32 Burst results for "Strother"

"strother" Discussed on Coach's Corner with Paul Ybarra

Coach's Corner with Paul Ybarra

04:07 min | Last week

"strother" Discussed on Coach's Corner with Paul Ybarra

"Listen i'm bargaining with god List what if i do this. Or what if. I do like okay. That like acting. Tell god what to do. Are you serious like are you serious. But as you see. God got the glory in then when like the people start coming to the support group and it was like no participation. I was like ok guys you know. Nobody wants to really listen in all that so Feel back but what happened last year or the year before is the holy spirit. Kip not me. The holy spirit. Dillon with me and then he began to talk about you. Know a writing journal in a preparing journal. And i was like wait. What sta- what. Now you know i will help people got here embarking being. I will help people as they come along because people never stopped coming to me. I never stop. You know really giving people advice in talking to people about five algebra and things like that. I never did because it was his in me. I guess In because what i go through without. I'm always keeping up with some of the latest that i met in. Dc at the time. I've actually gone to three or four national conventions. My daughter received a girl scout gold award which is highest award in girl scouts with fibromyalgia about doing fibromyalgia research in the manner that i'll be doing will they become an out. The end of the month is about a Faith in fibro finding faith in the midst of pain It has so many tips about fibromyalgia fiber facts Of the facts about you know have fiber Algiers things you can do to listen your pain of just a lot of inspiration in it has a declarations than because one thing i want people to know is that you decree thing. The bible says in it will come to pay us and aba again to really get get in. God is one of our floor carriers of france. In growth partners samantha. Simmons of gaither says getting god and abbott to get in god during this time so I don't look at it as something bad. That happened to me. Allocated is thank you because part of this journey. Then i'm on Because i'm not over yet. According of the journey that i'm on is it was growth. you know god was Sometimes that will take us through some things sometimes but is olive. Look at it. You know you wanna look stuff is what was maine and blame every and everything. Then you're gonna be stuck in that place but if you allow god to stretch to and you grow with guy and go a row through got you know what he faces. Three in twenty data is able to do exceedingly abundantly above our could ever ask or sake according to the power that working in In us through. Christ jesus okay so why. Why did we always feel that. We have to ask god for something and he's gonna do what we ask him to do. But we don't want to do what god asks us to do. So i think about what christ through so the pain that i go through. You know i'm paying. We have seven days a week at least three of them. But i learned you know how to manipulate it if you will have to deal with it. Whatever 'cause it compares nothing to christ through on the cross so hase. You know every morning that i wake up. Thank you jesus. Because somebody didn't.

last year Three samantha Simmons three france Dillon jesus seven days a week one Christ christ four national conventions abbott twenty data God one thing bible five algebra least three
Rachelle Strawther, Director of Leadership & Training at Gonzaga, on the Importance of Her 'Love Posse'

Taking Her Lead

04:21 min | Last month

Rachelle Strawther, Director of Leadership & Training at Gonzaga, on the Importance of Her 'Love Posse'

"Really excited to share part to with your shell. Strother director of leadership training and development of gonzaga university on taking her lead in the school leadership studies we staff members refer to ourselves as a love posse. There's a funny story about how that happened. Which i won't go into but it came from a realization that what has made us such a strong team over the years we've had people you know Leave the university or come in and join the team. What has made as a strong team is that we truly care for each other and that means that we are willing to speak our truth when we need to and were willing to support each other when people need that support that is what has made us this this love posse and i think that that speaks volumes. In general about how the power of women can create connection and community women at their best. We've community they think they we've togetherness and we have to be able to leverage that and we have to be able to see that opportunity at our worse we can become competitive at our worst we can see each other as Being in the way or as people like you know sometimes women have this mentality of while. There's there's so few spots. And and if she takes this one than i have my own chance and so there can be a competitive spirit to and we have to be very watchful that but at our best women can. We've this sense of connection. I had seen eight. No at were were caregivers. Were nurturers and you can see got in around. The world look at female leaders and the way that they are taking steps to think about the climate change the environment. I love looking at female leaders and around the world and responses to covid nineteen. I talk about strong. Powerful female leadership like for example for the prime minister of new zealand. How that's incredible leadership. The way that she advocates for culture in their their country that takes care of one another. It's been really beautiful to say and so we can do that. Were the effectively but we have to support each other in that role. We have to see each other as it is and his women who can bring each other up and notice competitors not as competitors and that can be hard to do but it's it's important for us to do that so i see it as something that we can leverage just briefly Just wanted to go just a little deeper in your perception. How do women bring about that connection in that nurturing in the collaboration are there particular actions or attitudes or perspectives. If you look at the world around us and and history civilizations you see examples of women coming together to raise children women collectively bringing up their children together is it's it's all over history and we still see this in indigenous communities. That is something that we can can learn from. And i see that spirit in my own group of friends amongst women who simply by reaching out to each other like during kovic. We've had ongoing chats our text messages with women who throughout the day. We'll say hey. I want to pass this along. My gosh you have to see this mean things that will bring giggles. Make us smile but also give us a moment of support and strength when we need it. It's a powerful the touch points that women have with each other to know. I think this is what someone may need at this moment and In our if. I look at our staff team. You know the love posse is called it or we call it. We do things like read books together yesterday. One of our team members said hey can we explore this new book. Let's can we read the new. Jim crow over christmas break and talk about in january. Those kinds of things that we do together because we know that we are better when we learn and grow together.

Strother Gonzaga University New Zealand Jim Crow
Timme, Kispert lead No. 1 Gonzaga to 20th straight win

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 2 months ago

Timme, Kispert lead No. 1 Gonzaga to 20th straight win

"Top ranking Zach got picked up its twentieth straight win since last season and improved to sixteen Arnold this season with a ninety sixty two pounding of San Diego due to me had twenty one points for the Bulldogs who started slow and actually trailed nineteen fourteen before taking control with a fifteen run I just got to play better you know I can't come out there and just throw some crap from the group I actually got a finish in the liver and that's what I'm here to do an install on this team and I didn't do my role to start off the game I got to be better and I owe more to my teammates and the coaching staff's Corey Kispert added nineteen points and keyed an impressive stretch in which the zags went ahead by twenty early in the second half Julia Strother had eleven points in Anton Watson had ten for Gonzaga which at fifty eight percent from the field I'm Dave very

Zach Arnold Bulldogs San Diego Corey Kispert Julia Strother Anton Watson Gonzaga Dave
'Our hands are tied': Local aid workers exposed in pandemic

The World

02:21 min | 8 months ago

'Our hands are tied': Local aid workers exposed in pandemic

"A mask, official reports say. Kim urged authorities to take precautions ahead of Typhoon Bobby's arrival. A storm came just weeks after monsoon floods damaged infrastructure farms and killed at least 20 North Koreans. That's according to media reports and the International Federation of the Red Cross and Red Crescent, which works with local partners on the ground there, Nazanin today Cummings lectures on humanitarian studies at Deacon University in Melbourne. She says Pyongyang usually turns to foreign aid groups for disaster relief. And to make that happen, these agencies need to build trust with North Korean officials. International organizations are really dependent on having relationship. Inside North Korea, where they have access to information and access to people and access to places that are affected by his after. But because of the covert 19 pandemic, many foreign aid workers are now locked out of the country today coming says You can't do zoom calls from abroad with North Korean officials to coordinate disaster relief. She says Pyongyang's containment measures like closing down its borders and limiting domestic travel were extreme but perhaps necessary. So I think the way North Korea has responded to the pandemic shows that the authorities understand and are very cognizant of how weak the health system is and how how devastating Corbett could be North Korea Earlier this month, Kim Jeong Eun made a rare admission. His economic reforms have failed. He largely blamed the pandemic, international sanctions and natural disasters Today. Cummings agrees that Cove it and US and United Nations restrictions have impacted foreign aid. But she pushes back on the notion that disasters in the North are natural. They don't become disasters and hold a interact with human decision making the inability to be prepared for disasters, the inability to mitigate risk for the disasters and the inability for people to have a system that supports them to be able to make it through hazards without casualty. She adds, the impact of typhoons and floods could be lower if North Korea made caring for its people a priority for the world. I'm Jason Strother and soul.

North Korea Kim Jeong Eun Cummings Pyongyang Jason Strother Official Red Cross Corbett Nazanin United States Deacon University International Federation Of United Nations Melbourne
"strother" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:36 min | 1 year ago

"strother" Discussed on KCRW

"People have died Jason Strother reports from Seoul the new corona virus outbreak has led to a shortage in surgical masks hundreds of shoppers lined up in the rain outside a department store and up to the fourth floor to purchase government subsidized masks reports say pharmacies and other shops are running out and online vendors are charging inflated prices here a five pack is about five dollars I'm one of those speaking through a white surgical masks fifty year old Kim so young says she waited in line about an hour she says she couldn't find masks anywhere until she came here south Korea's police agency says it's cracking down on price gouging and hoarding of these medical supplies for NPR news I'm Jason Strother in Seoul an airstrike in Syria's embattled it lit province has killed thirty three Turkish soldiers Turkey's blaming Syria but some air strikes there are carried out by Russian forces Russia has denied responsibility now Turkey a NATO member has asked the military alliance for consultations on the deteriorating situation Linda Fasulo reports that at the United Nations delegates are concerned about the Syrian humanitarian crisis the U. N.'s deputy mandatory and she very slim Mueller said that nearly nine hundred fifty thousand civilians have fled the government's offensive over the last three months and that women from the area told through the conditions are not evenly tolerable and that they've been children so traumatized that they no longer speak US ambassador Kelly craft said that all efforts must be focused on immediately establishing a ceasefire in it live if the monetary crisis is to end meanwhile Russia's ambassador Vassily Nebenzia said that the only long term solution to the problem of it live is an expulsion of terrorists from the country for NPR news inland similarly in New York California's utility regulator has imposed a record fine on utility Pacific gas and electric this for causing recent deadly wildfires from member station KQED lily Jamali reports it's the largest penalty ever issued by the California public utilities commission the fine modifies a previous settlement PG&E had agreed to which critics called too lenient more than a hundred people were killed in the wildfires of twenty seventeen and twenty eighteen liabilities from those fires prompted P. Jeannie need to file for bankruptcy last year this harsher fine sets aside hundreds of millions for those victims it's N. P. R. voters in South Carolina hold their primary election tomorrow president trump will hold a rally in north Charleston tonight the candidates competing for the democratic presidential nomination are all hoping for a boost that includes former vice president Joe Biden who was seen strong support among African American voters a key constituency in South Carolina in an interview with PBS news hour democratic presidential candidate and former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg has defended the use of a controversial surveillance program of Muslims under his administration and peers awesome holiday has more Bloomberg has insisted the program kept Americans safe but no arrests were ever attributed to the surveillance program is still in an interview with PBS Bloomberg showed no remorse and said he had a responsibility to go anywhere he could to get intelligence we have just lost three thousand people at nine eleven course was supposed to do that and so Bloomberg defended going into mosques listening to sermons and spying on Muslims he said it made sense given the identity of the nine eleven terrorists all of the people came from the same place and all that came were from a place I happen to be one religion if they'd been another religion would've done the same thing Bloomberg insists everything he did was legal but multiple lawsuits were filed over the program a small salad and PR news former Baltimore mayor Catherine Pugh is been sentenced to three years in federal prison for corruption convictions she fraudulently sold self published children's books to nonprofit groups to pay for her political career he resigned under pressure last may I'm korva Coleman NPR news support for NPR comes from NPR stations other contributors include neon presenting portrait of a lady on fire a love story set in eighteenth century France about an affair between an artist and her female subject now playing in select theaters and the Annie E. Casey foundation you're listening to morning edition on KCRW ahead on morning edition democratic presidential candidate and billionaire Tom Steyer has earned the support of many South Carolina voters it's not just about money it's about message you can have all the money in the world but if you A. saying enough but then what does it really matter mora Stiers South Carolina strategy that's coming up on morning edition here on KCRW I'm around all day on to the point the unintended consequences of charter schools in the privatization of public education what we've seen instead is almost twenty years of stagnant test scores we've seen teachers demoralized teachers fired principles fired schools close what we seen as twenty years of disruption this is not reform Diane Ravitch blames billionaires like Michael Bloomberg who she says don't know what they're doing on our to the point podcast you're listening to K. C. R. W. I'm Larry Perot next.

Jason Strother Seoul
"strother" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:51 min | 1 year ago

"strother" Discussed on KQED Radio

"People have died Jason Strother reports from Seoul the new corona virus outbreak has led to a shortage in surgical masks hundreds of shoppers lined up in the rain outside a department store and up to the fourth floor to purchase government subsidized mass reports say pharmacies and other shops are running out and online vendors are charging inflated prices here a five pack is about five dollars I'm going to go speaking through a white surgical masks fifty year old Kim so young says she waited in line about an hour she says she couldn't find masks anywhere until she came here south Korea's police agency says it's cracking down on price gouging and hoarding of these medical supplies for NPR news I'm Jason Strother in Seoul an airstrike in Syria's embattled it lit province has killed thirty three Turkish soldiers Turkey's blaming Syria but some air strikes there are carried out by Russian forces Russia has denied responsibility now Turkey a NATO member has asked the military alliance for consultations on the deteriorating situation Linda Fasulo reports that at the United Nations delegates are concerned about the Syrian humanitarian crisis the U. N.'s deputy monetary and she first learned Mueller said that nearly nine hundred fifty thousand civilians have fled the government's offensive over the last three months and that women from the area told through the conditions are not evenly tolerable and that they've been children so traumatized that they no longer speak US ambassador Kelly craft said that all efforts must be focused on immediately establishing a ceasefire in it live if the monetary crisis is to end meanwhile Russia's ambassador Vassily Nebenzia said that the only long term solution to the problem of it live is an expulsion of terrorists from the country for NPR news inland similarly in New York California's utility regulator has imposed a record fine on utility Pacific gas and electric this for causing recent deadly wildfires from member station KQED lily Jamali reports it's the largest penalty ever issued by the California public utilities commission the fine modifies a previous settlement PG&E had agreed to which critics called too lenient more than a hundred people were killed in the wildfires of twenty seventeen and twenty eighteen liabilities from those fires prompted P. Jeannie to file for bankruptcy last year this harsher fine sets aside hundreds of millions for those victims it's in PR voters in South Carolina hold their primary election tomorrow president trump will hold a rally in north Charleston tonight the candidates competing for the democratic presidential nomination are all hoping for a boost that includes former vice president Joe Biden who was seen strong support among African American voters a key constituency in South Carolina in an interview with PBS news hour democratic presidential candidate and former New York City mayor Mike Bloomberg has defended the use of a controversial surveillance program of Muslims under his administration and peers awesome holiday has more Bloomberg has insisted the program kept Americans safe but no arrests were ever attributed to the surveillance program is still in an interview with PBS Bloomberg showed no remorse and said he had a responsibility to go anywhere he could to get intelligence we have just lost three thousand people at nine eleven course was supposed to do that and so Bloomberg defended going into mosques listening to sermons and spying on Muslims he said it made sense given the identity of the nine eleven terrorists all of the people came from the same place and all that came were from place I happen to be one religion and if they've been another religion would be done the same thing Bloomberg insists everything he did was legal but multiple lawsuits were filed over the program a small college NPR news former Baltimore mayor Catherine Pugh has been sentenced to three years in federal prison for corruption convictions she fraudulently sold self published children's books to nonprofit groups to pay for her political career he resigned under pressure last name I'm korva Coleman NPR news support for NPR comes from NPR stations other contributors include neon presenting portrait of a lady on fire a love story set in eighteenth century France about an affair between an artist and her female subject now playing in select theaters and the NET Casey foundation corona virus will be covered in the first story in this segment of morning edition NPR's David Greene is going to talk to an infectious disease expert about the response to the outbreak of that the virus.

Jason Strother Seoul
"strother" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

08:58 min | 1 year ago

"strother" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Day. The Lancaster bombers the six seventeen air squadron squadrons flew in orbits eight miles long and two miles wide slowly. Moving Southeast at eight knots to Mimic and ocean convoy and according to an account given given to the Royal Air Force in May two thousand nineteen by wing commander John Bell M B E. Who is part of this mission quote? While they were flying there were two aircrew in the rear of each Lancaster. CASTER and I was one of them. We were handed bundles of Aluminum Strip which we dropped at approximately three second intervals through the flare shoot. The strips varied in size and went from small to large as we approached the French coast and large to small when we turned back to the English coast a green light indicated when it was time to throw it. The efforts of the six hundred seventeenth air squadron were part of what was called Operation Taxable which played out along the French coast near Cop Donte Fair a second operation in which made use of window known as Operation Glimmer made it look as though there was an allied force crossing a narrow point of the English Channel for glimmer. That two hundred eighteen team squadron was tasked with dropping the chaff and the deception also included a faint. That made it appear that a massive groundforce was moving toward pas-de-calais to to provide additional support for this ruse dummy parachutists were dropped southwest of and King in a segment of the plan called operation. Titanic all of these efforts combined worked as the allies hoped. The Germans could not get a correct analysis of enemy troop movements and even into the following month. There was still confusion about whether there was a large groundforce near the city of Calais. Also in June of nineteen forty. Four Salmon Joan Curran were invited to the University of California at Berkeley to work on the Manhattan Hatton project which they accepted. It was during this time that the pair worked on the development of a simulation counter to measure the ionization of radiation. While Samuel current is given credit for this invention which is still used today he consistently noted his wife's work on the project and during their time in California the Currents Had Their First Child oiled and their daughter was born with an intellectual or cognitive disability. The exact nature of her disability is unclear from the readily available information but after the war came to a close the curtains moved back to the UK. Where Sam had been offered a position at Glasgow University and they had three more children after they returned to Europe? All of which were sons Though her work with the war effort was done. Joan was hardly idle from this point in nineteen fifty four. She and Sam with four other couples with the goal of setting up an organization. Jose Shen to assist parents of children with learning disabilities. After the first meeting they printed a notice in the paper and biting people to an open meeting and more than three hundred people attended. This was the beginning of the Scottish Association of Parents of Handicapped Children which is an organization that still exists although its name has evolved hoped to be enabled Scotland which is a support and advocacy group. Joan Curran continued to work in support of people with disabilities throughout her lifetime. Her close ties is to academia led her to advocate on behalf of students with disabilities and work with the Council for Access for the disabled. Both Sam and Joan were really outspoken. Proponents the idea that education was something that should be available to everyone and this work that she did was one way in which she carried out that mission. She also served on Greater Glasgow L. Health Board and was part of the Scottish Special Housing Association. At the end of the nineteen fifties. Sam became principal of the Royal College of Science and Technology which gained its Royal Charter and became the University of Strathclyde under his leadership. During this time Joan founded and served as president of the Strathclyde Women's group she also also established the Lady Current Endowment Fund for overseas students in nineteen eighty seven at the age of seventy one. Joan was finally granted an honorary doctorate the University of Strathclyde. So finally she got her physics. Degree Samuel Curran died on February Fifteenth Nineteen Ninety eight a plaque was installed in his honor in Baruni Hall a Victorian Gothic Church at Strathclyde Joan unveiled the plaque and ceremony. Although she herself was terminally ill at the time at the event she he was told that a walled garden at the Ross priory also part of Strathclyde was to be named after her with the Joan Curran Summer House to be built. Their Joan Curran died less less than a year after her husband on February tenth nineteen ninety nine and she never had any of her work published by her contributions to the war effort science and her community were recounted over and over and habitue aries her obituary in the Scotland Herald opened with the paragraph quote. It is difficult to separate the lives of Joan and Sam Curran. And although they were a very different temperaments they made a superb team and partnership and were devoted to each other nevertheless it is very important and Sam always emphasized sized this to know that she was a considerable scientist in her own right and in the dark days of the Second World War. She as did Sam played an important part in the survival. All of this country politician Tim. Daniel wrote an account of his first meeting with Reginald Jones That person that had spearheaded the window project and in that conversation Sation Jones told him quote. In my opinion Joan Curran made an even greater contribution to victory in nineteen forty-five than Sam. She's pretty incredible. It it is and it's one of those things I'm glad there have been some efforts in both Wales and Scotland last probably five to eight years of people who are pointing out like this is a person that we should be recognizing more than we do and I love that they're doing that makes me happy. I have so much listener. Mail L. O.. Well we've just come off of the holidays and we are lucky enough to often get some really really lovely Cards from various S. listeners. And I wanted to read a couple of them and then talk about one Wonderful gift that arrived at I. Of course I'm in love with The first one is from our listener. Rebecca who just sent us the level card. That is a Dr Seuss card and says thank you for all your hard work on the podcast. I'm a big Fan. I also love the behind the scenes. Mary Christmas Thank you so much rebecca. We are long past Christmas at this point. But I hope yours was great as well We also got a card from Test Bill PIPPI and buster test wrote Hollywood Tracy. Happy Holidays in a very merry Christmas to you and your families. I'm a longtime listener to the show along the my two cats PIPPI and buster who are so stinking cute. I kind of can't deal with it. That's mine This is my boyfriend. Bill doesn't quite get the whole podcast thing but that is his loss. I am going to Rome in January so I won't be able to go with you and may bummer but I still get to go to Rove's so no complaints. Keep up the good work she can. She can prescreen it for us and tell us all the good places. That's officially your job. Now our last one is from our listener Shelley Kelly and she reads dear Halley. And Tracy I am a total spaceflight nerd and I loved every bit of the Apollo Eleven Fiftieth Anniversary celebrations. This summer including your fascinating Thomas. Harriet and John Wilkins episodes. I got to see the Columbia Command module at Seattle's Museum of flight and I highly recommend it to anyone who has the chance to see it. I think it's back at the Smithsonian now as part of the Museum of flights Destination Moon Events. I attended a great talk by an Astra. Biologists titled Life On the Ancient Moon conclusion. There could have been some and I picked up these moon photo postcards to send you glad I didn't get around to sending them right away because I then saw the building orbiter postcard on a more recent visit to the museum and I could not resist getting it as well. Thank you for all the wonderful work you do on the podcast. I'm always rooting for more episodes. In the history of science piece exploration and women in stem. Yes so it's this cool kind of snap snap together orbiter model that you can make and it comes in a postcard in. It's really cool and I love it. I also will echo her thing. If if you ever get to go see any of these marvelous orbiters please do it If you go to Kennedy and you see the Atlantis intas on display. That is one of the most beautiful and moving museum installations. I think I have ever seen in my entire life It is so good. I stood there and cried for forty five minutes But I also just recommend that you go and and recognize the amazing things the thing I always love about space and I tried to explain this to people. Aw like when I look at things like the James Webb space telescope or any of the space shuttle's Cetera is that to me. What makes them beautiful is that they are the best of us? Those are a lot of different people from different backgrounds. Who have all worked really really hard and come together to make something that transcends our life on earth that is why I'm such a space store? If you like to write to us you can do so at history. PODCAST at iheartradio DOT com again..

Joan Curran Sam Joan University of Strathclyde Joan Curran Summer House Samuel Curran Bill PIPPI Royal Air Force Scotland Operation Taxable Strathclyde Joan Lancaster Aluminum Strip pas-de-calais Calais Southeast Samuel Royal College of Science and T Donte Fair
"strother" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

09:30 min | 1 year ago

"strother" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Jones was against withholding the use of window although he also wanted to make sure that when they did deploy it it was at a time when it would be the most effective and impactful in October nineteen forty two British intelligence received information that indicated that the Germans knew what about this concept having fired on a dust cloud of aluminum particles that was thrown out of an allied craft and the Rheinland Jones made the case to command that they should absolutely absolutely US window immediately before German forces might have a chance to figure out a way around it perhaps even introduced their own version of it but his efforts were met with dismissal. This discussion did however lead to a more detailed analysis of window and how it would impact both the Germans and the British this. Let's more specifications Asians around the exact amounts of window material that should be used for various results and also the calculations of its value in terms of potential casualty reduction and as people were calculating these things how much to us and what it was what Israel value was in terms of war effort. They came up with some different numbers. Derrick Jackson in who was that man who had halted the initial use of window worked on this analysis as well and he came up with the weight of eighty four tons of window as the amount needed to make Germany's radar useless. Jackson also believed to reciprocate German forces could render allied radar ineffective with just one ton of a similar material. RV Jones made his own calculation. Remember he had really Birth this whole idea and he landed at twelve tonnes. The amount needed to wipe out the effectiveness of Germany's radar and then a whole other collie came up with the number of forty eight tons so they were all over the map in what they thought. It was going to require to be effective after a meeting on April April second nineteen forty-three in which everyone argued the case for or against window based on their own calculations it was decided that it was worthwhile and that a request Westwood be sent to the Prime Minister to use it as soon as possible. The case had to once again be made to Winston Churchill with some members of the British military still in opposition to Oh using window but eventually it was determined that the potential to save lives was worth the perceived risk of disruption to British and allied radar readings at the conclusion conclusion of the meeting. According to Jones Churchill said very well let us open the window. RV Jones knowing that if the plan for window failed he would take all the heat. Beat sent his men out to all of the bomber stations where this would be deployed to give talks about Germany's night defense systems and clearly explain how the packets of aluminum strips were to be deployed and at what rate as things were finally moving to actual use of the research that Joan had done. There are also concerns that Germany was essentially essentially in the exact same position with a similar radar disruptive technology that they were fearful about putting into use after the war. RV Jones discovered that Germans. Germans had definitely known about window and we're perplexed as to why it wasn't in use. They also tried a similar tech of their own. But the trials went so poorly that Hermann Goering during had all the reports related to these tests destroyed Operation Gomorrah on July twenty fourth nineteen forty. Three was the first time that window the culmination Shen of current experimentation was used in a bombing raid the first night of attacks on Hamburg Germany were considered a success British forces since seven hundred ninety ninety-one aircraft out and they lost only twelve. That's a one point. Five percent loss rate similar rates that it happened without the use of window had a six point. One percent loss loss rate Jones. Estimated that seventy to eighty aircraft were saved thanks to their parcels of aluminum strips over the course of several raids the next night window it was used again on our rate and Essen this time the disruption was so significant that the Germans were not only unable to track enemy bombers but they also weren't able to track their own planes plains. The loss rate for the British bombers was slightly higher than the previous night at three point three percent. But this was still a substantial improvement over previous missions without window there were additional raids on Hamburg in the days that followed both by British bomber command and by the US the average loss rate for British forces was two point. Eight percent averaged out over the series of bombings. While we're talking about the success of these rates we also have to acknowledge. The heavy civilian casualties. That took place in these. As a tax the ground fires created by the bombing on Hamburg. During the second raid there created a firestorm. The intensity of the fires created their own wind is hot air. Rose and cold air was pulled down very rapidly that spread the flames destroying huge swath of the city and suffocating people additionally a tornado like effect pulled people into the blaze even as they tried to flee. RV Jones account indicates that allied forces didn't realize how how devastating these bombings were until after the fact when casualty estimates were placed between forty and fifty thousand people. Yeah you will see sometimes even lower numbers and sometimes even higher numbers there I will tell you this. This is a one time that research for this show has ever resulted than me having nightmares. So if you want to go study this firestorm please know that the images you will see are very disturbing. The stories of survivors are very upsetting. but it's also really important that we talk about it so Jones also acknowledged that this was something that seemed very counter to what they had been in sort of preaching from the allied side. He later wrote quote. We had started the war morally opposed to the bombing of civilian populations and now we were pursuing it on a horrifying roofing scale. How did this come about? And then he goes on to discuss how that had been something of a gradual process as the realizations came that bomber command could not always guarantee precision hits targets but also that bomber command was really the only thing that was hurting Germany on the scale that was needed to end the war. Additionally there was a strategy in play demoralized the German population by striking a city filled with industrial workers Jones summarized all of this by writing unquote. It was on the grounds of probable effectiveness and not of morality that the battle was fought at one point. There was even a brief accusation that the allies had used chemical warfare at Hamburg. Although that was untrue was this allegation had been some of the aluminum strips that the Germans had recovered after a cow had eaten them at died. Did the strips had been coated in black paint to make them invisible at night and that paint did contain a small amount of arsenic but not enough to substantiate a claim of chemical warfare. Bear as another aside because suspect people will ask couldn't account just die from eating those strips Having grown up the child of farmers Cows eat metal all the time. Guess often they're fed stuff. That's just kind of sloppy and filled with all kinds of craziness. Also they will sometimes just find things in fields. Some farmers actually put magnets and their cows stomachs to kind of keep those things isolated and not pass through their digestive tract and cause mortality But yeah it's not uncommon for cows to eat metal Just the same. Despite those chemical warfare claims being abandoned the attack on Hamburg and Essen had significantly diminished both oth morale and production of war material over the course of eight days the British and US bombing raids destroyed half of Hamburg while it initially was considered by some to being active retribution of the Nazi bombings of London and Coventry the difference in the level of destruction at Hamburg made the ethics of war. Something that people inside the military considered -sidered in a new way even as newspapers were touting operation good more as a huge win and even today these raids and the balance of moral versus strategic chick decision making continued to be discussed. We also talked about that a lot in our episode on Sadako Sasaki and her thousand cranes and the bombings of of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. And all that so it came up a lot all through the war. The system that Jones had conceived and that Joan Curran had tested had worked incredibly well keeping German women forces confused as their radar failed to give them information that they needed to defend against these bombing raids and as the allied forces prepared for D Day Curran's radar chaffetz system system was used to obscure the details of the planned landings at Normandy. It was important to not only hide. The fact that Normandy was their target but also to misdirect the attentions inches of the German forces to another location. If possible the hope was that the allies could convince the Germans that the planned landing was east of the Seine River so that they would keep heap most of their troops and artillery there and then the allied forces would destroy the bridges that would have enabled them to move out of that areas. They kind of wanted to get them in one place and trapped from there and then to do all this the allies needed illusion. They wanted to convince the Germans that have force was coming in from the sea and they came up with a plan to use window to do you so Robert Cock burn who had overseen. The testing that Joan Curran had done to develop window was the person who developed this plan. And we're GONNA talk about how that plan was executed. You did with some very dire results but we're going to take a quick sponsor break before we get into that. Hey I'm andy eighty. If you don't know me it's probably because I'm not famous but I did start a men's grooming company.

Hamburg Jones RV Jones Rheinland Jones Joan Curran Germany Derrick Jackson US Winston Churchill Essen Hermann Goering Israel Robert Cock Normandy Seine River Prime Minister defense systems Sadako Sasaki
"strother" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

07:10 min | 1 year ago

"strother" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Of iheartradio's. How stuff works? Hello and welcome to the PODCAST. I'm holly FRY and I'm Tracy Wilson and today we're talking about a woman who is not a household name but In my opinion should probably should be there. Some other people who thinks probably should be as well She was a Welsh scientist. Who developed a system of thwarting radar? It was invaluable to the allied forces during World War Two and what we know of her work is unfortunately entirely piece together from accounts by her male colleagues who fortunately recognize the importance of her contributions so today we are talking about Joan. struthers current Jones struthers was born February twenty six nineteen sixteen in in Swansea Wales. Joan attended the Swansea Girls High School. She won a scholarship to Newnham College. The University of Cambridge and she enrolled there in nineteen thirty eighty four. She studied physics of note. Here is the fact that Joan. Despite doing. All of the required coursework Cambridge did not get a physics degree That was because it was policy not to issue them to women so when she finished her undergraduate coursework in nineteen thirty eight but again not a degree she started her doctorate work and that was actually funded by government. Grant and that work was carried. Out at Cambridge's cavendish laboratory and it was there that she met a man named Samuel Curren. Who she he was assigned as a lab partner? This whole deal where you could do. The whole of the coursework and not be awarded a degree because your woman that was not unique to Cambridge. We've talked about that happening in other other schools to yeah absolutely that was pretty much director across academia Yeah the Nineteen Thirties. Yeah so in one thousand nine hundred forty structure and Karen were removed moved from their physics work at the cavendish lab to Exeter and there they were both assigned to research. That was to help the war effort. They turned their problem solving skill to the development of proximity Timothy Fuses. These are explosive device. Triggers that sense when their targets are within a specified range so close enough to cause damage and then detonate the proximity refuses that Jones struthers and Samuel current developed targeted rockets and aircraft and they developed a very close relationship over the course of the years being lab partners in in November nineteen forty Joanne. Samuel married and not long after the currents had said their vows. They were reassigned. This time they were sent to the telecommunications research just stablishment this was again part of the war effort and Sam worked on centimeter radar and Joan worked in countermeasures. The goal for Jones work was to figure out a way. Okay to fool enemy radar and the team on this project was led by Robert Cock burn under the leadership of Reginald. Victor Jones is a British physicist. Who had become an expert Bert in military intelligence? Just as a quick refresher on radar that stands for radio detection and ranging basically radar works by sending out a radio signal in in one direction it looks for a bounce or an echo of that signal which would indicate that there objects in the path of the signal then using the information gathered that way including at the time it takes for the echo to return to the point of transmission radar can indicate the size shape and distance of objects so the team commissioned by Jones has adds a somehow thwart that process and so one of the experiments that Joan Kerlin began was using thin metal reflectors to disrupt the echo of radar. Large groups of small metal strips could even mimic a large object like in aircraft. When in reality there was nothing substantial? They're even larger groups of strips could create large amorphous. BLOBS were big enough to hide an aircraft inside. Even if an enemy knew that a plane was somewhere inside such a blob bob figuring out where would be a complete guests if that blob was big enough and Jones is credited with coming up with this idea and then passing it off to the research group to figure out the particulars and do testing and Joan. Curran really did a lot of that research. Jones later described the concept in this way years later in his book which is titled The the Secret War quote the phenomenon on which they depended was that of resonance if a reflector is made of a simple wire or strip of metal of length equal to half the wavelength used by the radar station it resonates to the incoming radio waves and re radiates them to such effect that it is roughly equivalent to a whole sheet of metal whose dimensions dimensions are square. and which has sides equal in links to half a wavelength. Thus a few hundred such strips or wires would reflect as much energy as a whole all Lancaster bomber fewer collar twenty-fifth episode on the twenty-third headquarters special troops. That are known as the ghost army. Creative deception was was a valuable tool in the allied forces. World War Two plans but at the point when Kerlin and team led by Jones. We're working on their radar. DISRUPTER technology the US. US Wasn't even involved in World War Two yet. Current and her colleagues were leading the effort and trickery as military strategy figuring out ways that blobs of reflective material could hint at a photo massive attack force or simply obscure one or two aircraft and so the practical idea of how this would work is is that elite aircraft would drop bundles of strips to create this radar confusion and then dropping additional bundles at regular intervals. Would create complete mayhem for enemy enemy forces that were trying to get a read on the situation. This technology was given the codename window by British intelligence though the US would eventually just kind of use the more casual term. I'm of radar chaff. Even after the December seventh nineteen forty one bombing of Pearl Harbor which brought to the United States into the war. Currents work was still in the experimental stage. She was testing the best possible materials. The best possible shapes and sizes for these strips there's decisions weren't made until nineteen forty two and the technology wasn't put into use until nineteen forty three. She performed test. I at Swan on the Isle of Pure Beck and then later at Malvern Worcestershire. Everything from pieces of the middle as big as slips of paper which were considered as a possible propaganda delivery system as well as being part of this radar disruption to very tiny wires were tested it before the research led to the decision that aluminum cut into one point. Five by twenty five centimeters strips was the best that is a little bit more than half an inch by a a little less than ten inches according to RV Jones the intention at actually bench. I use the system Joan. Kerr had tested as early as May of nineteen forty two he wrote with the chiefs of Staff. Approval the window packets where I believe actually loaded into bombers for a raid in May nineteen forty two. And then we're off loaded again because there was a last minute prohibition of their use and the reason for that last minute change according to Jones. Was that fighter commands airborne radar officer. Derrick Jackson had only heard about the existence of window right before the mission and Jackson was understandably concerned that those reflectors might also cause confusion to the radar tech's in the British forces and so he was not comfortable using a brand new technology.

Joan Kerlin Victor Jones Cambridge Joan. struthers Samuel Curren Nineteen Thirties United States RV Jones Jones University of Cambridge partner iheartradio Newnham College scientist Derrick Jackson holly FRY cavendish laboratory Tracy Wilson Robert Cock
29 displaced by massive fire, partial collapse at Gwinnett apartment building

Atlanta's Morning News

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

29 displaced by massive fire, partial collapse at Gwinnett apartment building

"Massive apartment fire in Duluth leave nearly a dozen families homeless for the new year W. S. B.'s bill chi at your reports live two people are in the hospital this morning yeah just a witness described to channel two action news the thick smoke and flames shooting from the land market Bellavista apartments it was huge fire everywhere part of the building it already started to collapse when firefighters got to the scene he too intense to go inside to search for victims Donald Strother with the Gwinnett fire department says they're looking for a because we don't have anything to go on at this point time after finally getting the fire under control search teams determine everyone made it out okay to residents though have non life threatening injuries the red cross is providing shelter for twenty three adults and six

Duluth W. S. B. Donald Strother Gwinnett Fire Department Bellavista
Hong Kong police battle protesters

Morning Edition

01:27 min | 1 year ago

Hong Kong police battle protesters

"Terrorist this is no one was injured in the eastern over hours critical level brightest intend to move the whole pizza anti government protesters say that Hong Kong police have used extremely brutal tactics to disrupt many demonstrations and that officers are not being held accountable president trump is calling on north Korean leader Kim Jong moon to act quickly to get a deal done on denuclearization Jason Strother reports from Seoul that trump made his appeal to Kim over the weekend on social media in his tweet addressed to Mister chairman president trump called on Kim Jong hoon to act quickly and get the deal done his message concluded with see you soon just hours earlier US defense secretary mark asper announced that the US and South Korea would scrap air combat drills that were scheduled for later this month speaking at a regional conference in Thailand the Pentagon chief denied this was a concession to North Korea but called it a good will gesture aimed at bringing Pyongyang back to the negotiating table the north had repeatedly criticized the maneuvers following the cancellation of the U. S. exercises on young announced that it's begun its own military drills overseen by ruler Kim for NPR news I'm Jason Strother in Seoul meanwhile

Hong Kong NPR Pentagon Mark Asper Chairman Mister Kim Jong President Trump Donald Trump Pyongyang North Korea Thailand South Korea United States Seoul Jason Strother
South Korea sends 2 North Koreans home for killing 16 in defection bid

Morning Edition

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

South Korea sends 2 North Koreans home for killing 16 in defection bid

"South Korea's says to north Korean fishermen who were deported yesterday are the first north Koreans to be sent back to their home country since the end of the Korean War in the early nineteen fifties as Jason Strother reports from Seoul officials confirm the two killed sixteen crew members aboard their ship including the captain the two fishermen were handed over to north Korean authorities inside the demilitarized zone Seoul says the two both in their twenties confessed to murdering the captain of their ship as well as its crew and allegedly through the bodies overboard while in north Korean waters after a third mutineer was arrested at port the two sailed into south Korean territory where they were detained last week a government spokesperson said the sailors posed a risk to public safety and did not qualify for refugee protection fishermen sometimes drift below the border and are sent back if they asked to be but almost all who ask for asylum are

South Korea Jason Strother Seoul
US, North Korea to restart nuclear talks after missile tests, State Department says

Morning Edition

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

US, North Korea to restart nuclear talks after missile tests, State Department says

"The state department is urging North Korea to refrain from provocations following Pyongyang's latest missile test Jason Strother in Seoul says earlier today North Korea fired a ballistic missile into the sea of Japan south Korea's military says at least one north Korean missile might have been fired from a submarine this is the ninth missile test to since president trump and leader Kim Jong hoon met in June envoys from North Korea and the U. S. are set to meet in the upcoming days the willow cation hasn't been announced working level talks between the trump administration and North Korea are to resume on Friday and

North Korea Pyongyang Jason Strother Seoul Japan President Trump Kim Jong
 South Korea confirms 2 swine fever cases

Morning Edition

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

South Korea confirms 2 swine fever cases

"South Korea is trying to stop the spread of African swine fever so far there have been two confirmed cases of the disease which only affects livestock face instructor reports from Seoul there is concern that the outbreak originated in North Korea south Korea's agriculture ministry says that it has or will soon call around fifteen thousand pigs to stop the spread of African swine fever the deadly disease has spread across Asia and in the spring North Korea reported an outbreak on its border with China infections in South Korea have all occurred at farms near the inter Korean border and it's feared that recent typhoon rains or wild boars have carried the disease to the south officials here say they are stopping the movement of livestock humans and vehicles from infected farmland to contain the outbreak South Korea has a reported sixty three hundred farms that raise about eleven million pegs for NPR news I'm Jason Strother in

South Korea Seoul Asia Jason Strother Instructor NPR
"strother" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"strother" Discussed on Revision Path

"Not only did you have some fun, but you met some people and come to be friends and you can leave with, you know, more connections that are real and deep and genuine at the end of the day. But that was something that was really important to us because we've all. Been the conferences before and, and a lot of times you know, you, you see people in passing, you sit at the table with them, but you don't really get to know them. Y'all listen to the same stuff. You might go out to lunch or dinner once or twice, but there's not really the opportunity to kind of grow in that relationship. And so that's what we wanted to try and foster. And that's why it's kind of a smaller event. It's smaller by design. Yeah, I was going to mention like it is. It's a pretty small. I wanna say it's maybe like thirty thirty five people, something like that. Yeah, yeah, that's that's about. That's about the cat this year. We may expand it in future years, but I think at this point that's about the size that we wanna try and shoot forward. So that again, you can. You can meet everybody. You can know everybody at the end of the weekend and it's not, you know, one of those things where I know I've talked to you, but I can't remember your name kind of thing. So no, I think I think that's great. I mean, I've certainly seen similar types of events like that where they try to cap the attendees at a certain number to keep this of intimates feel, you know. So I think that's, that's a great thing. And certainly, I think as you all kind of get more word out about it, get more sponsors, et cetera you can think about if you want to increase that or if you still want to keep it this kind of exclusive sort of thing. I mean, I think Ted only has what fifteen hundred attendees or something like that every year and people know about that all over the world. So I don't feel like you have to nothing. I'm necessarily giving advice but like you know, no feel like you have to grow it out bigger. If it's working at the size that you're doing it at, like keep it going at that size, maybe look at how you can replicate that same sort of capsule experience in other locations. That's something that's something that we are we're investigating for for the future is more than likely keeping it about the same size, but maybe having more than one a year or a couple of different locations around the country. Now you grew up here in Atlanta, went to school in Atlanta. I've been here in Atlanta since ninety nine ish ninety nine or so what is the design community like for you here? That's an interesting question so, and it's partially because I've kind of bounced between design communities. So I would have said, if you would ask me a few years back when I was doing industrial design would probably give me a different answer. But I think that this point the design community in Atlanta is flourishing mess. Specially in you x. and graphic design, everybody seems to be looking for US designers in all the major companies around the city. You know, obviously Georgia. Cranking out designers, scab has cranking out designers, I think even door to state has some some design programs there. So we've got a lot of kids coming out of school with design backgrounds, and we've got a lot of startups and technology companies that have been founded on the west coast or elsewhere in the country that are opening up offices here in Atlanta, partially because of of kind of tech in the technology hub here in the awesome engineers they have here, but also.

Atlanta US Ted Georgia
"strother" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"strother" Discussed on Revision Path

"And she was like, you know, I love what you guys are doing if we can help, if in any way that's we'd be glad to. So, yeah, it's, it's been fantastic, the response and what people are saying about it. Wow, that's that's pretty cool. So they invited you just to kind of see how it all goes and everything. Yeah, exactly. Just kinda see how they run their show and they offer to help us in the future with referrals for speakers and and that type of thing as well. Now, obviously, their conferences is is much more grand than than ours is at this point. I think they are in their tenth or so year, and they had maybe one hundred fifty or more people at the conference last week and speakers from around the world, which were fantastic, but any help and recognition as as always appreciated. Well, I think honestly, it's great that they even have done that. And I don't say that to say for them specifically, but was time I would say when I was first starting revision path about five years ago, and I think it's still kind of an issue, but I think the perception of the issue has gotten better, but there was a time when you know these conferences were put out there, speaker panels. Or whatever someone would mention maybe on Twitter like, hey, where are the black people Brown people? And the response would be so hateful and so vile. Oftentimes coming from the conference organizers themselves about like how dare you bring that up. That's sort of thing. And I mean, I've even gotten, I mean, dozens of inquiries over the years from events that are like we're trying to diversify our speaker roster, who can we reach out to, but oftentimes they're looking at diversity as kind of a last minute add on. So after they've already exhausted most of their budget or the rest of the programs planned out now, it's like, oh, we should probably sprinkle in some melanin it here. So people don't get mad. And I think at one point I think at one point there was a time when some conferences were bringing on people colored just so they could avoid that kind of bad PR. Another one conference in particular out of was out of Texas. I want. Say it was the circles conference where the guy that ran that just went like, but Listrik on Twitter about it. So the fact that a conference of that stature would reach out just to say, hey, we see that you're a smaller event doing the sort of thing, and we wanna help out and that sort of way. I think that is huge. That's amazing that they would even offer their resources like that. 'cause oftentimes they expect the reciprocal thing. They want you as the small entity to help them out. You know what I mean? Yeah. I mean, it was really awesome. Jesse, the lady the organizer that contacted us, you know, we had a chance to talk to her while we were there and she, you know, she was really, really genuine and really, really awesome in terms of her willingness to support what we're doing. It definitely didn't seem like she was like putting on or being in disingenuous about it because the some of the speakers that they had at that conference were talking specifically about diversity and inclusion on a number of levels. So it's obviously something that you know they feel like is important and, and you know, like, like I said, it's just great to see. Yeah. Let's bring it back to Hugh. What can people expect from the Hugh design summit this year? So we have a, it's Thursday through Sunday, and we've got a great lineup of speakers. You may be familiar and many of your audience may be familiar with with Gail Anderson. She was one of our keynote speakers this year, and we feel incredibly blessed to have her agreed to come and speak to our attendees. We've got a marketing and design specialist. We've got a couple of weeks researchers 's coming to talk as well. We've got no some, some catered meals, a private chef and just some opportunities to to sit down and converse and just get to know each other. So that at the end of the conference, you can say that not only did you learn some things?.

Twitter Gail Anderson Texas Hugh Jesse five years
"strother" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"strother" Discussed on Revision Path

"There was also the fact that we talked about earlier where clients, oftentimes, at least in the past, have balks at the idea of doing research, and we started, we started to have more and more of that. And that really, really irks me when my former co workers, you know, left this design firm that we were at and went to this firm that I'm currently at, and she was like, hey, we do real research and we, we actually talked to the people and get their feedback before we start designing things. And I was like, you are speaking my language. So, yeah, I mean, the kind of the combination of those those two things being able to actually talk to users and understand, you know where they're coming from an empathize with them about the troubles that they're having the things that they like to be able to do with a particular product or service, and and then you know, translating that into something that will make their lives easier is really what makes going to work every day, you know. Fantastic. Nice. All right. So let's switch gears here for a minute. What are you most excited about at the moment? So I am most excited about an upcoming design summit that myself in a few of my friends as part of the Hugh collective are putting on this week, it's called Hugh design summit. It's a small uncon- France for designers of color. We're having it here in Atlanta, and that's really exciting for us. How did you all I get the idea to do something like that. I've thought about that a lot. Interestingly enough, several of us that are in the collective are actually Georgia Tech grads. So I'm not sure whether it's a function of going to a PWI or what, but a few years after all of us graduated, we're just kind of thinking about ways to build stronger connections between designers of color. And one of the members of our group Alphonso created a group me group called box. Design started inviting folks that he knew that were designers and that kind of online group continued to grow and continues to grow at this point. And you know that was nice and it was it was great, but we thought, you know, that's it's not quite the same having relationships online as it is, you know, in person. So you know, we kind of thought, what could we do something in person that wouldn't conflict with? You know, the many other groups do conferences or do you know, meet up so that type of thing. And so this is what we decided on in. We had our inaugural our inaugural summit last year and it was span tastic, and our next one is coming up from last year. I think just in the Walker who's been on the show, she was one of the keynote speakers. Right? She was. She was and she was fantastic. We had a really great really great time. She led us through an awesome talk and has actually served as kind of an ongoing adviser for us since since last year. And it's been fantastic. Nice. What have you all learned since put. On this event. Oh, goodness. So putting on event like this takes a lot more than you originally expected to all the various details in logistics. I'm not sure that we really fully understood what would always involved with it when we first started. But like I said, it was a, it was a learning experience. And I think this year is going to be even better than last year and really, it's been great to see the response that we've gotten both from the folks who attended last year as well as you know, folks that we talked to about it since then, you know, we've had lots and lots of support from both kind of the designers of color as well as you know, some who aren't. And fact we had myself in another one of the members of Hugh James went out to the layers conference in San Jose just last week at the invite of one of the conference. Organizers just as a as a way to support us in what we were trying to do..

Hugh James Alphonso Georgia Tech Atlanta uncon- France San Jose
"strother" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"strother" Discussed on Revision Path

"Company and he was about to graduate and move to Japan. And he said, you know, I can't service my clients anymore. Do you want them? And I said, exactly, said, will sure I'll, I'll take them. Yes. And so I started a freelance web design company and that's kind of where, I guess some of the background for my transition into you ex came from, I knew how to code. I knew how to design for the web. And so the only thing that was really different from product design was the fact that oftentimes the products are digital instead of. Physical. So aside from that, the design process is nearly identical. You like to start out with research to understand the problem, understand if you should be designing this thing or not. And once you decide that you are are you should then you kinda deci, then you kinda research, you know will what are the issues that are that your potential customers are having and design solution for them? You do some manner of concept development. You do some manner of prototyping and ideally test those prototypes with the with the users. And as you get closer to refining that product or that concept, then you you shifted over to to engineering in the product development world or our development in the in the software digital product world. And then once that's done, you do some some QA testing, right? And and then you you get rid. To to release it the market. So the key differences, as you know, the, the embodiment of the product and the development time line product development is typically much longer in the development time line than than digital products are, but that was relatively relatively seamless. Interesting. I think now they just call the whole process designed thinking sort of like being able to apply those design processes across a number of things. But I think it's interesting that the the process itself is not that different. Sometimes we'll tell people that to me like I have more of like math and science background, like my mom's a biologist, my dad's an engineer and I majored in math. So when I was going into design, I came into mostly from analytical standpoint like I saw it as an equation to solve. And so it does feel like to me that the design process has some some correlation analogy. Like the scientific method, at least as how it relates to research, you know you're doing the research or gathering data, you're testing hypothesis, etcetera, etcetera. It's very similar to interviewing users and getting that information. So you can sort of present that back to the client so they can see whether or not this is a direction that they need to go on. Absolutely. I mean, they're definitely people who practice specifically hypothesis based design right where they as opposed to just going out and looking for input from end users or stakeholders as a way to define the problem. And you know what they should start to design around. Basically, they make a hypothesis and say, this is what we think is the issue. This is what we think could be the solution and they build something, and then they test against that and try and prove themselves right or wrong as the case may be. When did you sort of have this this moment where you knew that this was what you wanted to do for a living? I mean, star. Putting out wanting to do computer science and then industrial engineering. And now kind of transitioning into you. US winded is sort of click for you that this was this is what you wanna do. There's a point in time in my career as a industrial designer that a lot of the new projects that we were doing had digital interfaces as a as a component. So there was that part..

product development US Japan engineer
"strother" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

04:32 min | 2 years ago

"strother" Discussed on Revision Path

"I worked there for shrew well, actually I started they're working. They're like, interning there my senior year, and so I worked there for a total of about seven years. Got a bunch of utility patents different from design patents, a couple of design patents while I was there. But yeah, we got to work on a whole bunch of different stuff and consultancy life is fun and interesting in that regard. And that you get to learn a lot about a lot of different industries and. Every day is different sneaking of patents. We actually have a question here. This is from Sella Lewis who she's been a guest on the show. She's also a writer for the site and a patron. She wanted to know when you were in industrial design, did you have any experience going through the design patent process? It kind of sounds like you did. Can you offer any advice for those interested in industrial design and design pens, advice? Yes. So I guess some procedural things one as you're doing your design work, dated. Sign it and date it one for documentation for your portfolio and that type of thing and two. If you think at some point what you've created, maybe patentable, it's really important to make sure that you have that documentation because that's what the attorneys are going to ask for. Right? Because they have to figure out one is their prior art as there have other people who've designed things that are similar, you know, come up with the same idea before you did too. If you're not working by yourself, you're working as part of a team. They've gotta figure out who's actually responsible for creating this intellectual property. I'm actually in the middle of going through that on a project that I worked on. Goodness, maybe six years ago now where the company filed for this patent and they're going to be awarded it. And there was some misunderstanding about who was responsible for designing it. So I had to go back and. Go back through my archives and like find the drawings that I made and myself and one of my other former colleagues were had to do the same thing had to go back through his drawings and find the drawings that we made and basically present the case that, yes, indeed, some of my ideas and some of his ideas and some of, you know, another former co workers ideas kind of merge together into the final embodiment of the product that this company manufactured and falling patent on. So keep good records is, is the main thing as far as like what you do after that point, typically, the attorneys will handle most of the heavy lifting though though, take your drawings, you're renderings, whatever the documentation that you have and they will either submit it as is or they will use it to as a guideline for the patent drawings that they were actually submit with the application. So those patent drawings are done in a particular manner. Particular format. So they probably won't use exactly what you created, but it'll be, like I said, it'll be a guideline to for what they create for that patent application, and then they file it and then you wait, you wait a couple of years usually. And eventually if it's granted than you'll get a, you'll get a letter in the mail saying, congratulations, that's pretty neat. But again, the patent office isn't particularly quick especially nowadays, so don't hold your breath on that. Yes. Sounds like it's a lengthy process. It is. How long did it take for your pets? Some are faster than others. I say average. It was two or three years. Okay, so not too long, but people should know it's not a quick submission kind of process where you're going to hear something right away. No, not typically. Okay. I guess they kind of have to research and find out if there's something similar. Out there is that kind of what takes a long time, you know. I think it's partially that and it's partially just the sheer number of submissions that they get initiatives. There's just a lot to work through. There's a pretty big backlog as I understand it. But yes, there's certainly a bit of document review to make sure that you know somebody else didn't already have a file a patent have got awarded a patent for the same, the same type of thing..

writer Sella Lewis seven years three years six years
"strother" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"strother" Discussed on Revision Path

"I started taking classes and they are interesting, but they were not fulfilling and you know, walking back and forth across campus. I stumbled through the college of architecture and saw some of the work that the industrial design program was pinning up in like, this is what I've been looking for. It seemed really cool when so I changed my major when I started at Morehouse. I think we were probably like in college right around the same time. You weren't college in two thousand something like that. Yeah. Yeah. I started in ninety nine so it was the same way. I got some more house. I started computer science. It wasn't for me and I ended up having switched my major. No Morale's didn't have a design program. And I remember trying to actually one point at one point I was trying to transfer out because I was like, oh, well, maybe my scholarship work somewhere else. It does, but I thought it did. You know, just didn't know. But yeah, I didn't know that Georgia Tech had designed programs back then that's kind of good to know about. Yeah, it was. It had been around for a little while. Certainly it's much much larger now than than it was. Then they've had some great advances in in that program and this grown quite a bit. But yeah, it was. It was. It was great when I was there. I think we had seventy or eighty kids in my graduating class on the in the design program, which is pretty good. At that point. We were. I guess the the smaller as compared to architecture, but I think, yeah, I think nowadays they're almost equal if not a little bit larger on the design side architecture, which is nice to see the growth. Yeah, we had some great professors and great classes, a nice variety of classes. And one of the key benefits that I found when go into like ideas, say conferences and that type of thing with other design schools was the fact that we had all those engineering departments at our school allowed us to have more of a technical background and our design work, which was invaluable because meant that we were designing things that could actually be manufactured like didn't just look nice just, you know, awesome forms. But also we had some background in, you know what? The electrical engineering needs to go into it or what mechanical engineering. These go into this thing that we're designing. So when I got out into the into the professional world, I had some some background at that helped me quite a bit. So what were some of those classes? You said kind of earlier, you learned a little bit about cognitive psychology. Now. You're saying also can have tech background, like what all sort of classes where you taking? Well, I mean, the, you know, you had the the typical studio classes and that type of thing. But then there were also so I took a human computer interface class that was kinda cross listed with the CS department. So that was quite helpful. There were a handful of classes that, like I said, we're kind of a, I don't know, like a like a cross listed class with like a mechanical engineering class or an electrical engineering class. So you had folks who are WBZ or Emmy's in the class with you. And you did group projects where there were designed students and engineering students that were grouped together again to make sure that you could share some of the knowledge that you all had based on your your major and make sure that you were designing things that were robust in in manufacturer will cause there's nothing worse than designing something that looks awesome in then can't. He made it can't be made for a price that people would be willing to pay. Yeah, that's for those students that go to artists the toot. No, I'm kidding. I am so kidding. I'm not kidding. No, I'm kidding. No, that's that's good. So once you graduated from Georgia Tech, what was your early career like you're working as an industrial designer? Yes. So I got a job right out of school at a product development firm in Lawrenceville just north of Atlanta, and they designed and developed all range of things consumer products and medical devices, and some commercial Whitman, that type of thing. And that was awesome..

Georgia Tech Emmy product development Whitman Atlanta Lawrenceville
"strother" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"strother" Discussed on Revision Path

"Component to won't even call it US. It's more so just user research before we started doing design work. So we will do user testing and we would do interviews and talk to people, and it always amazed me how nearly every single client pushed back on that at the beginning. I think one because it wasn't additional cost. Like, for example, if they need a website that why don't we have to talk to people like because your website is not just for you, it's for your customers or you're trying to raise money, you're you're trying to do something to spur other people into. Action. I just found the kind of funny that that would be the one thing that people would would try to push back on for some reason. Absolutely. It's really funny how frequently that happened and not until not until you come back with some groundbreaking revelation or quotes from their customers that completely contradicts the line of thinking that they have that they see the value. Right. A lot of times, you know, like, like you said, a lot of times people push back, they can't. They can't understand the value because it's it's hard to place an ROI on on that type of research unless and until you have something that says, I actually would not buy this thing the way you've designed it. The way you're proposing to to release it, then you have, you know multiple be saying that that people are like, oh, well, yeah, maybe that was valuable. Then sort of, like you said, at least now, I think the market is changing where hopefully clients are more aware that this is something that they need to have. They need to get that outside perspective in order to make sure that the end product is better for for everyone. Absolutely. I mean, a lot of times you have folks in and companies, especially some of the larger companies around the world where they've been working on this, this product, this product line for multiple years, and they're just too close to it. And having that outside perspective can really be very valuable for your product developments process. Oh, my God. I worked with one nonprofit here in Atlanta. They shall remain. They miss. But I, I worked with one nonprofit and I mean, they were, you know, they're very close to the work. And what the work was about. And it was so hard to get them to look outside of that for other perspectives. But yet they were always looking to those outside perspectives because they had money and it's like we need people to donate, but we don't necessarily want to take their advice. They don't know. They don't know what we're going through here. I'm like, well, why don't we tell them or show them like show stories of, you know, say too much more. I'm going to divulge who it is. It's important to be able to to kind of step outside of that to not be so closely wedded to the the work that you can't see anything else. Absolutely. That's one of the things that is great about the work that we do is that yes, we can provide expert audits of their product and say, hey, based on our experience and best practices, these are some of the issues that we see, but even more valuable is having the quotes from their specific customers that say, you know, this is not what I want or. This is exactly what I want. You know whatever the case may be, so it's not like it's not that I hate your thing. Is that the people that you want to buy. Thing. So what maybe not hate, we don't want. We don't want to be that strong, but you gotta have to let them know that this is what your users are saying. So yeah, exactly. You mentioned school you went to Georgia Tech, which is here in Atlanta. What was your time like there that know that they had design program? There will go into that a little bit, but you started out there and industrial design. Talk about that for a little bit. Actually, I started out there as a computer science major. I I didn't know that they had to design program either until I got there. Like, like you said, I grew up here from middle school on and Georgia Tech was an awesome school. And so I was like, yeah, always been a geek always been a kind of a nerd as my. My dad's fault, I get honestly. So computer science was was the thing, man, I got here and I started..

Georgia Tech Atlanta
"strother" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

04:42 min | 2 years ago

"strother" Discussed on Revision Path

"As the experience that she provide for your customers. Right. And so if you think about you x. really a lot of times people focus on the interface or the look or feel of the after the website. But really, if you think more broadly, it's it's everywhere between the users. First interaction with the company and making that sale, I guess, and everything in between. I know sometimes when I talked to like freelancers and stuff like that, I always tell them to try to make sure they're adding more strategy to the work that they're doing because I mean, I think any designer, well, if we're talking about like web designer, graphic designer, etcetera, any designer can show that they're like competent and how to use Photoshop or whatever. And I think you know if they're trying to find clients trying to find work, that's not enough. You have to be able to kind of show that you can do more than that, like how you can be an asset to their project and really be able to help them succeed. Absolutely. I mean, he can't think so myopically really as designers depending on the industry. You're pretty much future teller. You're looking at where the market is where the products in the market are, and you're trying to come up with what people will like at some point in the future and being able to do that. That well is really a talent. Yeah, I agree with that. So what's your process when you're coming up like a new project? How do you approach a new project. All mining projects start with research. It's really, really difficult to come up with a viable solution if you don't really understand, you know what's been done the past what is being done currently, what the client would really like to see happen in the future. Kind of understand all the Allah various issues and problems and and desires that they have for their company moving forward. So kind of getting into the details with the stakeholders within the company, getting into the details with the stakeholders outside of the company. So the the customers, in some cases, getting into the details with kind of third party stakeholders. So the purchasers in some cases where the person who's going to be using the product is not actually the person who's required, who's responsible for making the purchase or acquiring the product, just kind of. Getting an understanding as deeply as I can for all of those different people involved with the product or service is where I like to start. And that really forms the basis of knowledge for what I need to to have to move forward with coming up with solutions for those issues that they've placed in front of us. So for designers that are listening to this kind of want to start using more you x. in their work, whether it's doing interviews or stuff like that. What kind of resources would you recommend for them? Oh, there's a lot psychology is is one thing that was really helpful for me when I was in school, I took a several cognitive psychology classes, so that comes into the some of the visual design that type of thing along the same lines, just being able to talk to people in understanding behaviors and how people make decisions is really key because at the end of the day and most cases, if you're a company selling product or service, which are really trying to do is convince your potential customers to become actual customers. And so understanding how people make decisions and what information they need in order to make that decision is really critical in order to convince them to actually buy what you're selling. Those are the those are the the biggest things to to start with. Once you're able to kind of take that time and talk. People when understand what their motivations are, what their desires are for particular product or service, then you can start to craft, you know something that will solve their issues. Sometimes I will hear people's kind of talk about that research part is being quote, unquote, a soft skill. I know even when I had my studio, I ran a studio for about nine years called lunch, and we would offer, you know, some sort of like you x..

web designer Photoshop nine years
Canada says agreed with U.S. to keep NAFTA alive, no talks set

Radio Specials

01:29 min | 3 years ago

Canada says agreed with U.S. to keep NAFTA alive, no talks set

"The foreign minister is from south korea and japan he says that despite president trump's tweet that we can all rest easy now that north korea's nuclear weapons are no longer a threat he says the administration is well aware that dialogue with pyongyang could still fall apart that's jason strother reporting from seoul south korea had expressed concern about president trump announcing the us would end joint military exercises with that country canada's foreign affairs minister is the latest official in that country to criticize president trump's new tariffs on us imports of steel and aluminum as dan carpenter reports she did so on capitol hill in testimony before the senate foreign relations committee christopher freeland took her denunciation of the tariffs to president trump's home turf she also argued for preservation of the world's rules based order with or without the united states phelan is the first senior canadian politician to come to capitol hill since trump in two of his advisors launched personal attacks against prime minister justin trudeau because he criticized the tariffs at the close of the g seven summit in quebec freeland said there was no justification to impose tariffs on security grounds and described the action as illegal under both world trade organization and nafta rules freeland is expected to meet with us trades are robert lighthizer on thursday in an effort to keep nafta talks from derailing for npr news i'm dan carpenter can toronto president trump imposed the tariffs on canada mexico and countries in the european union this afternoon the.

Robert Lighthizer Toronto NPR Nafta Quebec Prime Minister United States Senate Canada Seoul President Trump European Union Mexico Dan Carpenter Justin Trudeau Phelan Christopher Freeland
Women's Suicide Rates Are Increasing Faster Than Men's

NPR News Now

04:59 min | 3 years ago

Women's Suicide Rates Are Increasing Faster Than Men's

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Dave Mattingly secretary of state. Mike Pompeo is now in China, having wrapped up meetings in South Korea as Jason structure reports from Seoul. Pompeii was briefing. The two governments about this week summit between President Trump and North Korean leader, Kim Jong UN on denuclearization secretary pond pale met with president moon Jae-in as well as with foreign ministers from South Korea and Japan. He says that despite President Trump's tweet that we can all rest easy. Now that North Korea's nuclear weapons are no longer a threat. He says, the administration is well aware that dialogue with Pyongyang could still fall apart. That's Jason Strother reporting from Seoul, South Korea had expressed concern about President Trump announcing the US would end joint military exercises with that country. Canada's foreign affairs minister is the latest official in that country to criticize President. Trump's new tariffs on US imports of steel and aluminum. Mm-hmm. Has Dan carpenter reports. She did. So on Capitol Hill in testimony before the Senate Foreign Relations committee Christophe Lynn, took her denunciation of the tariffs to President Trump's home turf. She also argued for preservation of the world's rules based order with or without the United States. Freeland is the first senior Canadian politician to come to Capitol Hill since Trump into two of his advisors launched personal attacks against prime minister, Justin Trudeau because he criticized the tariffs at the close of the g seven summit in Quebec. Freeland said, there was no justification to impose the tariffs on security grounds and described the action as illegal under both World Trade Organization and NAFTA rules. Freeland is expected to meet with US trades are Robert lighthizer on Thursday in an effort to keep NAFTA talks from derailing for NPR news. I'm Dan carpenter in Toronto. President Trump imposed the tariffs on Canada, Mexico, and countries in the European Union. This afternoon, the Justice Department's inspector general releases. They report into how the f. b. i. handle the investigate. Action into former secretary of state, Hillary Clinton's use of a private E mail server the findings follow an eighteen month review. San Francisco has its new mayor more than a week after the election, Scott Shafer with member station k. q. e. d. says her chief rival has conceded the race. The winner by just a few thousand votes is London breed president of the San Francisco board of supervisors. She was acting mayor for a few weeks after the sudden death of Mayor Ed Lee last year raised in public housing by her grandmother, she'll be the first African American woman to be mayor here. Speaking to supporters outside city hall breeds said after a contentious campaign, it's time to get to work. Here's the thing the campaign is over and it is time for us to forget about the drama that existed in the world of politics during the campaign London breed. We'll take office in mid July for NPR news. I'm Scott Shafer in San Francisco. This is NPR news from Washington. A new study says, the number of women committing suicide in the US is on the rise NPR's retu- Chatterjee reports in the new study researchers at the National Center for health statistics, analysed debts by suicide from the year, two thousand to two thousand sixteen. They found that men are more likely to die by suicide than women. But the rate of suicide among girls and women is rising more than twice as fast as for boys and men. The new study doesn't offer insights into what's driving more and more women to take their own lives. But psychologists note that growing levels of stress is a risk factor for also asides and previous reset suggests that middle-age women are reporting increasing levels of stress at home and at work that is the age group of women that's most likely die by suicide. Read through Chatterjee and Pierre news the men's World Cup soccer tournament gets underway today in Russia. The competition among thirty two team. James begins with Russia versus Saudi Arabia. In the group stage, there are three games tomorrow, including Portugal against Spain. The US men's national team did not qualify for this year's World Cup FIBA announced yesterday, the US Canada and Mexico will host the twenty twenty six men's World Cup soccer's world governing body chose the joint North American bid over one from Morocco. Most of the matches will be played at stadiums in the US. The World Cup is played every four years. The next one in twenty twenty two. His to be played in Qatar, stocks in Asia, finished the day lower after the Federal Reserve announced another hike in US interest rates. I'm Dave Mattingly NPR news in Washington support for this NPR podcast, and the following message come from Comcast business from their fast, reliable internet on their advanced gig speed network to their twenty four, seven support. Comcast business is committed to helping power businesses every day, visit Comcast, business dot com to learn more.

President Trump United States NPR South Korea Washington Dan Carpenter Dave Mattingly Canada Scott Shafer San Francisco Seoul Comcast Kim Jong Un North Korea
"strother" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"strother" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Or you know thinly veiled threat whether it'd be a nuclear showdown north korea said last week or comparisons libya which has come out from vice president pence as well as john bolton in recent weeks talk like that could derail the summit and right now we have these american officials in the north trying to smooth everything over we have another team of americans going down to singapore for talks reports say a north korean delegation is also headed to singapore so it looks like it's happening but again you know it only takes a few days for the story to completely change here reporter jason strother base and seoul thank you thanks a lot marco talk of peace and war on the korean peninsula can be alarming to americans but for koreans north and south it's a matter of life and death and divided families this past weekend groups of women in north and south korea staged demonstrations for peace one group of activists called women cross dmz attempted to cross the frontier itself from the south sean kim was with them sean as a young korean american woman who recently joined women cross dmz her interest is personal i was born in south korea and i was raised there until i was in seventh grade but to go deeper than that actually my grandmother and my grandfather is from north korea they were born in north korea and when the korean were broke they came down to south korea so my grandpa side he was able to make it to south korea but he's.

north korea libya john bolton south korea sean kim vice president singapore reporter jason strother seoul marco
REUTERS AMERICA NEWS PLAN FOR MONDAY MAY 28

Morning Edition

01:02 min | 3 years ago

REUTERS AMERICA NEWS PLAN FOR MONDAY MAY 28

"The tradition boy scouts of america scouting troops and affiliate groups packed piles of small american flags and traveled to local cemeteries scouts placed some eighty eight thousand flags in the los angeles national cemetery this year as they plant each flag scouts say the name of the soldier place the flag and salute the soldiers service natalie mcewen is the president of the boy scouts of america venturing program a coed group for high school age teens mcewan reflected on the meaning behind the gesture if it weren't for them and their sacrifices and being able to fight for our country and for us we wouldn't be able to have those barbecues there'd be able to go to the beach or enjoy our summers or just live our daily lives boy and girl scouting groups have commemorated the holiday with flag link from state to state for years in some cases visiting the same cemetery for decades rebecca felt house adams npr news first named storm of the season alburto is expected to bring drenching rain to the florida panhandle when it makes landfall the storm expected to come ashore today a day after a separate storm triggered a flash flood that tore through a historic town in maryland one person now reported missing delicate city in howard county executive allen kittelmann says he's focused on finding that person i've always been told was last seen around five twenty pm that's the only person were aware of this missing were not aware of any pal he's certainly doing whatever we can to locate that person today flash flood and delicate city two years ago killed two people and left behind millions of dollars in damage a us delegation is in north korea today trying to finalize plans for a summit between president trump and kim jong un next month in singapore four days ago trump announced he was cancelling the meeting jason strother reports from seoul the american officials crossed the border into north korea and were led by some kim washington's former ambassador to seoul pyongyang's delegation was headed by chase on we the official who last week called vice president mike pence a political dummy these talks come just days after president trump cancelled the june twelfth summit in.

Official Jason Strother Singapore United States Executive Howard County Florida Mcewan Los Angeles National Cemetery Mike Pence Vice President Natalie Mcewen Pyongyang Kim Washington Seoul Kim Jong Un Donald Trump North Korea Allen Kittelmann Maryland
Chris Pharma, Wbz and Cape Cod discussed on All News, Traffic and Weather

All News, Traffic and Weather

01:57 min | 3 years ago

Chris Pharma, Wbz and Cape Cod discussed on All News, Traffic and Weather

"The iheartradio app wbz news time four nine senator marco rubio predicts there'll be a lot of twists and turns along the way before and if president trump holds a summit next month with north korea's leader cbs news updates a summit with north korea on on off on again maybe president trump says negotiations over a potential summit with the leader of north korea are going along very well reporter jason strother in seoul south korea while south korean president moon jaein says the north korean ruler is committed to the complete denuclearization of the entire korean peninsula it's not clear if what north korea considers the complete denuclearisation is the same thing that washington expects republican senator marco rubio on cbs face the nation my suspicion remains that he is going to try to get as much sanctions relief as possible without having to give up his weapons and i think it's gonna be a lot of twists and turns along the way to to try to get there if it's even possible says he's still skeptical about the north koreans motive so still under consideration is june twelfth in singapore summit with kim jong on the president says there's a lot of goodwill right now cbs news update i'm jim taylor a rhode island based ferry has been towed to safety after getting stranded off martha's vineyard the cape cod times reports the eva pearl a ferry that makes seasonal trips to the island lost propulsion about a quarter mile from shore the coast guard says the boat was towed with seventy five people aboard and that no injuries were reported wbz news time four eleven and now we turn to wbz's chris pharma well he's in the as hticket dot com sports studio chris well garwood started well finished poorly today at fenway as the sox lost their series finale to the atlanta braves seventy one chris sale made the start for boston retired the side in order in the first two strikeouts no last but it all went bad from there three runs in the second three more in the fifth that's when sale was pulled in each inning that the.

Chris Pharma WBZ Cape Cod Singapore Seoul Reporter Senator Boston Atlanta Braves SOX Fenway Garwood Donald Trump Martha Rhode Island Jim Taylor President Trump Kim Jong
Irish voters overwhelmingly repeal ban on abortion

The Moth Radio Hour

01:58 min | 3 years ago

Irish voters overwhelmingly repeal ban on abortion

"Video pleading for help now my life is threatened to suffer here how long did my kids have to go i've seen halt was finally released saturday following meeting between maduro and us senator bob corker he's scheduled to fly to washington this evening for a meeting with president trump for npr news i'm john otis south and north korean leaders have held an unexpected second summit the two met for a couple of hours today at their shared border village in the demilitarized zone and as jason strother reports from seoul they discussed the possibility of reviving plans for a us summit after president trump called it off this week this summit wasn't made public until it already happened president moons office says he met with kim jong un on the northern side of the dmz and they discussed interkorean agreements as well as the potential for talks with the us president moon will hold a press conference on sunday morning to give more details about this meeting meanwhile the white house says it's going ahead with earlier plans to send a team to singapore this weekend to discuss logistics in face a us north korea summit gets back on track this is npr this is wnyc in new york i'm lance lucky as you've been hearing on wnyc final results from a referendum show that irish voters have overwhelmingly supported repealing their country's constitutional ban on abortions and having parliament enact laws that reflect the popular vote many irish ex patriots in new york city are celebrating the group repeal eighth in y c protested on the streets of new york yesterday and wrote letters to irish politicians opposing the eighth amendment rachel gallagher says the antiabortion amendment is a relic or was a relic of the country's religious past kind of oppression of catholic churches like really really dwindling every step closer we get to kind of making sure that it doesn't have such.

Rachel Gallagher Korea Singapore President Trump Jason Strother NPR Washington Senator Maduro New York White House United States Kim Jong Un Donald Trump Seoul John Otis Bob Corker
At least 17 dead in area of Congo facing Ebola outbreak

NPR News Now

02:03 min | 3 years ago

At least 17 dead in area of Congo facing Ebola outbreak

"On twitter today noting they're in good health jason strother reports the men are traveling back to the us aboard a plane with secretary of state mike pompeo secretary oh traveled to pyongyang to win the three americans release as well as make the final arrangements for the upcoming summit between president trump and kim jong hoon the three crean americans were accused of either spying or committing hostile acts against the regime two of the men worked at a university in pyongyang run by christian missionaries the other is said to have been involved in business in the north the americans release was welcomed by the south korean government which called on north korea to free six of its own nationals who are currently in detention for npr news i'm jason struther in seoul stocks are trading higher on wall street at this hour the dow is up one hundred eighty points at twenty four thousand five thirty five the nasdaq composite up seventy two this is npr news in washington the world health organization and doctors without borders are working with the democratic republic of congo to contain a new ebola outbreak npr's jason bovi in reports at least seventeen people have died in a remote part of the central african nation and so far two of the deaths have been confirmed as ebola the world health organization is releasing a million dollars to respond to the health emergency and says it will be sending doctors epidemiologists and other abol experts to help deal with the outbreak local health officials initially reported a cluster of twentyone patience all suffering from what appeared to be hemorragic fever outbreak is occurring in an isolated part of the equatorial province in the north west of the country the who says health facilities in the area are rudimentary rely on international aid organizations for supplies and are illequipped tackle e bola cases on their own this is the ninth confirmed abol outbreak in the democratic republic of congo the virus was first discovered in the drc nineteen seventy six.

Jason Bovi Washington Seoul NPR Crean President Trump Mike Pompeo Ebola Twitter Congo Jason Struther North Korea Pyongyang Kim Jong Donald Trump Secretary United States Jason Strother
Indonesian oil well fire kills 10 people, injures dozens

NPR News Now

02:01 min | 3 years ago

Indonesian oil well fire kills 10 people, injures dozens

"Led the scene prompting a high speed chase that ended in a suspect's arrest us and south korean officials have held talks in washington ahead of friday's integrion summit president moon jae gene will meet with the north ruler kim jong own outside the demilitarized zone dividing their countries jason strother has more from seoul south korea national security advisor chong young and his us counterpart john bolton reaffirmed their support for upcoming summits with north korea's leader according to the president's office here president moon jaein is expected to brief president trump by phone following his meeting with kim jong hoon seoul says moonen trump might also meet before the us president holds his own summit with kim the location and date for that summit has not been announced though trump himself has said that it could take place in late may or early june for npr news i'm jason struther in seoul and from washington you're listening to npr news the associated press is projecting republican debbie lesko is the winner of special election for an open congressional seat national republican groups spent about one million dollars to help fend off democratic hopefuls in the race leskovac replace gop congressman trent franks who was on in december amid sexual harassment allegations a fire in an illegal oil well in indonesia has killed ten people and injured dozens more npr's anthony kuhn reports from beijing that the blaze was still burning out of control as it mid morning wednesday local time the fire broke out in a residential area of the country's westernmost province achebe disaster agency officials in eight hundred and twenty foot deep well in the area began gushing oil in the early hours of wednesday morning in villagers were collecting that oil when it caught fire several houses burned down and the injured were sent to hospitals in the provincial capital bundy archie firefighters were battling the blaze with help from.

Indonesia Bundy Archie Anthony Kuhn Harassment NPR Chong Young Advisor South Korea Kim Jong Beijing Washington Congressman Trent Franks Debbie Lesko Seoul Jason Struther Moonen Trump Moon Jaein President Trump North Korea
"strother" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"strother" Discussed on KPCC

"And then a few weeks later i stumbled a band to play what became the alto of the song there's paris strother on the keys there is a different person on base in that live trio but i ended up replacing on his base with under cat that's my favorite that was just like improvising like that's the thing i've always wanted to try to be acquire one man choir i spent a lot of time in solitude when making this album so many people were a part of it but i went away and wrote alone and tried to be as long as possible and when you're alone like that you realize a lot about yourself and you realize that you're not as simple or at least i realized by myself and vocal arrangement became a way to communicate that i couldn't really just boil myself down to one thing you could hear a longer version of that session at song explorer dot net that's all we have for today.

paris strother
"strother" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:46 min | 4 years ago

"strother" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"My daughter had strother email relax people a million error heart is trending may have actually died is a cast away and not in a plane crash a partial skeleton found on an island is believed to an belong to air hearts that's pretty interesting i know what eight so you know it's a just want to make it is you know there's been so many it's one of those great mysteries but the fact that we're hearing i've seen so many headlines about this gives meal it gives it a little bit of credence don't you think yeah i mean this is something that's been turning for a couple of days and i was like really what is this and the more you look into wade i mean the technology and being able to trace a skeleton that for a body that me she disappeared what in the thirties yeah i mean to be able to trace that eighty years later that's great in the fact that again so many legit new sources and not the crap people are spreading on facebook i played some of them like wow this could be a that this could be one of the great solve one of the great mysteries out there think of all the school books it would have to be changed his up and it was one of those it you while learned about is in great school yeah what do you make of this micheal douglas val kilmer thing i don't know i mean didn't val c'mon sick is you know michael said that oh ballot he's seen valley had cancer but now well squeezing back in seattle one fine yeah so this is been going on for a couple years of these kill murray's situation hasn't people have said he was treated for tumor he had a two murray said i'm never had a to murray's that i had believing in my throat so i want and micheal douglas as you know he is battling cancer are things don't look good without took to facebook era midnight last my totally denying these claim saying was sent i like you i am glad you're my friend but you're miss informed i haven't spoke with you almost two years i called you when you referred me to a specialist for a lump and my throw it but i went other doctors you know i'm fine so.

facebook michael seattle murray strother micheal douglas val kilmer micheal douglas eighty years two years