35 Burst results for "Streep"

Sharon Stone Discusses Her Autobiography in Candid Interview

BBC World Service

02:01 min | 2 months ago

Sharon Stone Discusses Her Autobiography in Candid Interview

"It's nearly 30 years since Sharon Stone played Catherine Tramell in the film Basic Instinct. It was a role she craved, but only managed to get after 12. Other actresses turned it down. It became a huge box of his hit on that infamous uncross ng and crossing of the legs scene remains one of the most controversial and talked about moments in film history. The movies that followed include an Oscar nomination for her role in Scorsese's casino alongside Robert DeNiro. More recently, the Laundromat with Meryl Streep on on the small screen. There was last year standout performance in the Netflix series, Ratchet. At the height of her career in 2001, having had several miscarriages on day after adopting her first child, Sharon Stone, suffered a stroke and almost died. She's now written her autobiography, the Beauty of Living twice in it. She talks about the fact that some people saw her as a very strong, difficult woman and how upsetting that's peanut times as she told the BBC's Emma Barnet. We think what it really is, is that I don't have the capacity to lie, and I think that people find that quite off putting And when I tell the truth that can seem quite offensive or the favorite Hollywood word difficulty. I do feel that in business. We're often put in positions that we didn't ever see ourselves being put in. And they're often crisis moments where we have to reconsider. I'm in this position. Now. What am I going to do with regards to the me to movement? Now are a couple of years on from that deep do you actually think Because the other thing you talk about being the only woman on set, you know men were doing your hair. Men were doing your makeup. Do you think it has got any better? Yes, because legally, they're just things that cannot be explained away anymore. You just can't say why can't she have a female dresser?

Catherine Tramell Sharon Stone Robert Deniro Emma Barnet Scorsese Meryl Streep Oscar Netflix Stroke BBC Hollywood
COVID-19 Infections Are Increasing Globally

PRI's The World

01:57 min | 2 months ago

COVID-19 Infections Are Increasing Globally

"Is kind of the pulse of this. Pandemic globally right now alana. Where are we at with infections. Well the big picture of marco is that the world is actually experiencing a steady increase in infections leaders at the. Who again sounded the alarm today. Because it's been seven straight weeks of rising infections actually is some of the highest surges yet in the pandemic and it's been four weeks streep of reisen deaths would areas most impacted. We have a sense of that. So i talked with ali mokdad about this. He's with the institute for health metrics at the university of washington and he's been modeling this pandemic since the start he says what's going on in five regions really stands out so i that is an increase in brazil. That snow started to come down so brazil is the big one. Neighboring countries like argentina and chile are now starting to experience rises to and then here the other hot spots this a big rise which still going on in india pakistan bangladesh at bark that is an increase in europe and the middle east following. What's your doping seeing. That is a. It is in cases in the philippines and that this is in south africa and african country. That's now started to come down so the fact that infections are increasing globally even parts of the us. We don't want to forget that. That really worries him. I mean it sounds like overall the world is just not close to controlling this virus. Do scientists have a handle on why cases continued to rise even with vaccines. Is it now all about the variants. Not points to the variance and lots of scientists do variants like be one one seven have become a dominant in europe and this has been found to be more transmissible. But there's another strong message. I'm hearing from a lot of scientists like angela rasmussen. she's just at georgetown. And as of this month the university of saskatchewan which is that these rises are not just from variants like the breakthrough masking and distancing another really important prevention

Ali Mokdad Institute For Health Metrics Alana Brazil Marco University Of Washington Chile Argentina Bangladesh Europe Pakistan Middle East Philippines South Africa India Angela Rasmussen United States University Of Saskatchewan Georgetown
Viola Davis, One of the Greatest Actors of Our Time

Pop Culture Happy Hour

01:22 min | 2 months ago

Viola Davis, One of the Greatest Actors of Our Time

"Welcome alex i. It's great to have you here to talk about viola. I'm so excited to hear your picks but first a little bit of background viola. When she won her first oscar for best supporting actress for fences and twenty seventeen. She became the first black person to win the so so-called triple crown of acting a competitive advantage emmy and tony award because of this in how omnipresent she's been over the last decade including her turn in the blockbuster period piece the help and as the shady complicated lawyer least keating in the long running series how to get away with murder. It might be easy to forget that. She has more than paid her dues to get where she's at. Now she graduated from juilliard in nineteen ninety-three and bounce between theater and screen throughout the rest of that decade by the early offs. She'd become a reliable supporting actor. Popping up in steven soderbergh movies like solaris and playing rations on the mom rule or the urban professional. She spoken candidly about how being dark skinned. Black woman has impacted her career like in this interview. She did with tina brown in twenty eighteen. I have a career that's probably comparable to meryl streep julianne moore. Let's sigourney weaver. They all came out of jail. They came out of juilliard. They came on nyu. They had the same path as me and yet i am nowhere near them. Not as far as money not as far as job opportunities. Nowhere close to

Emmy And Tony Award Viola Oscar Alex Steven Soderbergh Meryl Streep Julianne Moore Tina Brown Weaver NYU
It Is Finished! A Prayer for Good Friday

Your Daily Prayer

02:03 min | 2 months ago

It Is Finished! A Prayer for Good Friday

"Prayer for good. Friday it s finished by debbie mcdaniel but he was pierced for our transgressions. He was crushed for our iniquities. The punishment that brought us peace was on him and by his wounds. We are healed isaiah. Fifty three five the ashes. That marked the foreheads of millions of believers on wednesday just weeks ago held a reminder for us. We are but dust yet. His story reminds us so much. More we redeemed we are set free. We have been given new life an open door through jesus christ. The ashes are a clear picture of the frailty of human existence. And oh many times. We may somehow think we're invincible. And life or even led to believe that we are not needy of a savior when hit with life struggles are face to face with painful events. We quickly remember. We need help. We need a savior. We have one who was also broken in ways. We could never fully comprehend yet. He remains strong and chose to endure at all for us. He extends grace to remind us. We don't have to stay stock in our struggle and pain. He holds good in store through it all able to bring greater purpose grader. Beauty greater streep. He never intends for us to remain in the pit of despair for he breathes fresh life. God brought beauty out of the broken of the cross. He gives beauty for ashes. His sacrifice offers forgiveness for our sin. The power of the resurrection gives hope for our

Debbie Mcdaniel Isaiah
Golden Globes 2021: Complete list of nominees

Dean Richards' Sunday Morning

03:57 min | 3 months ago

Golden Globes 2021: Complete list of nominees

"Let's start off with the major categories. First of all, for best picture. For the Golden Globes. They break it down. Best picture drama and best picture, music or comedy. So let's start off with best picture drama in which the nominees are Nomad Land. This is the amazing movie with Frances McDormand. Who, you know, play. Somebody who's her life is sort of falling apart and she gets in a van and hits the road and lives in RV camps and recreational areas taking on you know little seasonal jobs along the way. It zest a very sweet and very thoughtful, touching movie. I think this is going to be the big winner for tonight. You know People love Frances McDormand. I think that this is gonna have a lot of Lot of success at the Golden Globes tonight. It will be up against the trial of the Chicago Seven, which, if Nomad land doesn't win trial of the Chicago Seven is going to win. This is the Aaron Sorkin. The written and directed production about the famous Chicago seven trial that took place in Chicago 50 years ago. The Carrie Mulligan movie promising young woman Is a revenge thriller, also an outstanding films nominated for tonight and also the Anthony Hopkins movie called The Father. Those air. Your nominees were best Drama for performances in the dramatic category. For actresses. The nominees are Violet Davis on Drew a day, Vanessa Kirby, Frances McDormand and Carrie Mulligan. For best actors in the drama. The nominees are Riz Um, Ed Chadwick Boseman, Anthony Hopkins. I think the winners are going to be Frances McDormand and I just I don't know how Chadwick Boseman Doesn't win. He's amazing in the movie Ma Rainey's black bottom. But you know the fact that he passed away the young age and nobody knew that he was fighting cancer. I think that probably is going toe play into the Planted the decision making also for best movie, musical or comedy. The nominees are Boer at subsequent movie film Hamilton. When they put together a television version of Hamilton in the put it on Disney. Plus, this got nominated. The motion picture called Music was nominated, as was the comedy with Andy Sandberg, Palm Springs. And the Ryan Murphy directed production. The prom. Which has Meryl Streep and has just AH, whole variety of very talented actors. That's also nominated for best picture as well. I kind of have a feeling that Borat is going to want to ping the winner tonight in the musical or comedy category. For best actress in a motion picture Maria Buckler Cova, who is placed Borat's daughter in Borat. Subsequent movie film Kate Hudson from music. And, uh, Anya Taylor, Joy dominated for the movie called Emma for best performance by an actor in a motion picture, musical or comedy. Sasha Baron Cohen is nominated James Corden from the prom Lin Manuel Miranda from Hamilton Dev Patel for the personal history of David Copperfield and Andy Sandberg. For Palm Springs again. I think it's going to be a kind of in a reverend pick, but I think Sasha Baron Cohen could wind up being the winner. Now. The Golden Globes also give out

Frances Mcdormand Carrie Mulligan Golden Globes Chicago Anthony Hopkins Violet Davis Vanessa Kirby Riz Um Ed Chadwick Boseman Chadwick Boseman Aaron Sorkin Andy Sandberg Ma Rainey Hamilton Borat Drew Maria Buckler Cova Ryan Murphy Palm Springs Meryl Streep
'The Prom' unleashes its stars in an infectious, high-energy musical

Bob Sirott

00:49 sec | 6 months ago

'The Prom' unleashes its stars in an infectious, high-energy musical

"Musical and super campy. There's the Ryan Murphy Netflix adaptation of the short lived Broadway production of the Prom. The story of a bunch of down and out Broadway divas trying to drum up some publicity's for themselves by going to small town Indiana to fake concern over high school girls effort there to attend her prom with her girlfriend, despite the homophobia, P T, A and some closed minded students, aside from painting both sides of the story with very broad, stereotypical strokes. The prom is mortgage letter filled, fabulous fest of Song and dance. Meryl Streep, Nicole Kidman, James Corden Keegan, Michael Key, Andrew Runnels and newcomer Jo Ellen Pellman delivering a high kick musical message of tolerance for all, It's fun. It's a Dean's list Be Meryl Streep also

Ryan Murphy Netflix Indiana James Corden Keegan Michael Key Andrew Runnels Meryl Streep Jo Ellen Pellman Nicole Kidman Dean
The Many Benefits of Participating in Research

Healthcare Triage Podcast

05:08 min | 6 months ago

The Many Benefits of Participating in Research

"Our guest today again is peter. Mb he's the president of the regan streep institute and he's going to be here today to talk to us about all in. And i can't wait to hear what that's about. But before even that peter if you could just give our listeners reminder of what. The reconstruction institute is considering the president of it. You should be best able to answer that. Sure happy to do it. And it's great to be with you again So the regan. Streep institute is an applied research institute in indianapolis indiana. That's a affiliated with and a support organization to indiana university and the indiana university school of medicine. We've been around for about fifty years and we do research and innovation in the areas of biomedical informatics. Health services research in aging research with the intent of really improving health and health care through innovation primarily in the areas. I've described that relate to how we better use technology data information science and improve the practice of healthcare in order to improve the lives of people everywhere. So what is all in. Yeah so all in is is an initiative that started with the indiana clinical translational science institute or see. Tsi which has the goal of really engaging with the residents of indiana to improve their understanding of health issues so health literacy. We often call it to better understand the role of research in Improving our ability to take care of people to make discoveries to improve healthcare and to give people the opportunity if they volunteer to be a part of research studies and so we do that. A number of different ways through this initiative call in. Is this something that it's an issue. Do people not have a good sense of health. And what's going on and had to be involved. i mean. certainly. There's some people who have a very good understanding of health issues and and certainly their own health but there's a lot of folks who you know may not understand a lot about the health and also the The rapidly developing science behind. What we think of as modern day medicine and healthcare and so as part of the indiana see. Tsi we work across the state to improve how we can take better care of people through research through discovery and part of that involves a we believe very strongly engaging with the popular engaging with people and making sure that they are not just a. We do not want to think of people who participate in research as so-called research subjects that you know that's not really the goal. The goal is to have participants. The goal is to have people who volunteer. Who understand what it is that we are studying and And then volunteer to be a part of those research studies and there are several reasons for that number one the more engagement. We have the science that results from that will actually be applicable to our population. Right so the more people from indiana from our communities that represent the diverse communities here across the state the more of them that are engaged the more likely the results are going to benefit them in their communities. And we think that generally speaking the impact of that is not only going to be felt by the kinds of therapies and resources that we bring to help people get better when they get sick but also just generally having a better understanding of health issues. will probably result in a healthier population. And that's an area where indiana traditionally hasn't done very well so we want to improve that. So how do you get people more involved. How do you get them linked in so. There's a number of different ways we've gone about. This one is that we've got these days of course websites and apps and other solutions where people can engage so for instance in the all in for health dot info website. People can go and read about health issues. They can learn more about the kinds of studies that are going on across our universities and our academic health centers across the state. They can volunteer to participate in those studies so we have a volunteer registry. Where at this point. As of last month we have over thirty thousand hoosiers that have signed up to be a part of the registry and that's pretty substantial in addition to that we broadcast information in different ways. Sometimes we do things like this with podcasts. Sometimes we do advertising and other kinds of activities all with the goal of trying to get people in our state to understand the important medical research. That's happening understand the kinds of discoveries that are being made to help them in their families and then giving them opportunities to connect so what happens when someone registers. What's the next step. so they register. They will get confirmation that they've registered and then there Depending on what they've agreed to they'll start to get information about health issues so we send out periodically newsletters and other kinds of information from a lot of the science. That's being done here across our different university partners at indiana university and purdue and notre dame and otherwise across our health system partners so they'll get that information and in addition they'll get notified and have the opportunity to see information about research studies as well when they become available and that can happen again in various ways that we can reach out to people so good example recently was giving people the opportunity to sign up for studies around covert as an example.

Indiana Regan Streep Institute Streep Institute Indiana Clinical Translational Peter Indiana University School Of M Indiana University Regan TSI Indianapolis Purdue
Holiday Entertainment: Everything Coming To Your Screens This December

WREC Programming

01:16 min | 7 months ago

Holiday Entertainment: Everything Coming To Your Screens This December

"December with new movies and shows coming to your TV Disney Plus subscribers can stream the live action. Mullan movie for free, starting December 4th on the 11th Catch high School musical, The Holiday special featuring the stars singing their Hanukkah Christmas and New Year's favorites and debut on Christmas Day on Disney, Plus the latest Pixar release Soul. Coming to Netflix, December 1st much love Christmas favorites get the documentary treatment in the holiday movies that made us then on the fourth. It's the David Fincher black and white epic make which documents the writing of Citizen Kane. December 11th, The Ryan Murphy Netflix original. The prom features and all singing and dancing cast starting Jo, Ellen Pellman, Nicole Kidman, Meryl Streep, Ariana Grande, a James Corden and more For Amazon Prime video subscribers. The Royals season three drops on the fourth starting December. 7th premium members get to stream NFL Thursday night Football. The Grand Tour returns for season two on the eighth. John Claude Van Damme stars in the comedy flick John Claude Van Johnson coming to prime on December 15th followed by the second season of humans on the 21st. Next month. The Lord of the Rings trilogy comes to Hu Lu, along with a handful of James Bond movies. The Hu Lu original series, The Hardy Boys premieres on the fourth, then season nine of Letterkenny on the 26th.

Catch High School Disney Netflix Mullan Ellen Pellman David Fincher Ryan Murphy Ariana Grande James Corden John Claude Van Damme Kane Nicole Kidman Meryl Streep John Claude Van Johnson JO Hu Lu Royals NFL Football James Bond
Solving Health Challenges Through Research and Collaboration

Healthcare Triage Podcast

09:05 min | 9 months ago

Solving Health Challenges Through Research and Collaboration

"Let's start with. Sharon who has not been here before we usually like to struck these podcasts by talking to our guests about specifically what they do and how did they get their sort of talking to the public about how does one become professor of medicine or a division director of nephrology or interested in the research that you do. So I started in research when I was in a froggy fellow at the University of Chicago. I was motivated to be honest by a patient on dialysis who kept having bleeding into their shoulder joint that I had to actually remove the blood for her to be able to use her arm on a weekly basis, and this was due to a rare disease that patients on dialysis get that deposits in the bone called amyloidosis. So that made me start doing research on bone learning about bone I worked in someone's. Lab and then when I came to. INDIANA. University in thousand hundred two I came really because of the strength of the Bone Research Group at Indiana University? Not Necessarily in the nephrology division from there I have held a lot of different administrative positions. I am kind of an organizer and get things done type person. So it comes pretty naturally to be able to put all that together. I could say I've been truly doing. Translational, research since my fellowship, as I hadn't during my fellowship, a clinical research paper and a basic science lab paper published in one year. So sometimes I feel like the word translational isn't really new and novel, but I'm happy that people are finally understanding that when you do something in the lab, you ought to be thinking about who the patient is. That would benefit from this at least some point in their life. So can I get you talk a little bit more about that like what do you? What do you think translational research is because I'd agree with you it it does seem like one of those things that people are treating soften is it's a new thing but it is it. So how what does it mean to you? So it should mean that there ought to be a potential and the back of your head. As to where this was going to go at some point in the future I truly believe there is an important area for research just to do research to understand, for example, and identify new and novel gene, and what does that gene do on the other hand translational means that you actually go from a patient and you work backwards to try to figure out what makes that patient tick? What makes them have this? Disease, what makes them prone to this disease? Both of those kind of approaches from science perspective are absolutely needed. But the whole emphasis of the he sl is really to actually take discoveries into humans and overtake humans back to bench discovery so that we improve their health to see this as something that doesn't do that. There needs to be a focus or we just sort of doing more no I think the difference between. That and very focused research is that in order to really cover that spectrum, you have to have collaboration you have to actually have other people who can work on different pieces of that Longitudinal plan again from patient back to bencher bench to patient, and so it is hard for someone to do all of those facets and so you have to have this ability or desire to get there and you need to collaborate. And that's really what the chess is all about. It creates an infrastructure that people can go to so that they can understand how to take that part that they're doing in that trajectory and make it happen. Can you give me some hard examples of some of the work for structure talking about? Yeah, I mean this is I. It is absolutely fabulous and I give talks and visit places all around the country and. We are truly one of the best and most advanced CPS I in my book from start to finish, you have an idea you think might actually be a drug down the road. We are working to try to figure out how we can actually benefit people who are not sure if it's going to be good. So connecting them with the right people to understand drug discovery, we then want to know if you're doing. An animal work is that gene that you're studying that protein actually present in humans because there's a lot of discrepancy in animal models of human disease, and so we have a giant bio bank samples that people can gain access to to actually measure the DNA and try to understand the Hamas between an animal and human, and then if you do have something and you have an idea and you want to implement a Clinical Research Study, do you need to know how many patients you have? So we have a connection where the Reagan streep data set to help to feasibilities. Do these people that you think exist really exist? Is there something unique about them that you need to know who the people are that you want to study, and then we have a pool of trained research coordinators and infrastructure setup to actually conduct clinical research and? Then from there, we have an ability to help people learn how to communicate how to publish how to write a grant. Harman's all these other things through our professional education opportunities the whole beauty and the fun of research is that it's never a dull moment. So every day you think you're going to be studying this and something send you to a tangent and you go wait a minute maybe I should be doing that. And that's how you end up needing collaborators and resources and methods and infrastructure to learn how to do it. Otherwise, you lose those tangents and discoveries are errors initially and someone takes a different look at it from a different viewpoint and they turn it into something really positive. So the CY is an effort that involves just more than Indiana University School of Medicine Right? Absolutely. So it's really Notre Dame purdue IU Bloomington. And many other hospital systems as well as the medical student campuses. So it it really integrates everything and it's very fun to actually learn what people are doing at different institutions and to actually get people excited and have a pathway forward to maybe something that isn't at their institution. Bring it back to what the research is that they're doing. So Sarah I'm not gonNA ask for full introduction. I think you may be the. Frequent. Guests on our podcast dates. So if the audience is familiar with anyone, it would be you but I would love to hear a little bit about how you became involved in community and translational research as well as what you see is the distinction between say clinical and translational sciences and community in Translational Sciences my research has always focused on vulnerable populations and health equity related issues and started with geospatial concentrations of poor health outcomes among adolescence and I was doing a project that was enrolling team girls on the West Side of Indianapolis and tracking them, and when we recruited from the clinic for the study just to give you an idea, we were using blackberry pearls. So that dates long ago this was. One hundred percent of the girls we had approached agreed to participate so much so that the I R. B thought perhaps the protocol was coercive because we were offering free cell phone service while we attract their locations and they were wondering if even after our main criticism with this grant to the NIH, which was like this grant isn't possible no never is going to let you track them Things have changed since I started asking those questions in any case my point is, is that when we brought it into the community because we didn't want a clinical sample because it can be quite biased for an adolescent population, those who are seeking healthcare, we were not meeting our enrollment targets and so what I learned after a lot of errors that engagement with the community in this case our target population of teen girls on the West Side we realized they weren't seeing sort of the Ir be approved flyers. replastering everywhere. That, there were all kinds of things that we needed to reconsider and it had nothing to do with the protocol itself. So the science was valid. There wasn't anything that was sort of keeping them necessarily from participating in terms of the incentives or what we're asking them to do. It was that we were not effectively engaging with them and as part of that as well as some I think innovative at least at the time collaboration with a faculty member from Herron. School of. Art and design in Santa Matsu we sort of employed this human center design research approaches sort of our how community engagement in any case because of that sort of experience for me personally as a researcher I learned the value of engagement and really beyond just meeting recruitment targets to getting to something much more meaningful from the participant's perspective, and it's just grown from there. So it has taken a lot of different trajectories for me and my own research relating to data, sharing partnerships to what's. Now Research Sham the patient engagement core to various community engagement in between but I guess where my role now as associate Dean as well as CO director of the CSI, plays in Israeli extending that translational spectrum in with the community and back rights as a bidirectional relationship, and so it's extending those collaborations to stakeholders in the community. My definition of team science and sort of that collaborative space is not restricted to individuals within the academy and really absolutely needs to include community folks at all. Levels of the translational spectrum. So this is not just from like clinical to community in my book it's you know community engagement even within the basic science from.

Indiana University Translational Sciences Bone Research Group Disease Clinical Research Study Indiana University Of Chicago Amyloidosis Sharon Professor Of Medicine Hamas Bloomington Division Director Santa Matsu Reagan Streep Associate Dean Harman Faculty Member Herron
Solving Health Challenges Through Research and Collaboration

Healthcare Triage Podcast

05:32 min | 9 months ago

Solving Health Challenges Through Research and Collaboration

"Let's start with. Sharon who has not been here before we usually like to struck these podcasts by talking to our guests about specifically what they do and how did they get their sort of talking to the public about how does one become professor of medicine or a division director of nephrology or interested in the research that you do. So I started in research when I was in a froggy fellow at the University of Chicago. I was motivated to be honest by a patient on dialysis who kept having bleeding into their shoulder joint that I had to actually remove the blood for her to be able to use her arm on a weekly basis, and this was due to a rare disease that patients on dialysis get that deposits in the bone called amyloidosis. So that made me start doing research on bone learning about bone I worked in someone's. Lab and then when I came to. INDIANA. University in thousand hundred two I came really because of the strength of the Bone Research Group at Indiana University? Not Necessarily in the nephrology division from there I have held a lot of different administrative positions. I am kind of an organizer and get things done type person. So it comes pretty naturally to be able to put all that together. I could say I've been truly doing. Translational, research since my fellowship, as I hadn't during my fellowship, a clinical research paper and a basic science lab paper published in one year. So sometimes I feel like the word translational isn't really new and novel, but I'm happy that people are finally understanding that when you do something in the lab, you ought to be thinking about who the patient is. That would benefit from this at least some point in their life. So can I get you talk a little bit more about that like what do you? What do you think translational research is because I'd agree with you it it does seem like one of those things that people are treating soften is it's a new thing but it is it. So how what does it mean to you? So it should mean that there ought to be a potential and the back of your head. As to where this was going to go at some point in the future I truly believe there is an important area for research just to do research to understand, for example, and identify new and novel gene, and what does that gene do on the other hand translational means that you actually go from a patient and you work backwards to try to figure out what makes that patient tick? What makes them have this? Disease, what makes them prone to this disease? Both of those kind of approaches from science perspective are absolutely needed. But the whole emphasis of the he sl is really to actually take discoveries into humans and overtake humans back to bench discovery so that we improve their health to see this as something that doesn't do that. There needs to be a focus or we just sort of doing more no I think the difference between. That and very focused research is that in order to really cover that spectrum, you have to have collaboration you have to actually have other people who can work on different pieces of that Longitudinal plan again from patient back to bencher bench to patient, and so it is hard for someone to do all of those facets and so you have to have this ability or desire to get there and you need to collaborate. And that's really what the chess is all about. It creates an infrastructure that people can go to so that they can understand how to take that part that they're doing in that trajectory and make it happen. Can you give me some hard examples of some of the work for structure talking about? Yeah, I mean this is I. It is absolutely fabulous and I give talks and visit places all around the country and. We are truly one of the best and most advanced CPS I in my book from start to finish, you have an idea you think might actually be a drug down the road. We are working to try to figure out how we can actually benefit people who are not sure if it's going to be good. So connecting them with the right people to understand drug discovery, we then want to know if you're doing. An animal work is that gene that you're studying that protein actually present in humans because there's a lot of discrepancy in animal models of human disease, and so we have a giant bio bank samples that people can gain access to to actually measure the DNA and try to understand the Hamas between an animal and human, and then if you do have something and you have an idea and you want to implement a Clinical Research Study, do you need to know how many patients you have? So we have a connection where the Reagan streep data set to help to feasibilities. Do these people that you think exist really exist? Is there something unique about them that you need to know who the people are that you want to study, and then we have a pool of trained research coordinators and infrastructure setup to actually conduct clinical research and? Then from there, we have an ability to help people learn how to communicate how to publish how to write a grant. Harman's all these other things through our professional education opportunities the whole beauty and the fun of research is that it's never a dull moment. So every day you think you're going to be studying this and something send you to a tangent and you go wait a minute maybe I should be doing that. And that's how you end up needing collaborators and resources and methods and infrastructure to learn how to do it. Otherwise, you lose those tangents and discoveries are errors initially and someone takes a different look at it from a different viewpoint and they turn it into something really positive. So the CY is an effort that involves just more than Indiana University School of Medicine Right? Absolutely. So it's really Notre Dame purdue IU Bloomington. And many other hospital systems as well as the medical student campuses. So it it really integrates everything and it's very fun to actually learn what people are doing at different institutions and to actually get people excited and have a pathway forward to maybe something that isn't at their institution. Bring it back to what the research is that they're doing.

Indiana University Bone Research Group Disease Clinical Research Study Amyloidosis University Of Chicago Indiana Bloomington Sharon Professor Of Medicine Hamas Division Director Reagan Streep Harman
Solving Health Challenges Through Research and Collaboration

Healthcare Triage Podcast

05:01 min | 9 months ago

Solving Health Challenges Through Research and Collaboration

"Let's start with. Sharon who has not been here before we usually like to struck these podcasts by talking to our guests about specifically what they do and how did they get their sort of talking to the public about how does one become professor of medicine or a division director of nephrology or interested in the research that you do. So I started in research when I was in a froggy fellow at the University of Chicago. I was motivated to be honest by a patient on dialysis who kept having bleeding into their shoulder joint that I had to actually remove the blood for her to be able to use her arm on a weekly basis, and this was due to a rare disease that patients on dialysis get that deposits in the bone called amyloidosis. So that made me start doing research on bone learning about bone I worked in someone's. Lab and then when I came to. INDIANA. University in thousand hundred two I came really because of the strength of the Bone Research Group at Indiana University? Not Necessarily in the nephrology division from there I have held a lot of different administrative positions. I am kind of an organizer and get things done type person. So it comes pretty naturally to be able to put all that together. I could say I've been truly doing. Translational, research since my fellowship, as I hadn't during my fellowship, a clinical research paper and a basic science lab paper published in one year. So sometimes I feel like the word translational isn't really new and novel, but I'm happy that people are finally understanding that when you do something in the lab, you ought to be thinking about who the patient is. That would benefit from this at least some point in their life. So can I get you talk a little bit more about that like what do you? What do you think translational research is because I'd agree with you it it does seem like one of those things that people are treating soften is it's a new thing but it is it. So how what does it mean to you? So it should mean that there ought to be a potential and the back of your head. As to where this was going to go at some point in the future I truly believe there is an important area for research just to do research to understand, for example, and identify new and novel gene, and what does that gene do on the other hand translational means that you actually go from a patient and you work backwards to try to figure out what makes that patient tick? What makes them have this? Disease, what makes them prone to this disease? Both of those kind of approaches from science perspective are absolutely needed. But the whole emphasis of the he sl is really to actually take discoveries into humans and overtake humans back to bench discovery so that we improve their health to see this as something that doesn't do that. There needs to be a focus or we just sort of doing more no I think the difference between. That and very focused research is that in order to really cover that spectrum, you have to have collaboration you have to actually have other people who can work on different pieces of that Longitudinal plan again from patient back to bencher bench to patient, and so it is hard for someone to do all of those facets and so you have to have this ability or desire to get there and you need to collaborate. And that's really what the chess is all about. It creates an infrastructure that people can go to so that they can understand how to take that part that they're doing in that trajectory and make it happen. Can you give me some hard examples of some of the work for structure talking about? Yeah, I mean this is I. It is absolutely fabulous and I give talks and visit places all around the country and. We are truly one of the best and most advanced CPS I in my book from start to finish, you have an idea you think might actually be a drug down the road. We are working to try to figure out how we can actually benefit people who are not sure if it's going to be good. So connecting them with the right people to understand drug discovery, we then want to know if you're doing. An animal work is that gene that you're studying that protein actually present in humans because there's a lot of discrepancy in animal models of human disease, and so we have a giant bio bank samples that people can gain access to to actually measure the DNA and try to understand the Hamas between an animal and human, and then if you do have something and you have an idea and you want to implement a Clinical Research Study, do you need to know how many patients you have? So we have a connection where the Reagan streep data set to help to feasibilities. Do these people that you think exist really exist? Is there something unique about them that you need to know who the people are that you want to study, and then we have a pool of trained research coordinators and infrastructure setup to actually conduct clinical research and? Then from there, we have an ability to help people learn how to communicate how to publish how to write a grant. Harman's all these other things through our professional education opportunities the whole beauty and the fun of research is that it's never a dull moment. So every day you think you're going to be studying this and something send you to a tangent and you go wait a minute maybe I should be doing that. And that's how you end up needing collaborators and resources and methods and infrastructure to learn how to do it. Otherwise, you lose those tangents and discoveries are errors initially and someone takes a different look at it from a different viewpoint and they turn it into something really positive.

University In Thousand Bone Research Group Amyloidosis University Of Chicago Indiana University Sharon Indiana Reagan Streep Chess Hamas Harman
Baa-a-a-a-a! Pesky goats block Trump motorcade en route to New Jersey golf resort

Unhappy Hour with Matt Bellassai

02:59 min | 10 months ago

Baa-a-a-a-a! Pesky goats block Trump motorcade en route to New Jersey golf resort

"Talk about the worst news of the Week I. A small herd of goats is responsible for blocking the presidential motorcade last weekend and Don go. Go Young Donald I was trying to travel to his golfers or in New Jersey obviously because we're in the middle of a pandemics where else would the president be but a golf resort? And our our good friends the goats would had the good sense to get in the way disruption protest goats. Did. We have any doubt that are abolitionist goats that we feature regularly on this podcast would be on the right side of history. I did it. I knew. Yeah. Fred started as the Harriet Tubman of goats, and now he's becoming the Malcolm X. of votes. He's saying protests violent protests necessary. I'm just GONNA foment. Insurrection via goat. We love a political goat lava political goat I mean maybe especially because these goats technically work for Donald according to a White House pool report, there was a brief poss- during drive onto the property to make way for a herd of goats that live on trump's property. He gets a tax break a property tax break known as farmland tax break worth nearly eighty thousand dollars a year on his golf resort because it's supposedly doubles as a goat ranch. According to the Wall Street? Journal. Yeah. So I, guess there's like a a loophole for landowners. Who if you say that you're like property is technically like an agricultural project then you get fucking tax break. So you know what this makes me WANNA do. Primal, SCREAM That's fucking primal. Scream I mean within I haven't like truly truly gone off on this pod. It makes me so mad when people call Batman a businessman, he played a businessman on TV he. Hey businessman that's. It's insane. It's like Meryl Streep was not editor in chief of Vogue magazine. Okay. She should be but she's not. But yeah. Apparently, the trump national golf club in bedminster maintains one hundred thirteen acres of hay farming and eight goats, eight goats, and you get eighty thousand dollars a year. It's ridiculous. It's not enough. Goat's remember when that person last time by bought like five goats and it was not one hundred dollars was not that much. So apparently that's all we need. We can go in together on five coats and get. Nearly. One hundred thousand dollar tax break. Let's do it I'm

Donald I Meryl Streep Batman Goat Fred Donald Trump New Jersey DON Harriet Tubman Vogue Magazine White House President Trump Bedminster Editor In Chief
The Biggest Streamer You've Never Heard Of: Rubius

theScore Esports Podcasts

02:00 min | 11 months ago

The Biggest Streamer You've Never Heard Of: Rubius

"Rubia, C. L. Rubio's Oh my God. He's in Spanish speaking, Youtuber and one of the biggest twitch rumors on the planet. We're talking sixty thousand concurrent viewers, and for the most part, the English language stream world has no idea who this guy is, and we're talking bigger than Ninja. Big In two thousand eighteen. This Guy Streamed A. A hundred. Youtube night match that peaked at a million concurrent viewers for comparison, remember when Ninja and Drake Streep fortnight back. In two thousand, eighteen in the world lost fucking mind for a couple of days that stream peaked at six hundred thirty five thousand viewers now because you might not have heard of reviews before it's easy to think that he's the new kid on the block, or he's an overnight success, but like a lot of content creators who suddenly blow up ravidas has been grinding this out for over a decade a grind that just a few weeks ago, paid off huge. He signed an exclusive contract to stream on twitch, and he poked fun at Ninja in his announcement video. Created his first youtube channel in two thousand and six making call of duty. Videos both is a hobby in as a way to make his friends laugh, but then some of those skyro-, videos cracked one hundred thousand views and kept climbing. Helping them realize that maybe youtube could be a full time career like I say, but I'm not going in yellow. Yellow. Both. By the age of twenty one, that's exactly what he did moved into Youtube full-time, and while his original channel took off in popularity, it remained a place for gaming. His early videos were all over the place and washing them. Now you get the sense that he was figuring out what games he should cover and the type of commentary that he wanted to provide. Basically, he was figuring himself out as a youtuber. Clearly, he felt like he could do more as a person. Because in twenty eleven, he created his second channel L.. Rubio's Oh my God which was dedicated to that wlob style, and Youtube, that we've come to know from people like PD, Pie, and even

Youtube Drake Streep C. L. Rubio PIE
Stephen Sondheim gets starry but tardy 90th birthday concert

The House Whisperer

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

Stephen Sondheim gets starry but tardy 90th birthday concert

"A ninetieth birthday tribute is being held online for Broadway hit maker take me to the world as a free virtual concert saluting Stephen Sondheim on Broadway dot com's YouTube channel the event is hosted by role Esparza who starred in the two thousand six revival of Sondheim's hit musical company also set to perform a Meryl Streep Peters and Mandy Patinkin among others Sondheim wrote the lyrics for West Side Story in gypsies also the composer for Sunday in the park with George Sweeney Todd in a little night

Stephen Sondheim Esparza Meryl Streep Peters George Sweeney Todd Youtube Mandy Patinkin
Pastry, Politics, and Pivots

Radio Cherry Bombe

09:06 min | 1 year ago

Pastry, Politics, and Pivots

"Seven years ago about this time I was in Fort Lauderdale Florida. I didn't live there but I was given a one way ticket and I flew into the city. I didn't know a single soul but I knew I would touch the lives of thousands. By the time I left in five days so what was going on seven years ago around this time. Barack Obama and Joe Biden were running for reelection and I was part of their advanced team that carried out their events across America. Pretty cool job right. How did I even get it? Well much like the food industry. The world of politics is a small one and I got my connection from my first job out of college working for Nancy Pelosi doing her first speakership in the US House of Representatives. Now I'm not a political junkie. I never was never will be. So why did I take a job so central to it all for the next four years my office would be in the capital and my office view of The Washington Monument? That on so why this damn working for the first female speaker of the House was going to be interesting. Here was a woman in a position with no precedent and now she was second in line to become president in a world built by men founded by men. What was she going to do? How was she going to act? All eyes were on her scrutinizing every move and for me as a young female professional in my early twenties observing. How she embraced. This role was going to change my life and my outlook of women in power across all industries. So what was it like working for Nancy? Pelosi Meryl Streep Playing Anna Wintour in the devil wears Prada's a fairly accurate description of my typical workday. There was energy in the office when she got to work. The kind that made you put your shoes back on your suit jacket so you look presentable. At all times. She was a tough loss with us. Her staff and the two hundred thirty three Democratic members that she represented in Congress. You left every meeting with her feeling like you weren't doing enough. She had goals and she knew how to carry them out. She made decisions with such force and directness that you did not question the outcome and these decisions were big like providing all Americans with healthcare and reviving that American banking system. Pelosi wasn't power and neither we or she doubt that. But in this position making monumental decisions is one thing getting others onboard to make them reality is another and the longer I worked for her the more. I noticed what she did to make that happen. No detail too. Small gop pastor because every detail was important where someone sat at a meeting who was included in a phone call even the order in which someone was introduced at an event and every choice. She made no matter how small was the right one and it was genius. She recognized that it was the details that counted for each person. It was her secret she could make. People feel counted recognized human. It was hospitality. She could remember the details of people's lives the names of spouses children grandchildren enquiring about your health. And following up on it she would write handwritten. Thank yous and well wishes for important events. She lended a human touch to the role of speaker. And I am telling you that is how she has gained the loyalty of those that she leads. How did she become speaker of the House again? It's not because of tactical skill. It's because she's found ways to connect with you as a person my four years working for her help me see what women are capable of at the highest levels of leadership and pressure and that one of the most important qualities that we have more so than our counterparts is that we are better at nurturing relationships and it is a quality that we should embrace in our leadership roles as for me. I didn't have to tap into this just yet in my professional life because things were about to change. How did I pivoted from politics to pastry? It wasn't so much pivot as it was the ground shifting below me as a result of the two thousand eleven elections. The Democrats lost power of the House. Speaker Pelosi lost her post and I lost my job and remember when I said I wasn't a political junkie. Losing my job. Was the universe telling me to stop living someone else's dream that I had other interests and now the curtain was lifted. It was nudging me towards something that I was a junkie about food. Baking had always been a hobby for sure but it was hardly the source of my career. Change it was the wider world of food that drew me in and being curious about food was my hobby. Was there an article about a farmer who is growing apple varieties from the days of George Washington? Was there a documentary about how Vitnamese I started making fish sauce? I watched it and was there a recipe calling for fresh coconut mill. You better be sure. I went out bought a coconut and smash it on my kitchen floor with a hammer. So during this period of unemployment I realized I needed to take this eagerness to learn about food and turn it into something tangible and so I thought might as well make it my job and there was. I was twenty nine years old when I made the switch. Twenty nine years old is when a cook has been cooking in a kitchen for ten years and becomes an executive chef. I was old and new at the same time and I knew I needed a fast track my career so my strategy was twofold to work in the best restaurants in the world and travel and in a span of five years. That's what I did from Chicago to New York across the Pacific Ocean to Asia in Australia. I did not stop I went to school. I stashed I worked. I worked for free. I worked in countries that I legally wasn't allowed to. I sacrificed my my finances and my family and poured my heart and soul into experiences that I opened myself up to because there is nothing more I wanted to do. This was it then. I became a chef. I was a cook became a chef. But really that's just title but it is a title that screams a responsibility to lead. And now I thought how do I want to lead? What kind of leader do I want to be? I'm a woman an ethnic minority of an immigrant family entering late into an industry dominated by men. How many predecessors do I have to look up to not enough? That's for sure but I had to remember. I had the ultimate example to look back on speaker. Pelosi did not see herself. As the first woman in a man's job she simply saw herself as the best person with the skills intellect and humanity for the job and this is what enabled her to be speaker as she saw fit without second guessing herself in regards to her gender and she has become one of the most effective speakers in recent history because of that Donald. Trump will see that for himself soon. Enough I am Sherwood. It and the key to her longevity leadership recognizing the little details that make up our humanity to cultivate loyalty. That is her strength. And that is how I want to lead. Coincidentally we as an industry are in a period of time where we are re evaluating how we treat people gun should be the days of physical verbal mental abuse treating people as they weren't people at all. We can still demand perfection and excellence. But how do we do it in a more dignified way? There's no easy and is going to take a long time for us to change our culture but I do believe women are the ones with an sinks to shape it into something better. How just like my old boss? Look for the details finding humanity and lead with it.

Nancy Pelosi House Of Representatives Barack Obama Fort Lauderdale Florida United States Joe Biden Prada The Washington Monument America President Trump GOP Congress Donald Trump Sherwood Anna Wintour Pacific Ocean George Washington
Elizabeth Banks being honored with parade, roast at Harvard

AP 24 Hour News

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

Elizabeth Banks being honored with parade, roast at Harvard

"Accurate director Elizabeth banks is being honored by Harvard university's named hasty pudding theater troupe she's been named woman of the year and will be paraded through Harvard square and then awarded a golden putting pop following a celebratory roast by the trip he's the putting says the picked banks because she's a role model for women in Hollywood as a director producer and writer thanks is forty five has received three Emmy nominations for roles on the television shows modern family of thirty rock she also directed twenty fifteens pitch perfect two and produced wrote directed and appeared in last year's reboot of Charlie's angels previous winners include elephants Gerald Meryl Streep and Halle berry the more than two hundred year old troop is considered the nation's oldest collegiate theatrical

Elizabeth Banks Harvard University Hollywood Producer Writer Charlie Halle Berry Director Emmy Gerald Meryl Streep
Florence Pugh on Little Women, Oscar Nomination & Meryl Streep - Jimmy Kimmel Live

Filmspotting

01:22 min | 1 year ago

Florence Pugh on Little Women, Oscar Nomination & Meryl Streep - Jimmy Kimmel Live

"Top five films of the year. I can't believe that I'm so in line with the academy but my top five were all nominated for best picture parasite the Irishman Mary Story Little Women. And once upon a time in Hollywood and I am grateful that little women at least wasn't completely overlook getting six nominations that one for director Jour- obviously is one the bugs me and I also think it was surely one of the best edited films of the year but happy about Florence pugh and some of the other nominations at got yeah definitely Florence. Pew is someone. I voted for best adapted. Screenplay was a no brainer so I'm glad to see that they honored little women there as well and there were things that I was happy about also I mean it. It isn't all gloom and doom for me five of films that made my top ten of twenty nineteen were recognized in major categories so best picture nominations for parasite the the Irishman and Joe. Joe Rabbit. Those were all my top. Ten best actor nod for Antonio Banderas in pain and glory. I mean it seems like you shouldn't have to say this but I was worried just because it's a Spanish language performance It might be overlooked or relegated to the sidelines. So I'm glad that didn't happen. And best original screenplay nomination for for my number nine film of the year. Ryen Johnson's knives out. We talked about the intricacy and the cleverness yet also the entertainment factor actor all coming together in that screenplay so it had to get that

Jour Florence Pugh Ryen Johnson Antonio Banderas Joe Rabbit Mary Story Florence PEW Hollywood Director
Who’s Hosting the Oscars in 2020? No One.

The Big Picture

05:19 min | 1 year ago

Who’s Hosting the Oscars in 2020? No One.

"Talk about where the Oscars stand right now. First of all they came really quickly. This was a very short season a truncated season Monday morning at five eighteen. Am Pacific difficult getting those nominations and the show starts on February ninth. which is I think the shortest season in history? If I'm not mistaken which is really odd considering when you think we'd be elongating. These things over time to get it more content out of them but the academy decided earlier run time one week after the Super Bowl and we got some information this week first of all no host officially confirmed by the academy. How are you feeling about host? I feel great about this. There was no host last year. Yes it went fine. I thought the show was perfectly clean and the ratings were up and we got a good telecast so the running back now. I don't think that the show needs a host. I do think inc.. This means that the show's ratings will go down. You think it's a cause and effect from the no host rather than the fact that it's twenty twenty and no one watches live television login anymore. I think that that is certainly a factor and maybe a much bigger factor than the host. But I need to point out that last year. Think of all the panic and anxiety and emergency emergency podcast. We had to do because Kevin Hart was the host but then he wouldn't apologize and then he wasn't the host anymore and there was a popular Oscar and there was not a popular Oscar and there was all of this energy around the Academy Awards right now. I think there's actually a lot of energy around movies which is good. We're in a great time for movies. In nineteen seventeen win at the Globes and it's opening wide died in theaters is another time where another great film has hit theaters and people are fired up about going to the movies. That's all great. It's not great for an award show though because there's no ooh tension around what's going on other than who's going to win well counterpoint. There is a lot of attention tension around. WHO's GonNa win and and we'll talk more about that but I do think it'll be an interesting race? You pointed out there. A lot of excitement about movies and particularly a lot of movies that are nominated. And you know this is just a theory. But maybe if there's less hubbub or like dragged out controversy around the ceremony itself then people are just like like Oh the Oscars. Should I watch that. I don't know anything about you know. Maybe you're grabbing people in a moment of enthusiasm instead of fatigue I saw. There's someone on twitter. Make a suggestion which I thought was very clever now. I personally believe that when you have a year like this in which the movies are good in the racist interesting. But there isn't that anxiety that we're describing you need a host because the host creates narrative all his own are all her own. Someone suggested after seeing Will Ferrell present an award Wilford might be the best awards awards presenter in the history of awards because it feels like everything is he's doing is occurring to him in real time. which is the opposite of most people? Were just reading off a teleprompter but what if will ferrell was just the a Co presenter of every award and we just shuttled out a new person you know. Here's Meryl Streep and Feral you know. Here's here's Jack. Nicholson and Will Ferrell. Here's Isla Fisher and Will Ferrell. Let's keep bringing all these random. Does you know Chris Evans and welfare would have chemistry with all of them. He wouldn't be the quote unquote host. But he would just have to riff in in one hundred eighty second bites because what you're looking for as continuity a little bit of continuity of clarity a little bit of like what will this be like a little bit of anticipation in order for an narrative for sure and a name to stay like Will Ferrell is the Co host of the core pilot. Sure I love Will Ferrell. And he's probably ably wanted to comedians that I actually fat so I I would be open to that but I think that idea is a more specific version of large idea which is the ah the presenters are always the fun part. That's actually always the thing. At the end of the night where like what were the highlights of the Oscars besides the awards. And it's someone or a pair of people who had three minutes and they they made it work and what I like about the no host option is that it dispenses with the the monologue and all of the the creaky machinery and actually does give you the option of just let the presenter shine how do you think the show should open this year. Didn't we had a musical number last year. If I recall why was it a musical. It wasn't Queen With Adam. Lambert and performance of we are the champions God. I had blocked that. No I didn't until this moment. I think two years ago maybe mistake committing two years ago we had a justin timberlake performance opening it up a song for minions remember that wondering why the Oscars are seemingly always in peril. That's how they opened the show. The last two years not ideal totally blocked these out of my memory. It's like they don't happen I think that they should not start with a song this year. Talking to hear Houston believe it or not. Well I think that similar to in practice if maybe not an execution Emmy's it if years years ago where they had a bunch of people come out to the host And they did do a musical number and it was a little bit tongue in cheek about diversity. In a way that I didn't totally love love but get a bunch of famous people on stage to start because that's that that is. That's the thing that I want to borrow okay. So maybe it's maybe not nominees but presenters or just people you like to see. I'm sure you could get the. We always come back to the rock but like you can get him on for two minutes. I don't know put the endgame cast on. What do I

Will Ferrell Academy Awards Meryl Streep Twitter Emmy Oscar Globes Justin Timberlake Isla Fisher Kevin Hart Chris Evans Houston Lambert Adam Nicholson Wilford
"streep" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

07:48 min | 1 year ago

"streep" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Like licking his lips. He's he's stroking so there's something like so like sexual about it but it's a movie for kids so was there lots of joking on the set about like the deeper. Sem Imagery of this scene. Oh what my joke was when we first I for her stood there brought in front of job. They talked to job. A job talks to Harrison and mark and then there led off. I never they never say. Hey Hey how are you. So as they were being led off I said in the rehearsal. Don't worry about me I'll be fine seriously Which I thought they should've kept in their shoes like all those sure? They're going to be digested for two thousand thousand years. But I have to stay with the slug with the big tongue and nearly naked naked which is not a you know style choice for me. We're listening to our Twenty Sixteen Interview with Carrie Fisher will hear more of the interview. After a break this is fresh air support for NPR comes from whyy. You H Y Y presenting the podcast. Eleanor amplified and adventure series. Kids love and will make those summer road trips a little easier on everyone here here reporter. Eleanor outwit crafty villains and solve mysteries as she travels the globe to get the big story available where you get podcasts or at whyy why why dot org support for NPR comes from whyy presenting the pulse a podcast that takes you on adventures into unexpected corners of health and science plastic in the guts of deep sea creatures crying after anesthesia building. Your own Internet. Each episode is full of fascinating stories and a big ideas. The pulse available. Where you get your podcasts or at whyy dot org? Let's get back to our interview with Carrie Fisher recorded in November number twenty sixteen. She died one month later on December twenty seventh the following day December. Twenty eighth her mother. Debbie Reynolds died. Your mother is Debbie Reynolds. You had a very contentious relationship with her when you were a teenager. And I think that probably continued into your twenty s and that you know you worked in her her Broadway show you were you were in the chorus of that. He Sang in her Broadway. Act You know in her cabaret act for a while so you work together the other in some ways you were very close in some ways like very far apart you were anxious to move away from home. How did your relationship change as she became an older woman? Like when you became elect now like your middle-age cheese or or or older. She's in her eighties. What's is the relationships? Contentious says a chain. Not at all I can appreciate. She's an immensely powerful woman and I just admire my mother very much. She also annoys me sometimes when she's mad at the nurses but you know she's an extraordinary every woman extraordinary. There's very few women for her generation. Who worked like that? Who just kept a career going all her life and raise children and had horrible relationships and lost all our money and got it back again? I mean she said an amazing in life and She's someone to admire. Did you appreciate her strength. And her accomplishments more as you got the older the whole God. Yeah when I was a kid I just thought she was someone who was telling me what to do and I didn't WanNa do it. How did you you feel about her celebrity? When you're young? Was it helpful. Was it intrusive. Well it I had to share her and I didn't like that when we went out people sort of walked over me to get to her and no. I didn't like it. I didn't like it and I you know people thought that I overheard someone saying what she thinks. She's so great because she's Debbie Reynolds daughter and and I didn't like it made me different from other people. I wanted to be the same I wanted to be. You know just no Jeffrey than anybody else. Your mother's most iconic film is singing in the rain You know one of the great musicals of of all time. What are your your thoughts about the movie and if you like like it now did you always or did it? Take you awhile to appreciate that film. No I always liked it. It's brilliant Irene to to do the transition from sound from silent to sound is a brilliant brilliant time to focus on and what was interesting interesting to me is that there's three people acting in the movie then it's two men and a female and the same with Star Wars and both movies were sort of a conic at well would they did the five ten top films and one was singing in the rain and one was star wars. That's so great. You're on the list together. I know you're right that you felt doomed to have bad relationships with men. That's what you've seen Eddie Fisher. Your father walked out on your mother when you were to to be with. Elizabeth Taylor Your mother's second husband Spent all her money. I mean left her with nothing the left her with nothing and and she had to pay his jets so future earnings went to him. Everything she made went to his jets to Harry Karl who was also having sex with hookers the entire length of their relationship which she found out later on. So did we so. It was a very interesting childhood so when women dressed like you at comecon conventions what do you most frequently see reflected back at. You like which which costumes which hairdos my favorite one. To see is the Metal Bikini on men that is happening a lot. Oh absolutely absolutely a lot and not thin men by the way that's hilarious. Yeah so that makes me feel good about myself kind of a before and after thing this is way after. Not only is Princess Leia fatter. She's a guy all right Carrie Fisher thank you so much for talking with us. We'll thanks for talking to me. Carrie Fisher recorded in November twenty sixteen one month before her death. Debbie Reynolds died. One day after Fisher Steph. Our end of the decade series featuring staff picks from the decade continues through the end of next week. If you enjoy hearing interviews from the past we have a great new archive site featuring fresh air interviews. Going back as early as the nineteen the seventies when fresh air was a local program in Philadelphia. You can search by name or topic you can make playlists. Check it out at fresh air. Archive Dot Org.

Carrie Fisher Debbie Reynolds Eleanor NPR Eddie Fisher Fisher Steph Harrison whyy reporter Elizabeth Taylor Philadelphia Irene Jeffrey Harry Karl
"streep" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:23 min | 1 year ago

"streep" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Just to me the boy no no no yours. You're not good. Meryl Streep from the Soundtrack of the Stephen Sondheim musical into the woods. Did Stephen Sondheim work with you at all on that a little bit. What he did was he? He wrote me a new. You Song that we recorded but was taken out of the movie because of length but he played it for me in his apartment and sang it to me. I mean it's one of the great. Most cherished memories of my life is just that little hallowed afternoon where he played this magical thing for me and And I think he's great composer. Oh yeah the musical school theater so yes it was like come on. I could die now. Do you know who you are singing as yourself have only seen you sing and character and yet one in your one year in like a rock musical rookie in the flash and in postcards from the edge you're seeing more I don't know but somewhere between like well there's a country and western song and then there's more you know yeah and postcards. Yeah yeah so like I don't know I don't have a sense of like if I said tonight Meryl Streep in Concert. I don't know what you'd sing or how you well it would be a very show I don't know I I don't really does that. A warm up. It's like okay. Well one Christmas I remember when I was twelve. My mother decided to in front of the whole family. The gathered family including my formidable grandmother. Mamie she said Merrill sank. Oh holy night in French and Merrill Sing it now and I have never if I ever have to play a person who is Over come with fear and terror. I go back to that moment because I was just. I hadn't had any any trouble singing in the in the Christmas concert but standing in the living room in front of my whole family all my you know so annoying brothers and my cousins and everybody looking at me. I just went crazy just was like shaking remember shake everything is shaking and I thought I don't like this feeling. I think I'm not a natural performer. I think I'm an actor okay. Getting back to music. I want to play something else in. This is from post cards postcards from the edge which was made in nineteen ninety directed by the now late. Mike Nichols based on a book by Carrie Fisher Carrie Fisher. Yes and it's it's kind of. It's kind of biographical so so you've been in Rehab. You're kind of trying to figure out your life in this your character and your mother who is modelled on Carrie. Fisher's mother. Debbie Reynolds is a singer and performer. who was big and musicals in the fifties and sixties? You've been living with her. There's a party at her place and you're asked to sing. It's funny that I spoke about my that moment in my grandmother's house because it was very similar Shirley maclaine plays my mother. She makes me do this. And I've just gotten out of Rehab and a my characters very tender and raw and she kind of more or less forces made it to get up in front of all these people and sing so that's very deflected and sort of a lot of excuses built into singing something that actually means something and and still. It's almost this little tiny voice from from somewhere deep inside in that her mother gets up and sings Stephen Sondheim. I'm still here and throws her legs up on on the piano and the red sequined dress and it's just blows her daughter out of the water once again I really liked her performance in that. You've been living with her. There's a party at her place and you're asked to sing so you go up to I forget if it's a guitarist taurus pianist and you start working working with and the song is you don't know me so. Here's Meryl Streep from postcards parts from the edge that okay you give you hand me that Charleston and then you say Hello Lou knocking on this thing Anyone can to us. Thank you know.

Meryl Streep Stephen Sondheim Carrie Fisher Merrill Shirley maclaine Debbie Reynolds Mike Nichols Mamie Charleston Lou
"streep" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:34 min | 1 year ago

"streep" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of course you get Meryl Streep sold they drown gel and twenty other innocent people and somebody's making money from it goes back to this law firm then tell the stories of what happened to some of the people whose lives here in the heart of documents leaked by a whistle blower in twenty fifteen. papers exposed tell a law firm in Panama called Mostek Fonseca enabled some of the richest men and women in the world to avoid paying taxes. thank. this would ring when exactly the me be inheriting the earth. it will be in my lifetime the film stars yes Meryl Streep and in no particular order James Cromwell Jeffrey Wright Rosalyn child Gary Oldman Antonio Banderas David Schwimmer and lots of people who make you go Hey isn't that the film is directed by Steven Soderbergh the acclaimed director of sex lies and videotape traffic and all those oceans movies Steven Soderbergh joined us in our studios thanks so much for being with us thanks for having me the film begins with the happy retired couple on vacation to get caught up in a tragedy how does that become the thread to tell all these others well I think the challenge as you were saying is how to how do you turn a story that was basically a newspaper headline that involved activity that I think a lot of people were not familiar with into a story that somehow connects to your real world experience that was the trick is how do we convince people that even if you don't have a lot of money you're affected by this behavior and his we researched the stories behind the Panama papers this lake George boat accidents twenty one people died in as it turns out there was no insurance the insurance that the cruise company thought they had existed within another company with another company none of the more real and all those people got screwed Antonio Banderas and Gary Oldman plays a real my second phone Seka you have missed kind of Greek chorus to explain how they helped hide millions billions probably really they're lucid and Frank and I I gather at the screen writer Scott burns actually did talk to them Scott talk to them Jake burns dean who wrote the book secrecy world that we used as our jumping off point spoke to them a lot their position is basically look we were following the law we didn't write the laws you're allowed to form these corporations have with their to phrase that or what we didn't write the laws were broken. exactly so the question of how much diligence they did on each of these companies that they were forming is an open one. we're talking about criminal enterprises a lot of yeah a lot of it I mean people harvesting body parts in China tough scene in the film by the wee hours organized crime networks grow all of that no that's when people are trying to hide their money there's usually a reason and most acts on second is actually probably not even the largest firm enabling the sorts of companies to be created it just turned out that this whistleblower jondo whose identity is still a secret decided they'd seen enough and wanted to leak all these documents. it is seen the trick me up I didn't expect to shake me up the but from Michigan played by Meryl Streep ends up in Nevis in the Caribbean and she stands in front of a line of mailboxes..

Meryl Streep
"streep" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

13:42 min | 1 year ago

"streep" Discussed on Kickass News

"Entertainment industry for the Hollywood reporter and the Associated Press and her work has also appeared in Glamour Fortune and the Los Angeles Times Times. She's the author of I'll have what she's having. How Nora Ephron three iconic films save the Romantic comedy and now she writes about the woman who is arguably the greatest actors of our generation and perhaps any generation in her latest book Queen Merrill the iconic roles heroic deeds and legendary life Meryl Streep Aaron Welcome to the podcast. Thanks for having me well Erin. I think we can tell from the title that you have a lot of admiration for LAS streep What do you consider yourself a Merrill Superfan of course I mean who isn't a Merrill Superfan Dontrelle like there's this donald pulled from all my God. How did I forget about trump. I try to forget about trump but you can't because he's everywhere and you know he he was the one that who tweeted in that three and toilet tweet that she was the most overrated actress in Hollywood even made her stronger are than before because we all all strippers we closed ranks around her and protected her and they were like no. You're you're completely wrong right right and the irony is that he said that the day after she received a lifetime achievement award at the Golden Globes I mean leave it to the Donald to tweet tweet something totally a name will I should tell people that this is technically not an authorized biography although. I doubt that there's much that Meryl Streep would object to in this book book when you decided to write the book. Did you reach out to her to ask for her participation. Oh of course there were letters. There is an various overtures and the thing about Merrill is she is so so privates and she's not going to talk about how great she is because that would be the most egotistical thing ever so she's GonNa leave it to me her Viagra for to do that for her. Yeah Yeah you describe an interesting situation in the book shortly after the mini series Holocaust stared and she's walking around New York City and a VW van drives is by and some guys lean out the window and Yell Hey Holocaust. Hey Data and how surreal that was for her. has she ever been very comfortable with her fame. You know it's funny that you mentioned that and she was so disturbed by that episode that she unlisted her phone number because fans were calling her already and that TV movie was extremely popular in it enhanced her profile and she went to do movies which made her even more famous and in nineteen eighty she got the cover of Newsweek and the headline said Star for the Eighties Meryl Streep and she was kind of horrified by that so she was taking the subway and she saw the magazine down in the subway and she it felt that it was so surreal to be that famous because she didn't want to be that famous because she's an actress and her bread and butter is observing the people out in the wild as inspiration for her roles and she seems to have had a similar relationship with awards because I know that early on and and she would say that she didn't believe in awards that put one actors performance against another and yet. She admits that she also craves the accolades now now that she's set the record for Oscar nominations. Do you think that her love hate. Relationship with awards leans a little more toward love than hate. Oh she loves to win. The thing about Merrill is she's extremely competitive so that part of her that loves to win always he's outranks the part of her that thinks is unfair to rank one performance above the other so she has said that she craves the attention attention and she craves the accolades like any Veron's dom of her stature at the same time she doesn't love all the politicking that that happens around and Oscar Award Season Oscars in award season the whole you know rigmarole. She thinks it Solis. I feel feel like she still thinks that way but most of her just wants to win. She's ambitious yeah well. I WanNa ask you about her background ground before acting although it sounds a little bit like she was more or less acting even when she was a teen and not just on stage you talk about how in highschool she suppressed pressed her loud assertive self almost willed herself into being this very agreeable popular girl cheerleader homecoming queen. It's an interesting contrast to the Meryl Streep that we know. Do you look at that period in her teens as maybe even her first real acting role absolutely so they're real. Meryl Pharrell is Bossy opinionated still fun but extremely and expressive and you know she she stands up for herself but that didn't go over well with the kids in her neighborhood growing up in New Jersey. She had brown frizzy hair. She had glasses asses. She was a bit matronly. Her classmates thought she was the teacher. You know you know what I mean. He was one of those kids who looked older like we all knew kids like that growing up and she was kind of tired of it so she decided to embark on transformation she reds seventeen magazine Eggesin. She lightened her hair. She straightened their hair. She adopted a giggle and an easy going persona and she's not it's totally easy going and she wanted to be appealing to men two boys. I mean I should add two boys and she succeeded at that and then she became homecoming. Queen yeah she seems to have an interesting relationship with her looks and there's also a great story in here where I guess she was up for the remake of King Kong in the seventies and she she auditions for the producer Dino Dila Rentis. Can you tell that story so and she goes in for one of her first major auditions not not Lorenzo's is this major producer he's Italian and she goes in there to read the part that went to Jessica Lang Hang in the one thousand nine hundred seventy six remake of King Kong and she walks in Gino says to his son in Italian this Lisa so ugly. Why do you bring this little. Does he know that Merrill went to Vassar and studied Italian at Vassar and she can understand Dan every word he's saying so she response to him in Italian. I'm sorry you don't like this. This is but this is what you get. What you see is what you get then. She stood up and walked out. She failed the audition. Needless to say Jessica. Lang won it yeah but in the end I suppose oppose it. Kinda worked down in her favourite because as I recall that was not the best of the King Kong movies was it oh no. I mean a fun role for for Jessica but I think Merrill dodged a bullet there. It's funny with Jessica Lang. She has never really been jealous. US of any other actress except for Jessica Lang Ruin Merrill always wished she was more beautiful more conventionally beautiful. She always wanted you know Jessica Lang's legs she was jealous of Jessica's role as Patsy cline in sweet dreams and Merrill had always wanted to sing loved patsy Kline so she just ached for that role and she lost Jessica Lang and it always always haunted her later. She realized that it was a huge waste of time. Wishing she were more beautiful but a big part of her wish that she had that face that say it all like especially in a romantic role like in French Lieutenant's woman which required her to to be this elusive Victorian Taurean beauty merrill felt like she could pull that off. That's fascinating because I was wondering if she's ever had any kind of a famous Hollywood rivalry along on the lines of her and Goldie Hawn in-depth becomes our or Crawford versus Davis. Is that the closest thing it was so I was bean gene journalist and biographer. I was sort of hoping for one of those sorry. Meryl Sorry Merrill I would say there might have been a one sided rivalry with Maryland Madonna yeah because yeah because what Madonna took Evita from her and then she later took what was the film from Madonna Music Art so Merrill House one-sided rivalries with actresses and when it comes to roles where she would get to sing so she had seen Patti Lupone onced on stage in Evita in nineteen seventy nine and she just desperately wanted to sing that part which I think she would just nail so in the late eighties Oliver Stone was going to do the movie adaptation adaptation with Paula Abdul choreographing and Merrill did dub she was you know all signed on on but salary negotiations forced her to walk away and then Oliver Stone walked away to and then in a few years later when she heard that Madonna you know had taken the role of Evita she said jokingly or maybe maybe it was half-jokingly. I could rip her throat out. Wow One thing that stands out about her. In this book is that she's he's almost led a charmed career because even when she was starting out at Yale you say that she was a little bit of a minor celebrity among her peers in fact they even nicknamed nicknamed one of the acting classes Meryl's class and then she moves to New York and almost instantly starts getting cast plays and she sort of mentored by Joe PAPP at the Public Lick Theater. She wasn't exactly typical story of a struggling actress paying her dues Jai. Oh no I mean and that was part of the resentment of her toward other Andrzej news is that she didn't have to wait tables while she waited tables at Yale School of drama or the Yale School of trauma however you WanNa say it but she didn't have to so she basically just got to New York and started working. you know Joe PAPP cast her in her first public theater show trelawny of the wells she had a marginal role but made a big impacts and later starred in Shakespeare in the park and measure for measure and everyone was buzzing about her everyone she was the it girl but she had the talent to back it up while at Yale she spent three years at Yale. She did something like forty different roles in three years and her classmates loved her but also were sort of jealous of her because she was taken all the good parts and I guess her big break was the film Julia and there's another great story hear about her Co.. Star Jane Fonda actually surely teaching her how not to miss her mark onset because that was I guess her first film did find a sort of act as a mentor to her absolutely so like imagine doing your first movie an acting scenes opposite Jane Fonda and you're a young actress and Jane Fonda is or Merrill said she had some like a feral quality a feral alertness. Nobody was worth confident than Jane Fonda and so Meera was intimidated but she was loosening up loosening up and just cracking Jane up just making Jane Laugh half and they had to film another. You know they had to film another take because Jane was like hey look at the floor. That's your mark. He disbanded handed it on that mark otherwise you're not going to be in the movie and get in the light so it's those little things that Merrill I didn't know that Jane sort of taught her and was really a mother hen then when Jane got back to. La She was telling everyone everyone about this amazing young actress that she met an open doors for Merrill that Merrill didn't even know about and this was around the same time that she had an ongoing ongoing relationship with the actor Jon Khazal who people probably know best as freight from the Godfather. They live together for something like three years. Maybe four years yes and then it ended in tragedy. When he was diagnosed with Terminal Cancer. She was by his side through this gradual decline in the eventually passed away. How at his death impact Merrill she and she was.

Merrill Meryl Streep Jessica Lang Queen Merrill Hollywood Jane Fonda King Kong Donald Nora Ephron Yale Jane Joe PAPP Meryl Pharrell lifetime achievement award Erin New York City Associated Press Los Angeles Times Times Meryl Golden Globes
"streep" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"streep" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"You know, she's a good actor. But I just don't think she's. In that place enough where she's that good of an actor where I felt like I knew who. Br Bradley Cooper's character was and I felt like lady Gaga disappeared a little bit. But I felt like I didn't know who she was. No, it almost seems like she's a good actor. But she's not quite there yet. Defined her character that will. Yeah. You know? And it made me think that that would make sense because you know, you're just you're still learning how to act. She's taken steps one two three four. But maybe hasn't reached the Meryl Streep step twenty-seven of like fully realize what character and becoming that person in knowing who that person is right because I again, it didn't feel like I was watching Gaga, but it didn't necessarily get. Get in her character. Sometimes they put stars in movies and everyone's excited about the star. But then when they played the role. It's like, I don't I she didn't convince you. What you mean? That is I know I feel bad because I love a Gaga, and she is. I'm gonna go. I'm gonna go to American horror story I had to get used to her in American horror story because I do love her as Gaga. But I felt like sometimes for me. I wanted more from her role that she was playing. And so I I understand what you mean. Sometimes the star power overpowers, the actual your character in the movie, I think we get excited because we see them as stars. But then they get there. And you're like, I mean, I liked there. But she didn't blow me away as this particular character. And I get what you're talking about. I'm with you. I think that is exactly how information she kind of. I feel bad saying this because I like her so much, but she didn't disappear for me. Like, I always felt like I was watching Gaga. I'm like, I knew I would ask you this. Do you feel that she's on her way to the Meryl Streep because she's she's grown on me in American horror story? She has she wasn't convincing to me at first. I don't know the Meryl Streep eight. To the to the to the height of she can I think she's on her way. I think stations are away. Yeah. Yes. No, definitely mean potatoes to work with as far as acting. Yeah. Yeah. No. I don't I don't think it's like not going to happen or something like that. But it does it definitely did feel like, okay. Maybe she's a little earlier on. I hear you. Hey, so that that was. Yeah. That was kind of a takeaway I felt like the whole movie I didn't actually get emotional until the end like didn't fully kind of believe their relationship, really experience. It all the way to the end. And it wasn't at the end. It wasn't even that maybe I felt differently about their relationship. It really is just I think at the end that she gives such a powerful powerful performance does musically that in the song is so beautiful, and they play back some of their moments that it's almost like the music compels you at that point. Yeah. Still kind of we do have a call on the line. I wonder if you are calling about stars one six five one six four one one zero seven one you're welcome to join the conversation about a star is born. Let's see do we have someone on the line as what we do here. All right. Hi there. What's your name? You're on mytalk. What's your name? My name is Paul. Oh, hi, Paul. What's up? Well, I wanted to ask you with the stores born, I love sky, go also. But. What was going on with those awful, wigs or hair? I mean, somebody told me that that was actually our air. But if you watched the movie again, just look at the hairdos string. It was also Bradley his directing the movie she used a lot of cliches with the, you know, the one I hear down the at least three or four times in some of those close ups might goodness. You could see the pores in their face. It was so close. But.

lady Gaga Meryl Streep Bradley Cooper Paul
"streep" Discussed on Comments By Celebs

Comments By Celebs

03:45 min | 3 years ago

"streep" Discussed on Comments By Celebs

"I think that I've ever like watched known on some level. You know what I mean? And I just think that they are probably incredible, incredible fronts. Well, you know, it works with them the generational gap. So there's not. They're not competing for roles. That's one. They're not going to being for roles. It's obviously very competitive for women to get roles because there's it's hard like if you're, you have a forty something role, there's only ten people who might get it. If you're one of those people and you're competing with Witherspoon for a role, it might be hard to be very close friends with them, but Merrill can be like this goddess mentor for everyone for everybody. She's all my God. She's so amazing my God. If you had to choose between meeting Ruben, please? Don't they do that. Who would you pick. It's hard. It's really hard like I have so many things where it's like one of those things where it's like if I say name, it's like, well, what about this? Like if I say Maryland, it's so amazing. She's done the volume court Justice like she's been the most incredible things, but it's like Meryl Streep is Meryl Streep. I know. I think I would have to pick Ruth because it's she's Justice. It's also I think we have more time left with Meryl where like if I have to pick right now, I'm going to say Ruth with the knowledge that maybe one day me and Merrill will cross pads, right? Merrill will be more fun to me, but I think Ruth for I hear birth is a woman a few words right? So it would just be me being like, oh, says you absorb, thank you so much for everything you do for us, so great. But it would just be very one sided or as Merrill could, which is fine because works Ruth going to say to us like, right, like how's your blog? Yeah, good job on that podcast. Like you think of how much Ruth is done? Right? She's like reading, very dense. Lawbooks. Like all the time? Yeah. Emeril we could have a conversation with a like, I feel like it's complicated would come up a lot. I could talk about my movie mine too. I watch it once a month. It's the best movie Alec Baldwin's and other elder celebrity. Although I hate hearing that he's not nice. Not everyone can be dice. Yeah, he has other qualities. He was once behind me, etc. In Southampton, and I just twitched everyone has a story about seeing out Baldwin Southampton. I'm not even kidding friend like eight other people around around. I just tried to play cool and like, didn't hear you because he was. He was like Tuesday morning. He's like getting his coffee. Like, what does he want to deal with some right girl. So funny. Like I think like, I don't know if I'd be able to like, I think everybody I have to go up to. It's a mood. It's based on your. Yeah. And you have to send it out. I agree with you completely on the Reese Merrill front. They who else be? I mean, I feel like a few years ago, I would've said KENDALL and g. g. but they're what? What's happening relationship. You never see them together every so often that come back. I think they're still supportive Erling willing. era. Yeah, cake. I love card illion I think she's careers. She, I think she wanted to go file. Yeah, I remember few years ago her being like I I don't want to, but the last time I saw she was seen with Paris Jackson, I think they were maybe hooking up for a little bit. I heard interest which I thought was a really cool couple together. I, I would be so down with that. Right. I feel like she probably is like not chasing the famed dragon. Yeah, I don't know something. I mean, just to bring us back to Courtney full circle and wanting to be famous what I would love to get. Maybe we can get someone on this podcast to do it to talk about the sort of ambitious plans towards being famous behind. You see a lot. You can only have them once at only after you're famous. Right, exactly. Otherwise, you won't get there, but I feel like a lot of celebrities burnout. Yeah, and you can kind of tell and then it's like you almost feel bad for ones that are like not in the spotlight that used to know..

Ruth Reese Merrill Meryl Streep Paris Jackson Alec Baldwin Maryland Baldwin Southampton Ruben Witherspoon Courtney Southampton KENDALL one day
"streep" Discussed on The Fighter And The Kid

The Fighter And The Kid

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"streep" Discussed on The Fighter And The Kid

"And it was just weird i caught him in a glimpse and it was like the light hits his face right you're like oh shit yeah how many get this guy some jello only get this guy of nice warm mask in some cucumbers you know well a lot of stress i think a lot of his skin falls off of his body a lot it seems like because stress i was using that movie death becomes her were they take that that that potion and that makes him stay alive forever but their body can't keep both so the fallen apart like spray paint their skin and and nursing becomes or is it hell yeah the classic you never heard of it becomes becomes a classic classic classic what movie we have for oh my god meryl streep i love meryl streep dune death becomes her biggest movie with meryl streep bro if she lame onto may not i wouldn't do it the other way but i'd watch her jerk off into a plant oh wow you got goldie hawn mill streep and then bruce willis the doctor allow that's a big movie son classic dude i can't believe that so i went to msci shorts funeral last night all how was that service on on sunday yeah yeah it was interesting jim carrey was air that's my hero yeah did it was pretty crazy see him i've seen him over there before the comedy store but it was just interesting to see because he used to work there you know used to work hand and be back there and like you know just seeing all the people that probably used to work there when he was like the people that were the waitresses and stuff you disarm having a good time which is pretty cool you have the bare look crazy or is he doing better now we look pretty normal i mean he's always kind of looked a little bit of like.

jim carrey meryl streep goldie hawn bruce willis mill
"streep" Discussed on Show Me the Meaning!

Show Me the Meaning!

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"streep" Discussed on Show Me the Meaning!

"I remember i used that as like my analog to try to explain why being an academic philosopher was important because the ideas would trickle down to like every day speech even though we may not realize it but we use the concepts that were previously like i dunno intellectual elitists concepts or something like that and so i remember i tried to use that to like in one of our back and forth discussions to get him to like me and it just made him hate me more so break up with you oh that was that was my first experience watching this movie and so this movie has a profound mark that it's left on my soul from that trauma so thanks for making me relive this guy's fuck you a okay cool awesome all right let's start with greg what do you think about this movie oh i just wanna say bad move using anything from delaware product get your girls dead trying to relate with the people you know larry's just like we use it a fly cray to try to get some good oh no you know what i love meryl streep you know i i'd watch bill streep ticket shit that'd be like eight ninety five percents she's she's good man she's getting everything i'd movie pass it totally totally right i'll pay ten dollars a month see anything else does he could play me anything she's so good i thought she did a great job as an winter i mean the movies the movies weird to me manna deals with so many like sexism deals with ageism deals with relationships workaholics everything i just feminism and it just made me feel bad for like oprah you know what i mean.

greg larry meryl streep delaware bill streep ten dollars
"streep" Discussed on Ask Me Another

Ask Me Another

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"streep" Discussed on Ask Me Another

"Great here we go here's your i laugh you do not need a hint for this kristen fringe rusher nats correct yes this comedian starred in the nutty professor films and the adventures of pluto nash beth eddie murphy absolutely yeah if you've ever watched an award show you've probably seen this highly honored actress laughing at a joke about how great she is meryl streep yeah that is meryl streep this hangover star also voices rocket recoup can in the guardians of the galaxy films kristen bradley cooper yes that is correct i like that you giggled at his laugh it's kind of infectious i need super hot yeah he's a raccoon i didn't say the raccoon was super hot just for the record it's not bad though he's pretty good this actress played the titular pretty woman in pretty woman quite a kerfuffle beth julia roberts is that is correct this guy made a comedy about assassinating kim jong hoon which was pulled from most theaters.

meryl streep beth julia roberts kristen fringe professor kristen bradley cooper kim jong
"streep" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

KHNR 690AM

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"streep" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

"The it was quite a challenge why was because some women in the fashion industry where and actually meryl streep did a film on prada i don't know whether you remember that but most women would and incidentally i my meryl streep was a babysitter for my daughter gosh yes but the woman that she played in that film was exactly the kind of woman i worked for but i'll tell you i learned more from her despite put any body said about her and they really she was called something on seventh avenue oh by the way she walked and took charge of everything but i learned more from her than i learned from anyone else professors and college or anything because she was so intense and it turned out that i was because people in the in the magazine were so concerned about talking with her that they will go towards through me right began to accept and take on her negatives though i had to leave i learned i learned from her more than anything else and that's to me was one of the most important times of my life and i also enjoyed fashion but not the high fashion that sort of bothers me people a little bit strange but i the regular everyday fashion and you're never you're never anorexic you're never the too thin.

meryl streep
"streep" Discussed on TV Avalanche

TV Avalanche

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"streep" Discussed on TV Avalanche

"Big little allies cast a relatively unknown actress named meryl streep have you have you heard of her i think she's from jersey i think that's why i know her like i probably had a right about or when i was at the store ledger than ever know center i try to focus on all jersey people whenever possible and i pronounce the right streep mironov strap may be yasser to let you do the pronunciation though i mean that people have talked about tv becoming a bigger deal and movie stars coming to do television and you'll there there've been some big stars who came over but i really think meryl streep doing a season over the tv show is about the pinnacle of that like we talk about peak tv we talk about it quantity and quality and everything but as far as like influence and movie stars coming to do television i don't think you can get much you keiko much above meryl streep doing hvo show while big little life in general has kind of raise the bar in that regard in at a lot of these people were we talk about you know what's a movie star coming to do tv if a quote unquote movie star someone who used to be a movie star and now can still find work in movies but are not not usually is the leader of a movie you know like your christian slater types even when extent clive owen mocatta hey when he did true detective his career was kind of fallow and anyway he was doing only doing that for a season where slick reese witherspoon nicole kidman their big honking deals and even at her age meryl streep is in a the post is a big hit en it's mainly 'cause i heard and tom hanks so.

meryl streep tom hanks clive owen
"streep" Discussed on Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"streep" Discussed on Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

"Good good or a view issues like a an an an immediate response h red hot red hot this time arkansas time my radio listening to perfection turning on your program justintime day marks review and the accent interview with meryl streep and tom hanks i was still on a high and had a big smile on my face dude as a story the post take told the boxes for me bravery in the face of opposition standing up for principles above self interest and the persuasive arguments in bullying to ignore you'll principles and play safe the bustle of the newsroom the setting of the hot led type the rolling machines backed by the reliable john williams school alter ific given that the film was put together so fast it was impressive all the characters were rounded incredible didn't spoke didn't spot a single weak point i noted bradley whitfield cast at one of in the cast one of my heroes from the west wing but not on the right side here marks interview was a joy register again no okay i'm just going to correct simon simon's interviews with the joy i me if mirror i mean that's been noticed isn't it maryland told me just as impressive in life as they characters possibly echoing their obvious respect and involvement in the subject matter i love how they responses are always thoughtful in eloquent and bravo to steven spielberg for grasping the nettle riding the wave of topical political news and other mixed messages picked it from me that i had a thank you very much apart from the fat you can't tell you what's great is that she said i came up with a small on my face she did in the end you know that isn't it a particularly interesting particularly when the fina the film as as we've said it's eight runs like a precursor to all the president's menu duncan rattled old men with a smile on you've become it will the press has been with a fred delman he will face and increasingly paranoid sense of the world so maybe not do it is a double bilateral eight minutes to four what else we got the thing that you perhaps could do as a double bill with the post is the final year which is documentary by greg barker about the final year of president obama in office at the white house the film has up close and personal.

meryl streep simon simon president duncan fred delman greg barker obama white house arkansas tom hanks john williams school bradley whitfield maryland steven spielberg eight minutes
"streep" Discussed on Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"streep" Discussed on Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

"Delay hands on hair neatly is ticket oh yes i know it's tom hanks but that's great you know you really too and meryl streep's performances terrifically film gay days and that's why it's at the beginning is actually about that characters arc and look out for the jurassic park moment towards the end of the film when you say it i think you'll understand vibrations in the coffee hole that cannot be awaken it in the next will do cocoa and the commuter you'd be hardpressed as we've often said before to find a better communicate to then tom and merrill together is and who who knew they'd never been into film together before you would think i would have happened ages ago i would like to say however that turning everybody could have done that in view as well as you did not thought it was very lovely that the end of it tom hanks did indeed say good good job or whatever it was he said he met tom hanks way that makes you just feel like you're reclining into an armchair of safety he probably says had to everybody they're no simon quilted from the norfolk branch of the church of witted time i'm taking my 15yearold son to the cinema this weekend a rare event which means i want is to make the best choice of film possible okay we have naronha fielding year old some yep dan why it's either the dark dark historic case they are no old oak is now the post not post here both of which i'm sure i will enjoy the better not to show whether my son will be enthusiast host listened to the context of the email and then as an were even slightly lerone family experience okay okay us anemic home defending the key my son james his knowledge of the period of history during which the post he said is quite scant but his second mobile knowledge is much stronger yep like most 15year old he enjoys action and fastpaced movies but also enjoy something with emotion and bite this in mind i wanted to ask you both your opinion do i opt for the safe abed and go for the chilean drama or do i take a chance on steven spielberg by concern with the post is that my son may need to have knowledge of the period in question in order to enjoy the intricacies of the movie.

tom hanks abed steven spielberg meryl streep merrill simon norfolk james 15year
"streep" Discussed on Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"streep" Discussed on Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

"Selling any protecting the paper okay we will kooyman okay you'd look you so far away from me over there as a clip itv they keep was so close together a number pitcher that's a clip from the posted stars meryl streep and tom hanks who discussing the so for that they're that they're sitting on the uk guys you really your yup after that clip bring it on uh it's very good to see came both on the show tomorrow i should say voted the most reassuring post by a voice in the world by listening to this program well it's amazing and what was i you were also very rochon stabilising in most intimidating poise can you can you both explain please the because a lot of people come to this story completely cold can you explain katharine graham and ben bradley who they were and why they were extraordinaire casarin i think character first yes katharine graham was a 55yearold woman in nineteen fifty in 1971 who was the owner publisher of the washington post which at that time was the second two paper in washington and nowhere near the eminence of the new york times uh she hired it was one of her first acts as a owner publish her she was delivered into her position by virtue of the death of her husband paper had been owned by her father he passed it to her husband and her husband killed himself at the time she was a mother of four had never had a job and suddenly she was the head of a publishing if not empire very very important organisation she hired been bradley to be the managing editor because of his.

katharine graham publisher washington managing editor meryl streep tom hanks uk ben bradley new york times
"streep" Discussed on Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"streep" Discussed on Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

"The eu canadian few just a moment when uh the big hollywood stars come of age evaristti matter time that we are grunted gifts yes uh as as an old the use that would grown dwelled sometimes it's is usually about fifty minutes and that that's about right because it gives john to expand about the subject may be includes homelessness questions i whistle around a little bit as right now we're fleeing hey because it was it was very narrow ten minutes that was what we were told and so what we decided his instead of getting the stars of the film to explain the context of which you will often do was saying you know tell us about earlier film a thinking like if i said tell us about the film ten minutes later there will be there be the end because it looks envelope desertlike complex so what we really do rather than that is if you before we hit the clinton before we hit the interview yes you can set up where we are counting seventy one broker for the post and that will save lives okay so steven spielberg film the post about the publication the revelations of the pentagon papers the film actually starts in 1966 in vietnam with third daniel ellsberg out there observing whose he's done he is he's a he's bob the people who's taking paul in a report which is going which then becomes this thing that we get becomes known as the pentagon papers which and intolerable costs for a document which effectively says that the us government have been covering up for quite some time both the progress and the purpose of the vietnam war we get to 1971 and the this the various parts of this document this huge big document have been leaked into the hands of the new york times tom hanks is and bradley who is the editor of the washington post meryl streep is catherine k graham who is the publisher owner of the washington post which at that point is in the process of going to the american stock exchange so there's a whole bunch of stuff going on about its ownership so crucially what we have is 1971 nixon is in the white house there is a there is a document which says essentially that successive administrations in the past have lied to the american misled the american public about the progress and purpose of the vietnam war some of.

catherine k graham publisher washington new york vietnam pentagon steven spielberg hollywood nixon stock exchange eu meryl streep editor bradley tom hanks vietnam war us paul daniel ellsberg john ten minutes fifty minutes
"streep" Discussed on Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"streep" Discussed on Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

"To be sick nice excellent can you give the official which attainment nicknames for the following actors okay miriam streep miriam street that's what is written here has given away parliament you know i had because it's miru strep ciller net very good for meryl streep the meryl streep make assist immi gerald butler shut up but what keira knightley oh this is i i kia nightly very goods and conflict calls room orbit only to go into now i think she's not i care anymore i think yeah she's not i guess over this is the past we don't talk about any law she's not fly packed anymore yes hugh jackman oh i've no i call him like huge huge acts man all that was i can imagine hens swinging colorado's to the huge action a huge action which makes no sense because you jackman is not commonly carrying and how enhance man reveals more about you than we were in yes what is often given as an example of unlikely costing meg ryan is up helicopter pilot very good we all know very well how to say hello to jason isaacs please name two other people to whom this greeting can be give him as a very long hey yeah because there's a lot of people in remote michael spender which hello to michael fay was michael has been one of them i feel like he got a hello he's not on it okay okay uh you again oh nazi doma because i remember she worrying about the other plane go very good she asked for allowing she received one very good.

meryl streep gerald butler keira knightley hugh jackman colorado meg ryan michael spender official miriam streep jason isaacs michael fay michael
"streep" Discussed on Never Not Funny

Never Not Funny

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"streep" Discussed on Never Not Funny

"Are our outer pop is that my com that was him this one on hypersensitive to these mikes now uh i went to uh did the just a one high school football game it it it done i bring di circle back to that because uh i'm currently uh fighting with the high school friends on facebook uh that i'm i'm part of the hollywood elite man um and i told the hollywood line so how did that started did you post something in may commented reacted you comment on something that i've guy i never comment on anything or so yuhaeng unless the only time i ever did was when somebody some ask fuck from high school made some comments about meryl streep is has no business talking member member what she did that speech about how get why don't we just be nice to each other right now that that she'd hedge radical agenda it just be nice to each other and people went nuts that she's got no business speaking uh one of the people i went to high school with said uh your job is to entertain you are not unlike the chicken were you put to quarter in and he plugs out a song on a tiny piano and i was like go fuck yourself you you're out of your mind she has for voller she has every right to say what she wants to say i'm sorry that her at a podium on tv is a bigger megaphone than you on facebook because you're doing the same fucking thing you moron so this today or let yesterday was i you know i did that day it's it's nothing it was a part of that mike pence nonsense of him that stunk they pulled that the the football game left that's a proven to be a stunt and.

meryl streep facebook hollywood mike pence football