17 Burst results for "Strickler"

"strickler" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

02:42 min | 2 months ago

"strickler" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"And because of NFTs, anyone, not just well-known companies like Gucci, can create digital fashion to be bought, sold and worn, and games, online platforms, and even in Avatar fashion shows. Take the pioneer 18 year old ferocious, who was way ahead of Gucci with his crypto art and digital sneakers. The use of augmented and virtual reality fashion is becoming mainstream. But because NFTs, as art and collectibles, are so new, the predictions are too volatile for anyone to make. But it is a sign that heavy hitters like Mark Cuban and Snoop Dogg are investing heavily. This is a new frontier for artists and their fans. And just like in the real world, an artist can sell a one of a kind piece, make limited editions to control for scarcity, show an art show in art galleries and marketplaces. But with NFTs, you can all say sell directly to your buyer without an intermediary. Collect royalties on all future resales. Expand your audience to the entire Internet, show in virtual galleries and virtual worlds and sell 3D objects and clothes to virtual humans. Okay, so how does this work and how do you get involved as an artist? Your artwork is a digital file. To protect this file and capture the value of your labor in perpetuity, you go to a digital goods marketplace and meant it, meaning you register your work as a token for a fee on the blockchain. It will contain a signature, timestamp, and any rules around its resale. Once you have mentioned your work and you want to sell it, you connect with your community and let them know that your NFT has dropped, meaning it is for sale. It is important to note that all the same rules that make for good art and good business apply in the virtual world. A strong connection to your followers. An authentic or compelling story. And consistent output and work ethic. So who will buy your art or how do you get involved as a collector? Buyers go to the same marketplaces that artists use. There you look for art that you appreciate and artists you want a direct connection with. Some people invest because the artwork resonates with them. Or they recognize great talent..

Gucci Mark Cuban Snoop Dogg
"strickler" Discussed on Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

05:05 min | 1 year ago

"strickler" Discussed on Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

"But they don't believe in. I guess the idea that they don't believe in the solutions that are being proposed to combat climate change. I think that's that's where the opposition lies. It's not in the belief that the climate is changing. I think that's well accepted. It's the ridiculousness of some of the solutions that are being proposed getting rid of roman animals. No it's like l. of the farting cows that are causing climate change. We need to get eliminate be from our diet which of the most ridiculous statement and who truly understands how we go systems working. I don't claim to be the world's foremost authority. But i do have a basic understanding of the carbon cycle ronin. Answer not the problem fact. They may very well be the solution. If it is indeed a probl- it's the opposition to the solutions that caused reluctance in large part lists from my perception my perspective. Some of that reluctance also comes from the historical pattern of agriculture. Being a. I don't know if i want to use the word scapegoated. But agriculture is often credited with being the cause or being the fault of different challenges such as momentum pollution groundwater pollution et cetera et cetera. I certainly believe that there is. There is an element of truth. There i don't want to discount that entirely. Other is an element of truth there but why is it that only farmers are being held accountable for those different factors if nitrate pollution and groundwater in iowa is such a big deal what responsibility do fertilizer manufacturers. Have for that if any it goes back. I made the comment earlier that it's a lot more convenient to blame the cows and the farmers than it is to blame airlines because it impacts a lot fewer people and it's a minority of the population and how much of that holds true for other challenges as well. It's a convenient scapegoat group and not entirely blameless but still my perception is that there is an element within the agricultural community. That people are very cautious about immediately being blamed for things that they believe and they feel not not always entirely true but they feel they have limited control over because they many farmers feel that they have. They're doing the best they can. And while you and. I may have a different perspective on that. They're doing the best that they know how at the moment. But there's lots we i believe. There's lots of room for a different types of management practices and so forth but still they feel stuck. They feel trapped and so being given credit for causing additional. Problems is not something they find particularly. Appetizing the flip side of that though being blamed for climate change. Whatever is the other side of that conan. Is that if we are the cause of these problems. We are also the solution those problems and perhaps we should be compensated to be the solution for those problems. I think there's an increasing awareness that farmers are our farm fields if indeed carbon dioxide if indeed we are causing climate change and if indeed carbon dioxide in the atmosphere or even water vapor in the atmosphere like you know altered walter any and some others are starting to tell us all those solutions can be created with our fields and beck may potentially be eight an income stream in the future that we look at. Maybe we will be compensated for that at some point and i think it behooves us to arm ourselves with knowledge on how to do those things on our fields. Agriculture in the near future is likely to look significantly different from what it has for the last seventy years because we have to recognize that. There's different adjectives you can use. You can call it. Industrial agriculture conventional mainstream..

iowa conan walter beck
"strickler" Discussed on Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"strickler" Discussed on Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

"I blew the dust off the manuscript said own. This will never do. There's so much more that needs added to this. Because i've learned so much more. If i actually waited to write the book until i knew enough to write the book it would never come out. It's always going to be incomplete. It's always gonna be insufficient but if you wait till it is. You'll never write a book so you gotta stop somewhere just enough. Yeah so i know as as you're describing there's always lots of things that don't make it into the book because either we don't know yet or because they're just not enough room for everything that we do know that we would like to include a dozen all fit. Is there anything that you would like to write about or to talk about but you haven't. You've been cautious because you were concerned about the reception. You were concerned that people were not ready to hear it yet. I have been somewhat reluctant to talk about climate change. You know it's very hot button politically. I can't claim to say i know. Climate change is occurring l. I can't claim to have proved that it is or that it is not climate. Change has always well of climate change has always occurred and is occurring. I think the bigger question is how fast is it occurring in humans. The cause of that. I think that's where the controversy lage we. We all know. The climate change because climate has always changed. Question is how fast. What direction are we heading and are we causing it in. I think finally. Can we stop it in an i. Guess another question is should we stop it. We should be able to think about her. Potential climate change objectively and scientifically. But and someone asked me said why farmers by farmers believe in climate change. Said you know. I think if you talked to him one on one pretty much all of them do believe in climate change..

"strickler" Discussed on Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

05:09 min | 1 year ago

"strickler" Discussed on Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

"Now i can take it rai. Cover crop in planet in front of soybeans and get an really nice yield increase in the soybeans Where did it come from. Well it could come from reduction and we'd competition it could have come from greater moisture conservation. It could have come from greater. co two of aleutian during the bloom period of soybeans. A number of factors that caused that. It's not magic there. Growth factors that that ri- cover crop was able to supply. And i could take that same ride cover crop and put it in front of corn and get a yield reduction. While i guess that just doesn't work around here no it. It worked great in front of the soybeans. What happened in front of the corn. Or maybe it was nitrogen sequestration. Maybe it harbored some army cut worms or something that clipped the corn off or figure out why i think if i could recommend farmers do anything said figure out why things happen instead of just noticing. What happened analyze it. It'd be like announcers at you. Know the the guys on football broadcasts and analyze everything ad nauseam in just ruined the game instead of just learning the final score..

football
"strickler" Discussed on Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"strickler" Discussed on Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

"They've identified which enzyme cofactors are missing. Like when you put all the research papers together and you read them. As one whole from the perspective of looking at this from an attrition management perspective the information is all there. We've had it all along but the mainstream perspective is not evaluating that information through a lens of managing nutrition and managing immunity instead. They're looking at it from the perspective of how can we develop a bacteria side or fungicide for this problem. It's incredible to me that the knowledge of how to completely prevent this disease with nutrition management is all there and has largely been there for thirty plus years and no one is implemented is considered to be an incurable disease that decimates orchards across the country every year and yet no one is really taking a different perspective on it so i point this out just to say that to your comments about self education sure there are additional pieces. That would be interesting to know. We could conclude every research paper by saying that. There's more research that needs to be done but we already know enough. In my opinion we already know enough to have a completely different approach to what we do right now so anyway. That's my soapbox well-spoken have to agree. I mean there's always more to know but like put it in farmer talk. I already know how to farm better than i do. And we did. I mean the knowledge is there and it just behooves zest to assemble all that knowledge into one entity and then take action. We don't do a great job with that neck agriculture so with this perspective of self limiting beliefs that we have and and the limitations that we impose on ourselves if we were to remove those limitations and we were to fully invest everything and make all the changes that we know and farm as well as we know how what you have observed and the depth of experience that you have..

"strickler" Discussed on Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"strickler" Discussed on Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

"Given your perspective that many of the challenges we faced are based on the mental limitations that we impose on ourselves. Where do you see areas of opportunity for growers today. I think the biggest opportunity is self education. Look at you. You are probably the best example. I have ever met a man who self educated. You've probably have the the learning equivalent of several. Phd's and you've done it yourself. The last class. I taught i told them that. Twenty years from now. If you think. I'm the best teacher you ever had than. I have failed because if i really succeeded as a teacher best teacher you'll ever have as yourself and nowhere in history. Have we had as much ability. I mean unless you had a you know a cot set up in the library of alexandria or the libraries of you know. They're in persia in money then. Would you had the opportunity to learn what we're doing right now. Podcast you can be winning a university.

library of alexandria persia
"strickler" Discussed on Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

04:55 min | 1 year ago

"strickler" Discussed on Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

"We put such mental limitations on ourselves. I strongly agree with you. Just the framework that you raised of thinking about not being able to feed ten million people in twenty years from now or whatever ten billion people rather that has several people who have had on the podcast have have made have strongly refuted that statement citing the large number of food that is proportionate food that is wasted and so forth just as a mental thought experiment. Imagine what our agriculture will look differently if we and are food. Production would be different if we adjust converted the forty percent of corn acres that go to ethanol to actual food crops. What if we started growing tomatoes and potatoes and rice. On those forty percent corn acres there would be zero problem growing a surplus of food. That is not going to be a problem..

"strickler" Discussed on Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"strickler" Discussed on Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

"I saw the results of the very very long term tillage versus no till study out in western kansas. Been going on for. I don't know twenty years something like that. They saw the results a measured all these different parameters in the long term. No till without producing the tillage field to one arid environment you would expect that no till would easily rise to the top. A mass y y is that in all well holds more moisture. Will they measured the water holding capacity of each soa the ability of the soil. The whole you know the grams of water per kilogram of soil the took a core of age and put it in the lab measured to water holding capacity and they were virtually identical will. Wait a minute interest you know. I thought the ability of soil the hold water would improve with no no till did but it was extremely slight. You say so. Where's all the extra water coming from increased root depth because of that poor space you get this increase in pore space in soil structure and the plant roots could just go that much deeper in when they measured water extraction by foot. That's where the extra yield was being made greater rooting depth because of the greater prosekey on better gas exchange in the soil. I think this is a really important point. I have fresh in my mind. Of course that. Harriet mela has put together for kind harvest. Which i've just been reviewing again this last week. In just startlingly fresh perspective a completely different perspective than we often hear even the regenerative agriculture space. And she made the point that when you.

kansas Harriet mela
"strickler" Discussed on Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

04:53 min | 1 year ago

"strickler" Discussed on Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

"Then all of a sudden. You start seeing all the tremendous waste that we currently have in agriculture. Anything but percentage efficiency are we operating at now. It's ridiculously low and when you see waste you see opportunity. It's ridiculously low. You know. I think if we were to look at our production and productivity from a global macro perspective we get caught up in what are yields per acre and the marketing mantra that has been developed agribusiness to us farmers to do the marketing for them that we are feeding the world but in fact if you started looking at a measuring yield measuring productivity in terms of calories per acre and grams of protein per acre all of a sudden you would realize that we're actually doing a very poor job of harvesting sunlight and converting that into calories and protein and there is a lot of untapped opportunity left on the table so it's a different perspective than looking at it purely in terms of bins and bushels per acre. You grow up thinking you were. Americans were the most efficient people in the world. We've put a man on the moon. You know yeah. We have exceptional technological developments and we see ourselves as the most efficient farmers in the world thank howard measuring that efficiency. Well i drive by the billboard all the time one kansas farmer feeds one hundred and fifty five people. Plus you so we're efficient because one farmer feeds all these people but when you look like you said when you look at calories or grams of protein per acre her miserably inefficient were not harvesting. Sunlight are sting rainfall. Every time it rains the river comes up. And so how much of the rainfall i know in my area of our thirty six inches a miserably. Poor percentage actually gets in the soil and stays in so to grow crops..

howard kansas
"strickler" Discussed on Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"strickler" Discussed on Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

"That won't work around here. You can't do that around here and like physics change within thirty miles of their house. Yeah and if a farmer five miles away. A successful in implementing something. Oh it rained moreover there may have or less or whatever yeah and it's basically just a rationalization of the mental limitations that we'd put on ourselves. I've finally found eight idea this presentation sometime. I give him a map of where where around here actually is. Look for the place for years and years and around here is one side of the property. Boundary is Ah left ear in the other side is right here around here exist burden that is you are right. Exit place where nothing ever works because we put those limitations overselves and you talked about the guys win the national corn yield contest like. Oh gosh she. You can't do that around here. Youth like none of those guys have neighbors that are producing six hundred bushel. I'm sure their neighbors saying all. I won't work around here either. And then you'd think how amazing six hundred bushel. Corn is and then you realize like you said corn plants only operating at peak photosynthesis for forty five sixty days out of the year. Like how much more can we derive from our land in. I think one of the biggest mental changes farmer could make is stopped thinking about. I raised coroner. I raised soybeans awry rates. Cobbler oranges or blueberries. Or whatever your crop is in say my goal. My job is to harvest. Sunlight and harvest rainfall an extract nitrogen from the atmosphere and have gas exchange in my soil..

"strickler" Discussed on Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

04:42 min | 1 year ago

"strickler" Discussed on Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

"And then you'd think that would choke out that fescue now. Fescue grew so much better under that canopy. So it just really really changed the productivity of that pasture it got made thinking about sunlight and sunlight capture. I think we really really overestimate our ability to capture sunlight and so much of our astronomic systems. Don't capture sunlight at all if you look at corn soybean rotation how many months out of the year do we actually capture sunlight so only sixty days or so peak period actually from cornyn forty five days of peak photosynthesis. Yeah i mean. Said a pasture can be more profitable than a cornfield in awe candidates. Well the unfair advantage of pastures that you can design that pasture to capture sunlight over a much longer period of time. You can operate big photosynthesis for a long period of time. You can't on a cornfield if you are growing. Corn in a monoculture cover crops no companions. You are not operating the synthesis but just a small fraction of the year and that experience really made me start thinking about our solar efficiency and of course that you know a cool season grass does not operate at peak efficiency in july and august. So what chain did was. He introduced some warm warm season species. That could make better use of that sunlight in the keep of summer period. You know what people on in fescue pasture aries all summer slum. Why not let a more productive plant species get first crack at that sunlight and then it got me thinking about temperature relations. How come that fescue grew better underneath that canopy than it did in full sunlight fescue grows better in october than it doesn't july. There's half sunlight. I don't know the the actual fraction with as far less sunlight in october. Lesion july should by putting that canopy it essentially as far as the fescue is concerned..

cornyn
"strickler" Discussed on Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

04:39 min | 1 year ago

"strickler" Discussed on Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

"But i would say six years out of eight. We had very consistent rainfall. that is gone. I remember this quote from jerry. Brunetti he used to say that We don't have a climate anymore. We just have bakeries of the weather and that's come about. We don't recognize this because many of us aren't meteorologists and don't connect all the dots but this is really come about as a result of a dysfunctional carbon cycle. Yes so when we restore so carbon. We also restore the rainfall cycle as well. Now i agree. Yeah i tell people when they ask me to. Who are not familiar with kansas. What's the weather like. Engaging air watch the climate likened. Kansas say it's a desert. Were it floods a lot while you know. And that's true. We like you said we used to have gentle rains in spring and fall and then thunderstorms in the summer and it used to snow in the winter. Now arly ever snows in the winter. We get thunderstorms punctuated by long periods without rain. You know intense thunderstorms long periods of rain. It seems like an old time farmers so i. I don't think the climate is changing but the weather sure is getting funny. We seem to be making you know. I don't believe in climate change. This weather here is getting funny. Yup and i think that's true. We do seem to be seeing more intense rainfall with less frequency at. Don't think many people would argue that. I haven't found anyone that would yet at this point and in fact even if they would desire to argue that. The data indicates differently as jerry. Hatfield has elegantly pointed out so in addition to the experiences on your own farm. You've also had the privilege of working with lots of different growers in many different types of environments and ecosystems implementing cover crops. What are some of the memorable. Moments are remarkable experiences..

Brunetti jerry kansas Kansas Hatfield
"strickler" Discussed on Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"strickler" Discussed on Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

"Fast are you while half fast. Run hundred meter dash. How productive is soil. Hominy bushel corn in a race. So i'll have an opportunity to find that out but it also gave me an opportunity to soil sample it because eastern gallagher has is it's very copy has an extremely dense read system. We tried to soil sample. It actually used a hydraulic probe stuck it in the ground and the trump queen up in the air while the probe wouldn't win. The soil is so dense with roots. Sounds to me like you had compaction issues. No lock impaction. It was it with roots and it was like. Oh my gosh what. What is the organic matter on this place. Well once it was tilled up. I don't know how many dylan's bass but add to be a lot. I went out there and grab a sample and eight point. Seven percent organic matter in fifteen years in fifteen years. So that's a show. One.

gallagher dylan
"strickler" Discussed on Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"strickler" Discussed on Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

"Things like that but I can relate experience at the farm. I had were a previously. I had a small ranch for twenty years. When i bought the place was cornfield. One field had been continuous corn for forty two years prior to my it and then within instituted no ill in some other things cover cropping and then i decided that i would convert it to an irrigated pasture. I was told subsurface arrogation converted subsurface drip irrigation. And i was told at one time had the only subsurface variegated pastor and the entire world. I have no idea if that's true or not but Got my irrigation equipment from netafim and one of the Executive said there is no drip tape. Irrigated pasture anywhere in the world. So i guess that was rather unique but then the drip tape allowed to eliminate tillage and also to put a perennial crop out there with on the flat Intentional gullies up there. I'd like to talk about droopy. Gated pass you for a little bit of the persuasion that if people manage their pastures as well as they manage their cash crops their passengers would be more profitable they would be more profitable than their cash. Crops particularly in the case of corn and the soybeans. I agree you mentioned that you're doing drip irrigation passers to eliminate tillage. How do those two dots connect well. Faraway allegation was I remember you know. I was so excited..

netafim
"strickler" Discussed on Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"strickler" Discussed on Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

"Eric culture with organic matter where you come from and so that makes it necessary to grow the organic matter. Onsite in each. And every acre gets enriched with more organic matter. How do you do it economically in environmentally responsible manner. How do you do it without taking from one field and robbing one field to enrich another and so that kind of a challenge. So you've been working with that challenge for a number of years now and i'd like to hear a bit about the results that you've experienced. What have you observed with this slow. That does better for making bricks than growing crops. Well i just moved back here for a while but my brother has been farming family ground along with my father who now nursing him. But a couple of the practices that i really promote one is really minimizing tillage. No till where you can..

"strickler" Discussed on Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

04:49 min | 1 year ago

"strickler" Discussed on Regenerative Agriculture Podcast

"I'm public health. My guest for this episode is dale stricter from green cover seed and from many other places as well not just green cover seed but i think when we look geographically at all the places dale has been than it would make for an interesting map so dale thank you very much for joining us. I've been really been looking forward to this conversation. Thank you yeah. You have lots of experience on a cover crops and on regenerating soil in lots of different landscapes and ecosystems. Can you tell us a little bit about your personal story and kind of the background. The context of your work and what. You're really passionate an inspired about that. Grow up on a farm southeast kansas. I actually i recently moved close to where i grew up as little town named colony. Kansas father was a basically sharecropper for a long time and then eventually bought land in and we had hogs and cattle in crops and occasionally sheep ducks goats the whole old macdonald thing so we were very diversified and school at kansas state university and got a couple of bachelors in masters and then totta grenada community college for fifteen years in thoroughly enjoyed that experience but found. It's hard to raise a family in the manner. I'd like to on teaching salary. I entered private industry at worked for land lakes agr- alliance you know all all these different permutations of of land legs that they had in agronomy at the time as a great learning experience as well got learn work with a lot of really good people and worked for star seed for awhile lab and vaillant usa and now with green cover. Which is a. I don't know if i could write a job. That relieve fit me better personality wise or or interest y site. I've always been fascinated by cover. Crops have been fascinated by soil. What makes so better of number of experiences early on in my life. That made me very interested in soil and when i went away to college it was you know every summer where i live now. We get about thirty six inches right which should be fully adequate but every summer crops will just burn up while i just thought we didn't get enough rain because all summer long woah. We could use. Your rain. Boy could use rain and just like yesterday. I was driving through and the area where i live now. We only got into the field. Start planning seven days ago and yesterday hundred degree day the corn is already rolling while and that's seven days after being saturated seven days after being to the plant we've got corn that suffering in salaciously. Here we're always one week away from a drought and it's true. I just grew up. Assuming that's normal. This is this how it is everywhere. You gotta have rain every week or you're in trouble and then i moved away in went to places where they have this stuff called soil and like you mean you can go whole month without rain or two months without rain your crops. Don't just die. Oh wow this. This is great. And so i looked at are really heavy. Clay soil i mean. Brickmaking has historically been huge industry in this area because the soils better for making bricks and it is for making crops and is like i don't like just accepting bets the way things are and so it's like how can i fix the soil. What can i do while the the answer obviously is organic matter. Have you increase your solar gang ladder. While if you open a garden book it says well you import you know all these long clippings are leaf moulder..

dale totta grenada community colleg kansas state university kansas Kansas usa
"strickler" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"strickler" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Deneche Souza, who brought you Obama's America comes his most important film yet Trump Card America is at a crossroads. The Democratic Party Socialist agenda, led by Joe Biden is threatening to take our freedoms away in Trump card Danish digs deep to uncover why the threat of socialism is really what's at stake if we let them win. And how we stop it. Trump Card in theatre soon ready PG 13. I am Robert Strickler. My wife, Joyce and I have been married for 53 years. We have been blessed with six Children. I've been taking private gin for at least eight years. Privilege in seems to help me recall things and also think more clearly, and I enthusiastically recommend privilege and it has helped me an awful lot privileges healthier Breen. Better life now available in stores everywhere. Robert Strickler is a content contributor for provisions and really user. Phone? Well, there's a lot of confusion when it comes to the reliability of tests for the Corona virus antibodies. But Michael Doherty of any lab tests now in Stirling says the nautical tests are the same. Really. There's two main and about it. I g n I. G antibodies developed most patients within 7 to 10 days after symptoms began. And I G m, which is the first anybody produced when the immune system kicks in their drawing for your arm. That's that's a good sign If they're doing finger sticks, really look at that crosswise because that's where there's instability issues and then you want to know are they doing G for G M antibodies, and some labs will say, Hey, we're running an anybody test, but which antibodies So you have to educate yourself and understand. There are absolutely reliable antibody tests right now for Cove it This is sneezy. This isn't like, oh, all antibodies with saying all tests of the same. They absolutely are not. For more information. Visit Covic test Virginia dot com or call any lab tests.

Robert Strickler Trump Card America Joyce Trump Democratic Party Joe Biden Deneche Souza Obama America Michael Doherty Breen Stirling Covic G M