35 Burst results for "Strana"

Exploring the galaxy with radio astronomy

Talk Python To Me

08:12 min | 1 year ago

Exploring the galaxy with radio astronomy

"What do you guys do day to day? Are you both doing Strana me basically day-to-day or code for astronomy me. Pretty much I mean. Most of my work is helping. Mohawk or storm is do things faster so every time for a group who were doing some multiple web it was taking full t two days to do something they then pasta over to us. We go down to eighteen hours. That's awesome that means you can do so much more science right. But as a classic divide and conquer problem at paralyzed line matt talks embarrassingly parallel and we Scott Shaw. We don't really do gathering till the very end Bassett. I see so. It's almost like you can almost do individual computation on a per pixel basis maybe the equivalent of a per pixel basis. We tench Wilkin Frequency Channel. Molden GAY but yes so. We would just purchase one particular or one of frequencies on one machine depend on another number on another world. Do quite a bit of machine learning. What Tech Team are affi- application wage doing corrections actually now moving? Some of our struggle me work into oceanwave investigations and transit or whether we can correct the swell so there's no way there's going to be a good idea right. Okay now. That would be a really unexpected consequence or outcome or capability from studying. Gravitational waves is better surf. Predictions obligation state has different quicken small. Yeah I guess so. Yeah the whole gravitational wave detection stuff is some pretty cutting edge science and it's really interesting and it's cool that you're using machine learning to try to understand that we have a smoke group working on it. We've got ten inches in the pump detectors. This is a very active area of research. There's a lot of groups around the world working on. Yeah I think it's kind of amazing. There's a Lotta stuff with gravity oriented things in astronomy right now. We have the gravitational wave detection for the Clintons Black Holes. We have the first picture of black holes in the last year and a half or so whenever that was going on around their medical field teaching. Sure I guess. If you're already university eventually you might end up. Interacting with a student or two very cool. All right Rodriguez. What about you got kind of similar? I on personal rights became evolving stormy. So I help a summer through the software in different languages for different purposes. Sunil only for me but also for Analysts form we also am theoretical group so people who simulations formation such so all over the place on we only me about all the people in the group we specialize comes kind of in this area of killing. Romans? Lloyd's mice also. On how much do you end up helping them with? Standard Software Engineering. Things like Hey. I need to teach you source control. This is get hub. Let spend an hour talking about that or are they pretty much. Good to go. The generation older durations. Aw It'd be harder to kind of move to sign a newer people like Jonker people come with all those concepts. Serie Computing Rights. They never give ray there so do help to push that. Far East most multi on their Meghan this offer the same side of thanks Entitled Opportune Opponent. How you organize it. Codes optimize things for the particular architecture on someone Okay cool and you're also working on this S. K. A. Construction the square kilometer array. Just this whole topic. I guess we'll talk more audits later. By one of the main institutions that are working on the square kilometer array yet. So it's interesting. I don't know if it's works for light. But it does for radio that if you put multiple detectors and sort of densely but not actually connected at one giant and tanner something you can put that together like a bigger detector right bigger lens in the radio world. So that's the idea right. Just that's exactly Gaskell interferometry you basically if you got three on tennis. Abc Do you do. Is You take measurements in the from from BSE. And then you correlate every repair so to correlate the from be from being from Do that correlates are. Which is the one voice doing all this mixing signals and out goes one correlated thing though which is as if you have one big content. So that's what happens in Vegas for me. I think I'm not sure by up to college. You can also from A to B. But I'm not sure how the kind of work in the science cool so this. Esca project is the square kilometer array which is International Project. That you all are working. On involving thirteen countries that are full members of the project in the Or others who are just participating right. Yeah that's right is the collecting. Because you know we're we're starting to run out of things off the screen. Where do we generally collecting area system is now missing in spite of the fun telescope which means belting countries so the life frequency components coming up to Western Australia and the Frequencies Gang South Africa? So they'll be speaking meat dishes in South Africa. I'm one hundred. One hundred and seventy two and ten is Western Australia so called Com fifty million euros just for the the first one. I don't know a hundred and thirty one thousand antennas bringing all this data. That is a huge amount of antennas. And it's your Joe decombis second five hundred fifty gigabytes a second. I don't really have a great way to understand that number. Honestly like you gotTa think of large cloud services like youtube or Netflix. Or something like that right and we say no orange them. Visualize it if you take your you know your how drives your five hundred heart ripe under throw it and you throw one of those second right. Yeah that's a lot of data also takes a lot of power right. Yeah that's one of the the the key things because we we would like Green as possible but we go cap on the moment to make a wall system on the planet. So that's still a challenge. We have to address. Yeah you almost need your own power plant. Tell me how much somebody call the ready down. Okay is it the blades that generate? Rfi Or is it the generators that generate. Yeah yeah

South Africa Wilkin Frequency Channel Scott Shaw Bassett Matt Sunil Rodriguez Australia Meghan Lloyd International Project Tennis Western Australia Vegas RAY Joe Decombis ABC Youtube
The Era of Multi-Messenger Astronomy is Here

Astronomy Cast

09:37 min | 1 year ago

The Era of Multi-Messenger Astronomy is Here

"For the longest time astronomers could only study the skies with their pathetic telescopes but then new techniques and technologies acknowledges were developed to help us in different wavelengths now astronomers can study objects in both visible light neutrinos gravitational waves cosmic rays and more the era of multi. Multi Messenger is here our Pamela. I've been seeing this term multi messenger astronomy more and more recently. So can you help people understand. Stand what is it well. It's not new. So let's just start with that. So the first big multi messenger discovery that people really he point to Supernova nine hundred ninety seven nineteen eighty-seven nine hundred eighty seven nineteen eighty-seven a which was detected in neutrinos as well as in in light a sense then the reason that we're now hearing about this. so much was the neutron star Neutron Star merger that occurred in two two thousand seventeen so thirty years later and that particular discovery which I've heard heard estimates of one in ten astronomers to three in ten years in the world depending on how you count. Astronomers worked on that particular discovery well that one was detected across gravitational waves all kinds of the electromagnetic spectrum and with so many different kinds times of detections going on with so many different people. This of course started everyone talking about multi Multi Messenger Strana me and also asking. Hey can we have funding dedicated to what we've been piecemeal together on our own on. So now we're starting to see these funded coordinated efforts where you have high altitude cosmic ray detectors in in Mexico working in coordination with buried in ice neutrino detectors in Antarctica in combination with gravitational tation wave detectors spanning all around our planet to together try and understand our universe and so like when radio waves. Microwaves visible infrared x rays gamma rays. That's all part of the electromagnetic spectrum and that kind of work has been done for for decades that you will look at something in both radio waves and in visible light and we call that that multi wavelength multi wavelength. Because it's essentially still just the same thing it's just photons right and so you're you're only really seeing it in one dimension. So can you explain. I mean it's useful but can you explain why it's not as as useful as starting to bring these other technologies on board well at at the end of the day thanks to this whole equals. MC squared the thing. We are able to have energy and matter transition back and forth in different ways through different astrophysical processes. So if you have a good old happy hot star hanging out somewhere. In the universe it's going to be generating light in a whole variety of the different colors in those colors are function of temperatures the star and if it happens to be flaring doing something particularly dramatic you may may get physics that has also on top of that generating xrays brand Marie high energy events but in general a nice good old fashioned black body radiation is what we call this warm object star hanging out is just GonNa be giving off photons of light that we can detect here On Earth and by looking at different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum we're probing different kinds of activities. were seeing everything from how the atmosphere of the star is absorbing out different colors of light telling us well what's the composition of the star we see radio radio signals that are starting to tell us about the environment around the star. Everything's different physical process. In a different piece of information right and at at the end of the day photons or photons and so and so in most circumstances you're GonNa see this nice smooth black body curve that you would expect expect to see and then as you said if you get like Aurora's on Jupiter then you might get a burst of x rays or if you're seeing some kind of radio emission from from your some magnetic field reconnection on the sun then you're going to get something else but so let's talk about. What are the avenues of? What are the new other other ways that we can perceive the universe and we should've quickly went through a bunch of them? Let's take some time now and then talk about what we've got. What astronomers have at their disposal so with with photons for using the electromagnetic spectrum with other things were still able to do that to a degree? so M- yuan's for instance. There are kind of particle that gets formed in our upper atmosphere. When high energy particles hit the atmosphere energy gets turned into a particle L. and those particles get detected at the surface of our planet Thanks to how they interact with different electric packets. Basically you can go to a variety of museums. See these setups. FLASH OF LIGHT WILL OCCUR WHEN IMMU- on hits the system and what we're seeing here is okay. Something with a lot of energy occurred at the top of the atmosphere created particles particles particles went at close to the speed of light changing their own experience of time as they did so until the interacted at the surface of our planet. So this doesn't get a lot of information about where the particles came from. And this is actually something that you're GonNa hear me repeat so we can detect mu on's at the surface of our world. That's cool we know there's cosmic rays because we see static on our television set when we're taking images with the CCD era Seema's chip. We'll see these bright blown out pixels. This is from particles either generated in granite and other slightly radioactive active rock. That's coming up from the planet or it's created by something that made it through our solar systems outer boundary traveled through the solar system and traveled through the atmosphere and made a massive itself. I've got an analogy that that I like to use with this is that it's kind of like watching fireworks especially if you're like under underneath the fireworks and so use the firework goes off and you see the bright flash of the actual firework itself and then you might see other flashes of other sub parts of the firework go off but if you're close enough and if you've ever like I dunno shot You know the big close up you can like sometimes like dust will fall down on from the the fireworks which is just like the particles that are made up in it will rain down tonight. You've got like sort of two separate pieces of evidence that a that firework went off. You're seeing the light but you're also seeing feeling the particles that are that are landing around around you but then you also can hear it. You can hear the sound waves from the fireworks that are coming from it and if you know if if a really precise seismometers when those booms are going off or when the firework is firing it will be shaking the ground and you would be able to detect the motion of that and each one is almost like a completely different way of sensing that these fireworks are are happening. And it's all each one tells you more information about what happened. And they're they're all independent. which is which is the key here? So cosmic rays are darkest like the toughest one right. Yeah they're and they're the toughest one to be able to. We don't know still what's really causing the most energetic these right so so to continue with your analogy that dust. That AH hitting you. It's been blown by the wind. It's been caught in various updrafts interacted with birds wings in some cases and all these different interactions with the dust. Experiences between being generated in that fireworks burst and dusting you. Those hide where it came came from. You can't trace back the path to figure out exactly where the fireworks occurred and with cosmic. Rays these are charged particles as charged charged particles. Move through the universe they're going to encounter a myriad of different magnetic fields in each of these different magnetic fields is going to deflect that charged particle one way another possibly multiple over different interactions over time. So when we see these cosmic raise and any of the myriad of different detectors we have scattered about the surface of our planet. Well we have no idea where they came from

Multi Multi Messenger Strana Aurora Marie Mexico Seema
Satellite Constellations and the Future of Astronomy

Astronomy Cast

11:11 min | 1 year ago

Satellite Constellations and the Future of Astronomy

"We are back at the American Astronomical Society Meeting in Honolulu Hawaii and and we last episode. We talked about the big controversy of the construction of the thirty meter telescope. Here on the on the Hawaiian islands the Bit other big controversy. That's going on is of course. The starling constellation and literally just a couple of days ago. SPACEX launched launched the third batch of starling satellites another sixty satellites into space. And I it is safe to say. Hey that astronomers are outraged. I think that's an under Sabin. Yeah and there. There were three different arguments. Demint put forward and I have to admit at the top of this episode. I am somewhat biased. I desperately want to see the digital divide to be overcome and low cost Internet Internet to be available globally and Starlink promises. That and so a lot of what we're GONNA talk about. Today the issue comes down to whether or not you trust. Trust Elon. Musk to actually implement the low cost in the low cost Internet so the three arguments that we heard today against Starlink And one was a cultural problem of old but the children if you see satellite zipping around in the sky will people still fall in love with the stars. Will your experience visiting a dark sky site. Turn you off to astronomy if you see satellites and the cry of outrage. We heard was that people won't be inspired by the sky if they see manmade objects now I have to admit I distinctly remember exactly exactly where I was the first time I saw satellite. I I was up in the mountains of the caucuses camping beside a glacier and and I was sitting on a rock all by myself because being a teenager is hard and I was fifteen and sometimes you need to sit on a rock by yourself from your fifteen and and the satellite. I just saw something moving in the sky and I realized what it was and that realization of I'm alone on orrock beside a glacier but there's a satellite moving through my stars that at the age of fifteen was amazing moment and this idea that satellites make it impossible for people to fall in love with the stars. I I don't think that's the case. But it was one of the arguments arguments put forward and getting together to the second but but sort of like from a practical technical standpoint win. The starlings are first launched launched. They are actually very bright there about magnitude two or three which makes them easily visible to the unaided eye from many spots on the earth and they look like this train of moving across the sky. Call this this string of pearls and end and then as the starlings raise their altitude up to their final position of about five hundred fifty kilometers altitude the dimmed back to about a five magnitude which is at the very limits of the human. I can see in Nice dark dark skies and and but of course in the eyes of a of an astronomer that is incredibly bright. Eight of fifth magnitude star is very bright star in in the eyes of telescope and then the other problem is that when when when they pass across the sky they will really only be visible to astronomy when they are low on the on the horizon during the summer months. So when it's when the night is the longest the night is the shortest. You're going to get really. You're only going to be able to see these satellite right. Aided the right after twilight and right before sunrise. And and that's it you have to be and then for the for the rest of the night there won't be any satellites delights but as the nights get longer the satellites get brighter over C- over the entire night sky and so they're anticipating baiting that over some of the the big observatories in Chile and in the Northern Hemisphere. When you're in the middle of the longest nights you're gonNA see these? These satellites run across the entire sky. So so there's no question that these are going to be very bright objects that are going to move through your field of view and I leave streaks and one of the things that people keep bringing up is there's already thousands of pieces of stuff. There's eighteen thousand thousand tracked pieces that you can pull from the database right now. Eighteen thousand seven. I think you can pull from the database and you can track the position using celestis and other other things like that. Yeah so there you know we know and to adding another twelve hundred. which is the goal for link? So so let's narrow this down even further so there's eighteen thousand things up there. Prior to the launch of Starlink only two hundred objects were naked eye visible. So Oh you can only look up two hundred different things in heavens above and go outside and see them with the unaided eye with Starlink. They're adding well over for a thousand by the end of this year to the list of things that will be visible to the unaided eye and its brightness that is really the problem. I was an observational astronomer. For a number of years before realizing I am the rain God in those years years that are as an observational astronomer. I had myriad satellites go through my images but because they were low brightness objects there'd there'd be the straight line of pixels that well I couldn't see stars in but that line was the size on the sky. I that the satellite was on the sky. We starlink what's happening is these well captured. photons that are reflected off of the satellite delight. There are so many of them that they saturate the pill pixels spill over to adjacent pixels wiping out a larger swath of your detector than the satellite alone would wipe out. And when you saturate a pixel that saturation can cause the next. Several images to have ghosts hosts of that satellites passage still visible so not only. Are you wiping out. A larger percentage of pixels with that satellite but you're wiping them out across multiple images. Yeah and and so you know a lot of these these these satellites as they pass the field of view view can overwhelm the sensor and essentially make an entire observing frame worthless and the speed that they're moving is of great concern into these dreamers as they as they move through it's about. How quickly is this thing moving through your field of view? And how long do you have to not be able to take data data while this while the satellite is is moving through so so they're they're quite concerned just about overall in the time domain as well and of course the the big observatory that's going to be the most effective is the newly renamed. That's a different controversial. I know that's like a third the Third Controversy Jersey. We won't get into that but the newly but we. I think we can all agree. That the Vera Rubin Observatory is a wonderful Navarine Observatory and that is going to be the. That's that's going to be the facility that's going to be deeply affected because it just is staring wide eyed at the sky for all all night capturing as much as they can as deeply as a canon so every frame is GonNa have starlings and one ebbs and all this past them and this is this this is a problem of because it has a giant field of you. The probability that there's going to be a Starlink in any one image goes up if you have a small field of view. There's the potential that you can time your images to avoid having star Lincoln them but because this is a huge field of view. You your ability to do. That is greatly reduced. And they're going to end up picking up. STARLA starlings left and right and here's a question starts to become one of mitigation so folks are working with spacex to see okay. What do we need to do to reduce the brightness of these objects so that they aren't blowing out the detectors? Yeah there's more than that so so Someone from spacex actually gave a presentation this morning and that was actually a bit of a surprise and they didn't do a very good job of letting us know that this is is going to happen. There weren't a lot of people we have the whole ballroom and there wasn't a lot of people they're listening to her her talk. They mentioned essentially a couple of mediation strategy. So the first first thing is with this first launch they have. They've applied some darkening materials to one of the sixty satellites to see if the some of their ideas to make them to have a lower Albedo lower flexibility. And before you laugh at the fact that it's only one the thing you have to take into mind mind is these suckers were already largely built in preparation and turning around and re fabricating that takes time and so my suspicion. My hope is that that they were only able to fabricate one with the new materials fast enough to be able to test and I think it's you know. No this is how you perform an experiment right. Is You you isolate. The variable does putting all this material on one of the satellites make darker than the rest and and we'll find out what happened happens so so that's the first thing they did is experimenting and and this is a good sign. I mean this is like literally. This is the first time I think that any satellite constellation Elation has ever had a conversation with Strana mors and said what can we do to minimize our impact on your science. I don't there's you know the two hundred others others that we mentioned plus all the eighteen thousand. No one's ever tried to make them not bright in the eyes of strimmers so till the first strategy is to try at a paint them so there will be the second thing is to provide an open source real time. Location of all of the satellites in the Constellation and to communicate with the other networks. And anyone out there. Who is who is going to be relying on knowing the position? These starlink so in theory as the as the Constellation gets built your of your telescope operator. You're going to know when a Starlink is going to be passing through your detector and you'll be able to shut detector down. Wait for the starling. Pass opened the doctor again. And continue to get your to get your

Starlink Spacex American Astronomical Society Honolulu Hawaii Constellation Elation Chile Demint Third Controversy Jersey Musk Northern Hemisphere Strana Mors Vera Rubin Observatory Starla Lincoln Navarine Observatory
The Rise of Portuguese Gastronomy in Britain

Monocle 24: The Menu

11:14 min | 1 year ago

The Rise of Portuguese Gastronomy in Britain

"Opening of the Hawaiian Bar Restaurant Bar Dole rowing London. Three years ago was a milestone for Portuguese greasy and in the British capital both critics and the public loves to the place and also Monaco showed its approval by including Doro in our fifty best restaurants list now. The success story continues us the founder Max Graham and his team prepared to open their second and location. This timing London cece waterbed as I'm then to look back at the past three years to talk about the new location and the revival of Portuguese. Food Food in Brayson Max. Graham joins me here Madari House Studio One Abbey early. I actually opened a pop restaurant back in two thousand fourteen in in Greek street. I was walking my family business. which is Churchill's put company that makes wine imports in the valley? So the d'oro has always been very much in my blood in my upbringing childhoods but really walking for Churchill's when I opened the pool house which was really focused. It was more of a marketing stunt than anything else that was a pup restaurants pop up wind pool bar and we showcase folio of wines and ports in some very very simple produce driven sharing boards and yet during that period. I think I started eating out in London particularly in the Soho area and I just realized that Portuguese foods was very badly represented. I mean a lots of Portuguese restaurants in Stockwell and I absolutely love those restaurants but there are different Soda Portuguese restaurant and you know I was really at the time. I'm loving bar. Fina unloving Morita on these concepts. That were really showcasing. Spanish cuisine in such a contemporary outwards. Outwards way I'm really engaging with Londoners. I'm getting them excited about gastronomy from abroad and I just felt. Portugal wasn't doing that in in London at the time. So you decided to fix that. Yeah I mean I. I started the process of putting together. Ideas Footballer on that culminated in the the opening in two thousand sixteen in between then others opened up some Portuguese restaurants. Nunu Open Tabatha and you know a few years ago. It was great that was about three three of US laundry. No Tobacco really pushing Portuguese food and of course like I said. There's lots of restaurants in stockwell London that really lead. You backed Portugal Assad way which is a sort of nostalgic way. I think it's interesting that you mentioned that before. You launched Bhadra you. You felt that Portuguese food wasn't particularly well represented in London for example. What do you think that was? I don't know maybe London wasn't ready when I was much younger. That was a restaurant on the Kings road called Tuba. It was a Portuguese restaurant. And you know they were showcasing Portuguese food and I don't think think it just didn't engage with London's at the time you know this was about fifteen years ago and I just think potentially Londoners the appetites it's for new experiences. New Cuisines has just snowballed and London just hungry for new concepts particularly when they're showcasing acing cuisines that are less represented. I think that comes in tandem with the fact that Portugal has just been having such a surge in tourism such exposure over the last five years. I mean Portugal. Now the past five years it's just a completely different country. I mean when I grew up importer. It's just so far away from what it is. Today I think in Portugal there is such a wealth of culinary Marie on wine tradition. And I think that these experiences already being heightened and I just think London it is now more than ever probably quite excited to engage with Puccio before we talk about your second restaurants. You're about to launch. Let's still talk about well. Well the first module has been like how strong of a vision. Did you have in regards to the menu as you mentioned you. Spent your childhood impose import. So did you have very strong. Opinions on wall belongs to the menu. And what doesn't so. We actually run a pop up in Puto for the summer for two months with my head chef at the time and we really use thoughts time to brainstorm ideas to travel around you you know. I'm I grew up in the north of Portugal so I'm very familiar with the northern cuisine. But what's so special about Portugal. I'm what's been so special about. The last three is building Baltar is really engaging and learning about those other regions which also rich in culinary and gastronomy but yeah at the time that would favorites from childhood's that were also dishes that we thought had identity which was very reimposed since a lot of the Times a small plates Portuguese concept. You know that's not really traditional. You have petit scores which are sort of small plates. It's butts traditionally wouldn't eat like that in Portugal. It's more about largest sharing dishes and so so you know I was conscious that I didn't want it to just mimic another Spanish tapas restaurant. I really wanted those decisions. And those menu items to speak the identity of Portugal's Strana me which is very much Atlantic driven and you've done a good job. Let's remember that was just a couple of years ago when we ranked as one of the world's what's best restaurants here US monocle very very generous and wonderful knowledge. You're very welcome now. You're opening your your second restaurant in the city. How much could you tell us about that? How different or how simulates the second body raccoons be compared to the first one so I think at London Bridge we? He was slightly limited in a way. By what we wanted to keep the menu short to the point we rotated every every season. There are some dishes that just don't move because they become so popular. That can actually sometimes be quite limiting when you wanting to show off a another hundred dishes that you've come across crossing excited about. I think that's really what the policier in Hof has been. What's been great about that is that we have just really been exploring? During Portugal's different regions different Tad was different recipes. Different Cultures and I think that our menu in the city just gives us a really great opportunity to scratch a little bit deeper about what Portuguese food is. What are those star dishes? By the way that are very much in demand. People may find from both restaurants. Well I think the Buccleuch Bras is one that has been a bit of a heritage buckle. Er Brash is shoestring potatoes very very thin chips which is gently scrambled with eggs and the so-called which we rehydrate for forty eight hours Solved with some olives lovely dish it should be very creamy and it's it's a real comfort food dish and I hope that that will be something that people enjoy in the city as much as they have done in London Bridge. But we're also taking some really exciting new dishes working on this lovely ill dish from the IRA Rawda which will be Friday deals with a Byron source which is really traditionally used on suckling pig. So it's a a white pepper black pepper golic source but it's great on the Friday deals as well how much you still have to be discovered from Portugal. Something the world hasn't quite goes familiar with yet. Every time I go home I think the world has discovered it even more so than the last time. It's just every time there's more people. It's a great points at the alignment with this buzzer tourism but also the locals really embracing the tourism. I think as more and more people go to Portugal. It also drives the experimentation of the chefs impeachable. So there's a wealth of traditional food as a starting point. You've got this book which is all a Bible. Maria alluded Vest who literally has written down all of Portugal's star dishes but then you've also got this generation of chefs Jeffs that went away from Portugal. Who have started coming back on bringing with them? A huge amounts of technical expertise on the taking these very traditional recipes on expanding Portuguese food is expanding those boundaries and considering how reached the Portuguese culinary culture. Do you think there are many dishes and many ingredients. The world has been discovered yet. Something you struggled to find from outside of Portugal I think Portuguese food is obviously hugely driven by the Atlantic. One thing that is very very hard to compete with even though we're in Ireland is the rich miss of produce on fish that you got on the coast of Portugal. You got wonderful. CARBONARA is down in the all. Gov You get incredible perception. which is a goose? Bonna cool on the north coast particularly something like Incredibly Hard Oughta find elsewhere. Something I'd love to put on our menu but it's just one of these ingredients. That's better left for Portugal and better enjoyed when you go visit. I mean there's a lot of dishes that we thought about putting on which would definitely challenge. I think people's perceptions but I mean you've could be the which is made with chicken's blood and you know and there's a lot of tripe and offal dishes in the north of Portugal which I think maybe will hold off from on the next restaurant where probably gonNA play a little bit more safe than that but maybe As a special once in a while maybe one day as we mentioned already. You're just about to open. Open your sick and restaurants in the city. What about after that? Do you have any longer term plans. Walt may happen after that. Yeah I mean. We now imports about fifty percents of all winus. Direct from Boutique produces in Portugal. One thing I've really liked to develop more of a wine shop Pango and also we bring in a lot of cheeses and shall coutries would love to develop a mercer which is a deadly concept. I mean the sky's the limit. You've got punch bakeries. which would be great to get involved in but Baldur in its core concept I think I think it definitely has potential insult to grow to one team or sites off to this Max Graham Phone Giraffe Bar Douro and the new restaurant in London's broad gate opens later eighty two this month

Portugal London Max Graham London Bridge United States Brayson Max Stockwell Stockwell London Churchill Madari House Studio One Abbey Founder Monaco Doro Soho New Cuisines Puto Pango Buccleuch Bras Walt
Who's the Champ?

In The Gate

07:41 min | 1 year ago

Who's the Champ?

"Bobby? A halt of the New York hot list is our first guest of two thousand twenty here on the gate now. The horse that won the Breeders Cup dirt bile beating Omaha beach is spun to run and he will be facing Omaha beach again in the Pegasus World Cup. The first major race of two thousand thousand twenty but maximum security will not be there and code of honor will not be there. Maximum security is waiting for Saudi Arabia. The world's richest race the Saudi Cup in February. It's very tempting to make this a political discussion. I'll only do it to the extent of saying with what's going on in the Middle East right now. How do you think that is going to impact whether trainers bring their horses over for the Saudi Cup and or the Dubai World Cup in March or maybe they take a look at that Pegasus again and say maybe we ought to just stay here that that's a very hard question to answer? Ah It's hard to understand how people feel I will say this. I am confident in saying that the people especially in Dubai. We're ruler of the country behind that I think they're going to bend over backwards to provide security and take care of the park I I would hope the same thing's going to happen in Saudi Arabia race and then just not become a outer tech or anyone but that is a question question that you just can't answer. I think it's very hard. It's an individual decision to a Lotta funny. I understand when people go play a lot of people who have no dog in the adviser to come up with answers of morally questions. And what they're gonNA do when not to you. Gary West was all set to run his voice Independence when it was nine nine billion dollar I. He was happy to take the fourbillion winter. Share the person. Just go to the Middle East but when you cut the first out of nowhere to three billion winter I'll get one point five billion something like that and you have just wants to you know once in a lifetime could easily win ten million dollars and probably turn around that month and win a twelve million dollar right I. It's hard because this is an expensive sport and as much as these people arrested of of money that goes into this so You understand it as of now. I haven't heard anyone saying they're going to change their mind about going. I'm sure people are a little bit nervous but I mean let's be frank. I think anytime you over. There is probably reason to be nervous. So it's just an individual decision and I wouldn't chastize anyone. Whatever they they decide because it feels like them? That's their call. It's not it. I make my own decision on my life. You make your own decision on your own life and I think that's the way it goes. Oh by the way. I think you're under selling the Saudi Cup. I believe the purses twenty million dollars. Well it's ten million the whip you get ten billion but it's it's one that that that's what I'm saying he gary West is looking at it. I will get sent. Don't get out of the home and billion dollars if I say in that term so you can when you look at it now. You basically have to win the Pakistan that in line with at one point I for share of the first compares to the ten million that he will win. Take home for winning the Saudi Cup where he will be the favorite and a one term mounting great definitely. I Dunno betting Saudi Arabia. But I know American pools. He's GonNa behavior and you running for stabbing tons of money. That's a pretty compelling nonetheless in the Pegasus World Cup you do have. Some horses is with some credentials including higher power. The Pacific Classic winner. We mentioned Omaha Beach. roadster for Bob Baffert is aiming toward the Pegasus. And you will be there. How do you see this first? Major race of the year shaping up that force right now in training maximum very doubt after that case to be made then Omaha Aubenas bunch of wrong especially violent eight might be the second and third bout with McKinsey right there with them so when you get fun to run and Omaha Beach I think he got a pretty darn good race. I mean it's interesting possibilities. Are the horses doing nominated at the box He's done. I'm very well. This is of course. A lot of people east might have remembered with Chad Brown Barrasso. And you know he was good you know. He got coming up. In the minor spot that West to John Adler Verona's ray thing all of a sudden. He's winning all these steaks and eat it. You can't east to Churchill even lost or any blocks. We'll see if he's going to be the ones that they decided to send into the race. It'd be a good one back wizar- people know this story. That fifteen thousand dollars who ran against maximum security and the world's most famous Amos. Sixteen Thousand Dollars Eight lamer and it'll be in there. I think it'll be a big competitive fourth. It doesn't I think have the superstar. One runner arrogate powerpoint chrome Omaha beaches in that category But it's interesting. It's good to get back into talking about racing and Bobby Hall. Nobody better to do it with so. Thank you so much barry. Thank you always chat that with you so when we come back here on the gate. The site of the world's first million dollar horse race is short on dollars and short on time time to secure them. Welcome back to win the gate in July of two two thousand. Nearly twenty years ago Churchill. Downs home of the Kentucky Derby purchased Arlington Park in Chicago for nearly seventy one million dollars. Arlington's owner Dick Duchossois had closed the track in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight and nine hundred ninety nine saying that he could not compete with other gambling businesses. The opened again in May may of two thousand presumably with the knowledge that a sale was coming at the time. Churchill was in something of an arms race against the stronach group. When it came to buying up tracts the idea was to create networks of tracks for simulcasting and cross promotion of races and Events in nineteen ninety nine Churchill bought calder race course in Miami and Hollywood Park in California and then bought fairgrounds in New Orleans in two thousand and four? This was meant to counter the STRANA group which began its buying spree in nineteen ninety eight with Santa Anita then they added Gulfstream Park in Florida. Both major Maryland tracks Laurel and PIMLICO as well as golden gate fields and Portland Meadows and Oregon stronach versus Churchill. Wasn't exactly the Cold War. But the battle lines had been drawn it it seemed that Churchill was the first to blink Churchill dumped Hollywood park like a hot potato in two thousand five just six years after buying it. Churchill said at the time that California has forsaken racing and its needs reports came from fairgrounds in two thousand thirteen that the turf course was too dangerous juris to race and that the track had been poorly maintained ever since the churchill purchase at the same time Churchill was trying any maneuvering possible to get out of its obligation obligation to operate racing at calder. Eventually the STRANA coned Gulfstream Park worked out a lease agreement to run the calder meet in October and November this year. Two Thousand Twenty is the final year of Churchill's obligation to lease the meat after which it may convert the track into a shipping logistics center. Or something like that.

Churchill Saudi Cup Saudi Arabia Middle East Omaha Pegasus World Cup Dubai Gary West Bobby Hall Gulfstream Park Stronach Group Omaha Beach. Pakistan New York Bob Baffert Chad Brown Barrasso Arlington Park Mckinsey
What exactly is a river?

Robot or Not?

05:53 min | 1 year ago

What exactly is a river?

"Listening Elliott would like to know the definition of a river now. I watched a youtube video recently about this about what. The world's shortest shortest river was and the idea was that there was one place where it was a like a spring that emerges and then there's like about fifty yards it's of concrete between it in a river and then flows into the river and the argument was this is the shortest river. It starts here at the spring and it flows out and then it ends up merging with this other river her then there was another example of somewhere else in the world where there are two lakes and there was a connector between them. The water flowed from one lake into the other and that was a river that flowed between between these two bodies of water. Do you have any thoughts about what what what makes a river with depth length. Anything else that it might make something a river versus the old creek or stream. I saw that video to and does get it had definition in it which just like whatever the the cartographers definition about where it has to flow from into. But I'm just going to say it has to be some water that flows in more or less uniform direction in a skinny thing not gonna go into manmade versus. Not because I feel like if you if you dig something and it's manmade but water keeps flowing there for many many years. I mean you made a river you can. You can make a river a lake. Why can't you make a river right? Like if you dig that thing and water keeps flowing on it and then hume's become extinct and five billion years later stuff still flowing like a river it was may may it's like it's a river so the length thing though. There is a minimum length like you can't just take two uber. Bodies have ordered that are separated by one. Millimeter breakdown that one. Millimeter thing and say this is one millimeter distancing. That's a river it's like no you've just you've literally just connected to things. There is nothing in between you have to separate them by a certain amount now. What does that amount is five feet two feet? I feel like we all moralize no most of the time. Things don't get names unless they are considered significant out got to be river this whole competition for shortest rivers causing people to name things in silly ways. If it's like three inches not say this is the World Charles. Wherever that competition for short will make you name things that are not rivers to call reverse verse? That's just ridiculous like you can name give it a name or whatever but if it's like a one inch long it's not a river at all so you need some water flowing flowing through thing that I feel like has to be. I'M NOT GONNA say thinner than it is long. But it should be recognizable as a thing that stuff flows goes down And I think a lot of the things I video probably too short to be over but I think you see it could be something that you could you know. It's the the minimum like shorter than you might think especially given the with if you really want to name something. That's twenty yards long a river. Fine because you might need to have the name for that thing because you might have one body of water another body water. What do you call the thing in? Between does it belong to the left body of water the right body or if it's long enough to be significant it should have a name and you could call it a river You could get into streaming creek and all sorts of stuff like that but I feel like you know river I'm GonNa say it's generic term like dish but it is is in discussions like this especially with the shortest one. I I don't I don't think it's productive to decide whether you're going gonNA call it a creek or stream or creek. Or whatever the other various synonyms are. We're all just saying. Is this a body of water worthy of being named all right I mean I I I think this is like it's however you wanted to find it. There are things that don't look like rivers but if you trace it back it turns is at this leads into a body of water. It ends up becoming the Mississippi River. You can jump over the Mississippi River in Minnesota at the source of it because it's tiny but it becomes the Mississippi the sippy river. It's the Mississippi River and it's it's very much like how do you want to set the definitions Geography is similar to like Strana me where it's like. What's planet well? Some group could define it in some way. But there's sort of like common use and it's very different. Yeah exactly for for professionals. There has to be a hard best definition like for matmaker and stuff like that but for regular people. They don't have to know about that definition when they're discussing rivers in in general that it's it's enough to I feel like there's this is one of those not probably not a lot of debate other than the shortest river people because we most people sort of know the Monday see them at only if you're in the Profession Ashen do you start drawing those fine distinctions and holding too. I do laugh my mom lives in Arizona and we often drive over a bridge over dirt. Sort that is the Gila River and it makes me laugh every time but the fact is in the there is a wet season. They're very briefly. And if there's a monsoon or a big rainstorm or something like that you know it will water will flow underneath that thing. But and they they call it a river even though for a large portion of the year there's no water in it but water flows through there in that direction and when it does. That's that's the Yellow River and sounds to me like you're driving over the Gila river bed for the area. Most of the year. It is a place where waiting for a river. It will get here eventually. It's not here right eight now. It's a riverbed it is. It is in the river is sleeping somewhere else for the moment. I don't know about the La River though about the Riverland Terminator. Two I guess yeah. Yeah and that's that is a river that they ended up putting concrete on and and guiding where it goes and you could call it something else but it was historically a river and it's still basically also very also dry out of the time if movies for sure believed absolutely also there's underground rivers but I don't even WanNa get talk talk about that. 'cause I don't even know what that is underground railroad but a little bit different. I think it's a lot different but okay.

Mississippi River Gila River La River Yellow River Sippy River Youtube Elliott Riverland Terminator Hume Arizona Mississippi Strana Minnesota
Weird Issues: Are comets asteroids or are asteroids comets?

Astronomy Cast

08:34 min | 1 year ago

Weird Issues: Are comets asteroids or are asteroids comets?

"Used to be so simple. Comets were snowballs from the outer solar system and asteroids rocks walks from the inner solar system. But now everything's all shades of gray. STRANA found asteroids have behavioral comets and college the behave like Asteroids Pamela. Make sense of this for him. It's a continuum of objects that simply want to mock with our desire to name mm-hmm everything let's face it. Human beings like to put things in boxes and and this is a problem for us when it comes to the solar system because we used to think it was so easy we had trust real world. We had gas giants we we had asteroids. We had icy things and and it's all falling apart as we've discovered that well somewhere between the icy things in the asteroid. Things is a continual. And there's there's no discrete gap or anything no set the technical term icy things and asteroid things. Technically it's comet or send tour or Kuyper belt object depending on where they are and then of course the cloud. We need to stop naming things based on where they're located located right or just like trying to classify them don't judge just that's just gonNA drive yourself crazy so and then they're gonNA set off a debate on the Internet where people are going to yell at each other about whether poodles planet or not. And we're still going to have to hear about it now however the classic we're just GonNa go with Planet Classic Play Planet Classic. Okay all right so so then back. In the olden days of your What was an asteroid? It was a dry rocky. Object like killed the dinosaurs awards and exists in the asteroid belt. That in general is made of metals of carbons of silicates and and is dry. That was wrapped is where we started. Asteroids that you've got the the ones that are near the earth we've got the ones as you said in the main asteroid belt and then we've got the trojans interesting side note. Did you know that. There is roughly in the same order of magnitude as many objects in Jupiter's Trojan Asteroid Area as in the main asteroid. Bill Lloyd didn't that's is you know that either the I know until I was doing an episode about it in other the words the solar system has second asteroid belt. And you didn't even know about it. I mean we all knew the trojans were there but we didn't know that they work and they're not even third third. They're really just to clouds that Leonie Trail Jupiter like like yeah parade on procession around our solar I system and yet there is as many objects roughly as in the main asteroid belt. So anyway interesting thing I just discovered So okay so so. Asteroid Rock Metal Draw S.. What's a comet? Eight comment is a Blob of mostly Isis. So so here you have. Water is nitrogen ice dry ice isis. Things that can be liquids. It's Things that will become gassy tails and we knew that mixed in with that was some gravelly bets but it was considered to be mostly Salihi ice and cold Gucci does a great of she does a great science show where she will make a comment with yes and and and this is something that that astronomers have been doing for ages because you can get all of the ingredients to make a comment in a bowl pretty much. It's from your local grocery store. If your local grocery store happens to have dry ice and I it's just a little bit of Corn Syrup a little bit of molasses lassus dry some water some ammonia and then you grab a handful of dirt from the art right and that's a comet and so it's pretty pretty clear right like obviously one is a chunk of rock and metal rock or metal rock and metal rock or metal at the other is a chunk of water with maybe a little bit of dirt thrown in meet both in volatile ICES. When did this categorization and start to go off the rails? What some discoveries that were made that made this clearly problematic? Well one one of the problems was simply the story we had told ourselves about. Our solar system turned out to be wrong and one of the stories that we told ourselves about our solar system. was that all of the water. We have all all of the earth's oceans came to us through the bombardment of comets on the surface of our world but when we started looking at the composition position accommodates the waters that comets are made of. Don't match the water that we have here on earth so there is a sudden w T.F. If water what's wrong with you and a realization that all the water we've got had to come from somewhere else now. It didn't end there it. It never ends that simply said but but just like just before you move on so we know Oh that like based on whatever the deterioration the tritium is the ratios of of what are the kinds of hydrogen involve are involved in making water ready the ratio Samyong comments right and so. Have you sample the water in the earth's oceans and then you look at the samples that had been done in in looking at comet. They don't match perfectly. I mean obviously they both have water in them. But but it's like the initial recipe doesn't seem to match so it's to the comments couldn't have been the source of all of an and in fact having looked at multiple comets. It's if our water came from the as we so far seeing them typical comments. It still doesn't work so it it. It can't even be like the smallest fraction of our water. Came from comments So yeah it's not comments. Okay so the so then. We have a clue but that doesn't mean anything right just means that the water came from somewhere else. Maybe it was formed in place as the earth formed and then maybe it was a part of underground and in welled up over time as the Earth Glenham models. That's out there. But that's no longer the dominant model because we have another Attacker that has been identified. It's it's been realized that asteroids have water in fact they appear to have a lot of water and big astros like series may even have subsurface sees of water right so within how was how were these discoveries made well. It's it's been a whole combination of looking at nearer by asteroid looking things and realizing shoot. These are actually active. They actually periodically spray material outwards and thinking. Well some of them were just going to call. I'm dead comments. We're going to refer to these objects that clearly used to be comets. Their orbits change they got crusted over with stuff will blame them on being former comets comets and about works to a point but then we started doing things like sending probes out to visit asteroids and when we got to series. We saw cry of alcoholism going on there are massive features on series that appeared to be former role. Kano's that have now begun to slump and there's at least one. What appears to be still active volcano in place in the bottom of a crater and these this is salty stuff that's getting sprayed up and then settling down and crusting over the volcano that that it is

Leonie Trail Jupiter Bill Lloyd Kano
The astronomer who took gay rights to the Supreme Court

Retropod

05:31 min | 1 year ago

The astronomer who took gay rights to the Supreme Court

"It was quite life for a man whose formal occupation was other worldly by which I mean he was Strana and a Harvard educated one at that but in the summations of his extraordinary life one of the most not bullock chievements went largely unmentioned actually it wasn't really an achievement at least not yet he was about the time he we lost and lost big after fighting in World War Two Kennedy returned to the States picked up a PhD and Harvard then moved to Washington taking a job with the army map service it was nine thousand nine hundred fifty seven he was gay and back then that was considered immoral and unacceptable after his bosses learned he had been arrested a gay cruising area not far from the White House they sent him a letter saying he was fired Yes for being gay there's some of their conversation that was featured on the podcast making history lean while by that time I had decided that basically what this amounted to a declaration of war against me by my government a grant my government the right to declare war against me and be I tend not to lose my wars Kennedy sent letters lots of letters all the way up to the Oval Office nobody did a thing nobody cared the anger it never abated in fact you got worse so many turned to the legal system for health he sued the government that didn't go so well either juris series of failures to move his case Ford Kennedy's Attorney Essentially gave up candy of course did not on his own with no legal training Kennedy wrote and filed a pro se appeal to the Supreme Court this was the first time that the rights of gays or lack thereof were taken to the nation's highest court Kinney's legal reasoning sounds familiar today but was historic event tolerating gays he argued wasn't enough the constitution itself required equal treatment he wrote in his arguments to the court in World War Two petitioner did not hesitate to fight the Germans with bullets in order to help preserve his rights and freedoms and liberties and those of others in one thousand nine hundred sixty it is ironically necessary that he fight the Americans with words in order to preserve against tyrannical government some of those same rights freedoms and liberties for himself and others he asked the court to allow him to engage in that battle in then he waited learned this loss by reading a one paragraph news item in the Washington store he was defeated deflated letter of apology. Cammie finally was satisfied apology accepted he said Slash Retro pod.

Ford Kennedy Supreme Court Harvard Kinney Chievements Strana Washington White House Cammie Oval Office Attorney
Belinda Alleges Frank’s `Fanciful Schemes’ Eroded Stronach Family Empire

In The Gate

06:44 min | 1 year ago

Belinda Alleges Frank’s `Fanciful Schemes’ Eroded Stronach Family Empire

"As the story goes frank stronach arrived in Canada from his native Austria in Nineteen fifty four with two hundred hundred dollars in his pocket and the hope of opening a tool and die shop that shop eventually became the auto parts company MAGNA international which made Strana on a billionaire frank then got involved with thoroughbred racing owning both racehorses and eventually race tracks today the Strana group the spinoff off company for many of the Families Racetrack Operations Owns Gulfstream Park in Florida both tracks in Maryland Loral and Pimlico home of the preakness and of course source the great race place Santa Anita among others over the years. Some of Frank stronach's race track plans heavy listed quizzical looks with one example being the thirty million dollar price tag for the Pegasus statue outside of Gulfstream his daughter Belinda though has done more than look quizzically. Belinda is now the chairman and President of the stronach group and she is suing her father for over five hundred million dollars. She claims claimed that francs pet projects as she calls them have lost the company huge sums of money frank has counter-sued saying that Belinda and a former business partner appropriated family funds for their personal benefit good grief. What will this family feud mean for the Strana Group Group and by extension for the entire thoroughbred industry here in the United States since T S G controls so many influential tracks to people who were quite familiar with the business dealings of the strategic group are writers Joe Connor and Barbara Sector of the financial post a Canadian based publication and we welcome Miss Scheckter and Mr O'connor here to win the gate. Let's start with Mr O'connor. Each side accuses the other of financial malfeasance. What facts do we know through all of this bluster. Well what we do know is what the suit alleges and what I'm frank is accusing blend end of is misappropriating funds and essentially locking him out of the company that his money built and what Glenda is same is. That's not the case and in her countersuit. She's saying well you know. The Truth is here is my dad and I'm quoting is is she's called them idiosyncratic idiosyncratic and often unprofitable side ventures meaning that she believes that her father has a frittered away money on then any projects such as an organic beef farm in California and on a fancy bike electric bike and on other things and that has put the company in jeopardy and that in order to see rescue the company's fortunes. She has to keep her father at arm's length from it. It's a giant. He said see she said as long as that's floating out there and working its way through the court system. It's going to mean some uncertainty. I think the the thing that is sure is that there's going to be continued uncertainty until this gets resolved so so. Michelle after financial controversy has followed the strongbox for quite a while even going back to two thousand ten when they were paid basically to leave magna and it seemed like a little unusual to say the least I mean what do things like this say about the nature of their business dealings things in their character especially as relates to their employees. Well I mean it was very unusual and it was quite controversial in Canada just because because of the the quantum the amount of money that they paid to collapse this dual share structure which gave the Straw nics way more votes per share than other shareholders. I mean it was a common structure in Canada and it's even sort of picking up steam right now in the US and a little bit back in Canada because it allows sort of families as an entrepreneurs to retain control but in the case of Magna and at the time it was an unpopular structure and companies were being pressured to drop it it and stronach agreed to collapse it and leave the company but he demanded what summit called a king's ransom to do so and he was not willing to bend on that it ended up going for Securities Commission and also through the courts with some of the large institutional shareholders like pensions demanding that you know that he takes less money that it was far too much money but he was unyielding and he walked away with exactly what he negotiated with the company who cares what at the institutional shareholders who've been there for varying amounts of time want so it was the same when he was running the company he did things his way he took you know large paychecks and defended them telling people that maybe he even deserved more than he was taking so certainly as strong willed and you know willing to keep pushing his way and getting it so that certainly is the type of personality. We're talking about here. It's a it's not a shrinking violet on either of their counts. What about the potential cultural difference at work here since you have the self made father and daughter who was born into wealth. I think that's a huge the dividing line you see frank who was a child in wartime. Austria who comes to Canada panelists our near to it and has the Moxie to build a company that goes through the roof in terms of its value he built this thing with his hands and I met with them for lunch going going back into the spring and what he said at the time and he wasn't GonNa go deep into the weeds of the actual legal case he wasn't gonNA roll mud necessarily Elliot his daughter but what he did say quite clearly and what was evident in our conversation was that he truly believed that he'd built this. This was whose baby as it were and that his children his daughter and son and their children should be entitled to some of that well but in the form of of a and inheritance in the form of what I think the figure he quoted to me was like I will give my children one hundred million dollars each and they can go on build their own legacy. I can see whereas frank sees. The He sees the race tracks. TST owns he sees the empire as I've been been built by his his money and he believes that he should have the keys to the empire and be able to drive you in whatever direction he

Frank Stronach Belinda Canada Stronach Group Magna Magna International United States Pimlico Austria Gulfstream Park Strana Group Group Mr O'connor Families Racetrack Operations Strana Maryland Loral California Michelle Florida TST
How Did We Miss This Week's Shockingly Close Asteroid Flyby?

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

02:35 min | 1 year ago

How Did We Miss This Week's Shockingly Close Asteroid Flyby?

"An asteroid as large as a football field is just flying past the earth with astronomers not detecting acting it until literally just a day before its closest approach. The giants space rock thought to be up to one hundred and thirty meters wide came within sixty five thousand kilometers of earth on july the twenty fifth in nominal terms. That's about as close as it gets. The asteroids being catalogued as twenty nine. Okay the european paint space agency says this near earth objects close approach illustrates the need for more eyes on the sky was able to observe the asteroid just before its fly by requesting requesting to separate telescopes in the international scientific optical network is on to take images of space rock the observations allow strana missed the determine the asteroids exact back position and trajectory yesterday it was i the technical the day before its closest approach by the southern observatory veneer of asteroids research observations of twenty nine thousand nine okay with an independently confirmed by other observatories including the chiba radio telescope in puerto rico and third telescope in the ice on network following following its discovery with knowledge of the astros would have been in the past based on its current course and by manually searching for it by existing images were found in the past is is an atlas skysurfer archives it turns out birth said they had in fact captured the asteroid in the weeks before it's ultra close encounter with earth but the space space rock was moving so slowly it appears to move just a tiny amount between the images and was therefore not recognized as a near earth object neo and hence the seriousness of the threat <unk>. It wasn't appreciated of course astronomers now of an attracting thousands of asteroids across the solar system so why was this one discovered so late will unfortunately originally currently there's no single obvious reason apart from its slow apparent motion across the sky before it's close approach twenty nineteen okay travels in highly elliptical orbit taking it from within the open of venus out too well beyond that of mas this means the time it spends near earth and therefore time it's detectable both current telescope capabilities is relatively short modules towards the size of twenty nine. Okay i relatively common throughout the solar system but they impact on average only about once every one hundred thousand years or so still an asteroid like that hitting a major city or urban area would cause major devastation destruction based from its current orbital path through the solar system the asteroid one come close to the game for at least the next two hundred years. I'm stewart gary. You're listening space

Giants Astros Stewart Gary Southern Observatory Strana Chiba Puerto Rico Sixty Five Thousand Kilometers One Hundred Thousand Years Two Hundred Years Thirty Meters Twenty Fifth
Mysterious light flashes on the Moon have been baffling researchers for decades

Money Matters with Ken Moraif

00:26 sec | 1 year ago

Mysterious light flashes on the Moon have been baffling researchers for decades

"A mystery about the moon continues to baffle strana mors since may, and walk the moon fifty years ago, there's still one phenomenon that has perplexed researchers for decades random flashes of light coming from the moon's surface, the flashes can happen. Sometimes several times a week, there have been some explanations from moon quakes to UFO's, but none of ever been proved researchers are hoping a new telescope in Spain may provide the

Spain Fifty Years
Starlink Upsets Astronomers

SPACE NEWS POD

03:36 min | 1 year ago

Starlink Upsets Astronomers

"So SpaceX has launched sixty communication, satellite so far. And these communications satellites, startling basically super high speed internet. Via satellite and strana members aren't really happy with what speaks us SpaceX has done so far because they can see Starling satellites when they look up in the sky with their naked, is my, what am I friends actually saw them he was in? I think was in Maine. Some somewhere on the east coast. Can remember he was traveling but he looked up in the sky. And he, he didn't realize that it was star lake satellites. He was like, what the heck is at thing. What are all these UFO's in their all in a lion? You know, they look like a caravan of satellites. So if a normal person can see them, not really caring about the nice guy, you know, like you just kinda glanced up, and he saw them had explained to him, you know, like hey Starlink is up there. Now, these astronomers they're very worried that their views of the nice guy are going to be clear anymore, especially if SpaceX gets their twelve thousand. Starlink said lights up there. So the international astronomical union, which is a key ruling body. When it comes to the night sky, they've actually released a statement that basically said, I'm gonna break this down for is easiest possible. Basically, we can't see the things that we want to see because they're satellites in our way. There needs to be regulations around the said lights, so astronomers can continue to do their jobs because they don't want to be interrupted by satellites. Basically, if you're looking at an object deep sky object deep space object in the night sky, and you're photographing at you're taking measurements of it in a budget said, lights fling by that are visible, you can't do your work, and it's just it's not cool. I mean, it's cool to see satellites, right? It's cool to look up. And he c satellites flying by. That's neat. But astronomy is super important. So these people at the international astronomical union put out a press release and said we don't like it. Let's figure out a way to manage all of these satellites that'll be coming because there's not just a Starlink. Right. There's other companies out there that want to do this, too, and they see a prophet in the future. And there has to be regulations, international regulations that stop or, you know, figure out a way to mitigate the damage that these satellites are doing to the nice guy, and it's not only visible these said, lights use radio frequencies to transmit data back and forth, from the satellites to the ground. And also, there's radio astronomy, which could possibly use the same frequencies as these satellites. So they're really worried about that as well. And these said lights could interfere with something like we just got an image of the. First black hole. Right. The first image of the black hole, and that might not have been possible, if there were internet constellation of satellites up there, so. That's what they're really worried about. They're worried about not being up to discover new things because they're going to be interrupted by radio signals and also visually in the

Spacex International Astronomical Uni Starlink Maine Starling
Munazza

Tell Them, I Am

06:24 min | 1 year ago

Munazza

"Hello. This is me. She yousef. And this is tell them I am. In twenty fifteen I went on a road trip from Chicago to Wisconsin. And we went like really far north. Like I think the nearest people to us were a hundred miles away, which now that I think about it was probably a dangerous situation. Anyway, it was stunning if you haven't been to Wisconsin, you're seriously missing out. So it was late summer like early fall. And as we get deeper into the night, it starts to get really chilly, kind of Chris, and in the middle of the night, I go out into the backyard of the house. We're staying and the night is so block that I had to just stand there for a second. Try to find my way. And after a while my eyes start to adjust and there's this brightness remember looking up at the sky, the stars were clear and more crowded than I had ever seen before. It was honestly like the stars where the crowd at a concert, and I was. Onset or something? And I swear I could see the curve of the sky, it was like I was wrapped in almost. It was so literally beyond my reach like forget figuratively. I felt so small in a good way. So the next morning, I'm sitting inside on the couch with my breakfast. The sun is, like, especially bright, the kind of right? That even if it's cold to kind of just warms you up. And there's the dust in the air and for a second. The sunlight, set this crowd of dust dancing. And I felt so small. My name is Vanessa all in the end. I am an astronomer. I think that is the primary way that identify myself when I, meet new people. Astronauts are on a lot of times ex military and engineers like they have survival skills versus strana mors are fabulous nerds. It's Uman to gaze up at the stars and contemplate the cosmos. There's a there's a Carl Sagan, quote, I'm probably paraphrasing at this point. It's not explaining science. Seems to me perverse, when you're in love, you want to tell the world. I grew up with my parents may data's from Pakistan. He moved to the US in the eighties. Horrible up getting. Okay. And my mom is from India, Mark from our message. Good. There. I have two sisters. We're very close knit family. We love hang out with each other like going home. It was always like the highlight of my day. My parents had this interesting parenting style, which I have started to now be more aware of I didn't have a bed time. I didn't have occurred few. I never had any like rules about how long it could stay on the computer or the or the TV or, or the phone, but it was kind of will lose things where if I wanted to do something by parents would be like that doesn't seem like such a good idea. And then I would kind of be like, oh, but I think it is. So they like, they'd say, well, go ahead, try it, and then I would try it, and it wouldn't be a good idea. And they come back like see. I feel like I'm humble Ryan about my parents really amazing people. When is engineers? I was a sophomore in college. My dad got extremely sick. So he was taking a medication for a rheumatoid arthritis treatment, the medicine was I N, H, I, E so Nisaan and it's known to be extremely toxic. We were not told that my dad was prescribed his medications, so he was told to take this six month course of I h and when he was done with the six months course than he could come back to start his Arthur treatment, well, five months in my dad's sorta getting extremely sick. I is getting very confused. And then one day he woke up and was just completely yellow like completely jaundiced. His is really his skin was yellow. And we took him to the to his primary didn't it turned out. He was having liver failure. Annan ver- when I heard that he was having liver failure. I didn't know what that meant, and I remember being scared, but not being sure why I was scared. A couple days after he started to get a lot worse. And there is one to remember it was the Saturday we were all home, and we had to do like basic errands, like grocery shopping. And we're all going to Costco, my favorite thing ever. And my dad was my dad was feed be used completely out of him. We started to get really concerned. So my mom colds, my dad's primary, who is also one of our good family friends. So he came by the evening, putting I remember who's putting on my dad's shoes for him. Like getting him ready to go to the hospital. And my dad was like kicking him in the face. And he eventually got my dad dressed enough to hospital. And like put him in the front seat of his car with a lot of struggle for my dad and drove him himself to to the hospital. NYU langone. Turned out that his liver was ninety eight percent necrosis, which means that ninety eight percent of his liver had died. It became very clear that he needed a new liver, and he needed a liver transplant.

Carl Sagan Nyu Langone Wisconsin Annan Chicago Yousef Vanessa Costco Onset Pakistan India Chris United States Nisaan Ryan Arthur Mark
Munazza

Tell Them, I Am

05:24 min | 1 year ago

Munazza

"My name is Vanessa all in the end. I am an astronomer. I think that is the primary way that identify myself when I, meet new people. Astronauts are on a lot of times ex military and engineers like they have survival skills versus strana mors are fabulous nerds. It's Uman to gaze up at the stars and contemplate the cosmos. There's a there's a Carl Sagan, quote, I'm probably paraphrasing at this point. It's not explaining science. Seems to me perverse, when you're in love, you want to tell the world. I grew up with my parents may data's from Pakistan. He moved to the US in the eighties. Horrible up getting. Okay. And my mom is from India, Mark from our message. Good. There. I have two sisters. We're very close knit family. We love hang out with each other like going home. It was always like the highlight of my day. My parents had this interesting parenting style, which I have started to now be more aware of I didn't have a bed time. I didn't have occurred few. I never had any like rules about how long it could stay on the computer or the or the TV or, or the phone, but it was kind of will lose things where if I wanted to do something by parents would be like that doesn't seem like such a good idea. And then I would kind of be like, oh, but I think it is. So they like, they'd say, well, go ahead, try it, and then I would try it, and it wouldn't be a good idea. And they come back like see. I feel like I'm humble Ryan about my parents really amazing people. When is engineers? I was a sophomore in college. My dad got extremely sick. So he was taking a medication for a rheumatoid arthritis treatment, the medicine was I N, H, I, E so Nisaan and it's known to be extremely toxic. We were not told that my dad was prescribed his medications, so he was told to take this six month course of I h and when he was done with the six months course than he could come back to start his Arthur treatment, well, five months in my dad's sorta getting extremely sick. I is getting very confused. And then one day he woke up and was just completely yellow like completely jaundiced. His is really his skin was yellow. And we took him to the to his primary didn't it turned out. He was having liver failure. Annan ver- when I heard that he was having liver failure. I didn't know what that meant, and I remember being scared, but not being sure why I was scared. A couple days after he started to get a lot worse. And there is one to remember it was the Saturday we were all home, and we had to do like basic errands, like grocery shopping. And we're all going to Costco, my favorite thing ever. And my dad was my dad was feed be used completely out of him. We started to get really concerned. So my mom colds, my dad's primary, who is also one of our good family friends. So he came by the evening, putting I remember who's putting on my dad's shoes for him. Like getting him ready to go to the hospital. And my dad was like kicking him in the face. And he eventually got my dad dressed enough to hospital. And like put him in the front seat of his car with a lot of struggle for my dad and drove him himself to to the hospital. NYU langone. Turned out that his liver was ninety eight percent necrosis, which means that ninety eight percent of his liver had died. It became very clear that he needed a new liver, and he needed a liver transplant. I just felt like as soon as, as soon as my dad was admitted hospital and this need for a transplant became a reality things kind of just felt completely different. And a couple of days into being in the hospital he fell into a coma. Apparently before my dad's slipped into the coma. He told the head transplant surgeon. Please help me get better because I have to take care of my family. I really was not processing like what was happening. Still going to all my classes I still hanging. All my problems, that's just kind of working on this autopilot mode, where I was going about my days, doing everything that I normally would going to my classes in the mornings, and they would take the six train down to NYU Langone and spend the rest of my day. There.

Nyu Langone Carl Sagan Coma Annan Vanessa Costco Pakistan India United States Nisaan Ryan Arthur Mark
Understanding Australian Indigenous Astronomy

Astronomy Cast

08:02 min | 1 year ago

Understanding Australian Indigenous Astronomy

"Right. This week we focus on the ARCO astronomy of another part of the world, this time from the indigenous people of. Another group of people whose lives depended on knowing what was happening in the sky from season to season are Pamela got a big continent. Here of what is the evidence of archaic astronomy from the continent of Australia. Well, what's kind of cool with a stray Elliot's? It's not so much ARCHE of strana me as it's modern anthropology that allows us to look, Pat back on sixty five thousand years of history with, with the aboriginal tribes of gelia were looking at a couple hundred different language groups. We are looking at a continent that has been peopled for sixty five thousand years, that hasn't undergone the same kinds of destruction that civilizations here in north and South America. Underwent? And so as. As we talk with the people who are there today, we can hear into days oral tradition evidence of Frincis, a meteor impact that was thousands of years ago, a supernova that was thousands of years ago, and we still they still pay attention to these stories. This is still part of how they live their lives and why they do and don't go certain places, and it's, it's really amazing culture, and they look at space in such a different way instead of having four seasons. Many of the different nations of Australia, Mark out six different seasons of the year that are marked out with when different of the constellations rise on the horizon, some constellations Mark out, this is when you should go and gather the eggs, this is when. These animals can be expected to be breeding, the dingoes for instance, it's different. And we've both had the opportunity now to be in Australia. I was there almost a year ago, thanks to Dylan O'Donnell and, and his, his got to speak at his conference star stuff. And then we got Carlin, I went on a road trip north from there into the, the jungle part of stralia north of Brisbane, and it was like the skies. There are just there stunning like it's, it's not surprising that anyone who, who lived there. With out light pollution and saw that sky. And it is, it's a Canadian we have dark skies as well here, and I've seen plenty of Milky Way. But the core of the Milky Way is down by the horizon. We see a little bit of it over the summer when the when we get to see Sagittarius and Scorpio and some of those constellations than the rest of the year. It's, it's, it's fine. It's fine. But, but there it is just right. Overhead it blazes, the planets moved through it, right. Overhead. There's like Ayman, if you have seen dark skies, you have not seen Australian dark skies. They are next level. They absolutely have the best view. The people in the southern hemisphere have the best view. Yes. To the core of the Milky Way that we just can't experience from from the north and like the peoples of South, America, and southern Africa. They include in how. How they Mark out the sky's the dark paths through the Milky Way. There is a tradition of seeing an emus spread out across the Milky Way were the coal shack nebula that super dark patch. I saw. Yeah. Societas once pointed out to you see it. And that that's only one of the stories, another one of the stories that are particularly love related to the Milky Way is they see the Milky Way as a dark river, through the sky. And it's the, the souls of men and women who have passed on to the heavens, that have their fires along that, that river and in some of their traditions when they see a shooting star, that is the soul of someone who died far from home returning. The home. It's cool stories. Yeah, I love I love that idea. What was it? There was a animation that came to a couple of years ago, but anyways idea of putting floating lanterns on like on a river and then letting them go and letting them all float downriver. You get this. They do that in, in Japan and China place like that. But it's, it's a very cool effect. So what are now you mentioned a couple of real big hitters. Supernova. Meteorite impact give me some more information. So, so I think the two really awesome things to come out of aboriginal astronomy is how they look at their crater covered lands, and actually maintain a history of. Yeah, these holes of the ground are actually craters, as, as well as their tradition of supernova. So let's start with the craters Australia is, is one of the oldest landmasses it has thirty confirmed craters that are well-structured. You look at them from an airplane, and you're, like, yes, that is a crater and the thing that really gets me is. They knew that these things in the ground were formed from things falling from the sky. In one case, the hen, very crater about four thousand two hundred years ago, a large nickel iron space rock hit central ustralia. And when it came down about one hundred and forty five kilometers south of siding, springs, it carved out a bunch of individual different craters. And when westerners I started visiting that land, and they had an aboriginal guide with them. The guide was like, no, we don't go there. That is the land that was formed when fire fell from the sky and, and right. They have a modern day tradition of fire fell from the sky. And formed this land, and that's oral tradition. That goes back four thousand two hundred years. There are many other craters across a stray Elliot that that they look at. And the various people know this was a crater here. Wolf creek craters is another one of these that is recognizes having fallen in this case when a star fell from the sky. And there are traditions of people going down in Orrell stories and exploring the sink holes and traveling them to through them to water in a great distant area, and it was a Mark of heroism to travel underground under these craters. And so there, there are clearly stories of when people explored and survived. And now people don't do that. Because. Those heroes did stupid things.

Australia Elliot South America Arco Pamela PAT Orrell Dylan O'donnell Wolf Creek Brisbane Ayman Mark Carlin Societas Japan America Africa China
Can Galaxies Exist Without Dark Matter?

BrainStuff

05:51 min | 1 year ago

Can Galaxies Exist Without Dark Matter?

"This episode is brought to you by the Capital, One saver card, earn four percent cashback on dining and entertainment. Two percent at grocery stores and one percent on all other purchases. Now when you go out you cash in what's in your wallet terms apply. Welcome to brain stuff. A production of iheartradio. Hey, brain stuff. Lauren Bogle bomb here. Dark matter. Sounds a little mysterious because it is it stuff. We can't see with any existing telescopes but that math and physics tells us must exist based on the way that normal matter the stuff we can see babes. And there's a lot of dark matter out there astrophysicists think the twenty-seven percent of the universe is made up of dark matter. Compared with only five percent normal matter, meaning that the term normal probably isn't the most accurate dark matter is the bedrock that all galaxies are anchored to you can't get one without the other. Or so we thought until strana mors found ghostly galaxy. The doesn't appear contain any dark matter. It's as if the universe is planning trick on us by flipping the laws of physics on their head dark matter should be there. But isn't it's a game changer galaxy astronomers are saying, and it's like nothing we've ever seen before we may not be able to spot dark matter. But astronomers can measure its gravitational effects acting on normal matter. For example, they can look at how fast stars cruise around galaxy when dark matters. Isn't that galaxies gravity will be bulked up causing it starts to move faster than if just normal matter were present? But in the case of N, G C one, oh, five two dash d f to an ultra diffuse. Galaxy located sixty five million light years away. Astronomers found that it stars are moving in exactly the way that would be predicted if only the total mass of all the visible stuff is considered. In other words, dark matter doesn't seem to be exerting its gravity on normal matter in that galaxy. And that's weird. Peter von doco of Yale University, sudden statement finding a galaxy without dark matter is unexpected because this invisible mysterious substance is the most dominant aspect of any galaxy for decades without the galaxy start their lives as blobs of dark matter after that everything else, happens guests falls into the dark matter halos, the gas turns into stars. They slowly build up, then you end up with galaxies, like the Milky Way this galaxy challenges the standard ideas of how we think galaxies form ultra diffuse galaxies auditees in their own. Right. Having only been discovered in two thousand fifteen as they are very difficult to detect. However, it appears that this class of galaxy is common but none are like the one in question. The galaxy was discovered using the Dragonfly telephoto array telescope in New Mexico. That's custom made to seek out these allusive targets. Then using a set of twin ten meter optical and infrared telescopes in Hawaii, the Stromer signaled out ten bright, globular clusters, which are large combat groups of stars orbiting the galaxy's core. They let us spectra. Data to measure their motions these clusters were found to be plotting along more slowly than expected. Meaning there's far less mass in that galaxy then would be predicted. In fact, there's so little mass that the researchers have come to the astonishing conclusion that there's little if any dark matter their follow up observations were made with Gemini north telescope. Also in Hawaii. So the galaxy structure could be studied with geminis help the researchers ruled out interactions with other galaxies, as being the cause of it's weird dark matter deficit. Ben dot com said in the press. Release, if there's any dark matter at all. It's very little the stars in the galaxy can account for all of a mass, and there doesn't seem to be any room for dark matter. This finding seems to suggest the dark matter has quote its own separate existence apart from other components of galaxies, he added and this makes the very existence of this galaxy of mystery if it has no dark matter how did even Volve into a galaxy in their study published in March in the journal nature then doco teams speculates that some cataclysmic event in the galaxy. He may have cleared out all the dark matter and blasted away all the star forming gases alternatively a nearby massive, elliptical galaxy may have played a role in the current galaxies lack of dark matter, billions of years ago when it was undergoing, it's early and violent stages of evolution. Now, the researchers are pouring over Hubble space telescopes observations of similar galaxies, to perhaps find more that lack dark matter, if they find more than alternative fuels and faint galaxies might be the norm when dark matter isn't present, and that's a fascinating development in our understanding of how galaxies evolve. Then dot com concluded every galaxy we do about before has dark matter. And they all fall in familiar categories like spiral or elliptical galaxies. But what would you get if there's no dark matter at all? Maybe this is what you would get. Today's episode was written by Dr Ian O'Neill, and produced by Tyler clang brain stuff is a production of iheartradio's, how stuff works for more on this, and lots of other dark topics. Visit our home planet has stuff works dot com and for more podcasts for my heart radio, I heart radio app, apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Hi there. This is Josh Clark, and I am taking my show, the end of the world. With Josh Clark on the road. Live to Minneapolis in DC this June on June nineteenth, I'll be at the Parkway theater in Minneapolis, Minnesota and on the following night June twentieth. I'll be at the miracle theatre in Washington DC, if you've heard the end of the world ten times already, or if you've never heard a second of it, it matters, not because this show, explores themes, covered in the end of the world and also chases down, new avenues, like, how good could things be if we managed to survive the next century or two. So come see me this June nineteenth and twentieth. Minniap- in DC.

Iheartradio Josh Clark Hawaii Minneapolis DC Lauren Bogle Yale University Washington Geminis New Mexico Peter Parkway Theater Minnesota Volve Dr Ian O'neill Apple Sixty Five Million Light Years Twenty-Seven Percent Five Two Dash
First results from New Horizons' time in the Kuiper Belt

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

03:31 min | 1 year ago

First results from New Horizons' time in the Kuiper Belt

"What is the Kuyper belt, Koiper belt is the largest zone in our planetary system? And it wasn't even known until the ninety s when planetary strana mors started to discover other objects orbiting outwear. Pluto, is mostly little things, the size of counties or New England states Pluto, for comparison is like the size of the United States. But also, we started to discover other small planets in the Kuiper belt Pluto's cohort if you will. This is the third zone of our solar system. You know, the innermost zone is the rocky planets earth Mars, Venus and mercury beyond that the giant planets Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus Neptune. And then there's the Kuiper belt the begins just beyond snip tunes orbit. And so actually, by the time, we reach Pluto in the summer of two thousand fifteen we're already at the inner fringes of the Kuiper belt, we will be in it even traveling at this enormous speed that takes us three. Hundred million miles, plus every year with still being a for another ten years from now we're about halfway through it in, in your book, tasting new horizons inside the epic. First mission to Pluto you talk in length about the quite rebuilt. You talk about this twenty mile by ten mile wide rock that is of such interest. It's like two spheres connected. Did you actually know it existed in? Was that actually on your itinerary? When new horizon, left, Florida, we, we did not know that ultimate to leave the name of the nickname of this clipper both object exists that we did know the corpora belt, existent right new. We knew how many objects are out there. It's a little bit analogous to if you know in two thousand six somebody said, I'm taking a trip to Paris, and in nineteen what restaurants should we, you know, wait a while back later Oeser there. Lots of restaurants. And so we actually found our particular fly by target using the Hubble space telescope in twenty. Fourteen and then burn the engines after Pluto, to range erect to go there in the fall of twenty fifteen and then traveled three plus years, another billion miles to make that fly by which occurred on New Year's Eve and New Year's day starting this year, you can actually steer this spaceship. I can't imagine what north south east and west is up there. And there's no longitude latitude. How do you navigate? How, how do you know where the heck you want to go, and where you are going? It takes real expertise. And we have some of the world's best space navigators on the new horizons team, a big team at a company called kinetics based in California. And we have a another team at the Caltech Jet Propulsion Laboratory the way that we do this is essentially, twofold, we track the position of whatever we're going to fly by next either Pluto, or ultimate Tuli using telescopes on the earth and the Hubble space telescope to plot. Its course. And then by Ray. Radio. We track our spacecraft. So we know its course and then the job of the navigators is to make those two things intersect on a given day when the fly by takes place. And they can do it very precisely. I can tell you volleying from Pluto, to ultimate too late, which took three and a half years at thirty two thousand miles an hour about a million miles, almost every day. We ended up arriving at ultimate Tuli only twenty three seconds all did time. Well I mean I I take airliner flights there. Never would.

New England United States Caltech Jet Propulsion Laborat Paris California Florida RAY Twenty Three Seconds Ten Years
Interstellar Lidar

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 1 year ago

Interstellar Lidar

"Astronomers are on the hunt for Exo planets. This is innovation now bringing you stories of revolutionary ideas emerging technologies and the people behind the concepts that shape the future. One of the studies funded under Nasr's innovative advanced concepts or Nyack program is a project that hopes to use stellar echo imaging to give strana mors detailed information about exit planets. Those earth-like planets revolving around distant stars. Here's Chris man to explain stellar echo. Imaging is an idea to try to get actual images of planets, the approach in this particular program is to consider the equivalent of an interstellar light are systems kind of like how a lot of those self driving cars have a light that help detect things what they're doing is. They're sending out a pulse and in their timing. Essentially, how long it takes that false to come back. So in this case, the light our source is going to be the star, and the planet will then reflect echo that Cigna. Back if we can leverage the timescale here live ridge, the fact that you can look at the geometric properties of light more. So than the angular resolution properties, you have the potential then to image individual continents on earth like planets, and that's the real power of this technique for innovation. Now, I'm Jennifer police innovation now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with nessa and is distributed by w h Wien. Visit us online at innovation now dot US.

Cigna National Institute Of Aerospac Nasr Chris Man Nessa W H Wien
"strana" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

03:25 min | 2 years ago

"strana" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"Officially detecting, the gravitational waves for the first time in this case from a black hole collision. So this this was an amazing event in scientist this opened up a completely brand new branch of strana me called govett-asia waiver strana me and this represented a completely new window into the universe. Qualitatively different from just detecting yet, another wave length of electro magnetic radiation, different beast, different horse of a different color, which which which is great because it gives us a new information that that radiation of really couldn't do it. So revolutionary it was as Yoda would say that. Was that just two years later in two thousand seventeen won the Nobel prize in physics if you could do that in two years, that's something special. So since then, of course, they found many other signals that we've mentioned on the on the show and puppy seen him in the science news, including neutron star collisions which is what these researchers are dressing. So another proposal be made is up by looking at the specific reputation wave signal that's produced by such a collision we could tell if quark matter was produced by the intense energies and pressures involved. Now, quark matter is one of the plethora of states of of matter. In in this one the constituent quarks and glue ons have escaped their proton and neutron or some other Hedren confinement. So they are now free to mingle like they've never done before. Especially at low energies, this matter only exists in extreme environments like the early universe particle accelerators. And Jay's bathroom neutrons, that's kind of part. Lots of Clark matter in their neutron star collisions would certainly classify as an extreme environment. I mean, imagine two stars half. Again, as heavy as our son squished squish that all the way down to the size of city and then flinging at each other at a significant speed action of the speed of life. That is Connecticut energy, my friends, so such an energetic. Collision produces insane amounts of energy some people I've read have compared to the energy the son releases in two hundred million years blam one quick collision. That's That's how how. a lamp. Much of that energy much that blam e energy is converted into gravitational wave energy that that propagates away and the shape of that wave that are like oh detectors detect can tell us lots of information, including if quark matter was created during that that collision. So so one of the papers is proposing that the collision the colliding neutron stars would create waves with different phase in theory predicts and this they claim what happened because of the cork matter that's forming throughout the collision before it collapses into a black hole. Right. Because if you got to do stars colliding. Yeah. Lots of stuff happens gravitation aways? But the ultimate state of that is gonna probably be a black hole because it's just gonna be way too much matter for the degenerates degeneracy pressure to hold it up anymore. Black hole is born. So the other paper describes a scenario where they rapid creation of a core of cork matter would cause the gravitational wave frequencies to be higher than expected. So though, so that's they're both kind of looking at it from different angles. And they. And they both of could certainly be true. So to see the signals and tester calculations though, they need to we need to accomplish two things..

Nobel prize scientist Connecticut Jay Clark two years two hundred million years
"strana" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"strana" Discussed on AP News

"California strana mors shine a light on the twenty one mile diameter moon hippocampal named after the mythological seahorse the SETI institute's Mark Showalter discovered. Neptune's fourteenth moon in twenty thirteen using Hubble space telescope images show Walter in his research team theorized hippocampal was formed from debris created billions of years ago. When a comment slammed into protease, the largest of Neptune's, inner moons, the two moons orbit just seventy five hundred miles apart. And we're likely even closer in the past before Proteus migrated outward, the Oscars are this Sunday. And as a PA. Entertainment editor Oscar wells Gabriel reports the road to this year ceremony has been iraq-uae. The throw. Hey, usually, the buzz is the Oscars approach is over things like whether Black Panther or the favourite will win best pitcher. But this year much of that is being overshadowed by the motion picture academy own missteps, I the hosting gig. It was offered to Kevin Hart. But he rejected it after some complained about his all tweets and jokes about gays telecasts won't have a host this year. Then there was the backlash over a decision. Not to air four wards during the live telecast instead doing them during commercial breaks, the academy has backtracked. And now says all the awards will be televised live. I'm Oscar wells Gabriel. Business confidence in Germany slipped for the sixth consecutive month. As worries grow about the outlook for Europe's biggest economy the institute and its closely watched survey says its monthly index fell to ninety eight point five points from ninety nine point three in January. That's the lowest levels since December of two thousand fourteen the survey shows managers assessment about their current situation and their outlook for the next six months. Darkened Germany's economy shrank the third quarter installed in the fourth. But the it survey and other indicators at least point to a return to quarterly growth a point two percent in the current quarter. Radio. I'm feeling wire. Rb singer R Kelly faced a throng of reporters and cameras as he arrived at a Chicago police precinct this evening. Indicted on ten counts of aggravated sexual abuse involving four victims,.

Kevin Hart Neptune Germany Oscar wells Gabriel SETI institute R Kelly Oscar wells Mark Showalter California Hubble Walter editor Europe Chicago two percent six months
"strana" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

11:58 min | 2 years ago

"strana" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Back on the zero hour. This is Richard RJ s Cowan we now continue our interview with Tom Hartman. Well, and that gets to you also have for example, you had strana Murray's theorising recently. That may perhaps the reason that we have an identified advanced civilizations in space radio signals is because this is a common pattern civilizations reach a certain level of industrial dominance over the planet, and then destroy their own planetary, platform, and ceased to exist, and that this happens. We're talking about a couple of hundred years out of this planet's history that we've been at is that this happened so quickly that we never see them. They just come and go in a blink as this Khrushchev said during the Nixon era, he was he was asked you think that the that the human race is going to survive, and he said, no, and no, no, he said, he was asked do you think that there are people from outer space visiting earth, and he said, no. And they said why and he said because any civilization the reaches the technological level where they're capable of interstellar space. We'll have used that technology to destroy itself. Well, as strana me is now catching up, and I wonder if Cruz shop meant environmentally or with nuclear bombs, whatever. But. But as strana me has now caught up with with cruise trough and say, so this look, Tom, this is very, and again, we're talking with Tom Arben radio host and author last hour or so each sunlight, this is tough stuff for people to hear tougher meted think about it's we have to absorb these shocking realities and yet at the same time prepare ourselves to escalate continue and escalate our efforts to resist what's being done to our planet. And I don't see how you do that without a certain sense of hope and optimism that if you go in there and fight that battle that you may prevail in some way. Now prevailing may mean at different things that may mean a compromise version of the future from the most negative one. But how do we do that? How do we tell ourselves a story that keeps? Us going and keeps us fighting. And yet doesn't have us delusional. Well, two pieces come to mind in response. The first is I think that there's a place for rage in this as well. We had been lied to for the better part of sixty years and and ripped off. And these guys lied to us for their own personal profit in a way that is that is killing life on earth. And we now know that it's undeniable, and you know, the David and Charles cope together. It's they were one person would be the richest person on the planet, and they made their inherited their their wealth from their daddy in in the oil business. He may Joe Stalin fortune, and then came back to the United States in the oil business, and they've been in the oil business ever since. And then they use that money find lots and lots of other industries. I think that a lot of rage is entirely appropriate. I'm not talking about any kind of inappropriate action. But I would love to see more suits. I would love to see just people being outed. There's virtually no discussion of the impact of these billionaires, not just the coaxed and others. And and you know, in some cases gambling billionaires hedge fund billionaires. People who've made their mind by. Question was not the right word, but you know, less than noble means showy know. Corrupting. Our political system in there in in collaborating with each other basically in promoting these bizarre libertarian philosophies that are that are equally destructive. So number one. There's there's the issue of rage number two. The larger issue. They're kind of a transcendental issue that you're raising Richard. I wrote about a book I called is titled threshold the crisis of western civilization and in that book. I I started out in crawl Peru, which is the first fully intact. Mothers city that has ever been found when other city is a city where hunting gathering people become city people. And you know, we have histories of these stories of these Napa group Gilgamesh in many ways is the story of this since a cautionary tale, but this was buried by sand in a climate change small micro, local micro-climate climate change back five thousand years ago in Peru, and they have just excavated it. And I went down there and met with Dr shade. Who is the woman who's running the expedition the uncovering of it, and they have they found that the city was trading with the local fishing community that or the sardines we're running up and down the Peruvian coast, and they were making growing cotton and making rope for Nazi trading that with the fishermen for the fish. But the amazing thing is that there were no weapons of. War. They have not found any weapons of war. And all they have found fluids, they found statues, and statuettes and all kinds of stuff that indicates an advanced culture, and this mazy I stood in the middle of it. This amazing amphitheater rush you stand in the middle of this thing. It's about the size of football field. And you talk softly, and you can hear your voice all around you. It's acoustically the most amazing, and they found all these pants fluids. All around apparently, thousands of people get together and sing. So we often from corral, Peru. Two two British New Caledonia British do Caledonia the the probably from Malaysia Indonesia the southeast. Asian people showed up there a couple thousand years ago. And there were all these moa sending happening in New Zealand all these giant birds thirty eight different species of them that went range in size from fifteen pounds to five hundred towns in the moment or is it never before encountered human. So you could literally walk up to them and break their necks and eat them. And which is what people did and over the course of a couple of hundred years in both New Caledonia and New Zealand, they ate all the birds, and then they went into famine mode, and they started eating rats, and they started eating frogs. And and and and then they started call today Neons in what came out of this was this insanely warlike culture, both places to the point that when captain cook, I arrived in in New Zealand, you know, they came out and they killed his is number two guy. And tree other guys and ate them on the on the shore, and you know, this data Maury culture in New Zealand is proud of its warlike in virtually cannibal like tradition, but in New Caledonia that happened in New Zealand that happened about a hundred years two hundred years before captain cook showed up in New Caledonia. It happened about a thousand years before captain cook showed up and when he showed up there instead of being attacked. He was welcomed and and faded, and and, but what had happened is they had developed this very, very, peaceful, very, ecologically, sustainable and balanced culture that then they were able to put together in the absence of the moa birds. Apparently, this is the same thing that happened with native American cultures in North America. The humans occupied the continent in in many areas, they wiped out all the large easily edible species there. The great three slot the woolly mammoth et cetera. All the easy to stuff to eat stuff. All the large animals are many large animals and as a consequence of this. They learned that lesson, and they said, you know, we need to have an ecological culture. And most of the native American societies North America point of first contact is Peter chronicles brilliant book man's rise to civilization. Most all of them had a Jeep ecological component. They couched it in different ways, you know, this is the way of our elders. This is the way of the spirits are this is revealed knowledge, but it basically was all sustainability. And so, you know, it appears that the sustainable lifestyle it sustained native Americans for that maybe as much as ten thousand years in North America. And there was sustaining native peoples in Africa in Asia for a long time before the eruption of the agricultural experiment in what we call civilization, apparently that came out a disaster. So there may be some good news for us as I as I read about in in threshold, but there's also some great cautionary tales there. I mean, the the Maury. We're still going through a period of great crisis in life was not fun in Maury society at the time. You know in the seventeen hundreds you know, I used to. I mean there's so much to react to their. One would hope of course, that we don't have to go through great catastrophe to for any reason, including to become more humane civilization, but a couple thoughts out of that of the first one is Rebecca Solnit Rhoda. Fine. Book an excellent book called the paradise built in how I think if I recall the name correctly. Talking about different communities that had suffered a horrible tragedy. Bhopal after Union Carbide was wanted saw and how in recovering from that tragedy in that horror, people found purpose and meaning community. So even in the grimmest of circumstances. Here's a possibility for a rebirth out of the ashes, which one would help wouldn't be necessary. But offers a bright light. But in the time hopefully between now, and then we can maybe mitigate things a little bit. I used to talk about I don't talk about it anymore for a couple of reasons. Paul Krugman made the same analogy later and so on but I used to talk about an old twilight zone episode Thom Hartmann where? Where some scientists got together and decided to unify our warlike planet. They would artificially create a threat to human existence by altering a man. So that he looked like an alien sending them out to space and a strange looking ship. And then having him land Robert Culp played the man, they all ice by actor and. That was the notion he was gonna bring humanity gather with this threat from outer space where we're facing an existential threat. And yet, we don't even really, you know, I mean, nobody most people can't even agree that the aliens are among us much less than we should do something about it. So I guess putting those two thoughts together. How can we get a kind of? Paradise built in Halas that we've got to fight this threat to our civilization and our existence without actually bringing on the how well that's that's where we need the Robert Culp character. And and that's why I was suggesting that rage is an appropriate response to this. And that we specifically identify the people who have been supplying the money that they got from fossil fuels for FOSS for climate denial, and that we specifically identify the people who took their money people like Mark, Geraldo and ran around the world spouting what they nudity lies about climate change. And. To simply maintain the wealth and power of the fossil fuel industry, and and you know that rage inappropriate ways. But it's time for us to identify the bad guys right now, the corporate media is unwilling to do that because the bad guys are huge advertisers. They control hundreds of millions of dollars in advertising revenues for the television industry in particular. But the day will come when that won't buy them a pass anymore..

New Zealand New Caledonia Tom Hartman Richard RJ captain cook Peru strana Murray Robert Culp North America Tom Cruz Tom Arben Joe Stalin Khrushchev Dr shade United States David
"strana" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

09:45 min | 2 years ago

"strana" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"David baron. Beautifully captures the off the magic and the mystery of one particular eclipse in event in eighteen seventy eight that's spurred on America to embrace the sciences a superb contribution to the history of strana me Marcia. Author of Einstein's unfinished symphony once again, you are listening to talkin pets and we're speaking with David baron. He is the author of American eclipse the nation's EPA grace to catch the shadow of the moon and win the glory of the world. Are you can watch the total eclipse, of course, on August twenty first that's coming right around the corner. David I wanted to get into a couple of other questions are a little more off the cuff, maybe, but one of the things that I wanted to say American eclipse is the perfect antidote for cynical and divided nation at this time, and if you watch the news right now and everything that's going on with not only the United States but across the world, but North Korea Russia and China, and and now what's going on in Charlottesville Virginia. If people haven't seen that they just reported one dead and nineteen injured from a car that drove into the crowd there. There's riots going on in Charlottesville right now. And it's it's a it's a strange world. A lot of people think a really good. Kind of mine. His name is Ken. He's in the Tampa area. Here. We were talking about the effects that astronomy based good the the planets and all have on the human psyche. And with the eclipse coming is not gonna play worse on people. Do you think as a scientist? I mean does that affect us in any way? I think that it will be a really good effect. Now, let me make clear I not a believer in astrology. I don't believe personally that the planets affect our behavior in terms of the gravitational effects or when you were born that's not my belief. However, I will say that a total eclipse is just such an ended eclipse in general again all of North America. We'll see a partial eclipse on August twenty first it's a really profound reminder that just how fragile life is. And how frankly we're all in this together. I'm sorry. I know our country is so terribly divided. And it really I find it. So disturbed more than it ever has been. I'm a proud American. We have so much more in common than we have differences. And when you realize that we are on this on this piece of rock floating in outer space. There's as far as we know there's nothing out there, at least it a long long way. That's what a total solar eclipse or solar eclipse in general reminds us of when the moon passes between us and the sun. It just it puts you in in your place. You know, we are we are the insignificant tiny beings, we are powerless in the face of nature or God. Or whatever you believe we better just get along. So this is meat. I know I'm a science writer, but if I can preach a little bit. I really hope that the total eclipse helps bring us together and remind us what we have in common. I I don't mind approaching actually because I think good. Preachings? Especially, you know, the one thing I I love radio I've worked in radio for thirty years been on the air for twenty seven. And one thing that I like about radio is that it's live, and it's real, and it's unpredictable and people make mistakes and things that they say things come out of people's lips that maybe not supposed to come out the way that they're meant. And you can take that both ways. And it's, but the one thing about radio with you all the time, you could take it with you, no matter where you're at. And I think it's good to be preachy at times, and some people will say, okay, you know, John, you you host a national pet show. But it's also about my life is well in my beliefs, and my preachy, and I don't go over preachy on the show. But every once in a while, I will say, my my piece, and the thing is that from time to time when I say something I get Peyton. I get love. But the thing is that I don't understand the path of the way the world is going, and I I was wondering I when I talked to my friend can about if it did have any effect here. This eclipse will have any effect people. And I liked the fact that you say we'll have a good effect on humans. What about in the animal world? Do you see anything that will it affect pets or even wildlife in any way? Right. Well, and that's actually really it's an interesting question. It's something that scientists are looking at now. So again, I want to say that there's most of North America all of North America. We'll see a partial eclipse, and it's unlikely that any that Rian during a partial eclipse that animals will do much at all because even say even if even if ninety percent of the sun is covered by the moon. It's quite remarkable. How you hardly notice it at all the day will still be bright. You know, it it it did the darkening or the diminishing of the daylight happened. So slowly that you're not even gonna notice that. However. For those people in the path of the total. Eclipse like Nashville like Kansas City likes Saint Louis there. I would say animals will react because it's going to go dark handle be subtly go from daytime to twilight and so birds definitely react. I mean, I've I've seen five total solar eclipses around the world, and I can tell you. I mean, I was in Australia number of years ago. And these tropical birds about five minutes before the sun completely went away. They started flocking like it was dusk last year. I was in in Indonesia and right by a little little village and just before the total eclipse, the rooster started growing. And then when the sun came back out, they rooster started crying again. So I will definitely react insect. You might see bats you might see firefly's come out in the in the middle of the day during the total eclipse in terms of pets. I've never heard of cats reacting at all. World. Really, no big deal for us. Yes. Exactly. So, but you know, if it goes dark, I would expect your animals to behave the way if you're in the path of the total eclipse during those few minutes when it gets dark, they're probably going to think it's suddenly night. And there'll be a little confused. Another question that I have I posted it on my homepage on talkin pets dot com. Actually, a video that was put up by Fox News last week. It's not under now because your videos on there, David baron, but it was a video from FOX interviewing some scientists. And so on and so forth where some people were saying the chances are because of a total eclipse that on the west coast, especially Seattle, Portland LA. They would see catastrophe seven hundred foot wave would hit the west coast a nine point two earthquake. And they had these people on there talking about it. It was a little frightening that yeah, I'm sorry. They did that. I mean, look I've seen total. I've been around the world to see total solar eclipses, nothing bad happens. And you know, the the moon is once a month the moon, effectively goes between us and the sun. Now, we don't always get a solar eclipse because the moon is sometimes a little above the sun is sometimes a little below. And it doesn't go precisely between, but the gravitational effect or effectively the same every month when the moon when we have a new moon when the moon is between us and the sun and you get larger tight, but it doesn't cause earthquakes. It doesn't cause famine. So no, one should be afraid. In fact, it's something to be celebrated and excited about sounds good. I think it's great to have something that might actually bring us closer together. You know, just because of an event like this. You know, like you were before David, right? Think about when was the last time we had a national event that we all were interested in that wasn't political or wasn't some natural disaster some school shooting, right? I mean, can we celebrated that we have something that's just to to to just bask in the wonder of nature and the world live very true, David baron. I wanna thank you so much joining us on the program. It was a great pleasure. Your fascinating, man. And you know, my best goes out to you you and your family and people can watch the video that you did it's YouTube videos posted on our homepage at talkin pets dot com. Congratulations to George out there in Washington. He got the the book American eclipse a nation's epic race to catch the shadow of the moon and win the glory of the world by David baron. And also, you're the author of the beast in the garden. So that's another one of your books. Congratulations in my best to you and your family, and and thanks so much for joining us on the program. I love thank you, John. My pleasure. And I hope we all have clear skies on August twenty first we can enjoy the eclipse sounds good. Thank you, David. Thank you. That's David baron. He is the author of American eclipse, you can find it in bookstores. You can find it online recommend that you go out and get one congratulations to the people that want a copy of the book, and we'll be right back from we're talking pets. We've got a story coming up from Phillips drops to stay tuned for that. He'll what are you gonna be talking about that one back to school season triggering Zaidi in some pets? So stay tuned for that. Once again, you are listening to talkin pets. I'm John patch. I'm primary Orion Zach this is talking pets. Eight four four three zero five seven eight zero zero eight four four three zero five seventy eight hundred..

David baron scientist North America John patch David EPA Charlottesville Tampa David I America Virginia Einstein Ken United States North Korea Marcia Fox News Indonesia Australia China
"strana" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"strana" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"I want to tie that into a comment that you're very famous for having made think it was in your first book and nineteen seventy five realms of the human unconscious. In which you mentioned the LSD could become for psychiatry what the microscope was for biology and medicine, and what the telescope is for strana me. What I'm curious about is suppose. A while you say that. But then be is there still a place for psychoanalysis traditional psychoanalysis or psychotherapy in combination with some of these psychedelic compounds? Because it's it seems to me that the. Perhaps some of the value that people derived from these experiences don't derived from these experiences is dependent quite a bit on what happens before handed what happens afterwards. But I just love to hear you, I suppose clarify what you mean by LSD becoming psychiatry with the microscope for biology and the telescope is strana me, and then be if therapy still has a place in combination with these experiences, another wonderful question. So let me tell you what happened to win. I lost interest in this laboratory research and took it to the clinic. We've you mentioned in the in your interview with Michael pond, there are these two forms. They've been using LSD another second that he's the cycle league. And the secondary the second delegates using large those which is fully internalized with at phones is shades and the methods that was used mostly in Europe. But also by some American therapies scored cycle Vic, which is sort of dissolving. The psyche dissolving the tension scornfully into psyche. And so on. From Lucy's dissolution. And so I started it was using sort of medium issues may be hundred fifty. Maybe up to up to two hundred at the beginning. And what happened to us absolutely fascinating? Because so intensification of the symptoms that the patients who are having. But then the process automatically took us through the different layers of traumatic experiences that were actually underlying that disorder and layer after layer, then I came up with the concept of coexistence system of Condon's experience or each symptom. Head like a history has a a serious of layered experiences behind it. And so it was a process of exploring the different layers of the psyche. One of my patients, call it onion peeling of the of the psyche and other golden chemo archaeology, so you could really explore the different layers of the postnatal biographical level. This used to what what Freudian analysis is about. But the problem is didn't stop there. Then each of those coexistence also had a contribution from the trauma, I suit even if we're using these lower dosages as we were going on took us to Burs, and that point sadly, people started experiencing that they are trapped. They're caught they are near situation of no exit. They had the feeding that getting crazy. They are dying. And so on. And. Oh, my psychiatry, and my my psychotic training did not prepare me for that kind of thing. And it took out including my own experiences to realize there was a powerful record of biological Burs in there. So. What we activated actually in. The psyche was what I call now self eating intelligence of the psyche. You see the the process dynasty was talking. It was taking us to the sources of of these emotional and psychosomatic symptoms. Also created automatically mapping of the psyche. So for a while, I was just collecting these. Reports from the by my own cards, and and the people..

LSD Condon psychosomatic Michael pond Europe Lucy
"strana" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"strana" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"I want to tie that into a comment that you're very famous for having made think it was in your first book and nineteen seventy five realms of the human unconscious. In which you mentioned the LSD could become for psychiatry what the microscope was for biology and medicine, and what the telescope is for strana me. What I'm curious about is suppose. A while you say that. But then be is there still a place for psychoanalysis traditional psychoanalysis or psychotherapy in combination with some of these psychedelic compounds? Because it's it seems to me that the. Perhaps some of the value that people derived from these experiences don't derived from these experiences is dependent quite a bit on what happens before handed what happens afterwards. But I just love to hear you, I suppose clarify what you mean by LSD becoming psychiatry with the microscope for biology and the telescope is strana me, and then be if therapy still has a place in combination with these experiences, another wonderful question. So let me tell you what happened to win. I lost interest in this laboratory research and took it to the clinic. We've you mentioned in the in your interview with Michael pond, there are these two forms. They've been using LSD another second that he's the cycle league. And the secondary the second delegates using large those which is fully internalized with at phones is shades and the methods that was used mostly in Europe. But also by some American therapies scored cycle Vic, which is sort of dissolving. The psyche dissolving the tension scornfully into psyche. And so on. From Lucy's dissolution. And so I started it was using sort of medium issues may be hundred fifty. Maybe up to up to two hundred at the beginning. And what happened to us absolutely fascinating? Because so intensification of the symptoms that the patients who are having. But then the process automatically took us through the different layers of traumatic experiences that were actually underlying that disorder and layer after layer, then I came up with the concept of coexistence system of Condon's experience or each symptom. Head like a history has a a serious of layered experiences behind it. And so it was a process of exploring the different layers of the psyche. One of my patients, call it onion peeling of the of the psyche and other golden chemo archaeology, so you could really explore the different layers of the postnatal biographical level. This used to what what Freudian analysis is about. But the problem is didn't stop there. Then each of those coexistence also had a contribution from the trauma, I suit even if we're using these lower dosages as we were going on took us to Burs, and that point sadly, people started experiencing that they are trapped. They're caught they are near situation of no exit. They had the feeding that getting crazy. They are dying. And so on. And. Oh, my psychiatry, and my my psychotic training did not prepare me for that kind of thing. And it took out including my own experiences to realize there was a powerful record of biological Burs in there. So. What we activated actually in. The psyche was what I call now self eating intelligence of the psyche. You see the the process dynasty was talking. It was taking us to the sources of of these emotional and psychosomatic symptoms. Also created automatically mapping of the psyche. So for a while, I was just collecting these. Reports from the by my own cards, and and the people..

LSD Condon psychosomatic Michael pond Europe Lucy
"strana" Discussed on Tumble: A Science Podcast for Kids

Tumble: A Science Podcast for Kids

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"strana" Discussed on Tumble: A Science Podcast for Kids

"Usually scientists as not having strong personal opinions to sort of being objectively detached and saying things like, well, what does the data show right? But there are lots of times when scientists disagree and one might decide to take a stand for what they believe in in the debate around Pluto is a prime example. So if you wanna bring poodle back, guess what Pluto? Never left. And fact Pluto brought all his friends with him or her. That's Kirby Runyon. He's a planetary geologist, which means he studies the geology of other planets. It seems like he's pretty obviously in the Pluto is a planet group. I have a strong opinion. Yes. A lot tied up in what is a planet or not a planet. Kubi is one of several astronomers who published a scientific paper arguing against the international astronomers union or IRA you. That's the group that decided to call Pluto at dwarf. Planet's, not a real planet. Ignore the. I a you. Dwarf planets are planets to sounds like a full-on protests Logan. It is. Scientists have been divided over Pluto for a long time. So how did we get to the point where scientists are like chanting slogans? Well, let's go all the way back to the first stargazers. The original Greek word for planet of course, means wandering star. And that just means that when you look with sky, you can see planets, mercury, Venus, Jupiter, Saturn, and they, they move relative to the background stars. So for the Greeks, planet was just any object in the night sky. The moved around faster than the rest of the stars. Exactly. But when strana me got a little bit more advanced with telescopes and observatories people started discovering other kinds of celestial bodies in our solar system. When the first asteroids were discovered in the early eighteen hundreds, they were called planets. Okay. So back then there were like a lot. Planets. Yeah, it was like a planetary explosion. People didn't have a problem with there being hundreds of planets in the solar system. Now, we know that they're almost eight hundred thousand asteroids in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter was a lot of planets. It wasn't until between nineteen fifty three and nineteen fifty seven that people started considering asteroids to not be planets. That's because an astronomer named Gerard Kuyper route scientific paper, explaining the asteroids were not like the bigger planets at all their surfaces, their interiors, how they form was just completely different from a larger planets. So it's not just Pluto, like hundreds of space objects, formerly known as planets exist. Well, yeah, and it's pretty common for scientists to re-categorised things once they learn more about them, whether it's objects in space or species here on earth. I mean, that makes a lot of sense. Whenever you learn more about something, you always. Categorize it like I used to think that there was just one kind of shoes. And then I learned that some of them had laces and some had Bill crow. Did you think that when you were eighty. Well, it took me a little while to figure out the latest thing. So bringing things back to outer space, it's time to talk about Pluto. The American astronomer. CLYDE Tombaugh, discovered Pluto in one thousand nine, thirty four. A longtime.

Kirby Runyon Bill crow CLYDE Tombaugh Kubi Gerard Kuyper IRA Logan
"strana" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

07:37 min | 2 years ago

"strana" Discussed on KGO 810

"And, welcome back Lynn Chris with us on coast. To coast as we, talk about these incredible spirits in stone they've really. Must have possessed some knowledge though Glenn in those, days I think we've all take them for granted haven't we Yes we have I think we've done a, terrible disservice to our inches native American friends. Who inhabited this land, they're just not giving the credit that they. Deserve the In the realm of archea was strana me and celestial observations they're not given credit in the northeast for having carried out, that activity the evidence is there. And it's accumulating to support that they in fact did. Now up in the northeast where you? Are and, you're looking at those? Structures, you talked. About the weather conditions it gets pretty darn cold up there in the winter what was the. Habitats for these people I mean where did they live Well they were master. Survivalists they lived on the land they? Built shelters, in caves and under Lock, shelters lock ledges and. In more recent times they. They had a large enclosed stockade and Large houses that were communal But in many cases they may even pack stayed in these structures that I've. Mentioned in Putnam Dutchess county these stone chambers was very, good places to to shelter but they Again in the northeast the ancient. Population was considered to be wandering bands, of hunter gatherers that really had no time to spend in one place long enough to build any kind of sophisticated society or civilization but we know from studies archaeological studies and this is. Something that the local archaeologists would have to knowledge that there were places. Along the Hudson river sample where there were continuous habitation of human since. People came into the region. So that's continual habitation in one area for well over ten thousand, years this is more. Than enough time for, a developed a sophisticated belief system this three dimensional belief system I mentioned earlier to. Have been developed and practiced for for many many centuries, and generations So the the evidence is there it's not generally accepted I call it a no convenient untruth that there was no civilization in the northeast there's a wonderful book published nineteen. Eighty nine called Manitou the secret landscape of New England's native civilization and. Just in that title native civilization that's you know that's not generally accepted. As I just explained but. In Manitou Mayburn Dick's very well made the case that the native, Americans in New England In fact building stone and did practice, argues, astronomy and, these guys were not lightweights James neighbor was. A naval architect at woods hole ocean graphic institute in Massachusetts Byron Dick's optical engineer for NASA And these guys were early members. Who, spent their off time in the woods documenting these stones sites chambers, and Karen's and negligence throughout New England and proving to my mind that they impact aligned with some events on the? Horizon Glenn, if people would come across these, structures for the very first time would. They be overwhelmed by what they saw and would they have a new appreciation for, the people who built them Yes and no Think so, well you know when you see the megalithic. Structures in Europe And other places around the world they, are really mind blowing in the northeast or a little more subtle crude and we every anybody who walks around the, woods in New England is gonna come across old things, made? Of stone whether it's an old. Stone, foundation and, old stone long right these piles of stones And again we've kind of been programmed to dismiss them all is being early American, or colonial agricultural activity or farm beautification surveying or road clearing anything but native American and spiritual but as the evidence is accumulating we're realizing and a lot. Of this has to do, with, native Americans are starting to take. Ownership of these sites and come out and and admit that that they are, in fact there's because many of them are threatened and many of them are getting destroyed and the Windsor site kind, of that opened the door about ten years ago a, site? In Turner's falls Massachusetts Designated the first remonial stone site in New England it's really the only one I think there's only one other that's been given that designation by the federal government and, that was because the attorneys flows airport. Was looking, to extend its runway and the the state archaeologists came in and saw that there were still piles and they you know they basically ruled, that these are just diamond. Dozen colonial early American instructions nothing, special here but then because it was a federal project these tribes had to be consulted and the Narragansett and the lump inaugural mashpee tribes in New England and their tribal preservation officers, came together and examine the site and and declared that it was in fact the native American sacred site and they were overruled by the state archaeologist but. Archaeologist by the department of, interior The actually, department of, agriculture the national forest service Designated this and it was listed in the national register is. The first native American ceremonial stone site in, northeast so that was opening the door that okay there there is the possibility that these hands get the recognition that they are deserving that they can be identified in their proper cultural. Context and mechanized as You know as resources of cultural significance Because. They are in fact ancient native American why were the structures in Europe seem to be more advanced, than in, the United States North America Well I have to do with the skills, of of the. The people who were constructing them and the those abilities taking more time to fuse across the globe It's it's A lot. Of people if you were to go back twenty or thirty years, maybe longer they would attribute many of these stone sites in New. England too early visitations, from Europeans We do have a couple of sites, there's, America's Stonehenge up in. Salem New Hampshire there's site called guns you walk in Connecticut and these are much more in the Dane of what you see in. Northwest megalithic European Scotland Wales and Great Britain these.

New England Glenn Stone Europe Massachusetts England Lynn Chris Manitou Mayburn Dick Hudson river Putnam Dutchess Windsor United States NASA woods hole Salem Connecticut European Scotland Wales Karen
"strana" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"strana" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"So we've got a new episode of Netflix explained for you, which is one I've been looking forward to and and working on for a long time. This one is about astrology. Astrology was considered as a gym at a science as strana. I mean, they actually emerged in a paired way and today modern science doesn't support it, but but it is still wildly popular. And that's what we wanted to set out to look at in this episode of explained, what is it that has made every human society we basically know of look for this kind of meeting starts and what does this people are getting out of it? How do people deal with tensions between science and astrology? What is it that it is giving to people's lives? It's important to me to us it in CEPA. So this is not looking tall, giant, and making fun of it, a huge percentage of human beings upon it or getting real value out of a strategy. So what is that value? What is it routed? Where did it come from? How's it evolved in the way it has? And why is it becomes so much more popular in the internet age? Why hasn't bef- rental assault of the scientific. Unity on astrology done anything to blunt, the appeal people get from it. This is really, really, really worth watching. It's a beautiful episode that will make something that may not make a lot of sense to you seem a lot more sensible, go check the episode on Netflix because search for explained or for boxer tons of other great episodes on the racial wealth gap on DNA editing on cannabis on k. pop on everything you can think of. I've told you this before, but I really think the show is the best thing I've ever done. So go check the upset out on Netflix search for explained or for box on the platform, or you just go to Netflix dot com. Sasha explained..

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"strana" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"strana" Discussed on The Science Hour

"But the end of this, the complementary information you get from Pluto. And from ultima Thule I you think we'll give a much richer vision of the answer subsystem. Well, that's right in it already has, you know, I think Pluto, really up ended paradigm about how complex small planets can be, how active they can be geologically so long after their formation which was not expected. Pluto is among the most complicated and diverse planets in the solar system. And that was a surprise to almost everyone, and for me is just a surprise that here we have this mission started not so long ago and it's already visiting the most remote things we can imagine visiting, you know, it is amazing to me how fast our capabilities in space flight have developed back in our parents generation in the sixties. We were just learning to fly spacecraft to the nearest planets Venus and Mars to put it in scale at Venus, we're one house to the left of your home and Mars were one house to the right ultima would be forty three houses down the street to the right. So we are really exploring very far away with very high tech, little spacecraft that has tremendous capability. We launched in two thousand six with the best technology that you could put on interplanetary spacecraft fastest spacecraft ever launched across the. Entirety of our solar system between six and twenty fifteen. And now it's out exploring even farther with these high tech cameras and spectrometers, and dusts sensors and radio science, and all of that. And it's working perfectly and many people probably don't know. There is no plan by any space agency anywhere in the world to go back out to the quite belt. We are the one and only exploration currently planned for this whole vast third zone of the solar system. And so we want to get the most out of it and I'm sure they will allinson that boldly going wet. No, strana has gone before. Now let's every Trump's off to this recording. All plug in my ear buds and stop pumping sa- music into my is it could be loud pulsating. Or it could be gentle and relaxing..

strana
"strana" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

04:38 min | 2 years ago

"strana" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"And welcome back to coast to coast you're gonna love the next couple of hours you newman back with us he was with me five years ago he's an author conference organizer world explorer as well as organizing the mega lithium mania conferences he organizes the origins conference in london with andrew collins every november he has spoken at events in the united kingdom france malta peru egypt bosnia north america he's appeared on the bbc sky channel bosnian television and his latest work has called the megaliths studies in stone hugh welcome back it's been a while thanks i haven't me jewish good to be back and we're going to introduce robin heath also a graduate of the and w school and bangor has started his career as a researcher and development engineer and semiconductor technology prior to becoming a senior lecturer and math and engineering since nineteen ninety robin has been seeking out evidence for the prehistoric science embedded within the surviving olympic monuments in britain and here's robin on coast to coast hi robyn good to have you with us thanks for having me your great to be listening to what's going to bring hugh in where we're all here let's have a great conversation first of all hugh what have you been doing over the last five years actually would be running the code friends published a couple of books the book about styling circles which features inside this studies in stone book had a book about giants came out with mccullough wars jim vieira as you know so you recently at a contract in the desert conferences like this and it'd be pretty busy we run toes conferences traveling and research to corners of the planet so keeping pretty busy good in robert how did you get involved in these kinds of studies my beginning with the lecture given by alexander thome who was a pioneer of oculus strana me in the sixties when i was at university and they went on the backbone while i into career and then i came back to it sort of fifteen years later and i've been sort of fascinated over students hoped you might say and he why do we seem to be so fascinated with these old stone circles like stonehenge should go beckley tepi in places like that i mean we're fascinated by this out calm the she used to be a wave of what we call megalomania sweeping the planet this is something that a good friend and colleague in my mental joe michelle who's a brilliant also died a few years ago put forward in a book came out in one thousand nine hundred eighty two cool megalomania we then founded the conference with him your mind so editor gareth meals and there's just so sensitive like even from the times or the antequera going back to the sixteen seventeen hundreds that people become obsessive and kind of crazy about the megalithic monuments they want to measure them and understand it and they want to meditate in them and we kind of you know a lot of us feel the same we have this undying passion to try and understand what the ancients up to and this is you know the one of the ways we approach is like we like modern antiquarians if you like we kind of we go in there with such high passion and drive and we often discover things about these these sites and this is these discoveries revealed in the new book have we figured out how these structures were ever constructed that's a that's a that's a loaded question george i tell you that i mean rubbing could probably jumping on this as well but there's no not really i mean we know it's possible to move steiner's the problem with some sites as we'll see nice we discussed today refrigerator stonehenge many of the stones came for wales so they came from me where robin lives you know over a hundred miles away and so managed to drag these times to quarry them move them across water and different terrains is quite remarkable feat in itself so it's being put down as you know potentially giants in the the the the people of this land hundreds of years ago the claiming it was made by demons or the devil because i couldn't understand how they could possibly quarry move them then construct them into geometric forms in the landscape so they i mean even in the old books like the history of the kings of britain by if moments with came out and the.

newman five years fifteen years
"strana" Discussed on The Down and Dirty Show

The Down and Dirty Show

02:56 min | 2 years ago

"strana" Discussed on The Down and Dirty Show

"The event to spectate or watch or anything before this or was this your first time ever actually even seeing them out and in person the first time yeah i mean i once i signed up for it i was like okay time to really go back through some of this on board stuff on youtube and look at it and that's really what i did that's that's the only that's the only time i've ever seen anything about it was just youtube videos everyone's seen climbed dance or something like that of ari vatanen driving up in the dirt and it's just it's a pretty nutty thing you know you're going in really high ovation so you're dealing with your own sort of hypoxia oxygen starvation situation the engines dying and weasing its way to the top because as a naturally aspirated cards losing three percent power three percent horsepower every thousand feet vertical so it's it's really kind of funny equation as you're getting more and more confident you're pushing the car and then it's just doesn't have as much for you but the top section it's like driving on mars and you're driving flat out you're gonna corners and fourth gear at you know ninety miles an hour hundred miles an hour and you're sitting there in the back of your head you're like i'm just gonna look at the lines i'm just gonna look at the road i'm not gonna look at the rocks or the cliffs or the vast dropoffs or something like that because it's like something out of a bad movie if you if you end up off the side and i know you know the first time i went last year to mount washington with the strana with with subaru when they when he beat that record in the first i'm mount washington it was one of those run looking and i'm looking at the edge and i'm like wow there's like some town of straffic consequences here and i got a feeling pike speaks gotta the first time you're going up there you're not you're just driving i'm sure just regular speeds up there and you're looking going oh wow what did i get myself into yeah i mean you know i brought my wife up here so she was up here today and we drove up the mountain after practice and all that stuff and we were just going you know casually twenty five thirty five miles an hour and she's like wait this is this is bunkers like serious i'm like oh no we take this corner like eighty five and she's like what like yeah this next little straightaway we're doing like you know hundred ten she's like way how is this house this possible there's nothing they're like well you know we're racers so you know we we have our eyes on where we wanna go and till bechtel who runs from my race team he's doing the event as well and he was like he's like yeah don't look off to the side because then you'll drive off the side it's pretty simple but you know it it's a it's different because you get five or six runs and then your days over you know and you get like these little snippets of you know third of the track here half the track there and then unless you really like you buy a passenger up and down all day the next day you're not gonna ever get as many laps as you would if you were going to go out and you know like learn new racetrack at a regular racetrack so it's a totally different type of discipline and you know i i'd really like to do some dirt rally stuff in the future i think that would be really cool but i can see why people are drawn to this type of event i mean it's it's an insane like spread of talent it's insane spread of vehicles.

youtube three percent thousand feet
"strana" Discussed on Flash Forward

Flash Forward

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"strana" Discussed on Flash Forward

"What the impact of putting all of these pieces of copper up in space might be the first detractors were the astronomers consider what would happen if if such a test was successful and the dipoto communications method became the norm what would happen if they set up they'll say the air force decided they send up a fully functional system which would require much denser belt of needles around the equator and the polls and then what would happen if russia or decided they wanted to what if europe wanted one suddenly we'd have a sky filled of copper dipoto and strana mors went in hard against project westford they were not messing around with their complaints i had a letter from one astronomer seeing that if to didn't take firm actually gets west verde would be kintu chamberlain's appeasement of hitler in the lead up to world war two they really took the seriously astronomers protested project westford so vocally that they actually end up taking it to the floor of the united nations the us stick department had to get involved in negotiating between the strana mors in the department of defense and international community of scientists really raised the alarm about what could happen if states were allowed to just launch anything willy nilly without consulting with the scientific community i make sure that it would not cause any sort of environmental harm but it wasn't just scientists who didn't like the idea of throwing up all of these needles the public got relief invested in this too and this was in part because right around the same time that project westford was being tested something else was happening in the united states so the first one wants to nineteen sixty one the second in nineteen sixty three and then the middle nineteen sixty two was the publication of silent spring by richard carson scene is used to be seen as a really major turning points in what came to be mainstream environmentalism one of the big themes of rachel carson's book silent spring is this idea of invisible pollution she's mostly talking about pollution from chemicals end nuclear waste but you could see space junk as another form of invisible pollution right you can't see it ruth also points out in her work.

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"strana" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"strana" Discussed on 790 KABC

"To be streaming it and you never know who's gonna stop by abc at stagecoach fueled by monster energy and seven ninety kabc we've got some new information about the van attack in toronto we do we've been able to identify the driver of the van so he is a twenty five year old this is according to strana on cbs news sources now his name is alec manasseh twentyfive they've obtained a photo of him from social media they did that just about an hour ago u s law enforcement sources telling cbs news at the incident appears to be a deliberate act witnesses said the driver was moving fast and it appeared that he knew what he was doing witness peter king told c tv news that the driver did not make any effort to stop if it was an accident he would have stopped or slowed down but the person just went right through the sidewalk this is again they're learning i don't know if he was born in canada i don't know if he is you know minassian is an armenian name and it was a big white writer van damme dry they rent these vans for this purpose they didn't they didn't they do that in france as well yeah it was a rental i guess they didn't want to do it with their own van so they had to go out and rent one we have an eyewitness account described what they saw his name is nick sanca he spoke with global news toronto let's go ahead and listen to what he had to say cut for they can't he was coming this way and from what i heard one person at young and finch to that corner over there and three people here were run over like it was all in shock i was studying and all of a sudden i see the truck just running through i get up and like by the time i come here i saw some little blood trill all that already.

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"strana" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"strana" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"People thought over the weekend was a ufo it was not but what else is in the skies let's check in with dr sky steven cates i stephen ed murray kirk lim happy new year to the roof in a your email on mark gave us who smoke amazing christmas gift with short because so many people on the one rather wafiq the falcon nine rocket here in phoenix george he was actually visible rising from the horizon that's almost over 300 in seventy five miles is the bird would fly and for all of people in southern california here in arizona people had no clue what it was until we realise later on it was this launch and you could actually see the first stage breaking away from this space sex rocket the falcon nine what strange about a georgian conclusion is i noticed that heading due south after it started the arc up into the sky and they'll be many more launches like this from vandenberg get a little to this george we're looking for the next of many launches of course in 2018 but the national reconnaissance office is going to launch a socalled secret payload probably as early as january the 10th and one commitment will make to the listeners of coast in 2018 we'll try to get this skinny on these launches way ahead of time so our listeners all over the place can take advantage of it towards wrapping it up the biggest these stories and my opinion for all of 2017 probably you're in astronomy to speak of first had to be the total solar eclipse just outstanding we'll have to wait till april the eighth of twenty twenty four to see it but from astrophysics in the strana me the detection confirmation of the gravitational waves from collapsing neutron stars probably ranks as an alltime high in the live sky as the moon now moves on just before its first quarter phase on new year's day the first of two full moon for the month of january the first one on the first floor on the second one we call the bloom over there is also going to be georgy total lunar eclipse on the 31st of january.

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"strana" Discussed on WEEI

WEEI

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"strana" Discussed on WEEI

"The celtics off the night they played on monday of course lost of the piston's strana slowdown andre drummond didn't work out on monday night roman 26 points twenty two rebounds where the piston's marcus smart was the hero for the celtics in the loss he hit hit six 3pointers had 23 points but not enough for the celtics will take the floor again on thursday night against joe and beat and the philadelphia seventy six years lebron james ejected from a game for the first time in his nba career tonight against the miami heat for throwing an air punch eu i manning is officially out as the quarterback of the giants he has been demoted in move that has sent shockwaves across the nfl the decision made by ben malkey do you like manning being benched in favor of keno smith start fake news jimmy garoppolo has been named the starter for the forty nine or is he gets his first crack in post tom brady life as a starter this coming week against the chicago bears the bruins will take the ice again tomorrow night or tonight now against the tampa bay lightning the puk will drop at seven thirty i am ben mallar and that's what's trending now on w e y and w e v i dot com these late night tv skis todd sports radio weei bosnian sports talk for insomniacs in the graveyard fact tonight it's mr overnight big band miller let's get it going with banvalor late night while sports radio weei.

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"strana" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:39 min | 3 years ago

"strana" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Ripped off roger trautmann in zepce funk masterpiece when he cranked out his mega head uptown funk with bruno mars great song by the way this according to a new lawsuit was strana entertainment which owns rights to roger in zepce nineteen eighty classic more bounce to the ounce says uptown clearly a copy clearly ripped it off particularly at first 48 secondserve it blue familiarity is they're definitely does is it enough after after judgment or call writing credit which sometimes comes out of these these acts of litigation rosy right you know i've just give us a call right credit the action we'll see what happens there that portion includes the repeated talk boxing of the word does similar to the lyrics of more balanced than me in the it so uptown fuck has been incredibly successful we all know sold allied to allow downloads on that moral yeah more than eleven million units since its release total the suit also points out that ronson even cited roger and zap is influences to him in his career includes note for note comparisons of the songs checking in at for frank vincent who was best known for his role on sopranos as eventual top top family boss phil leotard owed died today during openheart surgery the massachusetts born new jersey bread actor made a name for himself playing the tory sleaze tough characters but remember freight marino casino and of course billy batch in good fellas joe donnelly let's get you all my life i like getting too big struggle bus the my belly okay of breaking but only shane bucks jews coast fiction i like shoot mirrors shooting my linked to a terrific he was best they made a lot of money took so army moshe but to no more shines maybe you're here buddy been away long time to go up then they share issues anymore luxury affleck crowds which looks good until you i'm a breaking a little bit assault on a killing which semi you don't felt like you kill you know there's a lot of people i am only in which you have an apology in edges came home i haven't seen yet ill longtime in on breaking of.

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