22 Burst results for "Stromer"

The Time I Found a Rat in the BBQ

Does This Happen to You

02:02 min | Last month

The Time I Found a Rat in the BBQ

"Story. This week is from amy stromer. Who you'll find on medium dot com and here is the time i found a rat in the barbecue and scream so loudly. My dead grandma heard me after a steamy summer day in sonoma's county california the air cooled as evening approached. I looked up from the kitchen sink to gaze at the majestic redwoods that lined our property. Those trees mark the edge of our land and the beginning of our neighbors massive yard displaying a variety of fruit trees and gorgeous flowers. The beauty was contrasted by my grumbling. Swear words as. I washed a never ending supply of dishes. Why can't anyone else in this house. Do dishes broken arms allergic to water trying to make me crazy note to self. Check the security cameras for evidence that my family is plotting against me. I glanced at my watch and all my angry dishes thoughts disappeared because it was five o'clock and angelic humming entered my head. Five o'clock is a socially appropriate our to open a bottle of wine especially as a stay at home. Mom five o'clock also means dinner. Prep the menu featured stakes that night. Because hydration is vital to sustaining life. I carried my wine with me to start the barbecue. I opened the white french doors. And sauntered across the redwood dick to the built-in barbecue. I placed my glass on the gray flagstones counter to the right of the grill and swung open the lid. A primal scream erupted from my mouth. As i slammed the grill lid down. Oh my god. There is a rat in the barbecue.

Amy Stromer Sonoma California
Prof. Jack Burns, Professor of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences at the University of Colorado in Boulder - burst 01

Scientific Sense

29:14 min | 10 months ago

Prof. Jack Burns, Professor of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences at the University of Colorado in Boulder - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we explore emerging ideas from signs policy economics and technology. My name is gill. Eappen we talk with woods leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation be color a wide variety of domains. Rare new discoveries are made and new technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new ideas affect society and help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation v seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide edited content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do a companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense dot com and displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics guests at other ideas please send up to info at scientific sense dot com and i can be reached at gil at eappen dot info mike. Yesterday's a jack boone's who's a professor in the department of ece fisa goal in planetary sciences unto colorado boulder. He is also vice president images for academic affairs in blue sage for disuse system system. Jack while thank you. Joe is good to be with you. Thanks for doing this so you at your team. On deeply involved in the upcoming nasa missions to the moon including The designed to place radiofrequency absolutely on the far side of the moon and be kevin deemed really back there for almost fifty years. Now i know that china s landed. I was actually looking at some photographs that just gained today from From their lander. I israel in india. Almost got there but Fleas land properly. And so so. What's our interest. What's sudden interest in going back to the moon after fifty years. Yeah i don't know that. I would characterize as a sudden interest i think on the part of the science community and really the exploration community interest has been there for a while but what has changed in the last decade is the cost doing missions And the accessibility of the moon in this new era in which we have now. Private companies like spacex and like the blue origin company. Jeff bezos company They've put considerable private resources in developing new rockets of with reusability to lower the launch costs and also technology which was extreme in the nineteen sixties to try to get to the moon. All hannity vetted from scratch now is relatively straightforward at gill as you mentioned Even a small countries like israel Private companies have contracts with nasa to fly payloads. Now it's it's it's realizable to Envision going to the moon at a relatively modest cost certainly in comparison to the sixties and seventies. Yes so that's a. It's a very interesting phenomenon. Now it's it's almost like a business model question. Space is Blue blue horizon blue origin. Laura gin and that is another company. Lakers peterson things. Well lockheed you ally the united launch alliance which is the lockheed and boeing Company as well they all have these new generation of launch vehicles that are capable of going to so nasa in some sense outsourcing Some of the transportation right to so captain made a selection or are they going to do essentially multiple companies. Do it the the plan is to have monk multiple companies just like the commercial crew program To the space station there's boeing and spacex And for the case of the moon for the un crude landers that Landers that are just carrying payloads nasa has identified a out a dozen companies To be able to transport a payloads to the moon and at the same time. They're also undergoing competition right now. They selected three companies to design as part of a public private partnership the next generation of human landers. So that's the same. Mostly the same group that has spacex blue origin and the third one is is dynamic which is a company in huntsville alabama rate. So it's nassar's goal here is They are they going to take contracts from other other countries do send pedal to the moon in these companies. The the way this is working now is nasa is buying services so they're no longer buying rockets or landers which they will then own operate Instead the philosophy is To buy a ride for example a seat On a human land or or by space for a payload so these companies that are responsible for indemnifying Making sure they have a proper insurance for losses They take A bit of the risk and and then proceed along those lots now. What that means is that the companies then they own the intellectual property they owned landers they rockets they own the The other transportation devices. So that means they can sell seats. They can sell payloads to for example a european space agency Or the russian space agency or individual companies. That might want to puts a payload on the moon Investigation in this kind of a lower gravity environment so it's much more entrepreneurial than what we had before and it lowers the cost to the taxpayer for doing all these things by the artist program. Which is the new human programs. The moon the Recently released cost to get the first woman in the next man to the moon by twenty twenty four is a factor of ten less than the apollo program. Yeah it's interesting. I remember jack I was involved a little bit on the economic side of the next generation. Space legal program two thousand two thousand one two thousand two timeframe and this was a program was supposed to replace the shuttle and we did not go forward with it and i guess so. What was the arranged with the russian system to get their astronauts into space station. Yeah the the problem was that you might recall The shuttle accident that occurred in two thousand three And then president. George w bush declared that the shuttle really wasn't safe And that needed to be replaced and it took a while. We're still in the process of of fully replacing it. The last shuttle launch was twenty eleven If i remember correctly so in the meantime in order to get to the space station What we did is contract with the russians to use their soyuz spacecraft to go back and forth the space station so we. What we did is the buy seats. Those seats cost about seventy five or eighty million dollars so they weren't cheap but eventually got us back and forth. He said before we get the details of the Admission stack help philisophical question so way we have technology advancing the about conflict. Television's really taking off machines. Getting lot smarter What does sort of the basis for sending humans Could be not accomplished thing that human could do with machines if that's a good question i'm glad you answered that you ask that question because Excuse me i think what we're looking for now is is Really different mode for doing work on services like the moon or mars. Excuse me in that. We unlike apollo you had a single astronaut. Geologists such as astronaut harrison schmitt on all seventeen doing classic field geology. With a shovel to now advance unit twenty-first-century. We're gonna to do. Is i like to say we're going to bring Silicon valley with us to the moon. So we're going to bring advanced robotics. Be telly operated. That will use a machine. Learning artificial intelligence And will team with the astronauts so that they will these. These rovers advance scouting. They will identify interesting places and then the role of the astronaut is to make critical decisions on what to investigate What the samples. Look like i. i still think it's true. I've been told from my colleagues who are geologists stromer But who are uninsured. Scientists in that the difference for example between. Let's say the The curiosity rover on mars. And what it's been doing and having a human on mars that the work that the curiosity rover has done last seven years could be done in two days by geologists. a that's the difference and to also bring back. You know better selected samples and so forth. So there's no replacing humans and that's not going to happen anytime soon but you you do your point being. You only wanna use humans when you actually have to. Because their time is valuable and they're expensive and also Walking around even on the surface of the moon is dangerous. Because the you know the a space where the asian micrometeorites another possible dangerous but going into this new environment. I think what we're going to be able to do is reduced risk and improved efficiency. The i don't remember the numbers but a human Mission is about ten x the cost of a non human mission. Obviously the the efficiency and like you say what begin out of it different but guess on the cost side. It's about the fact of a magnitude different you know. That's hard to say because robots still are very limited in what they can do. They're just so many things that only humans can do is a little bit of apples and oranges but yet you're probably right that on the ballpark about a factor of ten. Maybe even more. But there's also much more than a factor of ten improvement in efficiency. So you know. Those costs will balance out and obviously the advantage of a human is You know they've been. The unexpected happens in michigan learning in As long as you have heard of data to teach a machine but then the unexpected happens machines. noel exactly. The rover gets stuck. It suffers a mechanical problem. That If you have a human there at least in the vicinity can help fix it. And move orders you know i think about for example servicing of the hubble space telescope and that was done five times by human astronauts and The astronauts such as john grunsfeld did to the servicing missions was very clear that the telescope could not have been repaired in upgraded by anything other than humans because the tab the complexity of the task the ability to be able to get in and To make repairs Make on the spot. Decisions just You know there was no replacing that so hopefully humans have a few more years of Do i think we've got many years to tell you the truth. I think it's going to be you know in reading some of the literature. I think it's going to be a quite a long time if ever that. We have truly Intelligent self aware machines can operate with the same decision making kick be very good at repetitive calculations outstanding job of there but You know making creative innovative entrepreneurial. Decisions were We're nowhere close to that yet So i do that. A multiple missions being planned An international collaboration so he's the first one that is supposed to take off as leave. Yeah artists is the new name for the human missions to the moon Artemis in greek mythology was the sister of apollo The twin sister of apollo. She's the goddess of the moon. So that's very appropriate. Since nasa has already declared bet up for that first landing which nasa has been planning for twenty twenty four would Would have that first woman in the next man on the surface the first expedition by humans to the moon in the twenty first century. So optimistic applaud. Its name the program programming program. Yeah exactly right so so andrade damasio multiple things going on And so do we have sort of a space station like that is going to orbit the out. Yeah in fact. That's honored design. And we'll be under construction in the next few years has called the gateway lunar gateway. And it's it's not like the space station in the sense of being gigantic And being really limited to that single orbit the gateway is really more of a spacecraft is going to have a pulse in system using a new generation of solar electric bad is ion propulsion That will be piloted for potential for optometry use in going to mars. I have just a couple of modules that will be there it will be a place where astronauts coming from the earth on on the orion spacecraft which is a it plus the space launch system is a heavy lift vehicle that will take astronauts the moon they will dock at the gateway and then they will get into a reusable lander go to the surface. Come back in that lander and then the next crew that comes in will do the same thing so you don't throw everything away like we did during hollow in the nineteen sixties again. The reusability idea is Is key to keeping the costs down so so it is more dealer so can't be attached as as alright right. Ds change in the future. Cab edge more against it. We can in fact The japanese space agency jaksa recently committed to fly a module And nasa has invited others such as the russian space agency to think about them attaching A module as well so it definitely is modular. That way you can add habitats you can add laboratories And can can grow over time. But it's also the the idea is that it's going to be long duration spaceflight and it's away way from the earth's magnetic field so you've got the full range environment of what you would have going to mars. So i think nasa all also looks at. This is a prototype of the vehicle that would be sent to mars. Lucchese david some Conversations yet again. Remember that To go to mars you would rather start off. Start off from the moon. Is that still thinking or that. Exchange i don't think that's been decided but there's this potential real advantages of a loon. First of all launching from the moon versus the earth requires much less thrust. What what we call delta the. That's the change in velocity to Get off there. Because there's only one sixth gravity on the moon and secondly if we're successful in mining water from the minute we know now there's considerable amount of water at the polls of the moon That's hydrogen and oxygen. We can convert that potentially into rocket fuel. You wouldn't have to bring that from earth so the costs associated with launching some could be substantially reduced in doing this from the moon versus from your so people are actively working that right now and seeing if that might be the way to go i of think that might end up being How missions to To mars or undertaking so under optimus Are there plans to actually create a habitat a big enough habitat for people to stave or extended period of time. So nasa has designs. And once again i should mention this is. This is all international Insa is involved. The european space agency is involved in providing a module for the service module for the orion. It also will be working on the gateway. The canadian space agency is providing the robotic arm And the same will be true on the surface The idea is that the first few missions will of just get started That first nation in twenty twenty four is planned to go to the south pole of moon. Will we've never been to before and look at the water. Ice situation there but Over time by the end of the decade the expectation is that will have multiple habitats. And we'll have people staying there for long periods of time like the arctic station. It's run by the national science foundation. The mcmurdo station as called in which you have a number of scientists come in and visit for anywhere from a few weeks to staying for year here so salama but when the next generation space program was in progress space. Too big big project. I would imagine spacex Others cab this business plan so what's the clamps time Do that The gay yes. So it'll be somewhere between three and five days to get from the earth and you're right about. The tourism spacex already has a fide a japanese businessman. If i remember correctly who has bought a A ride not the surface of the moon but to orbit the moon on a spacex vehicle. Sometime in a in a few years but the it'll be in a three to five days to get to the gateway and then Another day to get down to the surface. So i fully expect by the end of the decade especially given the accessibility to the moon by the private sector and by isa companies That they will be selling seats to wealthy individuals to spend a A summer holiday on the moon is so if the if the gateway is expandable perhaps Taxpayers can make some money nasa. Well it might be. Yeah but but once again this is. The transportation for the most part is probably not going to be through nasa but by these individual companies who own their own rockets their spacecraft and now they will sell seats to to wealthy tourists. yeah and so You you mentioned the european space agency. You mentioned the canadian space agency of so. Is this like the space station. A larger collaboration or those are the three major ones. Yeah it is and you're right. There are Oh gosh there's probably a dozen or so. Companies countries rather involved in the international space station and nasa envisions this much the same thing And i to. I order all the countries that are involved in. The international space station have been invited to become involved with the gateway And so as i mentioned several have accepted with With enthusiasms others are still keeping that around and take a quick break jack. Benny come back to talk about the radio. Frequency of savitri on the far side of the more that you're designing you bet sounds good. This is a scientific sense. Podcast providing unscripted conversations bit leading academics and researchers on a variety of topics. You like to sponsor this podcast. Please reach out to in full at scientific sense dot com back Jack you're talking about upcoming missions to the moon Some of the manned mission some of some of the technology that you're sending up there there is a gateway bridges like the space station but attested propulsion its zone. Sorta are based entity source. And it's more dealer things could be attached to it. That may be subject is imploding. Creating that a launchpad so to speak to go to mars perhaps habitats that a large announced a mining for water mighty for hydrogen and other things and so he the program is called autonomous. So could be portal light program and underneath optimists. There are various things being planned right. So what are the The primary objectives all of those radius approved betas projects. I should say under under optimus. Yeah we'll go. let me let me start off by just looking at the difference with The apollo program because the apollo program ended fairly abruptly once the political goals were reached and it was never Really a sustainable program so Nasa and i think all of the governmental space agencies are looking for is for arsonist to be the beginning of a sustained presence on the moon and in space and using the moon as a stepping stone for human and robotic exploration of the solar system including getting the mars so the philosophy of artists is really quite different. So you're there the stay So you need to figure out how to live off the land. So that does mean as you're saying mining's water being able to grow crops being able to manufacture Equipments the habitats themselves from the From the of the regular or the soil material so using the the kind of advanced manufacturing capability three d. printing Electrolysis so that's a really different approach. And it means that what will be worked on is not just get there but a flag in the ground rather in full of soil and return on instead it means You know how do you figure out how to be there for the long haul so that means than learning how to to excavate how to build How to really maintain a life in a in a certain sense of independence. Part of the reason you want to do all that is because that's exactly what's going to be

Policy Technology Economics Science Nasa Eappen Jack Boone Department Of Ece Colorado Boulder Gill Laura Gin Boeing Company Nassar Spacex Harrison Schmitt United Launch Alliance Israel Jeff Bezos John Grunsfeld Landers Hannity Andrade Damasio
"stromer" Discussed on I Know Dino: The Big Dinosaur Podcast

I Know Dino: The Big Dinosaur Podcast

06:19 min | 1 year ago

"stromer" Discussed on I Know Dino: The Big Dinosaur Podcast

"But he didn't trust him. He was a bit of a colonialist snob and he didn't like. That Mr Mohammed was trying to rise quote unquote above his station. Yet. However stromer made it deep into the desert by noon the next day. So January eleventh, he was in Bihari Oasis and he found dinosaurs. So. This is now two months after he got there you got in. November you said. Long, trip he base of operations in the Bihari OAC's. But there was a sandstorm so he explored but confined too much. Then on January fourteenth nineteen eleven he found three large bones. So. He cut up, skied netting and soaks them in a flour and water paste to cover the two larger bones. This actually might have been maybe January eighteenth instead of the fourteenth conflicting sources but he wrote in his journal he he found quote three large bones, which I attempt to excavate and photograph. And later found more bones including a gigantic law. He wrote in his journal apparently, these are the first of Egypt's dinosaurs and I finally before me, the layer that contains land animals in quote. So he went there looking for mammals and found dinosaurs. But logistically wasn't clear how to preserve and collect these fossils. The desert's really destructive for exposed fossils. In, February they packed up specimens in eight would increase with the help of McGrath who had recovered by this time, and then arranged to ship them to Munich, and then Ernst stromer was in Munich at home by February. Twenty third. Markgraff kept excavating fossils in the winters of nineteen twelve and nineteen thirteen and he ended up finding a partial would be named spinosaurus skeleton in Nineteen twelve in the Bihari Oh. Formation Western Egypt on strimmers instructions markraaff finally closed excavations in April of nineteen fourteen, and then returned to Cairo to ship. To Munich that was about one month before World War One. So Mark Raff had time getting angle authorities to cooperate. They did not trust him and stromer because stromer was German Markov unfortunately would only get paid. Once his fossils were delivered successfully to Munich. After the war broke out, stromer wrote to British Egyptian. Authorities begging for his fossils but it didn't work and then markgraaff died and his wife was desperate. So she wrote to Stromer stromer appeal to his British friends at the Geological Survey of Egypt and they paid Marcos. Widow fee and then took the twelve cases of fossil material for safekeeping and then eventually stromer got the fossils in nineteen twenty two. About, a decade after they got off the ground. Yes. But that didn't stop Schroeder from publishing. So meanwhile, he wrote monographs on the geology of the Bihari basis in the piece together fossil that markup had shipped in twelve. And Nineteen fifteen he officially named spinosaurus. In wore one stromer served as a male nurse medical training, and then he became a military geologist at the geological survey in Strasbourg, which was German territory and his geological skills were valuable to tactical planners. Never thought of that when you're digging lots of trenches, geologists are useful. True. So, stromer returned to Munich. November. First one, thousand, nine hundred and got an appointment to the Bavarian state collection of Paleontology and historical geology after the war. However, there were food shortages in Munich and food riots and violence stronger went home to Nuremberg in the winter of Nineteen Nineteen to nineteen twenty he taught at the city's Commercial College and retreated to his family's nearby. Castle state that had food because of the land farm in October of nineteen twenty he was back in Munich with his wife was another and bomb and then promoted to chief conservator of the Bavarian state collection of paleontology historical geology and the nine months later made an honorary professor of Paleontology at the University of Munich So July Twenty Third Nineteen, twenty one he became. A full member of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences he worked with international scientists to get his fossils from Egypt but because of inflation stromer couldn't afford to ship them. So former pupil of his BERNHARDT payer Pay Cairo officials to have the create shift and they arrived in the summer of Nineteen, twenty two. But the fossils were astronomer later said quote badly smashed up in. Cairo the staff at the Museum of the Geological Survey had unpacked and examined the fossils and then done a poor job repacking them stromer knew he probably wouldn't back to Egypt Margraaff was dead at this point and stromer was poor because of Germany's conditions after the war in nineteen, thirty six, he provided a reconstruction of spinosaurus with a sale and a skull similar to megalosaurus. The new. It had a peculiar lower jaw stromer compared this specimen to a crested chameleon because of the neural spines or sales. He gave spinosaurus more than eight foot sail along at trunk massive four limbs, locking neck, and a long skull. And showed that it may have been quadrupedal land but spinosaurus led to what's known as strimmers riddle where it was found. There are multiple carnivores in the area yet the carnivores didn't seem to compete for prey. So the riddle was how was this possible and it wasn't until many years later that we figured it out. So, spinosaurus was mounted at the wall at the paleontological museum in Munich, and then the Nazis came to power and stromer resisted the Nazi regime. However, he was an Aristocrat so that protected him in nineteen thirty stromer was head of the paleontology section of the Bavarian state collection appealing tall gene, historical geology but his career stalled because he didn't join the Nazi party and he spoke out against Nazis knee also kept close relationships with Jewish friends and associates. That's a nice legacy. Yeah. There were many paleontologists who were relieved to find this out. July seventeenth thirty-seven stromer was sixty five years old and then forced to retire from the university and the state collection he stayed in Munich and remained a fellow of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences, and he kept doing research and publishing papers. The Nazis during that time made sure that every institution in Germany was headed by Loyal Party members, which is why they made him retire this meant that the director of. The Bavarian State Collection.

Ernst stromer Stromer stromer Munich Bavarian State Collection Bavarian Academy of Sciences Egypt University of Munich Cairo Bihari Oasis Geological Survey of Egypt Mr Mohammed Bihari OAC Pay Cairo Germany Mark Raff Markgraff Strasbourg markgraaff Schroeder
"stromer" Discussed on Ace On The House

Ace On The House

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"stromer" Discussed on Ace On The House

"All right. <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Music_Male> in for foot. <Speech_Music_Male> Yeah, <Speech_Music_Male> it's these hidden. He's <Speech_Music_Male> hidden under their <Speech_Music_Male> as mom <Speech_Male> and dead. <Speech_Male> At some <Speech_Music_Male> point. <Speech_Music_Male> It's getting stuff <Speech_Music_Male> out of the fridge. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> String right <Speech_Male> Allie old pitcher. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Don't vote <Speech_Male> glass milk chugs <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the whole. <Speech_Male> I hope they didn't have <Speech_Music_Male> to do more in one take. <Speech_Music_Male> If he's <Speech_Male> lactose and <Speech_Music_Male> Scott. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> lactose intolerant. <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Music> <Music> Neighbor Laney. <Music> <Music> Neighborly. <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> With the neighbor ladies! <Music> <Music> Inside the. <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> had. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> A heart attack <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> filled on the stairs. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Again Ronald, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> with with. <Speech_Music_Male> With the <Speech_Music_Male> simple gaze <Speech_Music_Male> took out <Speech_Music_Male> a middle <Speech_Music_Male> aged woman WHO's. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> WHO's in perfect <SpeakerChange> health <Speech_Music_Male> before she met. <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> Bad, Ronald. <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> These are the horror <Music> movies we? <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> Killed Her! <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> During? <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> Loyd's <Speech_Music_Male> lovable monsters <Speech_Male> what he is! <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Ill sorry for him <Silence> a little bit. <Speech_Male> Yeah, <SpeakerChange> and <Speech_Male> even when I was <Speech_Male> ten, and I was watching <Speech_Male> at the end he <Speech_Male> busted out. <Speech_Male> He screamed <Speech_Male> and he was arrested <Silence> on <SpeakerChange> the lawn. <Silence> <Speech_Male> And <Silence> I thought to myself. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Here's really the moral <Silence> of this fable. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> If you're <Speech_Male> nerdy <Speech_Male> and made fun <Speech_Male> of an <Speech_Male> outcast <Speech_Male> in your mom. <Speech_Male> Your Dad abandons <Silence> the family. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> your mom <SpeakerChange> dies <Speech_Male> in hospital. <Silence> Don't worry. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> You'll <SpeakerChange> end <Silence> up in a prison. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> Basically that <Speech_Male> that was the moral <Speech_Male> of this story. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Never even bad <Speech_Male> bad bad. Ronald <Speech_Male> was just <Speech_Male> his mom died. <Speech_Male> Is Dad split <Speech_Male> it? <Speech_Male> Wasn't his fault <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> don't know maybe <Speech_Male> I'm too upset <SpeakerChange> about <Speech_Male> it. No <Speech_Male> I understand you <Speech_Male> know, and you should be angry. <Speech_Male> Because Ronald <Speech_Male> was unfairly accused <Speech_Male> of things, and he was <Speech_Male> a good guy <SpeakerChange> underneath <Speech_Male> you as a lovable <Speech_Male> monster I, think we <Speech_Male> I think we all identify <Speech_Male> with bad <Speech_Male> Ronald a little <Speech_Male> bit, I certainly <Speech_Male> did. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> You lived <Speech_Male> in a box. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Bob <SpeakerChange> Alright. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> Thanks for <Speech_Male> enjoying <Speech_Music_Male> the show <Speech_Music_Male> and until next <Speech_Music_Male> time this Atta <Speech_Music_Male> Kreil parole for <Speech_Music_Male> bad stromer. <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> Dan Mahala. <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Subscribe <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> on Itunes or <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> visit ace <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> roof dot com. <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> This <Speech_Music_Male> is Corolla digital. <Speech_Music_Male>

Ronald Allie Atta Itunes Dan Mahala.
How Does Uranus Work?

BrainStuff

06:32 min | 1 year ago

How Does Uranus Work?

"Scientists have coined an appropriate term for the large chilly bodies like Uranus ice giants. Neptune falls into the same category. But you're in. This is quite an odd duck compared to its neighboring planet. For starters you're a spins on an extreme tilt resulting in some truly wild seasons around the polls even the ice giants name is a bit peculiar and not just because it makes school kids chuckle. Okay let's not kid ourselves. You're never too old to enjoy good year in joke. Headline Writers certainly don't thinks so if article titles like NASA wants to probe urinate in search of gas and Uranus. Smells like farts are any indication. These jokes if you're not getting them hinge on the spelling of Uranus you are an US allowing for an english-speaking mispronunciation as your anus meaning rectum that where classy puns. Aside you're in his represents a break with nomenclature old tradition mercury Venus Mars Jupiter Saturn and Neptune all took their names from Roman gods or deities however uranus uniquely was named after a Greek God in the religion of Ancient Greece. You're an was revered as the primordial God of the sky he had a son named Cronos and a perhaps more famous grandson notice Zeus. Those two figures were later conflated with two Roman Deities Saturn and Jupiter though the planet Uranus was discovered by Stromer William Herschel March thirteenth of seventeen eighty one. He didn't give it the name we use today. A loyal Britain Herschel wanted to call this far away. World Georgie 'EM CD's or Georgia Star. In honor of King George the third but by nature. That name was politically charged to avoid. Alienating non-british Stargazers German astronomer Johann Alert Buddha suggested calling the planet uranus in seventeen eighty three eventually his alternative Monica one out but back to that axial tilt a planets rotate around an axis. Which is the imaginary line connecting their northern and southern polls and they simultaneously orbit on an imaginary plane around the Sun now Earth has an axial tilt of twenty three point five degrees. This means there's a twenty three point five degree angle between Earth's axis and its plane of orbit around the Sun without the tilt our home world wouldn't have seasons or possibly life. Uranus is skewed to but to a much greater extent in relation to its orbital plane. The ice giants access has been tilted at a chopping ninety seven point seven degree angle next to Saturn and Neptune. Urine looks like it's lying on its side so what we are orientation. A computer simulation published two thousand eighteen suggests your was hit by a huge Proto Planet. Around four billion years ago then again there may have been multiple impacts or a long gone circum. Planetary Disk could have played a role however it happened. The tilt subjects both polls too long dark winters long. Bright Summer's on Uranus was orbit around the Sun or one year lasts for roughly eighty four earth years. Each poll is aimed almost directly at the Sun for about twenty one St Earth years during its summer season. Meanwhile the other pole faces the opposite direction. Enduring Alliance Dark Winter. Despite the extreme tilt urine is warmer at the equator than it is either poll. Nobody knows why. And this isn't the planets only mystery. Jupiter Saturn and Neptune already radiate more than twice as much heat as they received from the Sun. Yet you're innocence. Heat output is significantly lower. This disparity has long baffled planetary scientists as we already mentioned. You're innocent. Neptune are both ice giants planets of this sort have rocky cores covered by mantles rich. An icy half frozen slush of ammonia methane and water next up there's the atmosphere whose outer level is full of hydrogen helium and even more methane researchers found that urinalysis atmospheric clouds contain hydrogen sulfide. A compound responsible for the rotten egg stench. We all know in hate so yes. You're in literally stinks to the densest part of its atmospheric sees brutal temperatures of negative two hundred forty three to negative three hundred seventy degrees Fahrenheit. That's negative one fifty three to negative to eighteen degrees Celsius. That's hardly a welcoming environment for any future astronauts but at least the color scheme would be familiar. Earth isn't the only blue planet in the solar system. Methane absorbs red light giving Uranus and Neptune deep blue complexions of the two worlds. You're in a slightly greener since nineteen seventy seven. We've known that Ernest has a ring system around its equator to date. Astronomers have counted thirteen rings encircling the planet the structures are relatively dim and lack the fine particles observed and other rings systems like Saturn's each one is composed of debris chunks that are golf ball sized at minimum for some reason smaller material gets exiled and space between these rings in also has twenty seven known moons twenty five of which renamed after Shakespeare characters like affiliate Juliet. There's Dimona puck and Miranda who's namesake appears in the tempest geologically complex. Miranda contains the single policy cliff known to humankind dubbed Verona repays. It has an estimated height of twelve point four miles. That's twenty kilometers. Meaning that if you happened to be walking along its peak and you happened to fall off. You would plummet for twelve minutes straight before hitting the ground. Others satellites of note include sicker acts and Caliban while most of your Ennis's moons spin in the same direction as the planet does these to revolve the other way. Scientists think they were once independent objects that the ice giants gravity in snared by the way how ban is another tempest character and sicker. Iraq's was said to be his mother from it's weird rings. It's puzzling climate. You're Ennis's found plenty of ways surprises. Only time will tell what further mysteries the planet holds until then although it's very dim your is visible to the naked eye on some dark clear nights if you have sharp vision if not so much. It's easily visible with noculars or a telescope.

Ennis Stromer William Herschel Miranda Britain Herschel Nasa United States Ancient Greece Iraq Johann Alert Buddha Cronos King George Georgia Star Verona Monica Ernest Shakespeare Dimona Puck
"stromer" Discussed on Ace On The House

Ace On The House

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"stromer" Discussed on Ace On The House

"Yung and run around your shoulders. Go Up that high note there you are now I can to have that song yes oliver but not Oliver the musical just the Oliver. The artist like nineteen schick. St Eight Year stromer said look at that backdrop. Sixty that backdrop. Hey let me compliment you on your sectional. Go ahead here we go. He's wearing a sash gene gene. Aw have cloud come. Do She. Good your here. We go into all right. Now let me tell you. Let me tell you something positive. The.

oliver stromer Yung schick
Can Galaxies Exist Without Dark Matter?

BrainStuff

05:51 min | 2 years ago

Can Galaxies Exist Without Dark Matter?

"This episode is brought to you by the Capital, One saver card, earn four percent cashback on dining and entertainment. Two percent at grocery stores and one percent on all other purchases. Now when you go out you cash in what's in your wallet terms apply. Welcome to brain stuff. A production of iheartradio. Hey, brain stuff. Lauren Bogle bomb here. Dark matter. Sounds a little mysterious because it is it stuff. We can't see with any existing telescopes but that math and physics tells us must exist based on the way that normal matter the stuff we can see babes. And there's a lot of dark matter out there astrophysicists think the twenty-seven percent of the universe is made up of dark matter. Compared with only five percent normal matter, meaning that the term normal probably isn't the most accurate dark matter is the bedrock that all galaxies are anchored to you can't get one without the other. Or so we thought until strana mors found ghostly galaxy. The doesn't appear contain any dark matter. It's as if the universe is planning trick on us by flipping the laws of physics on their head dark matter should be there. But isn't it's a game changer galaxy astronomers are saying, and it's like nothing we've ever seen before we may not be able to spot dark matter. But astronomers can measure its gravitational effects acting on normal matter. For example, they can look at how fast stars cruise around galaxy when dark matters. Isn't that galaxies gravity will be bulked up causing it starts to move faster than if just normal matter were present? But in the case of N, G C one, oh, five two dash d f to an ultra diffuse. Galaxy located sixty five million light years away. Astronomers found that it stars are moving in exactly the way that would be predicted if only the total mass of all the visible stuff is considered. In other words, dark matter doesn't seem to be exerting its gravity on normal matter in that galaxy. And that's weird. Peter von doco of Yale University, sudden statement finding a galaxy without dark matter is unexpected because this invisible mysterious substance is the most dominant aspect of any galaxy for decades without the galaxy start their lives as blobs of dark matter after that everything else, happens guests falls into the dark matter halos, the gas turns into stars. They slowly build up, then you end up with galaxies, like the Milky Way this galaxy challenges the standard ideas of how we think galaxies form ultra diffuse galaxies auditees in their own. Right. Having only been discovered in two thousand fifteen as they are very difficult to detect. However, it appears that this class of galaxy is common but none are like the one in question. The galaxy was discovered using the Dragonfly telephoto array telescope in New Mexico. That's custom made to seek out these allusive targets. Then using a set of twin ten meter optical and infrared telescopes in Hawaii, the Stromer signaled out ten bright, globular clusters, which are large combat groups of stars orbiting the galaxy's core. They let us spectra. Data to measure their motions these clusters were found to be plotting along more slowly than expected. Meaning there's far less mass in that galaxy then would be predicted. In fact, there's so little mass that the researchers have come to the astonishing conclusion that there's little if any dark matter their follow up observations were made with Gemini north telescope. Also in Hawaii. So the galaxy structure could be studied with geminis help the researchers ruled out interactions with other galaxies, as being the cause of it's weird dark matter deficit. Ben dot com said in the press. Release, if there's any dark matter at all. It's very little the stars in the galaxy can account for all of a mass, and there doesn't seem to be any room for dark matter. This finding seems to suggest the dark matter has quote its own separate existence apart from other components of galaxies, he added and this makes the very existence of this galaxy of mystery if it has no dark matter how did even Volve into a galaxy in their study published in March in the journal nature then doco teams speculates that some cataclysmic event in the galaxy. He may have cleared out all the dark matter and blasted away all the star forming gases alternatively a nearby massive, elliptical galaxy may have played a role in the current galaxies lack of dark matter, billions of years ago when it was undergoing, it's early and violent stages of evolution. Now, the researchers are pouring over Hubble space telescopes observations of similar galaxies, to perhaps find more that lack dark matter, if they find more than alternative fuels and faint galaxies might be the norm when dark matter isn't present, and that's a fascinating development in our understanding of how galaxies evolve. Then dot com concluded every galaxy we do about before has dark matter. And they all fall in familiar categories like spiral or elliptical galaxies. But what would you get if there's no dark matter at all? Maybe this is what you would get. Today's episode was written by Dr Ian O'Neill, and produced by Tyler clang brain stuff is a production of iheartradio's, how stuff works for more on this, and lots of other dark topics. Visit our home planet has stuff works dot com and for more podcasts for my heart radio, I heart radio app, apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Hi there. This is Josh Clark, and I am taking my show, the end of the world. With Josh Clark on the road. Live to Minneapolis in DC this June on June nineteenth, I'll be at the Parkway theater in Minneapolis, Minnesota and on the following night June twentieth. I'll be at the miracle theatre in Washington DC, if you've heard the end of the world ten times already, or if you've never heard a second of it, it matters, not because this show, explores themes, covered in the end of the world and also chases down, new avenues, like, how good could things be if we managed to survive the next century or two. So come see me this June nineteenth and twentieth. Minniap- in DC.

Iheartradio Josh Clark Hawaii Minneapolis DC Lauren Bogle Yale University Washington Geminis New Mexico Peter Parkway Theater Minnesota Volve Dr Ian O'neill Apple Sixty Five Million Light Years Twenty-Seven Percent Five Two Dash
What Can an Image of a Black Hole Teach Us?

BrainStuff

05:34 min | 2 years ago

What Can an Image of a Black Hole Teach Us?

"Today's episode was brought to you by the new Capital One saver card with which you can earn four percent cashback on dining and entertainment. That means four percent on checking out that new restaurant everyone's talking about and four percent on watching your team win at home. You'll also earn two percent cashback at grocery stores and one percent on all other purchases. Now when you go out you cash in what's in your wallet? Welcome to brain stuff. Production of iheartradio. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren Vogel, bomb hair an event. Horizon is the point of no return a spherical region surrounding the gaping maw the black hole beyond which nothing not even light can escape. We have no idea what mysteries lie inside. But we do know that our universe ends abruptly at this. Terrifying. Boundary into the unknown. Now after two decades of international collaboration. Some of the world's most powerful radio telescopes have captured an image of a supermassive black holes event horizon by doing so they proved that the predictions arising from Einstein's theory of general relativity are valid even in the most extreme cosmic environment possible the black hole in the image lurks in the center of the massive elliptical galaxy Messier eighty seven in the constellation Virgo. Some fifty five million light years distant the release of the image was highly anticipated all over the world and published in several studies appearing in the journal astro-physical journal, letters supermassive black holes dictate the evolution of. The galaxies. They inhabit so a direct look at this one's event. Horizon could open a new window of understanding into how these behemoths work. And this monstrous object is quite the specimen has a whopping mass of six point five billion Suns all crammed into an event. Horizon measuring nearly half a light day across despite its incredible size and mass no single telescope on the planet could capture it's portrait. It's simply too far away to resolve to remedy. This Stromer is used a method known as very long baseline interferometry to combine the collective observing power of eight of the world's most powerful radio telescopes to do the job the event. Horizon telescope is a virtual telescope as wide as our planet and powerful enough to capture the first glimpse of one of the most massive black holes known to exist. It took a team of more than two hundred researchers to accomplish this feat. Although black holes are well. Black should there be any matter close to the event? Horizon extreme friction in the relativistic environment will rip electrons from atoms creating a powerful fireworks display? This is why the event horizon telescopes. I image shows a dark circle surrounded by a bright ring of emissions. These emissions are being produced just outside the black holes event horizon or the extremely hot gases orbiting it are heated to several billions of degrees. Kelvin with the event horizon itself appearing as a silhouetted dark disc against a bright background features, the confirm what theoretical physicists could only predict up until now surely dramatic moment for those theorists. This is possibly the most profound outcome of the event. Horizon telescopes observation all the radical predictions for what the event horizon telescope might see are based on the framework of Einstein's general relativity, a theory that has proven robust since its formulation more than one hundred years ago on seeing this first image. Physicist remarked on how precisely the reality of the black holes event horizon matches the predictions of general relativity, and this first image is just that the first the event horizon telescope collaboration will continue observing Messier eighty seven and a second target the supermassive black hole in the center of our galaxy. If four million solar mass object called Sagittarius, a counter-intuitively, although such tears a is comparatively close only twenty five thousand light years away two thousand times close to us than Messier eighty seven. It has a different set of challenges. One problem is that as such Terry's as smaller its emissions vary over shorter timescales than Messier eighty seven's monstrous black hole, making observations more difficult. Also, as we are embedded inside, our galaxy's disk, which contains a lot of interstellar dust the event horizon telescope signal suffers more scattering making it more challenging to resolve. As most of the intergalactic space between us and Messier. Eighty seven is pretty empty scattering is less. Of a problem when we'll see Sagittarius a remains to be seen. But now that the technology behind the event horizon telescope has been proven our understanding of supermassive black holes short to blossom. Episode was written by Neil and produced by Tyler clang, brain stuff is a production of iheartradio's how stuff works for born this and lots of other supermassive topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. And for more podcasts for my heart radio. I heart radio app apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. What is hard? But I was so afraid I could lose everything love is wonderful and confusing, and magical and infuriated everything about life that we had thought and planned and hoped for was just in that moment gone. I was so so so lucky that that join the millions of listeners who've made committed possible, I promise you it's cheaper than therapy. Listen to commit it on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts.

Messier Iheartradio Capital One Einstein Lauren Vogel Apple Physicist Terry Neil Tyler Clang Four Percent Twenty Five Thousand Light Yea Fifty Five Million Light Years One Hundred Years One Percent Two Decades Two Percent
"stromer" Discussed on Two Scientists Walk Into a Bar

Two Scientists Walk Into a Bar

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"stromer" Discussed on Two Scientists Walk Into a Bar

"The tumor will be able to get rid of this Stromer or reprogrammed that Stromer, for example, in the support that will help in growth, another very very well understood pathway is being used to reprogram the environment is Danja Janik factor. The Jeff that's vascular and Attilio growth factor that will help the tumor recruit a vascular so that it can feed itself on blood vessels. Exactly. So it will influence its environment by C creating factor that will do that or as you've discussed also in a previous fuck in previous podcast to to fight or to prevent the immune system from attacking. It was I think that's really fascinating as an immunologist to win. The immune system comes into play. There's many cell components to that. And there are signals. Coming from the to mount that will be forming these blood vessels or instructing that. And then within the blood comes the immune system to start to help fight the cancer cell. So it's another home you stasis that's going on T shoe beyond just what's happening within the cell as well. And one of the things that I think is really fascinating is is when you think about the immune system coming in to fight the cancer or the Chuma cell is the tumor cell. Not only is putting up these barriers and struggle sells. It starts to mutate genes that are really important for recognition my systems, or for example, it makes E H A molecules, which the T cells need to see to target that tesol and eat it kill it need it. They Denver you let those molecules as well. And these are beyond just the mutations that you're the driver mutations your described. They're probably also one of the mechanisms that the tumor reading needs to you know. Take care of in order to be able able to develop one of the defense mechanism that we have we've discussed already probably do the DNA repair mechanism and all that there's probably many tumor stuff. We would have developed that we have developed in our body over the years that we've never noticed because the immune system got rid of them in time. And we just didn't know they were there little blips that we don't even know exactly. So that two mutations and back to why it's so hard to drunk directly drug target Chuma cells because you know, on paper. It sounds simple. Right. You describe those five to ten mutations. You design drugs to those bam. They should be targeted and depleted from the body as tumors grow and respond to their environment. That may include the drug environment of they're in faced out to mutate or developed resistance. Well, yeah. So first of all. Just the fact that we now know what all these mutations are and what all the important mutations. The oncogenes are is just fascinating, you know, in my career as a as a molecular oncologist, you know, we went from just being able to seek once one or two genes to now being able to just seek once a whole genome in a day. So we have sequenced now thousands of genomes between the public effort and various private. I I, you know, so many tumors are sequenced that we understand very precisely most of the genes what they are who they are. Only a few of these can we draw not the majority of them. There's many that we still don't even know how to drug because they're not enzymes they you know, they proteins that. We just don't have an easy way to develop a drunker gains. Maybe a good example of that is mutated that are in the chaos mutations us exactly that's probably one of the most commonly mutated oncogene. It's been very difficult to drug all the more classic kind as deuce lose enzyme Stutz mediate phosphorylation, these we know how to drug quite well and most of the oncogenes arcane as have been drug today. Jane, what does it mean? Difficult address was something they care us, these mutations could be as simple as just an amino acid change..

Stromer Jeff Stutz Denver Jane
"stromer" Discussed on The Wade Keller Pro Wrestling Podcast

The Wade Keller Pro Wrestling Podcast

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"stromer" Discussed on The Wade Keller Pro Wrestling Podcast

"And he just he was the perfect guy for that sake. And it's on paper. It's a ridiculous Sunday. Gimmick like, he's an undid old west, you know, undertaker. But it like it was it was just perfect. I mean, it's just absolutely perfect. Gimmick. You know? And and again, it's it's and it was from the same head from the same brain the same Vince McMahon. Who was like, okay. Your garbage, man. You're you know, a repo man in your ear. You're a dead, man. It's just somehow it worked, you know. I don't know. I can't explain it. It's that intangible thing of. I mean, there's no there's no movie studio. There's no TV network in the country in the world that isn't putting their money into something because they don't think it's going to work and people are going to like it. But then, you know, another great that we lost William Goldman wrote an amazing book. Adventures in in the screen trade. He said it himself repeatedly in that book. He goes, nobody knows anything. This is this is that that's the entertainment business. Nobody knows anything. Nobody knows what's going to work. And nobody knows why what is working works. You know, it's that it's that intangible Joe Stromer in the clash that fast. He's like if something is working don't mess with it. Because once you start messing with it. It's going to stop working holiday tips and wine stories from Kristen, and Paula, total wine and more. This sweetness of a maple glazed ham paired with a bourbon, barely.

William Goldman Vince McMahon Joe Stromer Kristen Paula
"stromer" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

The Adam Carolla Show

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"stromer" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

"Like, my dear show back in his chair over your head knocked him sensitive like nothing but threats beating the shit out of her nonstop different time, God damn sticking every time beat off. The holiday season. How shocking is it? More and more every year that baby it's called outside. Still gets played on the radio that I'd say joy while we can three years overdue. Pretty much date rape song plying her against her wishes like a really should leave. No different was considering everything that every time is now out. I'm shocked still around the original. No means yes. Dawn. Thank you Christmas. Carol Clark Gable threaten what's her name. Vivian. Yeah. One hundred fifty times with bodily damage. I tell you I got fucking to mass because she'd be like, I know it's my fault. Please accept me back. What is this fan is awesome? All right. Sorry. Oh, by the way. And that theme on that theme. Sorry. Somehow when I was doing car cast earlier today because Eric Stromer wife as a choreographer and work with Madonna. I was thinking about the movie truth or dare from early nineties late eighties. I don't know what I say car cast as on the house are did that. Somehow we got onto Madonna got on a truth or dare circa nineteen ninety one. I don't know somewhere in their late early nineties late eighties, whatever and. I should you know, there was a scene where Madonna's assistant was taken out roof, eat and raped and the kind of Madonna had a laugh about it. And I thought that's another thing that probably time it's not going to be kind to fifty second clip. And max battle played for you. It's sort of sort of quivalent if it's cold outside. Sorry. How does she know what happened to shipping? Someone's. She says she was dancing. The next thing. She knew she woke up in heroin, nude and stuff was stolen and she went to the bathroom bleeding..

Madonna Carol Clark Gable Eric Stromer rape heroin fifty second three years
"stromer" Discussed on The Animated Journey: Interviews with Animation Professionals

The Animated Journey: Interviews with Animation Professionals

04:58 min | 3 years ago

"stromer" Discussed on The Animated Journey: Interviews with Animation Professionals

"And you know, what other character liked? I can't remember the name of him. But it was the toe guy. That's what I loved was in the Q and A this small child. They are probably about ten goes. Why did you have this character? Were they supposed to be funny or scary? What was grouse? What was this? And the direct one of the directors goes I wanted to be like watch you. And when I looked at each other like kids never seen total recall. He has no idea what you're talking about. Bicker adults lap and all the kids. But we were laughing we were laughing. No, see go watch total recall, you guys. It's it's an interesting movie. It's funny. I don't know when I was a kid seeing thought, oh, this is really Dirk scaring weird as a Bill you're like what's happening here. But it's still it's good. Yeah. Yeah. I recently watched it, and it's still holds up for me. Especially quiet. Watch this movie. This and I liked I mean, some of the animation especially at the end which. She's a big Ralph. I don't wanna spoil. But it looked so good, and yeah, I don't know how much rendering time sired, but what they're able to do now. Compare because I just I watched an older CG film that for the time. It was it was made it two thousand eight for the time. It was good. But you see what they can do now. And it's only ten years is not that long period. And even from Toy Story two now the level that we're at now with what we're able to do with hair and skin and simulations and special effects. It's a standing to me how amazing all of this looks now and in the racing game too. I mean, you felt like you were in a game. And they did they did a lot of angles often see in live action with the cameras. Moving back and forth. Like this very well done and also difficult to do. This is not an easy thing. Like, you said to be able to render this kind of stuff. Oh, yeah. I mean, just looking at the game consoles we have now with the XBox, PlayStation. Even the switch the games coming out are almost Pixar quality older Pixar, but it's still pretty amazing red dead redemption to just talking about this. I mean, you look at that. And you look at pong who has Patty you're just like how how do we go from this to this mazing? I always think about that. While I'm playing games like if I could go back in time and show, my younger self this is what's going to happen to video games? If I would believe it feel like no my mind would melt or just go even even further like back when movies were first invented. Oh, you think this is impressive. Oh, yeah. You don't even know. You don't even know what's go-. I wonder twenty years from now with like a future part two was watching jazz eighteen. Skirt comes down. Who knows who knows what what's on their horizon. But it's a really good movie, so recommended you guys go and see it's very fun. And that brings us to our main event. So we are very happy to have our second part of our interview with crystal Stromer in this interview, she talks more detail about working on titans, go to the movies as well as work on unity for Cartoon Network. So Jeff how did you feel about part two? Oh, great. I love hearing about Unix. You know, what she was doing after teen titans? Go to the movies. And I appreciate it when she was talking about the animation industry, and what it's like for animators that. Yes. Well, just list to interview. Listen and y'all understand. No. But we very much enjoyed having crystal show, and I'm sure she'll backing in because she's just going up and up and up and up. So the next time she directs another movie, we'll have your here too. So without further ado, we're proud to present episode eighty-five interview with crystal Stromer part two. So then we're on the swimming. Louis ends months later, you're able to relax. Much. Palestinian our able then to jump back onto Unix or to university. There was a weird adjustment teen kitty take about two weeks off between the movie and Yuna kitty slept for like a week. And then this week. I was like so like a lot of overtime the movie everything was lakes like we have to get done..

crystal Stromer Dirk Pixar titans Patty Louis Cartoon Network Jeff twenty years ten years two weeks
"stromer" Discussed on The Animated Journey: Interviews with Animation Professionals

The Animated Journey: Interviews with Animation Professionals

03:51 min | 3 years ago

"stromer" Discussed on The Animated Journey: Interviews with Animation Professionals

"But two months later, I'm finally finishing. And full disclosure. I got a code from a friend at Sony, so take what I say with the grand salt. But I love this game. It's definitely in my top ten for this generation, probably on the PlayStation. And it's an exclusive. It's just a lot of fun. The the fighting mechanics are really fun and pretty deep, you know. And just slinging around the city is so much fun. I know you're fan of Spiderman to write the Sam Ray mean very much, so yeah. So am I that's one of my favorite superhero movies to this day? I still think it holds up and this game the writings really good and the stories fun. And it feels like that Spiderman two movie. Yeah. Because docs in it, and it's kind of the same thing. He's a mentor d-, Peter and you see his whole art going from mentor. To villain, and what they did with them's really cool, and this is kind of its own universe. So it doesn't really fit exactly with the comics or the movies or the homecoming series of just came out for, you know, the homecoming movie, but it brings in doc ock rhino, the vulture mister negative and just in this really cohesive little narrative, and I thought it was a lot of fun. So I finished that game. And I actually bought the deal see because they're coming out with a deal. See that's in three parts. And I finished the first part and the second part comes out. I think in the next week or two, but it's kind of a continuing story because at the end of this first piece of deal. See it said to be continued in ends on giant clipping or two and that deals with black cat and. Hammerhead? And if it's just a lot of fun, and I recommend, you know, listeners who haven't picked us up to definitely pick it up if they have a PS work. What is the DLC downloadable content? You. Yeah. It's just an ad on that you can buy this not in the normal. So if you like the game, and you want to keep it going, then you can pick up the steel see. And I think then the next part comes out the third and concluding part, I'm assuming I think that comes out in December. So I finished the game. And now, they're giving me more. Sounds smart. Yeah. Hey, well that sounds like a fun game. That's really fun. And speaking of other things we love we love this interview because we're very happy to bring back are returning guest. Crystal Stromer, y'all may remember crystal from episode forty nine when she was an animator on Nickelodeon Bunsen is a beast. She's currently an animator for unity, but for the past year, she was also one of the animation directors for teen titans. Go to the movies, so Jeff how did you like today's interview? Oh, so much fun. Talking to her especially because we both love teen titans. Go to the movies. And so hearing some stories about what happened behind the scenes in how she got on this project and stuff is just really just really cool. You know, because it's a unique situation with her that she came in as a co director yet just something that was already so established with the TV show. So I think it's really interesting ESO yeller gonna love it. So we're very happy to present episode. Eighty four interview with crystal Stromer part one is great to have you back. This is so cool time on the animated jury episode forty nine..

Crystal Stromer Sam Ray Sony director Jeff Nickelodeon Peter two months
"stromer" Discussed on The Adam Buxton Podcast

The Adam Buxton Podcast

03:46 min | 3 years ago

"stromer" Discussed on The Adam Buxton Podcast

"I mean, it was really very good. Did you suspect -spective he was unwell, right? Because he had a heart attack in two thousand and four right? And then he retired. And he didn't see much of him. And then yes, rumors start circulating. And I think he he certainly was unwell and he had cancer for a while. I think. Know put two and two together off the his well-publicized drug use in seventies. You remember those scans of his brain that he. That he had some sort of what the correct term for them is. But it's a certain type of photograph of the brain. Right. That revealed all these holes really that he'd created from taking so much coke. And he was obviously shocked by it. And know just huge gaps in his memory didn't like talking about that period. Partly because he just couldn't remember love. Why Don was this is sort of Berlin kind of air? Yeah. Mid seventies. When he's in till Alister, Crowley and. The confused bits of niche in philosophy and stuff, and he just doesn't remember a lot of it because he was so off his face Jesus. And so you think God he probably did take a few years off. But he was looked in the best of shape that he I mean, he always. It was perfect. Yeah. Yeah. He was beautiful that I never get over that mug show of him which anybody would have as their time by eight just look so good. He has look, and you know, all the punks all used to take speed that just takes years off your life. Yes. Joe Stromer and people like that. Yes. My god. That's the bathtub speed, which is just verandas. Do you ever go through that phase? Yeah. Yeah. Well, you know in the sort of I guess mid to late nineties, I say phase, I think being net got like some one weekend and had a bizarre. I remember driving back to Gloucester for my dad's fiftieth having had a crazy weekend stuff and just crying all the way down the for cause. I just with my girlfriend, right? It was a very odd. I mean, it's weird when you look back that kind of and you do it when you're young because you feel so indestructible and now. I can't get behind the mindset of why you would do anything that would essentially jeopardize your well being just for a moment of feeling different. You know, sound can all fuddy-duddy now. But it's what everyone goes through, isn't it? It's trying to come to terms with what how you fit into the world. And maybe you feel that you don't. And so then you certainly get into that mindset of thinking scrim, although we did I mean XY was one of those ones that just because it was such a fun time. Even though there was some paid for mid week, you'd feel terrible. But I remember the late nineties when we did the soda spaced on clubbing. We've elected term into haven't. We're going to show. What is really like that is actually really good fun. And you don't die. And it's it's good, and everyone should do it and all the world leaders should that crap. That you think when your age considering that it might actually do some sort of neurological damage was never even affect thing. Yeah. Yeah. That's the thing. I mean, you you don't think too hard about consequences. At aged. And then suddenly within a period of just a year or two suddenly, you do you think God, that's all you can think about what is is it forty. It certainly starts around there. I mean, I do think it's just a question of things happening around you. Yeah. And also having children, right? The mortality starts to become an issue..

Crowley Don Joe Stromer Berlin Alister
"stromer" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

The Adam Carolla Show

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"stromer" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

"As you drive out of your Belling, they just as the crow flies this fall, you and you pull up to the little mini mart and it's at night and you're going in your feeling a little weird walking out your carpet. They're just sitting up there in the pit. Yeah, just just wait and make sure safely get into your car. I love it every character kind of staggers from ten feet away. No, you just point point and he looks you backs away. Yeah, that's good. Them brandishing a gun little clicker on your keychain, like they do to train the dolphins. Just one. Oh man. I'm in love major problem, Bryant's asshole school thing in love with it because you don't want to give the teachers guns. And then I hear this crackpot I dunno some city official or some guy a few months ago. It was like, I'm going to arm all teachers with Iraq's bucket of rocks. Like. That's cute. You're gonna hit one of the kids in the head before he gets shot. The kids go to our and then get you stopped shooting for a second oriented. There was somebody who was giving teachers buckets of rocked. All right. Let's give them a crows train them to attack and one of the fire. And I gotta say, you go to like my neighborhood. We're lousy. There's more than we know what to do with all, evidently, very easily trainable looking for work. There you go. All right there nailed. It will take a quick break with this good sports and Phil Rosenthal. In studio. Now. San Corolla. Hey, Eric, Stromer Hayes, kind of my thing. Hey, I'm gonna. Hi, I'm Eric stroller. Let's not living the past. Usually listen to ace on the house because me and Stromer dispense building advice. Every Saturday, past one, apple, how might even goes, I say, professional building, hey, give me some coffee..

Stromer Hayes Eric stroller Belling Phil Rosenthal Iraq San Corolla Bryant apple official ten feet
"stromer" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

The Guilty Feminist

02:40 min | 3 years ago

"stromer" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

"Guilty. Would you much having me. Straight to the chase. It's five and seven from fifty five minutes show. So let's get down to brass tacks. Well, in April of this year, I was at the comedy store in the dressing room, and I was just about to walk onstage and my wife was very, very Kane. I don't get blase about doing things that she sent me a text message pulled out and the text message that she was pregnant and. I was absolutely overjoyed boss was presented with the problem as every single ever written immediately left my head. And then I walked on the stage and I came into the mic, stand at my brain was like worry gutless and it whispered routine Stromer head popped in, but it was a routine that opened my last show about how he didn't want to have children. Which was perfect. Actually a video of that, and I will be able to play it too much. And this is what I said to a roomful of strangers when you were gonna exist. How soon after literally seconds. See the approval of the strangers, happy birthday. That my mother when my sister was twenty one years of age in her birthday card, my mother gave her the best birthday present ever seen anyone given. She gave her the receipt for the alcohol and food that was consumed on the night. She was accidents conceived. Present those. I was twenty one. I was like, mom, where's my receipt? And she was you're the second show you a plan. So one of the presented a number one of the main problems that presented to me, my wife being pregnant was I realized I knew absolutely nothing about pregnancy because I went to an all boys Catholic boarding school. Yes, indeed. So we had one lesson on pregnancy. When like this, we'll down about seventeen. A priest came into the room. That's right. A priest and he said today, we talk about a woman's right to choose now. I think we could all agree choices of anything. Yes, yes. Now, of course, nobody in their right mind would be in favor of terminating a pregnancy, of course, nudity in them, right might would be in favor of something like that. But of course, we all in favor of Joyce. I will give an example, we will going kick quality of life. That is, of course, a situation where we may which to choose between complexity quality of life. Of course, boys so example, the first. Young child to be born into poverty. That's not a very nice life visit being. Oh, new.

Kane Stromer Joyce fifty five minutes twenty one years
"stromer" Discussed on She Who Persisted

She Who Persisted

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"stromer" Discussed on She Who Persisted

"So oh, an on a totally separate note. I just wanna let you know. My husband just sent me a text since we're talking about true crime today. Police in Germany have arrested man who may have murdered twenty one of his yes by poisoning their lunches in killing streets, free stretching back to two thousand. But you know, what he did he? It's so weird. It's like one of the weirdest things if hug because he poisons them with lead, which is their food. But the thing is you don't immediately da is just something that you get sick from. And there were so many case if people getting cancer and heart attacks and just getting sick in this company, which was really strange, but the didn't know what was going on. And apparently, he just killed them. Very very very slowly he has a very patient serial killer apparently. Yes. So I guess lesson learned. I need a food taster all don't put food anywhere with the people can have access to it. Go to bed with your refrigerator. Yes. Yes. Don't give other people access to your food and the vet donate money to backlog and politeness fuck politeness and post the hell out of anything that you see about people of color being victimized or murdered because the profile on those is just as important as when white women yet disappear to yes and say nasty Szenasi. I. Pocking with easy trip. Now saying dumb drum town center. So you can know use your toll tugs to call parts simply registered easy trip. Doshi would slash Caulkins? Easy pocket with easy trip done drum when more happens. None dipa. Stromer Lund fun chick into Vigo. And channel those times kiss Nissan's of event on smitten coast Tyson on soon, and this is Lana shifting sawn than meeting causes can

Stromer Lund Doshi Vigo Nissan Germany cancer Lana Tyson
"stromer" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

The Adam Carolla Show

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"stromer" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

"You will when you sell your porsche nine nine six i bid nine hundred ninety six dollars so they're selfish so entertained sold the five ten i bid five ten it'll be great i'll take it and they don't have nine six dollars i would you take seven hundred and forty until payday now the the car may i don't know what that estimate on a car like that is but what do you think at the bar well ballpark this one is going to be around fifty gram right so obviously when you make your bed for nine hundred ninety six dollars on the first day you have no worries about having to produce nine hundred ninety six dollars bid way pass we allot novelty yeah bids to on there all right shall we take ourselves quickey break and oh alonzo it just you can have a little would during the break i'm getting on a plane i'm going to good would later on and i am driving a porsche nine thirty five up that hill wow so you sport a little would yeah that's worth a little more than my nine six yeah you know i think i think so there it is there's the car yeah all right we will take ourselves quickey break come back with the news and alonzo bone right after this san corolla hey eric stromer hey of my thing i'm gonna say hi i'm eric stroller let's not live in the past listen to ace on the house because me and stromer dispense building advice every saturday hot cast one apple hot i even goes i say professional building hey give me some cough there.

porsche alonzo bone eric stromer eric stroller nine hundred ninety six dollar nine six dollars fifty gram
"stromer" Discussed on CarCast

CarCast

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"stromer" Discussed on CarCast

"And hopefully when he got it he changed oil to castrol edge designed for consumers demand the best for formats from the cars tech advances made engines smaller more powerful we always talk about this that produce a lot of pressure these days the only thing stopping metal the metal contact is a very thin layer of oil so the oil needs to be strong obviously castrol edge it's formulated with fluid titanium technology three times stronger against viscosity breakdown then the leading full synthetic all right so got a spec miata question here which i like jim forty seven idaho hey ace and stromer great show man my son and i love listening to car cast together it's just a great deal that's the andrea yeah we great but he doesn't ever show yeah all right all right all right go ahead all right the andrea hey i i wanted to help that jeep owner out real quick it's g patriot first of all you never buy a patriot and less you totally broke or gay so get rid get that thing fixed and then get it traded off like matt said you know get it gone because it's sort of a worthless thing to have it's like buying a harley sportster when really should just bought a real you know what i'm saying listen i i literally see those gps on the freeway and i call people in the she'll why that's true test just don't i just like i wanna know why i wanna know what's going adam why gee patriot in front of you.

matt castrol jim idaho
"stromer" Discussed on UFC Unfiltered with Jim Norton and Matt Serra

UFC Unfiltered with Jim Norton and Matt Serra

01:36 min | 4 years ago

"stromer" Discussed on UFC Unfiltered with Jim Norton and Matt Serra

"Um i don't know you don't see well listen he could a listen i've been i've been rome anytime how many fight if we single the gist that we think see me a first round knockout instilling doublestandard dammit i can't leave this went the distance yet goes came jds fights that go forth and i were of the video games because i know he is a major he loves the call of duty stuff and i was right there with them in tall i found that i actual reality love it so much is get the i want to show you to show you look it up it was on i think it's on his instagram of abib playing um i believe it's five i think he's playing corn much shore which is a fighting tied game in arena 'cause you seem throwing punches and share i sort quick but it is cool let me see let me see what are you looking at this instagram who see it well let's sale no way was it him that i see him playing the fucking revive now i was the other day he would've seen it already i think it limited come on man this is exciting is i talk about this shit oman you know what i need you any aid and you and your very very passionate matt well jimmy let me tell you i do enjoy a good video game was specially the i mean it's it's fun we don't do a lot of fish and fun we don't do a lotta politics on the show is that we don't really care at least on the show getting his pilot no no no no obvious hey adult film star stromer danga's alleging she slept with president trump and i'm going to say regardless of what you think of trump if that's true that doesn't hurt by image of him.

matt stromer danga rome call of duty jimmy president
"stromer" Discussed on Sound Opinions

Sound Opinions

01:58 min | 4 years ago

"stromer" Discussed on Sound Opinions

"You could still in healthy energy but ethics food well that's the point of view of the film okay fortunately i think it gets mitigated by the end because the end is quite sentimental yeah i think it would have been better probably to end the film with said like dying in a pool of his own vomit pizza shahed zone well it was a horrible end in a horrible story but what we might not have got the money to make the film if it had been that if the hedged reveille true did you read leicester bags this famous piece about oh yes i did a tale of two patsies yes really be moaned the waste of a life that was a very good article and that was really inspiring i think icy last obiang's article a tale of two patsies really was an inspiration to me and and abby in in terms of finding our feet with the screenplay yet because he really got it you know he really understood that they were both a pera passes and he also understood that there was this potential there that said really could have been an extraordinary artists visit needs more than a mere vice fly as a fabulous days off that a simple matter bodies the dementia of annoy the general election isa install the possibility of that yeah and let it just all went fashion steve after a short break we'll continue our conversation with filmmaker alex cox will look at his collaboration and friendship with joe stromer of the clashed and later we can review the new elven from eclectic hiphop hop trio any argue that in a minute unsound opinions from wbz chicago and p r x.

alex cox joe stromer chicago leicester abby
"stromer" Discussed on A Cast of Kings - A Game of Thrones Podcast

A Cast of Kings - A Game of Thrones Podcast

02:01 min | 5 years ago

"stromer" Discussed on A Cast of Kings - A Game of Thrones Podcast

"I should like that the low key suryadi's bagheri from sam's brother taken tiredly play by freddie stromer of unreal fame and i thought that was a great s just like low key should he performance the other thing we learn in the scene is that should performers really he was shitty or the nurses vote he was great at being a little shut them the other thing we learned the scene is how you know how a reminder that white walkers are still a myth to most of southern kingdom's and you know says flashback to season onesies and tubular y walker's hilarious of the in you know so just that that john in davos and says a the rest have a lot of work to do propaganda work to do to get people to understand what's coming so and agreed the premature function lucy i mean we he leaves the castle right after resorting the whole function of the scene is just to get an explanation of what that sort is an and get it into sam's and as the as half so i wouldn't be surprised if we saw randle's highly again 'cause it's kind of a significant book character but the rest of might be one and done and this episode so now we gotta king's landing and we see thoman who is just i think of uses were to describe before but he is just completely hapless it feels at his killing bounced along by the waves in there's a scene where he meets marjorie in their reunite end marjorie seems to have completely converted jaroon is completely ernest l yeah tomen is so dumb he doesn't realize he is being played by wife so hard i will say that marjorie does put a pretty convinced performance she does not betray all that she's just putting on an act.

sam freddie stromer john davos randle marjorie thoman