also take a step back from that person so many times we go forward and we push forward into somebody's face or we want to get up you know all in their business and make sure that they can hear us and see us and feel us feel our power and yet that's when it is from pure reaction and reacting acting <music> out lashing out in a way that can be hurtful harmful to the situation and probably doesn't have any <hes> moving the Neat Neil forward you know <hes> productive aspects when you're in when you're arguing or coming from that type of <hes> emotional state but taking that step back after you take the breath after you take that step back yes you could go with you know what thank you for your feedback. You could end up there or I believe. Brenda looted to before you can ask the clarifying defying question you know the English language. It's so it's so limited we are have so few words to describe certain things that a lot of times people will use a label in such a general way and we take offense to it and we take we take reaction to it and yet not completely understanding why they even shows us that label to begin with and so asking the question. Hey you know what did you mean by hi that or what do you mean by that word that word specifically you would you might be surprised to find that they didn't mean at all what you tell you took it and they were actually you know attempting to to give you a much smaller <hes> more defining word but maybe they just use something larger general or or vice versa. Maybe they use the wrong word. How many times do we slip when we're in in you know <hes> whether eh whether it's a heated argument or heated spirited debate that's what I like to call it whether sometimes sometimes we're in spirited debate and you know how how often do we were on the verge of not being able to think really clearly and so we use as the wrong word and so the person reacts to the wrong word and then you have this whole escalation to something that didn't even mean to come out? We've all been there and so again. Take that deep breath take that step back. Ask a clarifying refined clash question you know what did you really mean by that or what do you mean by that word and see where the conversation goes for from there okay so how about a lot of the times we when we're teaching especially the performers that are in the studio day in and day competitive dancers as a choreographer you use labels to describe people or performers based on what they are doing in how you want them to perform better. How do you decide the difference between a choreographer? Geography pushing you and somebody mislabeling you in you taking that negatively. How do you then try to not take that label negatively while you're in with everyone else during the performance like the first thing is to not try? I heard that word <hes> how did not take it negatively. I think it's it really comes back to just really owning that anyone's opinion that's just their opinion and really understanding who you are the dancer that you know kind of triggered this whole concept for us. You know it came down to you know I simply asked him. Who are you because he was? He was struggling with these labels that people were giving him because he he wasn't. I guess feeling feeling really congruent in alignment with them and he wanted to keep them separate <hes> similar like when I was growing up there was the part of me that was a dancer. There was the part of me that was a band Geek. There was the part of me that was also one of those A._p.. Nerds and the science geek either and you you tried to keep those segmented and so I simply just asked him who are you and he started running those labels and it took some work and some questioning on my part to really get him to broaden what those labels even met for him and really helping him know who he is because when you really know who you are. It doesn't matter what other people say about you when you can know who you are an own it and love yourself for who you are. You're everything else just becomes. It just bounces off of you because you get to that point. I think I'd like to challenge you know a lot of the teachers instructors the choreographers all the people out there that or giving feedback <hes> when you know working in this industry and other industries and just in life in general but if you are going to use labels especially in the process of giving feedback use it in an empowering way and we like to use something that's called the feedback sandwich and so you give them a small thing that they did right using positive labels into what they did right you give them their stretch in the middle something that they can work on stretching. You're pointing running that out to them and then you just give them an overall general <hes> did a good job <hes> something something broader to close off that sandwich and in doing so even in our in our events in our trainings when we do those types of feedback the reaction that people have the response is far more empowering because you're you're giving them good nuggets and then you're giving them this this thing that they work on that a label that you no something that they need to stretch in life or in there in the on there in the studio <hes> or as a dancer and so and then giving them that overall okay you did a great end to finish it off. You did a great job so the feedback sandwiches a great way to I used labels in an empower way. If you don't have time to do the feedback sandwich just as a teacher in general always always choose to give empowering labels. Even when people have done something that was incorrect you can always find a way to give that feedback in a more empowering way. Hey I saw this going on and I would love to see more of this happening over here. <hes> or you know again you do this really well. Let's just make that bigger. Let's let's go bigger here. <hes> there's always a an empowering way. I do believe that you can use labels that that we have to give awesome. Is there a specific example of feedback sandwich. Where were you could elaborate on that because a lot of times just compartmentalizing all that's difficult? What's like an example of that that somebody listening like Oh? That's what that means all this weekend. <hes> we just came out of an inhouse intensive blocks and one of the things that they were doing solo critiques and so I got to go in because one of my daughter's is little. She doesn't have a phone so I got to go in and listen to the critiques and they were all really really good at using this so that always makes me happy because then it's something I don't have to try to fix on the back end and but one of the things they did for her. Hey we really love this this and this we love your leg will turn we loved you know your power over here. What we want you to work on is really pulling that shoulder because it's holding you back in your leg whole turn and they actually had her try it right then to get it into her body and then started giving her an overall? The Solo looks great loved everything about it. Keep up and it's you know with anything you do. I mean we could sit and go hey andrew. I really love how you ask these interview view questions my stretch for you would be to make sure that we fill out our forms ahead of time so that we're better prepared and overall. I mean great podcast rate. That's that is a feedback sandwich. It doesn't have to be anything big long drawn out. It's just making sure that you're pointing eating out the positives and that you're not giving thirty eight things to work on because after one or two they're overwhelmed awesome. Definitely we are going to be throwing a quick info-graphic together for anyone listening. If you want that info-graphic make sure to head to the facebook group facebook dot com slash groups slaps the dance video podcast to actually have an info graphic that shows how to use the feedback Sandwich Brendan Greg we have to start packing for nationals and good stuff together and Oliver craziness that entails so thanks for joining me on this episode and we'll see you next time you've been listening to the dance studio podcast. Make sure to hit subscribe on itunes or Google play to get new episodes every single week..

Neil facebook Brenda Brendan Greg itunes Google Oliver andrew
"studio" Discussed on The Dance Studio Podcast

The Dance Studio Podcast

12:06 min | 3 years ago

"studio" Discussed on The Dance Studio Podcast

"The dance studio podcast. My name is Andrew and I am jazz to be sitting here with Brenda and Greg of belief company and we are location so things aren't being video recorded today so if you listen to us on the PODCAST podcast well it might sound a little preference with this thing that we are actually on location. We had a busy busy busy week half. That's an understatement we had. What do we have in house convention banquet? We're going to get ready for nationals on. We're just so we've been kind of all over the place so sometimes we're not always able to be in the studio recording everything so because of that. I wanted to preface that with that before we jump into it so Brennan Greg. Thank you so much for joining us on today's as episode. Thanks for having US absolutely good to be here so we actually got a question the other day Brenda <hes> we were talking to a dancer and he talked about labels and how he didn't like the labels that he people were calling him <hes> and I I know that you have to say about labels and I wanted to just jump right into it. Well I wanNA profess with it. Wasn't that the the labels themselves were not negative. They were you know Sportsperson an athlete a dancer. They were labels that I think you know we all give ourselves all the time yet for some reason for him. The wave the context that they were done in it kind of triggered something inside of him and I think it's really important that because we do spend so much time talking about the words that we use and it's in the labeling of something in the naming of something that you create it. It does not exist until you label it in the second you label it. You not only label what it is. You label everything that it's not and I think that's one of those things that he was struggling with that when someone gave him a label he was seeing everything that meant he wasn't versus being able to take the resources of that label that was given and saying yes. I am that and I'm so much more. It's interesting how exactly likely that when you use a label it creates a boundary. You're you're creating that boundary around that thing or that person or that place that object that you're describing and so giving that a label then then like Brennan said also describes everything that it is in unfortunately in this particular case looking at all those things that the label wasn't how many of us out there. You know do that all the time we we get. We're in conversation and somebody you know describes a certain way or they tell another friend that we are certain thing and you know a social media. We see that all the time <hes> people Miss Reed <hes> a lot of times somebody else and they'll create a label and throw that out there in a post or something and and then the person reads it and they think all the wrong things about that label and yet a lot of times maybe that person meant it in a better way <hes> and has just taken in for everything that it isn't and losing sight of or just not even realizing oh I can have this label and all the good things that come with it and I am so much more than just that label okay so so how does somebody understand the difference between the label itself in the resources that they can tap into because somebody I mean a lot of times we're saying oh this is the label lake I worked in restaurants and I helped grow restaurants in the thing that people kept saying all the time was millennials millennials millennials. You Never WanNa hire millennial and those are the people that actually raise the millennials that were saying that so I mean I love being millennial. I'm a millennial myself. I have a ton of resources that I have that people that are older than me. Don't necessarily have and I can also tap into the resources that the younger generations have because I am able to see both ways but how can people actually come into actually see <hes> the different resources that are available to those labels instead of just seeing it as a negative. I I think it comes down to in neuro linguistic programming we have I think we've talked about the presuppositions before those things that we conveniently believe as true because they just make life easier to navigate and one of them remembering that everybody has their own version of reality. That's built out of everything that they've experienced in life and so for me with the dancer we were talking to it was him hearing that label and then me actually turning on him and asking him why he was choosing to find the negative in that label because it wasn't intended in that way it was a clarification that somebody was making to try to justify something and they were trying to help be positive and it's in that realizing that even when someone says a label about you number one if it strikes a cord for you you might WanNa look at something. Thing that's going on because you may have some internal things you need to deal with and that was something for him. <hes> he liked keeping his life very compartmentalized and so that was the struggle for him. There's also just that realization that when somebody says a label number one what they said head and what you think that word is are oftentimes different and number two anything that someone says about you especially when it said in a less than positive manner that actually says everything about the person who's giving the label and nothing about the person in his being labeled because we have this belief that what you cannot see and other people what you don't see in yourself so if someone is seeing something negative in you it's because they have that in themselves and that's that's an internal struggle for them and when you can teach kids and this is something I've done with my daughters all growing up being dances not an easy sport to be in and there's a lot of judgment because we actually go into the sport for the purpose of being judged by others in sometimes it goes a little far and in that you know really from the time. They were little if somebody said something less than Nice saying hey you know what that tells me a lot about what they're going through. Maybe something they're hearing from their parent or someone from school or maybe this is going on and I have used used it to help my girls kind of get better understanding of life for everybody around them and having that bigger picture and it's hard especially as a kid to not take everything personally and being able to turn that in going okay if they're saying that about me what are their struggles struggles that they're in and how can I have compassion for them because that lash out from the other person that's because they need help. And how can I go support. That person and I think that's where I've I've used that balance for my girls. I think I think that a great place to start is an awareness of when somebody uses a label that you feel is negative or you don't associate with in the way that they're using that label the great place to start his awareness. What is that trigger inside you? How does that make you feel and where's that in your body? Where where do you feel that inside of yourself? Start with with the awareness of that and then you can also then begin to kind of discover with union yourself. Why is it that this is causing this trigger in me? What is going on within myself that I'm reacting my body is reacting in this way you can do a lot of self-discovery with that about why that label tends to trigger you <music> in such a way and then you can begin to deescalate that trigger once you have that awareness it allows you and gives you gives you back control of the situation of over that label when somebody somebody uses it <hes> having that awareness gives you the power to then say well? You know what I'm not gonNA react that way. I you know what they can say that all they want but that just isn't me all of a sudden you come back to that awareness us and finding who you are and having that belief within yourself knowing who you are and what you stand for <hes> when you can arrive there <hes> and really really know what you are about then you've you've come to a place where those triggers those label or those labels no longer have the same effect to trigger you <hes> like they may be had been before okay well. I know some people are probably listening to the episode right now saying Yay that's all great fine and Dandy in theory because everything's great in theory and then all of a sudden when they are in those emotions and somebody labels them something they immediately react to that <hes> how can they become aware in that moment to then be able to take step.

Brennan Greg Andrew Brenda Miss Reed
"studio" Discussed on The Dance Studio Podcast

The Dance Studio Podcast

08:35 min | 3 years ago

"studio" Discussed on The Dance Studio Podcast

"And I think your heart needs to be in at your desire needs to be in it. Because otherwise, it's translates on stage. If you stick a child onstage who doesn't want to be there trust the judges see it. Absolutely. They see it. And if they're in group dances, their team is affected by it. Maybe not consciously. But subconsciously and so for me. I have a conversation with my daughter, every year is the something we want to still be doing is this something you want to pursue, and trust their times that we've tried to talk her out of it, and I may have kind of sort of talked out one time, and we needed a break, and she needed a break from the environment that we were in I needed a break from the environment that we were in because it was becoming very toxic unhealthy for us at the time. And we didn't leave dance though the agreement was she was going to do some other things we weren't going to compete that year. She finished the dedication that I had asked for had told her that if she was going to. Pete. We were staying through minis. She finished off her many here, and I said, do you wanna compete again? Do you wanna do some other things? And she said, I think I wanna try some other things great. You are still going to go to class as direct dancer. You are still going to take a couple of privates. Because if you decide you wanna come back in a year, I wanna make sure you've at least maintained your skills, maybe you're not growing at the same rate, but you've at least maintained everything that you've worked for, for five years. And sure enough that next year we were back full force and competitive dance. And I'm so glad we did my other daughter had something happened where it scared her, and it was traumatic, and we did quit dance with her for a couple of years. And she saved me money it was great. And yet, when she decided to go back, she went to one class and said, mommy, I want to dish in. She hadn't danced for over two years, took to forty five minute classes, and then walked into dishes, and we were shocked at not only how much she loved it. But how good she got an? And she wants to do nothing else, and I will support that and yet we will still ask is the something you want to do. And if it's not, what would you rather do? Instead, let's start those classes and do two things and explorer instead of just walking away. Remember, remember that if they make that decision that the something else. I know the parents, you know, parents want the best for their kids. They really do. They want their kids to excel and succeed life at dance and I know they have the best best heart for their child. And yet, it's it is one of those tough decisions to say, it's okay, it's okay to take a step back or two, like separate for a little bit, and try something new, maybe do both, you know, explore a little bit of both. It's okay to do that. So something to remember that, you know, it doesn't have to be black and white all the time. It doesn't have to be one or the other. So it's, it's parenting isn't easy. Right. So, and sometimes it comes down to changing how much you dance or where you dance or was styles you're competing in or. Days your dancing. There's so many different ways you can play with it. You can work with your studio owners, you can work with your choreographers and having that flexibility. And having that open communication is what makes that really easy, and, you know, we have a home here at our studio that we will probably be here forever. And even if my children decide not to dance, I'll probably still be sitting in here and helping out because I love this community so much, and I love helping the dancers and the families who are here, and, you know, and long after they are done, dancing, I will probably still be here supporting the studio and you know, helping out where we can because this is something that there's so much like I said earlier to dance and to the dance family, and maybe they do go from company to wreck for your maybe they go from doing Jillian dances to having a few less, or maybe they will the other way. Maybe sometimes they're not happy because they're not doing enough dances. And they're not feeling used. Enough. And I think for my daughter, that was one of them, her burn out was from not really feeling appreciated sometimes to okay? We're going to go in limited number of dances mom's gonna go a little crazy crazy. And we're going to make that happen. And you know what that actually made her happier, and it made her stronger dancer, which then kept moving that excellence bar higher and higher and higher, and it made her feel good about yourself. And so it's playing with that it's not always about cutting back and doing something else. Sometimes it's about going all in nice, and what and look at her now how she, she talk about someone who goes all out dancing is much as your your daughters. Do the those to go all out? They do. Leave it all on the dance floor time and time again, whether it's at the studio in practice or out there. You know, in competition, they really do bring it every single time, probably because they have a great training from great mom and yet it's amazing also, again the energy that projects out to the other students and the other dancers, it affects everybody. And so they're all doing that they're all showing up, and it's exciting to watch the studio this year. So one, I think it's. Also important remember one of the things that we love talking about is for what purpose for what purpose are you, dancing and making sure that what's important to you for dance instruction? What's important to you is a family that the studio that you're at matches that, and I think that has a lot to do with two is for what purpose are you dancing for what purpose you doing company for what purpose you not doing company for what purpose? Are you doing a solo or not doing a solo understanding all of those, I think, really helps understand the child and any struggles going through. And sometimes they can be saying, I want to quit. And you can simply say, for what purpose and then in that conversation, you find out that we'll just because it got a little hard that responses apparent is going to be different than I just don't love it. I really want to do something else. You know, Mike kids wanted to quit because of hard guess what? I'm not gonna let you off hook. That's, that's a no go from. We push through things being hard. Because we expect things to get hard. That is the edge of that comfort zone this, and what we know in what we teach is that everything in life is about continually expanding beyond that comfort zone, moving it somewhere new and till that becomes comfort and then moving out again. And so for us good. It's getting hard great. That means. We're right at that point. That's where the breakthroughs going to happen. I love that. That's one of the learning takes place the up and I would love to keep talking, but we are getting to that time we can carry on this conversation on another episode. The one taffeta half for all the listeners though is, I want you to focus on one thing that you're going to do this week that you're going to go all out for. You're gonna leave it all out on the floor. You're going to do give it your best give it your all you're gonna go all out one hundred percent. What I want you to do is, I want you to post what you're going to do in the group, the dance video podcast group, Facebook dot com slash groups slash the dance studio podcast. You can join. If you are not yet, in there come join us, and there will get one of three to approve approve you're right away, and then I want you to post in, in the scriptures the strips in the comments and the group, I'm diehard oppose aim went out and we went all out. We went out today in my body is telling me that so what's the one thing that you're going to do, whether it's in your business, whether it's as a, as a parent, whether it's as somebody who is a wife or a husband or a brother sister, whatever it is, no matter what area of life you want to focus on. What's the one thing that you're gonna do to leave it all out on the floor and go all in for yourself and for your business suppose that in the group below Greg Brenda, thank you so much for joining us on this up sedans, new podcasts, and we look forward to seeing you on the next one. Thank you, and you love it by..

Facebook Pete Greg Brenda Jillian Mike kids one hundred percent forty five minute five years two years
"studio" Discussed on The Dance Studio Podcast

The Dance Studio Podcast

10:52 min | 3 years ago

"studio" Discussed on The Dance Studio Podcast

"Be perfect at it. Perfect is the lowest form of excellence that you can strive for strive just to be excellent be better than you were the day before and enleve perfection. That's one of those things you can leave at the door because, you know, you're gonna make mistakes. And that's a great thing 'cause you are learning you're moving forward. If you weren't, you wouldn't be making mistakes, well, in the simply say that perfection the lowest standard you could shoot for is. It's a completely unattainable. Yeah. Or if it if attainable. It's not attainable consistently. And if you cannot be that excellent on a consistent basis, then are you really your true? Excellent self, and you're not, and so we're wanting are dancers to get continually better each every time they go out. It's always fun to grab that, that video at the first competition. Of the season and the last competition, I love the fact that our first regional is also the nationals were going to it's going to be so fun to compare countdown February versus countdown July, and so many of our dances, don't even look the same dancers. Don't look the same. And that's what we do is trainers. I come out of any training with, you know what's my feedback. What's my feedback sandwich? What is my stretch on anything and everything? And when people tell me, no everything was great. Okay. Thank you. And what is my stretch? Please. Help me grow because there was always a way to stretch. Always always always no matter how good something is. There's always a stretch because you want to keep growing, if you're not growing them. What are you doing? What's Foley for sure am? I mean the over, we have all those great messages. And at the end of the day, Dennis was the one that called it out on stage. He said the point of dance is to have fun because if you're so focused on growth and getting better in may. Making all of these things are so fine tuned in yet, you forget to have fun than at the end of the day. What's the point? And he had called out, basically said, if there's a child out there that I can see that's not having fun, and they don't want to be there. I will go talk to their parents in Saco, take them to Parkinson because I want them to be here so they can go all out. And if you're not willing to go all out and now, fun and have so much fun that you're just a super enjoying yourself. So you can allow yourself to listen to the music than go play outside because they're choosing to be there over the weekend. Two days. Saturday Sunday in a cold hotel in that hotel was so cold. That That was. was. And at the dentist was just like if you're not having fun. I don't want you here because that means you're not gonna show up folly so one of those things spreads everybody else though we have a thirty energy field. So when you have that person that doesn't want to be there, not only they not showing up for themselves, but they're having an energetic fact, that's rippling out from them. And when you're in it convention, and there's a lot of people you don't have thirty feet from you to the next person. You may have thirty inches. Right. You're right on top of each other and some of these rooms, and so that spreads. So it's not just the matter in consciously. He may not understand this. That, that's part of why you don't want that person. That doesn't want to be there. Well, a some absolutely. And I want to since your parents, I want you to talk on this one, especially because it's something that we hear a lot and we kind of talked about it a little bit on the last that Iran, but the parent expectations in the parents that are forcing their kids to be in dance into continued to compete, and then the ones that are so focused on if you didn't do well in didn't place, well at competition, even though all of the judges are looking at completely different things in every single time. No matter how many times that you would actually go up and do that performance, they would find different things that they like and didn't like in judge based off their perceptions of what they saw in that moment. So can you speak a little bit on that about how we can start transitioning, the parents to actually focusing in on how to actually talk to their kids about if they actually want to continue doing this, or if they should go find something else? You know, it's kind of that, devil, edged sword is you don't wanna be the parent that let your. Kid off the hook the second, they say, I don't want to because when things get hard, it's kind of a standard response to say, I don't like this anymore. I want to do it and you know us and we push the comfort zone and so, especially from kids, like, right? And then they're certain ages were they just I don't wanna do anything I want to sit on my phone all day. Right. And so there's there's that line. And I think it takes number one, just really understanding your child and not just watching what's going on, on the surface, but looking for those deeper things that are going on. Are they saying they don't like dance because of something else, they would rather be doing or they saying they don't like dance because it's hard and they don't wanna do it like that's different. If there's another passion if they're saying, but I really wanna do this sport. I really want to join this team I really wanna do this club. But I can't because I always have dance that's different than this is really hard and I'm losing. So I don't wanna do this anymore. And you know, and that's one of my daughters. It's been very interesting to have the two of them. One of them's been training for a very long time. And, you know, technically she doesn't always have with the judges wanna see onstage in a competition yet. She has a performance value that those same judges wanna see and vote dancer, the weekend, then her sister comes out and from day one is hitting the overalls whereas, you know, my older daughter struggles just to reach that highest level of adjudication, because we've pushed her into the competitive level, when she's, she's stuck somewhere in between that mid level, and the competitive level, and we decided to push her, but that means, again, she's going to have to work really hard and. You do want to be very careful about just letting them off when things get hard and yet, at the same time, you do want to encourage them, and I think it comes down to encouraging them reminding them that this isn't about how your placing overall against other people this isn't about me versus other people. This is about you versus yourself. Are you improving? Is this performance better than the last performance? Yes. Then that's a win. If you stumbled on stage, did you recover? Yes. That's a win. I had there was the competition last year and my daughter because of how we warmed up her turns before she took the stage. She did something. She never does, which is forget choreography, and she had a brain fart, and she went into the wrong kind of turn she hit a coup bay and went oh, shoot that's supposed to be posse and tried to pull off the impossible going Kupa pasta and landed on her, but it was her opening trick of her solo which some kids have burst into tears run off stage. She however danced, the rest of the dance better than she ever has and scored higher than she ever scored that season. And so I call that a win. Whereas other parents may look at that good. But you fell or they bobble in turn you could've done better. You know what now's probably not the time to address that, especially if they've got nine more chances this weekend deaf. Probably the time to address that. And I think for parents, it's keeping your own expectations and check. And even if you're disappointed because you wanted so much more for your child. And that's really what it comes down to. We want so much for our children to do well, and so we feel that disappointment with them. It's also managing those expectations and managing that disappointment and maintaining your emotional state to be there for the purpose of the weekend because that, that interaction can potentially set the tone for the rest of the weekend. And, and I've seen that happen, or that interaction consent, the tone in a positive where you know what not your best. What do you got coming up next? What are you going to do to pull it together? Let me help you with that. And then go kill it the rest of the the weekend. Yeah. Everything. Yes, it's all about that communication. So all about the communication between dancer parent having that level of communication with your with your child with your kid. It it's everything because that is where you will empower them, you help them get over those moments get through those moments and onto the next performance in the best way possible. There is another piece of this that we haven't talked about when having that conversation and expectations as a parent, you have to also ask yourself if you're a parent, and you're hearing from your child that they do want to do something else. Maybe there is something else. They wanna go after maybe there's something they're excited about. Maybe it's arts, you know, you never know what it is, if there is something that they want to do, the hard question is out there for the parents, are you pushing the child, because you're trying to live vicariously through them? Is this your dream not there's that I know that's tough to take? And that's that's something that you have to really dig deep sometimes, and ask yourself to come to terms with is this something that maybe you on it as a child and didn't quite get this level of attention. And maybe your parents, you know, didn't didn't go that route for you. And so it's you know there's some parents who push. This upon their kids. And maybe it's just not the right time for the child or teen. Maybe their expectations are rising out of their own own attempt to live vicariously through their their kid and, and have something come to fruition that they wish they would have for themselves. And so that is a tough question to ask as a parent. But yet it does need to be addressed. Well, and there's that balance of sometimes we see how good our kids are even when they don't, and we see their potential, and sometimes it's hard to let them walk away from that. And I think Andrew, and I think you and I were talking the movie center stage at the very end of the movie it's, you know, one of the dancers is this phenomenal dancer, and yet she, she wants to quit, and she's simply she has basically a conversation with mom at the end. And it's she tells her mother, you didn't have the feet. I don't have a heart. And I think your heart needs to be in at your desire needs to be in it. Because otherwise, it's translates on stage. If you stick a child onstage who doesn't want.

Saco Iran Foley Dennis Andrew Parkinson thirty inches thirty feet Two days
"studio" Discussed on The Dance Studio Podcast

The Dance Studio Podcast

11:02 min | 3 years ago

"studio" Discussed on The Dance Studio Podcast

"Are. And even in that moment, the things that may not show up, or the things that do show up like projecting energy, in an interview situation, which is what exactly you know, some of these dancers, go through on stage when they do some of those other awards that they do throughout title title. They're doing an interview process. Right. And they're even when they're dancing having to project that energy out to the judges, and then beyond projecting to through to the audience, and all the way to the back of the auditorium, back through the room in the moment of getting, let's say interviewed for a job later down the line, or even just, you know. Interviewing for school and things like that. Having that skill being able to hone in and project that energy out that is a massive skill that can just have such a great impact, and the other recipients, may not even realize what's going on that, you know, you have this ability to project, your energy out into the world in that way. So, yeah, I mean, coming from a training position as a rush on executive, we had to actually, as a trainer, you had to be incredibly organized, and you had to step in with your energy ready to go. So imagine if a choreographer walked into a room full of students, and was just like okay, so we're going to do this today and we're just going to do some light holds and this is the routine, and they're just blah, blah, blah, blah. No. That's not how the dancers going to go all out. They the choreographer has to lead with the energy going into the room, so that everyone else, that's in the room is ready to step up in, you know, that as trainers as you are energy, so important as a trainer, you have to lead them into the energy want them to go now. Now. What's, what's that statement? We love to say go there, I go there, I if you're if you're a choreographer teacher, and you're want your kids to step up to that level and have that, that massive impact, or projected than more show them and step into that be there and go, there, first and that way, they have something to lead and follow. So they have an example of that, and again energy meets energy, and that, you'll bring up their energy as well inside a room or in a competition something else that you had mentioned, you know, they're putting themselves out there to be judged, and they don't they have to do it live. It's not like they can hide behind a TV screen or social media, and not have that sort of shield, if you will it that they're, they're onstage live, and they're putting themselves out there. Like you said to be judged in that way in person. Leading it all on, on the stage. So I mean, that is that is a massive skill to build and be able to handle that kind of, you know, that kind of judgment place, upon them, and I definitely a learning process for, and not even just a little, I have a friend her daughter's different studio, and it's for senior year. And she said, this is the first season that her daughter hasn't thrown up before every competition while she's a senior. She's been dancing her whole life. And it's taken this long for her to be able to get that in control yet, she's been able to do that, and it's just interesting to see these kids, learn how to get out of their own head to get out of their own way to control their energy and just to really be able to leave it all on for. And I think that was the one of the most fun things that Brenda you and I saw with your, your fifth grader will now sixth grader, your eleven year old basically. When the court because all the choreographers that were leading the convention. They were go in there and yet, you can see so because it's brand new choreography so learning choreography quickly as a skill that to learn and as long as you continue to practice that muscle. But you could tell there were certain classes where a lot of the, the students in the performers dancers. They were so focused on landing the moves that they forgot to allow themselves to feel the beat and it was in Jack not Jack is, but tina's class. That's all the categories. Tina Dion Dennis. And Mark Mer, but with Tina, your daughter really stepped into her own, she was leaving it all on the floor. She was yeah, you're older. She was like this is what I've only got one chance. Because when you're at competition, all you have is that one chance, and it was fun to watch her say, okay. I know the choreography enough to allow myself to step up in just allow my sub conscious mind to listen to the music in move with the music Intel. Story instead of just being so focused on the moves that was one of my favorite lessons that they were getting all weekend long. Number one, I loved how all three of the cast breeze started by just listening to the music. They explained it for second than said, let's listen to it and hear the feeling of it and get into the energy of the music, which I had never and I've been to a lot of conventions had never seen another teacher do that in that way, which I love and it was Tina that stopped them and said, hey, if I came in and I did it like this because she wanna talk about matab on the dance. I don't know if you saw her many room, but it started off with the very powerful pose, and she did demo that being able to attack from day one. But then all of them, my favorite message that was hearing all weekend was, you are here to learn, which means that as your teacher we expect you to make a mistake because we expect you to be going all out with the energy and feeling the music. And we get that these moves are noon. We. We get that these styles are new. And we get that this may all be new. And we wanna see you dance. Just go all in. There are no mistakes in an it was gonna paraphrase because pretty much every instructor said it. We don't care about the mistakes what we care about is you not going for it, and you not trying. And it was in the mini Rome that Tina cast react gave a very nice speech because one of the older kids in that room. Older kid, meaning like eight or nine. Lost it just crumbled. And so she actually stopped the class and had a whole discussion with the kids on you are here to make mistakes because you are here to learn. And then it was her husband Ryan, that stepped in and said, hey, if you already knew everything we were going to teach you. Why would you be here? Why would be here, right? If you're here to learn, and we are here to teach that means you were going to make mistakes as you learn. Because think about the first time he wrote a bike, could you do it? No didn't think so. So think about that. To me is in that -absolutely transfers over to every studio out there to every single dancer, who shows up every day to learn new choreography, or even just practice the choreography that's that's already being been given. But they're going to make mistakes. And, you know, that's just it there as a choreographer or teacher expect that they're gonna make mistakes, and continue to empower them lift them up with positive words and just know that, you know, they're gonna give it their all and project that out there. Also, as a teacher choreographer project that they're going to do their best and give it their all because if you don't show up initially, like we said, putting your all out there, you're not gonna get out. You're all out of your dancers. Absolutely end. The nice thing was with Tina when it came to the junior, Tina, senior room as they were mixed up in the beginning of the day. Like she had her choreography set. I of a more upbeat style, and then the later the teens in the seniors were going to do more lyrical, and melodic and something that was really heartfelt in Feeley. So she had even the younger kids listened to all of that. She said she had them listen to. And so this is what we're going to be doing in the afternoon session. If you're sticking around with us, in it was a really heartfelt on like it was like pulling out all your heart strings, and she had said, she said that boiled down to as a performer, you need to be able to adapt because if you're going to be working on set if you're going to be doing these things you have to put it all on the table. You have to leave it all on the floor, go all out. And then at the same time you still have to pivot. You have to be flexible enough to adapt to the next thing that you have to do the next emotion that you have to tap into in by allowing yourself to step into that energy first and then going that direction and always going all out you're able to be more adaptive. And as a choreographer as long as you're willing to listen to the words that your student is saying, you can help them daft easier so that they can when they do make a mistake, they can fix that easy and effortless. And I think for the choreographers a child, who's going all out and making a mistake is very different than child who is marking and not trying. And, and also making mistakes, if you're going full out and giving it all you have, and your learning style just means you need a little bit more time. They're all four that because there are so many different learning styles in some kids are gonna be faster at picking it up if you show it in a certain way versus another some kids may be faster if you showed it in a different way or you taught it in a different manner, and that was one of the nice things you could actually watch how each teacher each Kroger for top differently, and you can see different kids excel in one class and then maybe struggle a little bit before really catching on in another class, but as long as we're going all out in your giving it all you've got mistakes happen. That's how we learn. Absolutely. I mean you're gonna make mistakes. It's just a general rule of life. You're going to make mistakes, and what better way to learn. If you're making mistakes, that means you are moving forward. So you wouldn't be making the mistakes if you were progressing. And so it's a great thing to celebrate mistakes say, in what I am giving my all I m putting myself out there completely leaving it all on the floor and celebrate those mistakes again. Everybody should be celebrating. That's gather dancers celebrating dancers mistakes. Everybody encouraging everybody when that one student or dancer, you know, doesn't quite get it as long as everybody's pushing everybody to be their best just to do their best and show up and be excellent. You know as long as you're as long as they're better than that. You were the day before you're progressing, and it's about excellence not perfection. So the we discussed that at length. You know, in this business, and that is, you know, so many people want to be perfect, and even the dancers choreographers. The parents want want their, their child to.

Tina Dion Dennis executive Intel Brenda instructor Jack Ryan Mark Mer Feeley eleven year
"studio" Discussed on The Dance Studio Podcast

The Dance Studio Podcast

13:25 min | 3 years ago

"studio" Discussed on The Dance Studio Podcast

"I am your host the Andrew Carlson. And I'm so jazzed back with Brenda Jones, and Greg soul. So Brendan, Greg from belief company. Thank you again, for joining us on this episode of the dance video podcast. Of course, thanks for having us. Hey, how are you, Greg? It's excellent. All right. So as you can tell if you're watching the video on this, you'll be able to see that we kind of look tired, and the reason for that is simply because we actually took class with some Brenda did an adult tap class or not adult adult. And then Greg night when the juniors and teens and seniors were doing some of the tumbling. We had a boot camp with Mr. Aaron who is one of the tumbling choreographers, Anna choreographer, tap, choreographer here at A. So we are a little haggard after a big big worth understatement. Raft twenty four hours it was awesome, though. So I know Greg wanted to say something about finding time in your schedule to work outs, Greg role with blue. Yes. The way I feel right now is just it's all worth it because I know the payoff will be weeks from now getting my endurance levels back up, and that's what. I just wanted to say out there to the whole dance community especially to parents, who you know, we spend so much time at the dance studio, getting work done just being in this environment, you got to fit the exercise in for yourself wherever you can. And sometimes it's one of those things I mean look, I hadn't exercised in a year and a half until two days ago, that's the long one the longest times, I've gone without exercise, but we were just so busy and life gets that way. And so, where can you as the parents, maybe you're stuck at dance studio, you know? And you know, to be there with your kids if your dance studio offers conditioning classes, or has bootcamp classes that you can take the alongside your kids or maybe you can ask for adult classes, something to just think about, and that way when you're already in that environment you can benefit from it as well. The benefits to your mindset to your endurance levels. You'll sleep better there, so many benefits to exercise and I know a lot of people, it's one of those things that they just put off because it's inconvenient most time. So find the convenient places to do it. Not to mention just being that role model for your kids and showing that, you know, it's easy to make an excuse of I can't because my daughter dances. Like this is a t shirt. We have that saying of can't my daughter has dancer. I can't I have dance and his dance mom, it's very easy to say. Well, I can't because I have dance and that's not really accurate. You can go for walk. You can go for run. You can do wall sits while they're in class. There's so many ways that you can fit in five minutes. Ten minutes thirty minutes and instead of making the excuses of all the things you can't get done. Because you're at the studio. Look at all the things that you can we get so much done in the time that we're at the studio because we chose to look at it differently so absolutely. And the thing about it is, though, the last episode that you are the podcast of we talked about how everything is just a simple decision away. And for the like Greg said he it's been a year and a half until he made the decision to make it a priority again. And he stepped into class saying, I'm gonna do at this time, I'm going to show up for myself in a show up for my business partners. I'm gonna show up for the community around me and he was filming in the in the class the other night, because he was like I want to show me working out with the little minis, and the thing about that is the look at the role model that you have now become because you showed up and you were talking to them about how I haven't worked for eighteen months and then you showed up, so now that you have shown up think of how they're gonna show up and I love that. That's a great transition into what we're talking about. So over the last weekend, we had spent a couple days Brennan, I spent two days. Greg was there for the first day at today's enough. See. So that's a convention here in Orange County put on by the people of countdown Dennis. And that really fun thing about that was was being able to watch the kids interact with the choreographer a seeing how they would dance pick up moves and pick up all the, the techniques. See how they would perform in what was interesting is Brenna Greg, and I were talking a lot about what the choreographer's were saying, and how so much of it, we would hear from one room and then run over to the other in they're talking about the same exact message just in a different way. And it was interesting that most of the choreographers, if not all of them had always hit on one, one of the most important aspects of it, which is why I wanted to talk with Brennan. Greg about that in a showing up fully every single time when you step into the floor show up everyday with your energy. What's your energy? What's the first move that you're gonna make when it comes to starting the corio? Are you just going to ease into it or actually gonna show up in? You're just gonna make that first move. What's the energy that you're portraying to the audience? Are you showing up for them? Are you showing up for the the? Judges. If you're in competition, are you showing up for the choreographers? Are you leaving it all on the dance floor? So run great. What are your thoughts on what you heard over the weekend in that main thing about showing up fully, especially when it comes to mind set, and, and we turn in the dance world? It's going all out and leaving it all on the floor because that's something that can be more a little bit more used to hearing versus showing fully and it really comes down to like you were saying in everything that you do dancers. I think there is that habit of marking and running through dance, but marking through it and can, especially when you're hearing class, a lot of times, you can Mark new choreography until you go, all out when you're performing it and doing the combo in class, but convention is so different because most conventions you are still additioning for things like dancer, the weekend you're additioning for scholarships. There's all these other things today's no was different. It was class for the sake of taking class. And yet, at the same time these are all. Professional Criag offers. These are all people who are already starting to take notice of who you are in how you show up. And I think it was even at L. A D M dance magic. Jackie slight had also talked about from the moment you walk in the room, you are here to work. How're you showing up and that was that message that we got all the time that from the moment you walk in, you need to be on. You are at work as a dancer, when you get to class when you get to convention when you get to competition from the moment you step onto property, you're on stage already, you know, our studio wanted award for sportsmanship that is because they're not just looking at the dancers on stage, but they're looking at the dance family as a whole because wall, we were there we were all on stage, and it was how we all chose to show up that earned our studio that award. And that's one of those things to remember that. It's not just the two and a half minutes that your dancing on stage. It's not just that one combo that the teachers saying the. The end of class. It's from the time you enter your studios doors. That's actually gonna take a take a play out of brenda's playbook from her past in a story that she tells in that is leaving everything at the door. So take it back a step further. The day gets crazy from start. You know, when the time you wake up in the morning, so many things can happen in the beginning of the day before you know, as parent or as a student, even as a choreographer or studio on her so many things can happen in a day before you even get to the studio to get to dancing, so all that stuff that has been going on make it a point, you know, parent and dancer, make it a point to shelf, those things that are happening and going on outside the dance studio and leave that outside the door, you always like to say you can come back and pick it up later if you want to when you. Leave right. But who wants to do that anyway? But leave that stuff leave the baggage of life and the things that you have going on. And there's sometimes some big issues happening that's just life. But all those things when you walk in the door of the dance studio, or onset, or wherever it is the job that you're doing, you leave all that stuff out, and you're there, like she said, to show up there to do a job you're there to dance and give it give your all go all out. And so that beginning knowing that is just a great way to begin to, you know, prep your mind for what you're about to go into and just say, hey, I'm gonna leave all this out that stuff doesn't matter as soon as I walked through the doors. This is where my head's at this is where my focus is. And I'm going to give it everything I have wall, I'm here, whether it's just for an hour for some students, and some dancers, and some of them stay an entire day class after class after class like, and then there's dancing. End of the night. So that is a great way to begin your entrance into a studio with that sort of mindset. Well, I think so I'm pulling up a note because I like like Andrew was saying we were going through today's see listening to the different choreographers and hearing the thing they were saying, and it was Niklas arena. That's the two things and they kind of talk about, like you said throughout everything. But Knicks quotes are the ones that I grabbed that really kind of some all this up, but the first says the energy, you give is the energy, you get back, and he met as he was trying to get the kids to applaud for one another as they were going through class. But all of life. It's so much that the energy I put out if I put out smiles, and positively a smile, it's so fun to go out and just smile at a stranger because a lot of them are really kinda thrown for it. But then, eventually, they smiled back and that she is their day. You know, when you understand how the subconscious mind works in the way that. We do we know that, just something as simple as simple smiling, does start rewiring the brain and how it's looking at the world and then he then said, put your energy towards your focus to become more clear in what you're doing. And I think those two things while he again, meant it in terms of dance everything that we heard all we all we can long really did apply to life. And that's one of the things that I love because I'm not raising dancers, dancers aren't in dance just for the sake of dance. They are in dance for their love of arts, but more. So, because there are major life lessons that can be learned through dance if you're willing to hear them. Oh for sure. I mean, I was just talking to you Brenda about this, that I was not having been outside the dance competition while the dance convention world in just over the last couple of years, being more integrated fully into it in sitting there listening. I was like, you know, dancers are the one type of people that go. Oh out. Leave it all on the floor and then they are okay being judged. They're like, give it to me. Let me know let me see how I can improve. How can we better? They're the ones doing that. And so, I think dancers have this competitive edge over everyone else because since doesn't just relate to dance relates to everything just like in business. If you're going to if you want to start a business, you wanna start posting stuff in your message on social media, so many people are frayed just to say their message. Because what will others think, in yet, dancers are, like, tell me what you think let me know I wanna get better. I want I want to be more. I want to leave it all on the floor. And that's in that in business. They can be some of the best sales people. They can be some of the best business and entrepreneurs business owners announced preneurs, because they aren't afraid to go out there and get their message heard, they aren't afraid to leave it all on the floor because that's what they've been trained in condition to over and over and over again. We'll think we went to my daughter's fifth grade promotion last was it last week. And it got to the point it was a fun game as a home school program. So they had a fifth grade promotion, eight grade promotion of high school graduation, and it got to the point that Andrew, and I could tell the dancers musical theater as they stepped on the stage because the carried their energy and had a different presence about them. The second they stepped on the stage just to cross and shake hands. Think about when you're going into into a job interview, and you're used to being judged, and you're used to presenting your best self and you're used to being able to turn on the impressive you for those few minutes or, you know, those, those twenty minutes of an audition, all those things that's a life skill and we could actually see the difference in just how they held their posture, and we know so much about posture and energy and how we project meaning and you have kids that are slumping when you walk into that job interview, and you're very reserved and you're going for something like customer service. Even if the person interviewing doesn't know consciously something about that. Subconsciously. It's gonna feel off. They're going to feel just something's not right in the energy or whenever you go to meet someone for the first time, like all of those things, there so much that going into their everyday training that they're gonna wear, and I don't even know if the teachers are aware.

Brenna Greg Brenda Jones Greg soul Andrew Carlson Brendan Anna choreographer Mr. Aaron Brennan Knicks Orange County Criag Jackie Niklas arena two days twenty four hours eighteen months thirty minutes twenty minutes
"studio" Discussed on The Dance Studio Podcast

The Dance Studio Podcast

08:20 min | 3 years ago

"studio" Discussed on The Dance Studio Podcast

"Your favor, again social media marketing, do you have a pattern when it come when people land on your page? Does look nice or is it just a bunch of random photos that are post posted gather are you monitoring who is following your child? That's another important thing. That's something I didn't even realize what's thing until working in this industry for a couple years, realizing a lot of Crete's out there, so making sure that you are actually monitoring people that are actually following child is also very important. And I know that kind of picks back a lot of the organic reach in new builds your follower. Yes. I know I understand that end the same time we want your child to be safe. We want everyone to be safe when. It comes to social media marketing now when it comes to your personal brand, though, there are three things that people absolutely level. Talk about this another episode, but it needs to be engaging and the to be empowering and it needs to be educational, but you have all those three engaging. Educational and empowering than you will have a successful personal brand. And then again. It's not about follower count. But it's always about the cage meant. That's what we wanna focus on. So as parent personal, brand, I know children can be ornery. Sometimes I wouldn't post photos up there. Yes, you can be honest about it. You can just say, I wasn't have a really good day. But you can make sure that there's a post with one of the your child performing or it could be with them doing something. Or maybe you're there tumbling class and you keep getting videos of them, falling falling falling what you can do is, you can post those videos of your child falling, and you can put an inspirational, or empowering description. The just says, yes, every single date doesn't go my way. I don't always stick the landing. It's important that always get up and dust myself off. I myself I get off and I try again. And again, and again in eventually Atlanta, that's the type of content that people love to see, especially when it comes with children. If you can get them to understand that. Yes. Life happens. Sometimes you're not it's not always going to be this amazing, beautiful thing every single day. Sometimes there are going to be difficulties. You're gonna come up against challenges, but it's how you come up against those challenges in how you overcome those challenges that matter. And as a parent, when you are managing their social media. Yeah. People are gonna know that the children aren't running their social media, especially when they're six seventy snack. It's just not happening. People are paying attention to, whether it is that you're posting every single day who is that you were doing that. You want your child to be seen. You're trying to build on them in to become a role model because people love win people succeed. And that's the thing that you have to hold that entity is, yes, I am a marketer. I am somebody. That's. Focused on all of these things. We'll talk about face Instagram and Facebook strategies, Instagram strategies, mainly because Facebook doesn't really make sense for children. But the Instagram strategies there are in place. We'll talk about that on a later thing. I just wanted to give you a quick insight into what Instagram's all about, because you are managing their profiles, and it's important for them to really embody, the identity of performer. I am a marketer. I am a business person at the end of the day because I am a brand. When you are a brand, you have to have a massive stands for something, don't just know never just choose for them because it's important that they choose for those who do they want to become. Do they wanna be on Broadway? Great document on social media. Third journey of getting onto Broadway and half that be the message in the overall our over arching message, while you're building that up have the conversation with them, yet they may be six. They may still want to be princesses dance gives them the opportunity to become that Princess you, as the parent are the one that tribes them forward in that until they're old enough to run their own social media, and understand that there are intricacies when it comes to social media. But again at the studio owner as a choreographer as a parent that manages your child and Ceram or your social media. Yes. Social media is important started. As soon as you can also a strategy in place. It's gonna take time to build over time. The thing about it is, though, there are a lot of dance companies out there that want to sponsor your child. They want to sponsor people to have money to sponsor, whether it's just free leotards. Hey leotards are very expensive. I didn't realize how much everything. Cost until I got into the dance with house like dang. It's crazy. It's an expensive sport. And we just have to understand that. It's an expensive sport. But there are ways that your child can stand out against everyone else. They can actually be sponsored as long as you have the right following in youth. Right message that aligns with the company's values that want to sponsor your child or your performer. So remember, I am those are the two most powerful words that you can utilize in the human language, and the thing about it is, what are the word that you use to describe yourself, every single day after that. I am what? This isn't just for business though. Remember as a parent, you are so much more than just a parent. I am blank. You are allowed to be an entrepreneur yourself. You are allowed to be worthy of being a parent and having a job and having a career in heaven, all the things that you want out of life. And that's why this podcast was created was because. Yeah. Studio owners need to learn how to run a business. And if a lot of time studios closed down, and I've seen happen, because they don't understand how to run a business choreographers need to also know how to promote themselves how to boost themselves on social media, so that they can get those private so that they can have those really cool jobs of working in Hollywood working with those reality shows that are focused, the dance competition shows that you can help choreograph some of those routines, you can become a personal brand, because my job my role, my mission is to make sure that everyone that listen to this podcast is able to create a successful personal brand, so they don't have to rely, so. Holy on one dance studio. Yes. I know. That's really big task. I don't like having to put all my eggs in one basket and hope that everything succeeds for sixty years, while I'm working in that one place. I wanna make sure that I am taking care of that your role as an individual is to make sure that you are taking care of and that you can take care of the people that are in your life in that are part of your family. We can't always do that on just one income anymore, and that's difficult. That's a difficult task. That's difficult. Pill. The swallow short say. I want to make sure that you are always leveraging multiple shins of income, as a studio owner. There are different masterclasses than how market that masterclass. How are you able to do all of these different things, so that it all filters into your studio so that you can be successful business owner as a choreographer, do you have online classes that teach your specialty? Do you have all of these different avenues of income? So that you're not just relying on one because your time is the most precious thing in the world in, you are worthy to enjoy the time that you have on the surf on my mission is to make sure that everyone in the dance industry is able to create a successful personal brand that allows them to get sponsorships that allows them to market themselves that allows them to have multiple streams of income that allows them to alternately be incredibly successful in this industry. And that's why I wanted to start this podcast. And that's why meant business partners. And I are going to be jumping on this every single week every single week going gonna be new episodes. So I'm so excited that you jumped onto episode one. Talking all about the I AM's member performance. Studio owners, what is it? What's your one thing? If I want you to join our Facebook group, Facebook dot com slash groups slash the dance video podcast in post in the group what you're I am, as also starting threat on that. So I'm so excited that you listen to the first episode, if you know anyone that is in the dance industry, or that would love to be a guest on the show. Let them know sent have them joined the.

Facebook Instagram Crete business owner Atlanta Hollywood sixty years
"studio" Discussed on The Dance Studio Podcast

The Dance Studio Podcast

13:58 min | 3 years ago

"studio" Discussed on The Dance Studio Podcast

"I so that you can have it run on auto pilot while you are focused on the things that you absolutely love to do. I also have business partners Brenda Jones, and Greg stole who will be joining that are focused on all things mindset, when it comes to performance, when it comes to choreographers when it comes to everything they are master, trainers in neuro linguistic programming, which is all about being the user manual to your mind. How you're able to do things why you do the things that you do. So they'll be on many of these episodes on coming up in future future, seasons of future dates because the thing about it is everything is tied. To your minds, whether your business owner, whether you're choreographer, whether you are a student becoming in growing into the professional dancer, that you are the professional performer that you are, whether it is that you wanna be on Broadway. Whether it is that you want to open up your own studio, all of these things we have come together to start this podcast, so that it can be the place the education portal for you to kick start everything because at the end of the day when it comes to you as a performer, you are your brand. You are the person that is in charge of where does that you wanna in go in your life in that all starts with having goals. So before we kick everything off, before we start launching, all of these amazing interviews in everything that we have lined up for you. I wanted to talk about one thing today, and that is your I AM's in what, what am I talking about when it comes to your out, because people are like I am will. Yeah. Because those are the two most powerful words that we have in the in the in the human language in English Lang. No matter how it is. Translated across different languages. You want to understand that I am are the two most powerful things to say before you start describing who you actually are. And that's why I love this topic is because I am what when you think of IM when you say the words I am. What is the word that follows that for you? And when it comes to choreographers in business owners all of those things I am a choreographer. Great. What happens when you're are for that owns a business. How does that translate over? How are you? I am performer great. How're you before when it comes to monetize your brand when it comes to social media, because when you're performer as, as a dancer performer as a choreographer when you want to get an agent when you want to be on Broadway, when you want to go out and do all of these amazing things you have to have a following on social media because that shows that people wanna come see in. Yeah, that's not the way that used to be based on all pure talent. And it used to be based off driving determination in all of these things, will the industry has dumped shifted in change. It doesn't matter what you are doing what you want to be doing, whether it is that you want to be choreographer, whether you want to be a dance studio teacher, whether it is that you wanna perform on Broadway, or you wanna be on tour with some of the best pop artists. The thing about that is you wanna have following so that no matter where you end up, you're always taking care of your always taken seriously because you understand. And that the marketing aspect of that. So instead of just saying I am a performer. I am a choreographer. It goes so much deeper than that, especially if you're a studio owner, I wanted to talk to you, as a studio owner, really quick. So if you're dancer, in you're listening to this podcast of this, this is really good information that you need to know as well. And it would be very good for you to stick rattle because I will be pivoting over to you in just a little bit. But I wanted to communicate with the dance studio teaches that actually had studios right now. Those choreographers that own studios right now. Because I am a business owner, I am an entrepreneur are the two biggest Iams that you can actually identify yourself as the way that you wanna look at your mind as it has different layers. So at the very top is the identity level, but in between all of that. There are different belief systems that drive your behaviors. They're different behaviors that actually drive your actions. They're different value systems that you value. That's why when it comes to your brand value systems, while people. Say that you have to have core values when it comes to your businesses, because those values actually dictate in drive your beliefs, and you behaviors to actually do the actions that you said that you're going to be doing, so that's why I always love to go straight to the I am because that is going to dictate your values because you're gonna have a different value system than as a choreographer than you a business owner, because at the end of the day, yes, you want to impact the lives of the future generation of performance that are going through your classes right now that are being impacted by you as a choreographer as a business owner, while you're other choreographers are there, impacting them in the class running assisting, that your classes every single. Dave the words that come out of our mouths are so impactful into the minds of these children. And that's where we want to get started is because you're I am of business owner, you're going to have different belief systems when it comes to business than you, would if you were just simply choreographer that doesn't have any responsibilities of the business side of things. And I know you're saying Andrew. Why are you such a Debbie Downer? I'm not a Debbie Downer. I wanna make sure that all of these studios that you have open right now all the students that are open that are listen to this podcast. Right now, continue to stay open for belong jetty of while you are alive while you're here on this earth wanting to do what you wanna do impact in the lives of children and having this success. Wildly successful business. I wanna make sure that you're able to do that instead of three years from now having to close those doors a year from now or ten years from now having to close those doors. Because you didn't think of things a certain way you didn't have certain value systems when it came to your business. So that's why I am a business on her. I am an entrepreneur as a performer. Hello. I'm ladder, so listening because as a former I am an entrepreneur, what is an entrepreneur, are you gonna are you gonna ask him? That's fine. If you don't know entre preneurs, that's fine. But the basic identity level of entrepreneurs, a problem solver they love to solve problems. They love to get in there figure things out. Make it successful. Make it profitable. And that's what we have to do as business owners, and as performers, if you wanna make it on Broadway, if you wanna go perform with Popstars be the performers onstage in those stadiums. You have to think things differently you have to solve problems because it's not just about talent talent gets you so far because when you are talented than things become easy, and effortless for you, because you can just catch on to choreography easily. Effortlessly, when it comes to drive and determination. You have to there are people that are more talented than you that are doing the job that you want to do. Why is that because a they understand marketing they understand that they need monetize themselves because it doesn't matter if you have a job for that one pure time for your on tour for six months, guess what happens when that six month? Right is over, then the performance not gonna go out for another year and a half you have to find another gay. What if you don't have a following? People who, like, trust you that you could just say, hey, let's jump onto this tour for a little bit, and this tour for a little bit in your making those connections. That's what an entrepreneur being an entrepreneur is all about building relationships, making those connections. And then just really fine tuning in just what's the word for really honing in on those relationships and making sure that exact they are exactly the type of relationship that you wanna be a part of those professional relationships that will say, hey, you're done with this project, jump undermined. I worked in the film industry for very long time. And I worked in commercials the night of this for about three to four years. And the thing about commercials is, you'll only worked for about one to six days in a row. And then after that the commercial was done filming and we had to move onto the next project. And guess what if you didn't make your connections if you didn't go on network if you didn't actually build your network of people of saying, hey, you're done at this job comes on the job. I need you. I really wanna make sure that you're on this project with me because I absolutely love you. And that's the thing when it comes to. A performer part of being your brand is being able to be working too. Well, with people, let's say that, again, part of being your personal brand is all about how people like you, if they like you enough to spend a lot of time with you. Then they're gonna wanna bring you on tour and that's what comes down to. So now that's revert back to the studio owners. When it comes to business that comes to marketing, it is your role as a studio owner to make sure that your doors, stay open for a long time. That is your goal if things start sidetracking you because you wanna be more in the choreography room, that's fine. Just make sure that you find a manager, that can run your business for you that can your administrative team that can put in those systems that can handle your billing that can handle parent. Issues that are happening if there's any rumors that are happening. They need to be able to bite that office. Nabet off of the and make sure that when you are in the choreography room when you are impacting the lives of their children because you are really good at what you do. All you have to do is just say, hey, I am putting my business taking my business owner hat off. I'm putting my choreography half on while I'm in this room choreographing in running this class. I'll be choreographer as soon as I step outside of this class, though. I'm taking off the choreography hat and putting back on the business half because I need to know how to get more people in for next season. What are you doing for marketing? Are you doing? Any social media marketing. Are you doing any social media at all? Are you driving in dictating the way that things are supposed to be moving? You driving your business forward. Are you handling the objections that your parents have are you making sure that when it comes to your company season?.

business owner Brenda Jones Debbie Downer English Lang Greg Dave Andrew three years four years six months six month ten years six days
"studio" Discussed on The Dance Studio Podcast

The Dance Studio Podcast

04:02 min | 3 years ago

"studio" Discussed on The Dance Studio Podcast

"You're listening to the dance studio podcast. Our main focus is on mindset, marketing, and monetize ING your brand to help you be successful in this industry, whether your studio owner, a convention director choreographer Warren student topics discussed on this podcast will always shift you towards the light, you want to create. Here's your host. Andrew are Elson. Hey everybody in. Thank you for joining us, for episodes zero of the dance studio podcast, we are incredibly excited to be launching a podcast that is focused on every aspect of the dance community from the conventions to the studio owners to choreographer students, and even their parents. I've been heavily involved in the dance community of the last few years and have helped studio owners with growing their brands in their community through numerous marketing efforts else. Well as being a mindset coach for the students and choreographers during competitions and throughout the year spending the last decade growing brands and businesses throughout the United States and internationally, I have learned strategies that can be applied in any industry. What makes this podcast different is that we will occasionally be interviewing other experts within the field where we will discuss everything from mindset to marketing to monetize in your social media to how your energy affects your performers, and the success of your classes to even how important your languaging as with everything that you do my biz. Partners will also be joining in from time to time as energy workers and mindset experts to talk about a range of topics. One of my business partners Brenda Jones has been a dance mom for the last nine years and has many interesting takes on her experience as an entrepreneurial dance mom with an extensive behavioral psychology background. We are on a mission to shift at the dance community from where it's heading and move back to being empowering, and fostering, a love of the arts. Now, this podcast, wouldn't be possible without the support of our very first sponsor Chevra RIA institute of the arts, which is located in Irvine, California. And it's been amazing watching how they train the performance and how they are able to elevate every single performance. Their main focus is on bringing out the performer within the student, and it's been phenomenal to see the growth in every single child, regardless if they've been performing since they were two or since they started later on in life. If you live with in southern California and are interested in checking them out. They offer their first class for free to see if you're a right fit for the studio, and if the. Culture and the energy of the choreographers matches. What your child is looking for finding the right? Studio is a two way street, especially when you're stepping into the world of competitive dance where you'll be there three to five days every single week. It's vital to do your homework before making that decision as hosts of this podcast. We are looking to build a safe place. That's free to discuss the business side of the dance community as well as a place where we can have read I have deeper on all of the topics discussed on this podcast as well as talk freely about things you may be weary about to discuss in public. We have a private Facebook group where you can join in on the conversation. Ask those burning questions that are on your mind, and we'll also have some hot seat opportunities to create massive shifts in your life and your business had to Facebook dot com slash groups slash the dance studio podcast joined the community. We look forward to seeing you inside the group and for to chatting with you, more, thank you so much for listening, and we look forward to bringing you new episodes, every single Monday. You've been listening to the dance studio podcast, make sure to hit subscribe on I tunes or Google play to get new episodes every single week. Also, join our Facebook group and Facebook dot com slash groups slash the dance studio podcast to expand the conversation and get your questions answered remember with the right mindset and strategy, you can achieve anything.

Facebook California Brenda Jones director Chevra RIA institute United States Warren Google Irvine Andrew Elson nine years five days