35 Burst results for "Stralia"

Beijing lists grievances against Australia, giving warning to other countries with tense China relations

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

07:23 min | Last month

Beijing lists grievances against Australia, giving warning to other countries with tense China relations

"Relations between beijing and canberra deteriorating. Awhile have created spectacularly in recent months. Australia has excluded while away from australia's five g network. Australia has cold for an international investigation into the origins of the covid nineteen pandemic. It's spoken up in support of hong kong and protested against china's treatment of its wiegand minority and china has bristled at all of these moves. Some of china's responses have been merely rhetorical and calls medic including crudely goading australia. You've alleged crimes committed by string. Troops in afghanistan others had more measurable effects. Devastating tariffs on australian exports to china including especially ruinous levies on australian. Wine has china decided to full out with australia. How should australia or any other country. China has a popat react or adjust. And is there any way back to cooperation with china for australia or anyone else. This is the foreign desk. My advice to punish morrison repeatedly has do more say lis- do more is in fact. A series of concrete measures enhancing national security pows enhancing now fundamental economic cow enhancing population growth and strengthening our alliances and relationships with countries around the world. Or just the united states but in southeast asia and beyond as well so this kind of patriotism and chest puffing plays very well as china's coming out of covid domestically a want to show and deflect residual public anger over. Its cover up and handling. I'm so getting the country tonight. This way to show that they can stand up and push back against the west. I mean that's a really good message to be spending so it's really two birds. One stone the chinese government should be totally a shined of this past. It diminishes them in the world is hello and welcome to the foreign. I'm andrew muller. China is not a nation known for its impulsively where foreign policy is concerned but using tends to act carefully and deliberately so it should be assumed that it is acting carefully and deliberately towards australia for a look at what china is doing and why china is doing. It joined first of all from beijing by sophia yan china correspondent for the daily telegraph severe festival. I think what we're trying to establish here is whether this is a specific row between china and australia or something. We might see more of in china's dealings with western democracies in general but we will start with stralia. Does it strike you. That china is going out of. Its way to pick a fight with australia. Or is this something. That's just kind of happened. Organically absolutely china's definitely targeting australia. It's been going for some time and it's obviously hit a peak. Now it's every day. There seems to be something new in the sputtered. Diplomatic spat between beijing and camera. And what beijing's really trying to do is to make australia of retail. Australia is a major. Us ally part of the five. The lions and australia matches on values with america. So hunting. Australia is a way for china to send a message to other. Us allies or the country's just thinking about siding with washington and to try to prevent them from considering policies that china dislikes bans on chinese tech firms over national security risks while we issue for instance even territorial disputes in the south china sea being public about stances over hong kong and taiwan china does not want countries to get involved with what it thinks is its own backyard so pressuring australia. This way is just one way to show. Hey this is what can happen to your country if you dare to take on. There's an upside to this too. It's certain swagger for the domestic audience to show that this all powerful country china can finally stand up to the west. You have to remember that. For the chinese government and for many chinese people there is a very painful history and memory of what's called the quit century accumulation. That was the hundred years before the communist party took power in nineteen forty nine during which many say the glorious chinese empire crumbled at the hands of foreign powers. The brits the russians japanese china at the time lost almost all the wars fought. And actually that's when hong kong was ceded to the brits so this kind of patriotism in chest puffing plays very well as china's coming out of cova kovic domestically a want to show and deflect residual public anger over. Its botch cover up in handling and still getting the country two nights in this way to show that they can stand up and push back against the west. I mean that's a really good message to be sending so it's really two birds. One stone does a number of things going on there but let's just focus on one of them because it is a proximate cause of china's irritation with australia and indeed china's irritation with a few other countries. Which is far away and other chinese companies being locked out of five g networks. Why does china perceive that as an argument worth starting because it's not imaginable that any of these countries are going to change their minds. Way is in a way national champion. It's a private company. It's not state owned. But of course any company that succeeds in china is in some ways states approved so to succeed here. You definitely need to have certain. Party officials Tests the quench relationships and people in high positions in your corner and so while we the company that really shows and reflects the rise of china. It's headquartered in shenzhen which just two three decades ago with a rice patty backwater. Now it's silicon valley hub of china and this company itself really does show how quickly the economy here has grown china now. The world's second largest economy in china trauma very broad level wants to be taken seriously on the world stage and so attacking hallway company. That many would consider really national. Champion is attacking the status. That china now thinks it should have on the world stage so it's ironic also that there's concern from beijing. That other nations are talking about who as a national security risk because china itself has long said that it wants to keep certain industries telecoms utilities oil and gas within its own country at state-owned enterprises. Because they themselves. Beijing is concerned about the very same issue that foreign players could come into the country. Take a big share of the market and therefore be competitive domestically. They didn't want to see control here to foreign companies over the issue of national security. So it's actually a bit ironic for china to now be upset with other nations for saying that a chinese company coming in to build critical national infrastructure. Whether that's a nuclear plant or the telecoms network but then to say hey. You can't say that this is a risk. We don't pose a risk. it's it's it's it's. It's not very fairly for china to be saying that other nations

China Australia Beijing Andrew Muller Hong Kong Sophia Yan The Daily Telegraph Severe Fes United States Canberra Chinese Government Morrison Cova Kovic Afghanistan Asia South China Lions Washington Shenzhen
Teaching Music in a Multicultural Classroom with Rachael Morgan-Jones

Emma & Tom's PGCE Podcast

05:26 min | Last month

Teaching Music in a Multicultural Classroom with Rachael Morgan-Jones

"Just being very aware of the population in your local community and so on and really understand and getting to know your children is key to understanding what is going to make me tech in the classroom so i have put all those coat cultural backgrounds into three main areas to take into consideration. So there's the islamic tradition the western classical tradition and the oral tradition. So if you look at the islamic tradition you might cross children from north africa middle east pakistan. This country's per pack afganistan and those children are very likely to be muslim and islam. You have to members of multicultural cross continental religion so there will be a broad range is broad range of approaches to studying music and the feeling about music so the most conservative denomination doesn't allow music tall the engagement of music and the reason for that is because within the sharia law music is seen as being within a very negative context for example prostitution and gambling so there are some conservative very conservative muslims. Who don't believe in engagement and music. All the mainstream belief is that music is absolutely fine. Studied in the educational context. Although it's only the very liberal muslims who will consider taking music onto key stage four key stage five on maybe within the the kind of liberal groups you would expect the food. Fourth plus generation immigrants. So that's the the one group be quite mindful of then. The second group is the western classical tradition. Which is the group that really embraces music. Probably the one that most acquainted with stralia america britain and these musicians will be very used to listening to music in the house. They might study an instrument and music orchestral band instruments. They might be part of a band. So that's what would be the music associated with that group that british group i talks about. And then there's that food group oral traditionalist so those will musicians that may be learning instrument that has been passed down from generation to generation. They learn by eia improvise ation say features. Very heavy heavily in it. So those i would say with the three main groups and there are considerations and balances in order to to kind of cater for for those three groups. I was gonna say i you. Can you can as a often classically trained musician as as a new music teacher you can probably kind of get your head around the idea of moving away from you. Know travel cliffs and dotson sticks in music notation to kind of embrace the huge number of traditions in the world. The do that music through oral transmission. How do you kind of get going with group who believed that music is actually forbidden unlawful. Unlawful and against their religion. Because you know if you knew to the classroom you might be worried about getting them to sit down and stop talking and listen to you and the older you might actually be transgressing. Religious beliefs might be a bit of well the when it comes to that group. They are not very used to listening to music in the house and i would say physically. The mainstream belief is that music is fine in an educational context. And i can tell you that within pupil voice over the years and people voices taken with our external partners. The feedback is really positive and they enjoy music in the classroom. So don't be don't be frightened about that at all. Yes a have come across the odd pupil here in that that is coming from that consume conservative background. Brit just means having some conversations and maybe with the parents sometimes and saying we'll actually music as part of the school curriculum and you do have to embrace it and that after you've had that initial conversation it's fine of never had a problem after that and again you know you do find some liberal Muslims who will take music for key stage four but the main thing to remember. Is that it you know. Music is enjoyed in the classroom by children. These cultures i think the needs to be a sensitivity. And if you're going to be working in a school where there's a very large percentage of pupils who follow a faith maturities could be a catholic school for example. You would be very careful in terms of the music that you sharing with them. A lot of music these days very sexualize than you'd be careful anyway not to share things that are really explicit but you would then probably find an opportunity to introduce more classical music into your schemes of learning and. I think that's fair to say that. The schemes of learning that have developed over the years have really broad range of music with quite a generous amount of classical music. And that's that's something really positive. I think

Multicultural Cross Stralia North Africa Pakistan Britain America House Brit
French children's podcast platform Keeku launches

podnews

02:51 min | Last month

French children's podcast platform Keeku launches

"Key coup is a new french children's podcast platform which has just launched it features curated children's audio content from a variety of publishers curated by age group theme or time of day. The company says it's good to the mid screen time sprouts have released. Their platform stands for october and will publish these online. Every month from now on apple is now forty seven percent and spotify twenty four point four percent of all the data includes podcast apps episode generation downloads over the first seven days and lots more. The reuters institute has published a new report about daily news podcasts. The research points to them being very successful in terms of total downloads and highlights four types of daily news. Podcast currently available as recline is leaving. Vox the company. He co founded and joining the new york times as columnist and podcast host. He starts in january and leaving luminary. Your lander sang when he is now senior director for programming at npr. Google podcasts third. Most popular podcast app has now reached fifty million installations on android the fat. Mary's podcast is a podcast from australian restaurant. As jake smith and kenny. Graham who in recent episode described their employee's whining and self entitled according to the sydney morning herald podcast producer. James atkinson says that ad-libbing is a risky approach to content curation and business insider writes about your stralia in podcasters who are quote earning thousands of dollars a month for decades a quiet and remote australian country town nurtured a world-class monster. A man who often more than half a century is only now coming into focus as possibly this nation's serial killer his name. Is vince dempsey. Psychopath gangster child killer rapist. That's one of queensland's best known investigative journalists matthew khandan. He's launched a new true crime. Original with bush ca studios ghost gate road examines vince so dempsey a multiple murderer who claims to have killed thirty three people. Though it's thought the real number is more than one hundred. How i found my voice banquets third season. Samir ahmed hosts and talk. Show host graham norton based guest and focus on foot has won the gold award and the people's vote best arts and entertainment. Podcast at the lovey awards season six. We'll start on december. The eighteenth with an extended episode with richard thompson.

Jake Smith Sydney Morning Herald James Atkinson Spotify Reuters Vince Dempsey NPR Apple New York Times Matthew Khandan Kenny Graham Vince So Dempsey Mary Google Samir Ahmed Queensland
Is Europe copying Victoria's lockdown strategy?

Coronacast

04:54 min | 3 months ago

Is Europe copying Victoria's lockdown strategy?

"Say Norman. Let's talk about a place, which is now imposing a five Columba travel limit You can't go to the body shop anymore he conquered the beauty salons jeans I'm not talking about Victoria I'm talking about I land and it looks like pices in Europe adopting some USTRALIAN stall approaches to curbing coronavirus. Yes. Because despite all the complaints about lockdown in Victorian has unnecessary M- should. Just. Let it go climbing from some sources and how in complaining not letting up quickly enough lockdown is actually all you can do when it's getting out of control I mean as a Stralia being used as an example to the world or is this just best practice? No matter where you are let's talk about Ireland for a moment, which is a country that's got a smaller population than Victoria bending how you define. It is right about five million people in the past month if at seventeen thousand cases past week seven, thousand by yesterday twelve, hundred cases in a single day. So. That's getting pretty worrying from them and they they're locked on looks remarkably similar to victorious yet they're going into heights lockdown of his six weeks well, in Victoria. That wasn't long enough. Do you think they might extend it? Well, it's hard to say and it goes on modelling the Senate got more cases and more virus circulating and as we've said. Before on Corona, Cast University of Sydney modeling showed that for every day you delay lock tone when you're out of control, it's a week at the other end, which is one reason why Victoria has gone on a bit longer they try to ring-fence thirty six suburbs. It didn't work and that delayed things by a couple of weeks and we've probably shortened it by lot. At, the end effect on that but that's engine. Now the sorted out and the hopefully, we'll get done very levels, but it depends on how much virus there is around week or so ago a senior person at the W. H. O., the World Health Organization was saying lockdowns shouldn't be the primary way that countries control Khurana, virus, and that sort of headline went out. And I think a of the new Scott got in it because we are seeing countries using lockdown and it can be effective. So where's the? Where's the nuance here? So that's certainly not what was being said last week courting the World Health, organization and we for Monday's synthetically report I interviewed Dr Dave Navarro. Who's in fact, the same health official he's professor of public. Health. Imperial College London and his Special Envoy to World Health Organization on Covid Nineteen, and he feels that he's been misrepresented his view is that sure down is not the first thing that you do. It's not your primary means of control. Your primary means of control has to be testing and contact tracing and quarantine in isolation of the people you find in that process. However he does say that you can get to a point where locked is the only thing that you can do and you should use that lockdown to improve your contact and testing regime. And in fact, if you look at Victoria, that's really although in the first wave, that's what we did as a nation back in March we got our act together in terms of contact tracing. There are still deficiencies in Victoria and they have used the last few weeks to get much better and so the contact tracing regime now in Victoria is fantastic there. quickly, the locking off mystery cases in super-quick time, and that's what you've gotta get. So then fighting the of used that time well. It's not that they're against lockdown. It's just that it has its place. and. When you when it's out of control, the way it is in Europe you've actually got to be able to do that another problem. And, I don't know what they've done in Ireland here. But the problem is the borders and it was a really interesting study the other day looking counties in the United. States and showing that cross-border flow was a very important factor in both the sustenance and the growth of SARS COV to infections. and. If you don't control your borders and you still got people coming in from outside, it's very hard to get this done and on control it. So so really European. Countries are trying to do this with one hand tied behind their bank. Britain and Ireland could control their borders because they're islands but it's harder for other nations exactly and can we just come back to smoking before about Australia and we are doing the numbers that are coming out now looking really really promising do how close are we to having zero spread here in Australia, we're almost there new south. Wales still has cases popping up Victoria might get there before New South Wales because they're still in lockdown and those extra few days of Lockton make make all the difference I think New South Wales it's going to be really hard but they're. You know they're getting on top of it too. I think we're going to be very, very tiny sprayed, and maybe in Victoria, they'll get done to zero spread. And that will make it much easier to open things

Victoria World Health Organization Ireland Europe Dr Dave Navarro Norman South Wales Wales Senate Lockton Imperial College London Corona Scott Australia Cast University Of Sydney Lockdowns Official W. H. O. Britain
Why 1 million coronavirus deaths is only just the beginning

Coronacast

07:24 min | 3 months ago

Why 1 million coronavirus deaths is only just the beginning

"Yesterday Norman the world clock devote one million deaths from covid nineteen since this began less than a year ago it's been reported by the Johns Hopkins University. Dashboard, which is a pretty morbid side that keeps keeps an eye on all this sort of stuff apart from the one million deaths we've got thirty three point three, million cases in counting. And it's amazing to think that this all started from one person probably about less than a year ago. Yeah. Ten months ago November, that's the smart money is one person in China from a Bat Or Bats and moved into on ESPN. Is, an extraordinary number. And this is not necessarily going to slow down as many countries go into the second way. So we're at one million. What's the chance? Do you think we'll get to two million? Oh, I think that we'll get to two million without too much trouble unfortunately. We've got view of the United States figures on that Hopkins sites the United States numbers are going back up. There were going down a couple of weeks ago or through a few weeks ago and other going back up. Second Wave Solidifying in Europe France, not come back to France and a minute. So I think that we will get to the the the second million sadly tragically and low to middle income countries are really just getting going with this and there that just don't have the medical facilities that we do into in terms of helping people who've got severe illness. So unfortunately, this is going to go on. So when you look at also where the number of deaths really have. occurred it seems like about ten countries account for more than seventy percent of the debts. Obviously, the US is the big one there nearly a fifth. That's about two hundred and something thousand followed by Brazil India Mexico the UK Italy, where do you think that the new deaths will likely come from? Where is the the virus currently growing? It's going to come from those countries probably because they're the one seeing second wave in the second wave could well be worse than I. I wouldn't be surprised if that looks pretty similar. In some other countries, you're not necessarily going to know what's happening because they're not doing enough testing to really be sure how much corona virus they've got many people are dying of it. So I think it's in countries with doing testing that you're going to see the effect and it's likely I mean you see a million? It's likely that it's seven to ten million in reality. Because we are underestimating the amount of coronavirus around. So one million is just what we know about seven to ten is probably what the real figure actually is, and that's really scary. You mentioned the the second wives coming through a lot of countries and where in Europe, in particular saying a lot of cases suddenly jump up a lot from where they were. But. We're not actually saying the death toll yet follow. Why do you think that is all and do you think that it's likely that that's going to continue that trend so one reason you see a delay in the deaths appearing is that it takes a couple of weeks. People become seriously ill, and then we can be seriously over quite a long time. So that's one reason why it's a delay. There's probably a reduced death rate as well because the getting better at treating people in intensive care with decks meth zone, which reduces death rates by twenty percent nursing tummy not using ventilators and also the older people are so socially isolating themselves wearing masks. So they're tending not to get infected, and so the bias infections towards younger people who tend not to die of covid nineteen of Ova can get long-term effects we've spoken about. On Kurna cast before and you mentioned France before what did you want to say about France? France. Is reporting an upsurge and the authorities there are really getting worried in its report there that for example, one of the senior doctors and France as told newspapers that they're worried that there's going to be enough medical personnel to be able to deal with the the record number of cases that are appearing in France and that they may run out of intensive care beds. And it's patchy and it's also into an underprivileged areas such as Marseille where there's a lot of overcrowding and there's the worry that the capacity of the French hospital system to cope with could be welcomed a very good hospital system. So you mentioned testing before and there's been quite a few announcements recently about testing the other day we saw one from the World Health Organization about rapid testing and I think we also saw demonstration at the White House by President, trump what's the rapid testing? All about what what's it hoped that it'll achieve take overseas before we get to Australia, what the World Health Organization has done through the gates. Foundation is purchased one, hundred, twenty, million test kids rapid test kits. and. These test kits. One of them in particular is a bit like a pregnancy test where you do a swab, you shake it in some liquid and then you Putin liquid on a test strip and you went fifteen minutes into the. Shows the line or to bend your positive for the virus and it's pretty accurate. It's not quite as accurate as the PTR tests the wonder doing the moment but you don't need the artery. You don't need cars to take your samples to a laboratory then get an Aq- and wait for the results. This is done on the sport fifteen minutes. You've got an answer. So it's a way in resource poor environments to get an answer and it is cheaper than doing the PC artists. In countries like Austrailia, these tests could be used as a way of controlling the pandemic moving forward. What are we going to do in states like Batori and you South Wales even Western Australia with US tonight breaking the ship off the coast of port hedland where everybody's vulnerable to new infections coming in from overseas in particular? HOW ARE WE GONNA? Make sure there's no virus circulating that we're not aware of and mass testing particularly where people gather in large numbers is one way to actually see whether it's almost like screening the population see if you're missing any virus. And you can't really do mass screening with the existing resources because you're just going to clog up the system. If. It's instant testing people are more likely to agree to it because they don't have to hang around. They don't have to isolate themselves until they get a positive result. And it's a way of quickly finding out what's going on in an affordable way. Do you know any plans by the Australian government to get any of these rapid testing kits and and instigate that that type of program with therapeutic goods administration has stralia has approved several of these I think it's four or five of these rapid testing kits so that all they're already available in Australia. The one ones that w chose bought, which is like the pregnancy test. By Abbott, his is still under consideration for approval and there's no reason why wouldn't be approved. So the the tests are available here and available affordable price. The ideal here would be one that self contained. We don't need a little machine sitting on a desk some of them do you have to put it into machine? This one is a shake squeeze onto a strip and just wait for the result and there are others do that as well. So there's no reason why not? No in Victoria the DAUGHERTY institute is testing a way of doing mass testing using the PR test, which is the old test if you like the accurate using using saliva and they're testing that in the thousand members of the police force just to work. Out, what is the most efficient way of collecting the saliva? So you could mess testing with the old way of going about it, but the rapid testing is probably more flexible,

France United States Austrailia Europe Johns Hopkins University Norman Espn China World Health Organization Marseille Daugherty Institute Brazil India Mexico Australian Government Putin UK Port Hedland Foundation Abbott French Hospital
"stralia" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

01:54 min | 6 months ago

"stralia" Discussed on Conversations

"And just the paik sort of emotion was really relief should been through so much of that point, and just to know her suffering had ended. That was kind of this big. After three years, we were glad to be able to say she's in a better place. It's like when you're in tune. It must have been like the floor falling away from you to some degree, you must've felt. Like you needed to hang onto something for dear life. Was a strange experience a as a year ten student. Not Having had any friends again, being here, Stralia not having that extended family, and so therefore pass it onto your uncle or cousin gone through this, so it was, it was very new, but in some ways. For me at least it came at a time in my life where. You're an adolescent and find your own identity and you're trying to do that through you know no works at school and what you enjoy doing and it sort of came to me because my mom was very insistent, she didn't want anyone apart from the necessities. She didn't want anyone at school to know why. I think there was this sense of number one she didn't want. My brother sister to be that that kid whose mom has cancer I think she viewed the stigma it. That she didn't want. She didn't want to rely on other people She didn't want to put the burden of care onto the papal, and she was also a very private person. And so not not a single one of my friends teachers to the school now what you small number of my teaches news, so the principal deputy, the head of welfare and I really leaned hod on. Those teachers because I would sometimes ten to school. And I'd just be ragged bags under my eyes, because my mom's lung cancer as she gradually lost lung function. She eventually to the point where she was. Twenty..

Stralia principal
Has the COVIDSafe app been worth it?

Coronacast

03:44 min | 8 months ago

Has the COVIDSafe app been worth it?

"So it's been just over a month since the federal government released the COVID SAIF APP which is all about digital contact. Tracing at the time it was sold as a vital tool to reopen the Stralia economy to get things moving again. He is the prime minister. Scott Morrison said in early. May there are currently over three and a half million downloads and registrations of the COVID SAFE APP and there needs to be millions more. How has the APP being used since then? Has it been the key to get things moving ours? Has it been forgotten about well today? We got reported aerial. Bogle Vac to help answer those questions and many more. So I t and Hyneman. So what's going on with the APP? These days it was salt is a vital pot to get us out of look down but We haven't really heard much about in the last waco so that's right so back. In late April wind APP launched. The government was using really strong language around it. As you've discussed describing it as sunscreen tying really explicitly to the lifting of lockdown restrictions. It's like not putting on Sunscreen to go out into the blazing Sun. We need that too so we can open up the economy. And that's what's so important. So if you haven't downloaded the APP yet downloaded that rhetoric has kind of died off lightly and in fact we only know of one instant so far with APP has been used as part of the contact tracing process. That's in Victoria. Where it was used to identify one person who contact tracing had not picked up so we don't really know too much yet about the APP. Success do we know much about numbers downloads? But then also there was talk early on especially that perhaps it was hard to use it correctly. Do We know about downloads? Also usage figures. It's a good question so the government said as of this week more than six million. Australians have downloaded the APP. But that's pretty different number to those who are still using it. I mean some of that six million. They may have deleted the APP. What we really want to know is daily active users. How many people have the APP on their phone? Using it correctly with Bluetooth turned on all those things that make it work and those are the kinds of numbers. The government has repeatedly said it caught. Shame doesn't have access to or is really not measuring so we don't really know the exact number of Australians. You have quite a bit safe operating correctly on the fines today. So the digital transformation needed say they're responsible for the APP. There's a whole series of controversies around. Its use on the IPHONE. I've got an IPHONE and I keep on getting messages implying that it's not on when it is on just in the background. What'S THE STORY WITH? Iphones versus androids and the functionality. Well this was an issue early on so when the APP launch the government insisted that it worked perfectly a lot of people who had some technical expertise. This space. Question this from the start so as you might remember. Singapore has its own contact tracing APP and we all knew that Abbott. It had problems with performance on iphone and we were wondering has strategy fixed this problem. How they got around this it turns out they hadn't so it did emerge as weeks passed since the APP launch. The APP had reliability problems on iphone. So if the APP wasn't full grounded a visible on the screen and with the Foreign Arpan. It was not always reliably communicating those in crafted dazed funds with the APP or collecting them. So the government has continually updated the APP and it looks like they may have fixed some of these iphone issues but we still hearing reports of people running into problems when they using other Bluetooth Devices Sabo headphones so we really still need a bit more clarity. I think about just when the is performing as it should and on iphone even if some of those obtaining problems have now been fixed.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison Bogle Vac Stralia Bluetooth Devices Sabo Hyneman Singapore Victoria Abbott
Concerns over new mothers and babies during COVID-19

Correspondents Report

05:47 min | 8 months ago

Concerns over new mothers and babies during COVID-19

"They even though they've been classified as vulnerable group. Pregnant women have so far not shown themselves to be particularly vulnerable to the extremities of coveted non team. But there's no doubt that pregnancies and births around the world have been disrupted even in Australia. Pregnant women have missed out on important appointments and support services like mother's groups and birthing classes and for women who've been suspected or tested positive for the virus pregnancy and childbirth has been traumatic Catherine Gregory reports that maternal health experts are now looking at how to prevent any long lasting impacts. These pandemic could have on new mothers and their babies look. It wasn't sure she'd get to hear these miraculous. Sounds my waters break? I was thirty one weeks and six days so we came to the hospital. Thirty seven year olds spent the night Victorian Maternity Hospital by herself. Luckily I didn't gone to live within the next morning. I recall my husband and he left in a hurry but husband never got further than the hospitals front desk. You can't come into also and you need to get checked for carbon scandal. Has He was about to enter and found he had a favor. Sorry basically like a really sorry you husbands not going to be for the lie in ways to treat you like you have carbon sorry smashed up and secluded up. And that's when Abby Real nightmare began. She was facing childbirth alone. I'm by the side. A little bit of pioneer. That asked with some high relief and will live. You can't have guests now because you might have carbon then the stock transferred into special boosting room an isolated one by that stage. They checked me. I was now ten centimeters dilated and there was going to be our pain relief at all and now husband merciful person. Sorry I started freaking out a little bit and then came be pays Yoda me. We'd no drugs. I think I just Kinda ran into shock. Mars surreal experience. And because because you early doctors in the room whiting just standing there waiting to take him as soon as he was born only had thirty seconds with her newborn baby before nurses took him offer. Say I took them up to spatial. Katya and I was taken to isolation in the world so it's about three or four one of the midwives came in and she was almost in tears and I said I know you're GonNa Seiger's narrowing are it's we have the results yet. It's just I have to tell you the results come back positive until you've Corinthian Stralia. Since the pandemic began about half a dozen women who've been suspected tested positive for the virus have given birth in conditions similar to Abbey's it's brutal bought needs to protect doctors nurses and other patients from the virus overseas in countries with pandemic has been far worse the restrictions on more extreme lawyers and human rights advocates. In the United States a pushing the legally mandated. Birthing rights. Face ain't too many women even those that aren't sick. New York especially have been forced to give birth alarm and then separated from their baby here in Australia. Each Spain less of an issue hospitals have tried to ensure covered. Moms and Bob stay together but now as the virus appears to a Bite. Maternity experts a worried about the long term impacts of some of these measures. But it's really important that we don't intrude on oil impact on human rights. That are not necessarily going to be beneficial or even potentially harmful. That's Professor Hannah. Dolon from the School of Nursing Midwifery at Sydney University. Though I am concerned West some facilities are suggesting that the woman be accompanied by nobody not even have pa. We have had some concerning reports. Where Pediatricians Indiana technologists recommending in the case of cove in nineteen being a confirmed that the woman be separated from her baby And then there are some other things such as being excluded from water birth or not having it available at all in a hospital or not having guests in air. That are not necessarily based on strong evidence Jason's days reports are mainly coming from private hospitals. And she's heard of cases where partners aren't allowed in operating theatres for C. Sections even if there is no risk. The thing is while the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and gynecologists have issued guidance. The health practitioners. There's no standard approach across different hospitals. Health districts in states then needs to be some level of adherence particularly to the international guidelines. So one of the very concerning bits is where mothers and babies are separated when that strongly recommend that they have skin-to-skin all of the recommendations have come out saying that women should have a support person with her at. That's very concerning. When we see deviations I ask her about Abbie's experience I can tell you as a midwife hearing the Midwest speaking that they're the points we john heartbreaks. 'cause it's the last thing we want to do. All of us in on the planet at the moment with the best way forward. Sometimes we get it right.

Catherine Gregory Australia Victorian Maternity Hospital Katya United States Corinthian Stralia Spain BOB Whiting Indiana Midwest New Zealand College Of Obstetr Abbie New York Professor Hannah Abbey John Heartbreaks PA Jason
Aboriginal People of Australia

The Outside In

09:48 min | 9 months ago

Aboriginal People of Australia

"I'm just I'm shot and we are the outside. We're podcasts at syndicated to bursting your bubbles and opening up to new perspectives. And this time we're GONNA be talking about something been learning about the past few months. Which is the rights of Indigenous People in Australia? If you've been listening to our PODCAST You know that just Ni- are from South Africa in the United States separately. I'm from the United States justice from South Africa and we are not aboriginal people or in any way But we were very passionate about doing an episode on this topic because we've seen a lot of injustices in the world and in our travels yet to expand that all. Yeah well yeah like Charlet said neither of us are from indigenous groups and you were both like the colonizers in much. Yeah but I think that's one of the reasons why it's so important for us to be talking about this And finding a way to like raise awareness for the indigenous groups because a lot of the time people don't think about that and even back home in South Africa were like we've had a really good peace movement. People still don't like acknowledge the true ramifications of colonialism that has been that has had on our country and it's the same thing that we've noticed in Australia is people are very unaware in a lot of places and very very ignorant and I think it's important that we educate ourselves and talk about it. Yeah one of the reasons. I'm very interested in. This topic is during two thousand sixteen. When the d'appel North Dakota access pipeline was happening and the injustices that I saw towards native Americans really inspired me to try and make a change and currently have been researching a bunch on that topic and have connected to connected it a lot towards environmental racism and so that is why I wanted to focus on this topic today in our podcast super important to talk about. We're going to be going through some of the main terms that we're going to be using because this is different to our usual content. You might not know what's actually going on First term to talk about is colonialism. Now there's a whole lot of different types of colonialism but essentially one will be talking about most is settler colonialism and this is when one group of people move to another place moves to someone else's land and basically tries to take over that land so that can be in the case of places like Stralia and the states where people showed up and then said this is our land and that means everyone who was living here before copy here anymore or it could be in the case of like my country and South Africa were a small minority moved there but then took complete control even though the majority of the population were the people that were living there before So that's kind of what colonialism is. It's this inclination of like trying to take over the world in a way. Colonizers are the people who call our Joan people for the first nation people of Australia. The oldest people who've lived on the land and fun fact average Australians are actually the oldest surviving culture in the world with like traditions that date back sixty thousand years which is insane pretty amazing. Yeah Yeah and the colonizers that actually came over were the British. They were so they needed a place to put their prisoners in their convicts. They found Australia and they were like sick. Let's put these people here and one of the reasons because of that. Australia is very difficult back then to live on for people who don't know the land because of the amount of things that can literally kill you hear. The prisoner is like a really good experiment. Sent here I because it was like well then we can live. Yeah no yeah. It's a it's an intense story so the first colonisation of Australia happened in seventeen eighty eight. That was the first time that people actually settled on this land and before this there were more than five hundred indigenous groups that inhabited Australia and the way it worked back then was like it wasn't just one country. It was five hundred countries essentially or maybe less or more depending on the groups but it was divided up in the similar way to Europe and there are about seven hundred fifty thousand people living on this land cultured. Like I said that's developed for sixty thousand years and there were over three hundred languages spoken in total whereas today only about one hundred and forty five languages spoken with only eighteen being strongly spoken by lots of people so you can see immediately like the decline of the culture in the effect that that's had on original people because of this one. The colonizers were coming over. It's hard it was very hard for them to unite as like an aboriginal front. Because there's so many different tribes and Like currently like when it was being called as they're probably like still wars going on between tribes then as well so it wasn't like everyone is a one aboriginal nation it's all divided separately into different groups And then when we get further into so we're GONNA talk a bit about like how it is now and why that's difficult even unite. Today one of the things that was actually released pricing to us. Because we've spent seven weeks or six weeks now in Australia. Learning about indigenous cultures learning about that kind of stuff and we spent a week in Alice. Springs the rest of the time we've been in Melbourne. And what I found really interesting is when we first arrived in Melbourne we were welcomed by one of the aboriginal groups were under people with a smoking ceremony which is a typical welcome into the land. That when we went to central Australia near Alice Springs. We were told by the indigents people. They're like they don't have the thing and it was kind of a weird moment for me because I automatically assumed like. Oh this is what they blame. Everyone does it. Yes accents but you eventually realize that like those three hundred five hundred nations like were completely different groups and spanning across the country completely different cultures which makes it really difficult to unite even today so aboriginal. Australians are still facing a ton of issues today a ton of oppression from the White Australians and this is largely in part due to just the history of this country and the history of the racism that so institutionalized into the country's law so when the British first arrived in Australia they said Yeah. This land is free to take. Because they didn't recognize the aboriginal people as Human Beings. They were classified as flora and fauna so basically plants animals not human beings and that sentiment existed for years and it let it has led to a lot of the attitudes that sill exists today even if people are no longer classified that way they're classified as human beings like a It's still rings true. In the way the government treats these people one really good example of this In central Australia. There's this thing called the green credit card. Basically if you're aboriginal half of your income comes in whatever form you want and the other half needs to go on this card that basically you can only spend on assesses which they classify as clothes and food alcohol or tobacco products or anything like that. So if you're thinking of buying a house nope And this is a very big issue because they're basically controlling like where where you go in life if half of your income is stuck on that card then like that's that's it you know and this is just one way that the government really keeps control of Aboriginal people whereas they justify it as A. We're helping them because like many of them have addiction problems and things like that one in reality like no colonizers introduced alcohol to them and introduce tobacco products. And it's really actually your fault that that may be a problem in some communities but the people should still have a right to choose because they're people and this is where the whole flora and fauna thing connects back. I think it's a real real problem like this idea. And it was something that we encountered a fair amount in the northern territory yet. Definitely yeah we got to spend time not only with aboriginal communities but also like the settlers there and it was quite harsh because it was an attitude of we know best yes coming from the white people which was pretty horrific and you can see that through like that green card. We know best what you should be doing with your money rather than dealing with addiction problems at the source. Would you most frequently accident in? My research comes from like loss of culture. Loss of tradition like the oppression that's been placed on these people definite instead of focusing on that. It's it's just putting a band aid over the problem.

Australia South Africa United States Charlet North Dakota Melbourne NI Europe Stralia Alice Springs
Are financial institutions waking up to climate change?

FT News

13:23 min | 1 year ago

Are financial institutions waking up to climate change?

"Concerned about climate change is rising around the world on the streets in parliaments and among investors questions about the future of fossil fuels are putting new pressure on companies. He's and financial institutions so he was made to discuss what this means are hugh vents daynuss chair of the sustainable finance committee at UBS and former adviser to to Bank of England governor mark. Carney and billy nauman a reporter for the FTA's moral money. which covers the world of sustainable finance? I billy let's talk about some examples of the financial impact of climate change. What's been the economic fallout from the Australian? Bushfires that's a very good example I think and and it's one that's still kind of playing out obviously so it will take some time to see. The True Fallout Bank of America made some projections that the fires just for the first quarter of twenty twenty twenty could subtract at least zero point zero point four percent from Australia's entire GDP. So yeah. It's it's bad and probably a bit worse than people. Were expecting only a month six weeks ago absolutely. Yeah I mean the numbers were seeing on the insurance sector at this point they. They don't jump off the page. Necessarily I think they were close to nine. Thousand fire related claims from September until early January but that compares to just fourteen hundred fifteen hundred hundred for the yearly average of the last five years. I think so. It's a massive uptick in so much is still coming at this point. It's hard to say with the crisis. It's still playing out how bad it's going to be right. Hugh you recently wrote pace for the FDA about why investors and boards NATO take climate. I'm at risk into account now the Australian fires an example of that sort of risk. Or you have other. Things changed as well. Australia is clearly very stark reminder of the potential attention challenges but I think it's a much broader range of issues and I think there's always a push poll we're seeing regulators start to impose stress tests on the banks and their insurers shores particularly led by Governor Connie but also there have been some great initiatives to improve the quality of data. Because the key issue if you can't measure it you can't manage it and I think one of the companies and boards in particular realized they will increasingly be held to account through numbers which could be used both by investors by pressure groups. And we shouldn't underestimate the impact or pressure groups oops grabbing and using this data so far it's been a kind of voluntary initiative nine hundred of the biggest one thousand five hundred companies now starting to measure data but bit by bit is improving but the challenges as just investor behavior themselves. A growing number of vest design meet. Astonished say well they're all GONNA be big valley dispersions not just more Stralia. It could be from changes in tax. Six regulation or Brandon Pam if people think the company simply not honoring its responsibility. So it's it's a range of issues but there was definite groundswell in the market and that son what we're seeing in all business. Yeah you mentioned shareholder pressure there. We've just seen shareholders in Barclays Bank demanding that it starts the phase out financing companies that are not aligned with the Paris agreement. I wonder if both of you this seems to be something of a step up in relation relation to shareholder action when it comes to financial institutions. Is that how you say it or do you think. It's a trend already saying certainly I see. It's a growing trend and I think it comes from particularly some of the AH owners the big pension funds who are demanding action something like two thirds of all new mandates which are granted have some sort of sustainable finance aspect so they're pressurizing the managers to put their money where the mouth is but secondly on billy side of the pond in the states. There's a much richer. Set of data around proxy voting. One of the most striking statistics about the current round was the provos around environment were as frequent has governance. I think that's the first year that I've seen that. Yeah that's absolutely been the trend in it's been increasing and and one of the things I think is interesting is looking at some of these pressure groups some of these activist groups. And they're really ramping up their efforts. I was at a thing in in September around climate week here in New York and it was the principles for responsible banking which is a big. UN Consortium of banks talking about what their responsibility is as bankers anchors in terms of helping the world achieved the sustainable development goals and even at that event there was a group of protesters out there. And you could tell it really struck a chord with the bankers anchors. That were there. You know they're thinking well we're the ones that are doing well. We signed our names to this piece of paper and replacing to do this but from the activist groups. The message was that's not enough. We need to see action on this. And they're very adamant about keeping up this pressure on the banks that are financing fossil fuel companies. That's the case isn't Hugh that the banks are moving. They are taking steps to be more transparent in many cases but at the same time activists are saying listen. That's great but we just want. You should get out of fossil fuels. Yeah I think this is very challenging because you know let's face it finances the arterial system of the economy. And so we always you need power and and whilst I think many can be frustrated with the pace of change this will be more evolutionary than revolutionary some stats that McConnell US recently is one hundred trillion dollars of power and a sustainable projects which needs to be financed of the next decade and some of the going green so a new soda plant but some of them can try to be improving the quality of what we've God and we shouldn't underestimate improving. The bad to good is actually still step forward and I think that's a very nuanced and difficult argument for a financial innovation to make into a pressure. Group agree with what you said and it is very important that we have financing for going from bad to good from Brown to green. Or however you want to phrase it but I think that at that area gets very ripe for greenwashing for putting money into things that are not actually improving climate emissions. Like they might say they. Are you talking. In relation onto green bonds there perhaps green bonds is a perfect example. Yeah and then there's these things called transition bond which is a relatively new development. You Know Green bonds you run into the the problem where these companies are issuing green bonds for these projects that are allegedly going to improve carbon emissions. But it's just they were going to do anyway at stuff they're mandated to do you buy some new set of regulations and they are going out with this green bond and getting better terms as a result because they can label it his green the transition bonds. It's something that's offered offered to companies that might not usually qualify for green bond but they need to transition to be more green so this is a new category of financing financing available to these companies that helps them fund projects that move along that spectrum from Brown to green. Yeah and I mean greenwashing is a concern obviously and seems to me that more and more focus has come onto these sorts of bonds at some people find a suspect however broadly speaking. Isn't this a structural troll issue. I mean it. Doesn't it really point to the fact that there's not enough regulation either national or international of this market. I'm not sure if it's necessarily the regulation because you know if you make an example. Sir Chris hones dissolve all the company's portfolio disclose. Just this Christopher Hon who has a large hedge fund and here in London and. He said that he's not going to invest in any company that doesn't abide by the climate disclosure guidelines. That Mr Connie and you helped develop the Governor Carney server initiative but I think that the bottom line here is that actually sometimes the activists in the regulators may not be that far apart. Obviously there's a lot of good hard work to be done around the Standards Serum the investor point of view. Wouldn't it be great if as early as possible tomorrow. Really these guidelines which as you say currently voluntary were made mandatory. So I think actually in the best thing to do would be say within three years it will be mandatory and get companies to get on undo it there are still some some creases to iron out in the methodology but I think I would be very encouraging of that. Why should we wait three years when we've got the climate scientists telling us that this is a matter of extreme urgency and we really need eight to be cutting emissions as quickly as possible and therefore financing of fossil fuels needs to be effectively reigned in so for me? I would want all the companies to start today. Hey but you may not want to co defy methodologies. There's still a work in progress so I think it's by saying we will make it managed to in three years and we really rather expect you to do it. This year is sort of awed. Get to and billy what about the US. Do you think that you're going to be seeing. Regulators introducing mandatory disclosure anytime soon. No no I don't think the Political Otago Environment here is is going to lead to that at all. Unfortunately and what does that mean then if we have a world in which we have say European countries are making it mandatory the US and others a saying saying it's fine. You don't need to what then happens if we have a very uneven playing field. Well I mean I think we kind of saw something like this with GDP right where American companies have to abide by GDP CPR if they have European clients or do business in Europe so it's it's not ideal that the US is dragging its feet on these sorts of issues. But I do think that US companies will have to come around to some degree depending on what sort of regulation comes out of the you just moving onto another area. Do you think there are parts of the financial world old that Performing will when it comes to taking climate concerns into account for example green bond market is expected to keep growing this year. And we've forty saint extraordinary growth there there any other areas where we are starting to see a real change. You're starting to see a lot of sustainability linked loans Richard similar to green bonds where banks are incentivizing borrowers to hit targets whether it's emissions reductions by whatever means they can do it and if they do so they get better terms on their loans. That kind of stuff is growing a lot of support. You'll nap there's lots of really interesting pockets. One of the ones which is hardly reported about is the private equity quarter to also trying to become more sustainable an increasing number of creating their own sustainable funds. But also if you turn this around and it's not just climate if you've got a very concentrated portfolio do you really WanNa make sure your companies are being well run and that by the time you come until I was seldom they actually look as valuable as possible. So there's an increasing focus on what I'd say is the sustainability the inability of the franchise in all its manifestations and clearly firms will prioritize. But there's a growing market as well in private equity. I'm a little skeptical of of a lot of the claims coming out of the private equity market cricket and that's because of the lack of transparency. A lot of the major major companies have come out with these big impact funds. And when you look under the hood at some of the investments they've made aide you know there since there are no kind of set definitions on what is impact or how impact is measured. Some of them do a little dubious. I've been doing some research into one. One of the the bigger impact funds and just looking at some of the underlying investments. This is the Bane Double Impact Fund which is run by Duval. Patrick who's a former governor of Massachusetts. WHO's now running for president here in the US and A lot of the investments are in home health care which is a growing sector but is that really impact or is that just a play for a sector that they think. There's going to be growth in. I think more transparency from the private equity market would help a lot in terms of if they do deserve credit on this to give them that credit. But I'm skeptical of a lot of their claims this to be frank right. I'd like to ask both of you when you think we will see major banks in Europe and on wall all straight no longer financing fossil fuels. Never sorry to be a downer. But unless they're strict regulation that says you cannot do this someone will always do. Okay never look we will want to keep the lights on and so I. My sense is that this isn't evolution. And I got back the statistic if there's one hundred trillion over investments be made in energy clean energy and transition. That's an extraordinary amount of money. And fumbled in central banks buying and so whether it's capital markets all banks or insurers don't need be financing all the overall transition I think that what regulators can do and what I was certainly arguing for in the pieces through stress testing the banks us through providing better data. You can at least act to trump bring forward when that transition happens and that's probably the best one can hope for. I mean even the practice of with that transition though is likely to have an impact on a lot of industries. And how should that be managed. Well this comes down to the big public policy questions which you know the F. T. writes about so eloquently silently. I mean these are genuinely as much political questions other opportunities. I think that you know Al Gore says the investing in Green Tech is one of the biggest investment opportunities in his lifetime and at one level we need to also change the language so it was seen as much. The investment opportunities immobilized the capital in the way. That governor Connie is going to be going onto after the bank as much chaz trying to stress test and think through the risks. And I think it's a bit of sticks and carrots to try not just along but that's not going to take away the very big political challenges ages of you know who wants a carbon tax. I think that's an excellent point. Actually I I will amend my never if there is a disruptive technology that makes fossil fuel obsolete then then they will stop financing it because it will no longer be profitable. Think about whale oil. I suppose you could compare it to that. When fossil fuels came along and made will oil obsolete than nobody nobody is financing it anymore? So maybe if there is some sort of green technology that completely upends the energy sector then that could lead to it from a fan perspective. I suppose billy thank very much end. Hugh thank

Hugh United States Governor Connie Billy Nauman Australia Europe Brown Bank Of England Bank Of America UN Carney Green Tech UBS Al Gore Reporter Barclays Bank Brandon Pam
The Rise and Fall of the El Camino

CarStuff

04:29 min | 1 year ago

The Rise and Fall of the El Camino

"A car that you particularly love? Kurt well Off off the top of my head El Camino comes to mind You've hit a pine the topic of today's episode so by the scenes things This is this is a weird way by scenes when you and I were working on our previous episode on the cars of breaking bad We also talked about the the spin off films. Breaking bad came out called El Camino and at some point. I don't know if we ever mentioned this on Air Man Dan but at some point we were both baffled that they're never been a car stuff episode on El Camino or as we call it here in the US the El Camino Camino which should be hilarious. Anyone who speaks a lick of Spanish. Because what we're saying is the the road you know it's like saying ATM machine or Orvin Number Ri- vehicle identification number number the El Camino man. By the way I'm GonNa Continue Calling the El Camino movie the The the alchemy of is a fascinating vehicle. It's it's sometimes like A. It's like a platypus of the road. You know what I mean. It's not quite fish. It's not quite foul. It's something different. Something unique a mix tape and you and I have some personal stories about the El Camino but I have the following proposition. Why don't we start with the origin story of the actual vehicle vehicle which may surprise some people some eighties? Babies may be surprised. How old this vehicle actually is? El Camino is introduced. The first generation was introduced in nineteen eighteen fifty nine. It was basically a response to Ford's Ranchero But even before that in Australia in the thirties a created this this vehicle known as the Coupe Utility. So the idea of a car that had some of the attributes of a truck The idea that was around for a while before they started showing up in America and even in the early Fifties Chevy and Ford made light-duty drums like the Chevy's made a truck called the task force. It was a light duty pickup truck but the El Camino brought in some of that I guess the elegant lines of the late fifties and early sixties the chrome trim some of the more visually appealing aspects of the sedan's at the time yet you can look at some pictures of the first generation El Camino and you can clearly see the aesthetic. You're talking about here. Kirk I do. I have to also confess. I have a weakness for those Those flowing lines that space-age retro-futurism so common in Ford's and Chevy's of the fifty s and into the sixties A. We do have a previous episode on car stuff about utes in Australia and their origin origin for anybody wants to check that out. There's a really cool quote that you found about the youth as well of from the like the way it was marketed in Australia. Stralia right yes so It was Farmer's wife in Victoria Australia she desired a car that quote to go to church in on Sunday in which to carry our pigs tomorrow on Mondays. And so that encapsulates the entire concept here. You know what I mean the the idea that instead of buying two separate vehicles for two separate specific task right you can buy something something that fulfils Both of those functions. This is a question that will come back to right. Because what we're what we're GONNA WANNA see here is going to be ultimately a battle between some of those functions like is a daily driver or your. You know your good-looking car right. Your Business car. Is that the same thing as your haller your work vehicle. The folks who made the Cameo carrier and the folks who made the El Camino and the voter made the utes in general. Were there answer due to that was yes it can be the same thing. Forward the future. What a time to be alive?

El Camino Camino Ford Chevy Australia Utes Kurt Orvin Number Ri United States Victoria Australia Kirk America Farmer
Understanding Australian Indigenous Astronomy

Astronomy Cast

08:02 min | 1 year ago

Understanding Australian Indigenous Astronomy

"Right. This week we focus on the ARCO astronomy of another part of the world, this time from the indigenous people of. Another group of people whose lives depended on knowing what was happening in the sky from season to season are Pamela got a big continent. Here of what is the evidence of archaic astronomy from the continent of Australia. Well, what's kind of cool with a stray Elliot's? It's not so much ARCHE of strana me as it's modern anthropology that allows us to look, Pat back on sixty five thousand years of history with, with the aboriginal tribes of gelia were looking at a couple hundred different language groups. We are looking at a continent that has been peopled for sixty five thousand years, that hasn't undergone the same kinds of destruction that civilizations here in north and South America. Underwent? And so as. As we talk with the people who are there today, we can hear into days oral tradition evidence of Frincis, a meteor impact that was thousands of years ago, a supernova that was thousands of years ago, and we still they still pay attention to these stories. This is still part of how they live their lives and why they do and don't go certain places, and it's, it's really amazing culture, and they look at space in such a different way instead of having four seasons. Many of the different nations of Australia, Mark out six different seasons of the year that are marked out with when different of the constellations rise on the horizon, some constellations Mark out, this is when you should go and gather the eggs, this is when. These animals can be expected to be breeding, the dingoes for instance, it's different. And we've both had the opportunity now to be in Australia. I was there almost a year ago, thanks to Dylan O'Donnell and, and his, his got to speak at his conference star stuff. And then we got Carlin, I went on a road trip north from there into the, the jungle part of stralia north of Brisbane, and it was like the skies. There are just there stunning like it's, it's not surprising that anyone who, who lived there. With out light pollution and saw that sky. And it is, it's a Canadian we have dark skies as well here, and I've seen plenty of Milky Way. But the core of the Milky Way is down by the horizon. We see a little bit of it over the summer when the when we get to see Sagittarius and Scorpio and some of those constellations than the rest of the year. It's, it's, it's fine. It's fine. But, but there it is just right. Overhead it blazes, the planets moved through it, right. Overhead. There's like Ayman, if you have seen dark skies, you have not seen Australian dark skies. They are next level. They absolutely have the best view. The people in the southern hemisphere have the best view. Yes. To the core of the Milky Way that we just can't experience from from the north and like the peoples of South, America, and southern Africa. They include in how. How they Mark out the sky's the dark paths through the Milky Way. There is a tradition of seeing an emus spread out across the Milky Way were the coal shack nebula that super dark patch. I saw. Yeah. Societas once pointed out to you see it. And that that's only one of the stories, another one of the stories that are particularly love related to the Milky Way is they see the Milky Way as a dark river, through the sky. And it's the, the souls of men and women who have passed on to the heavens, that have their fires along that, that river and in some of their traditions when they see a shooting star, that is the soul of someone who died far from home returning. The home. It's cool stories. Yeah, I love I love that idea. What was it? There was a animation that came to a couple of years ago, but anyways idea of putting floating lanterns on like on a river and then letting them go and letting them all float downriver. You get this. They do that in, in Japan and China place like that. But it's, it's a very cool effect. So what are now you mentioned a couple of real big hitters. Supernova. Meteorite impact give me some more information. So, so I think the two really awesome things to come out of aboriginal astronomy is how they look at their crater covered lands, and actually maintain a history of. Yeah, these holes of the ground are actually craters, as, as well as their tradition of supernova. So let's start with the craters Australia is, is one of the oldest landmasses it has thirty confirmed craters that are well-structured. You look at them from an airplane, and you're, like, yes, that is a crater and the thing that really gets me is. They knew that these things in the ground were formed from things falling from the sky. In one case, the hen, very crater about four thousand two hundred years ago, a large nickel iron space rock hit central ustralia. And when it came down about one hundred and forty five kilometers south of siding, springs, it carved out a bunch of individual different craters. And when westerners I started visiting that land, and they had an aboriginal guide with them. The guide was like, no, we don't go there. That is the land that was formed when fire fell from the sky and, and right. They have a modern day tradition of fire fell from the sky. And formed this land, and that's oral tradition. That goes back four thousand two hundred years. There are many other craters across a stray Elliot that that they look at. And the various people know this was a crater here. Wolf creek craters is another one of these that is recognizes having fallen in this case when a star fell from the sky. And there are traditions of people going down in Orrell stories and exploring the sink holes and traveling them to through them to water in a great distant area, and it was a Mark of heroism to travel underground under these craters. And so there, there are clearly stories of when people explored and survived. And now people don't do that. Because. Those heroes did stupid things.

Australia Elliot South America Arco Pamela PAT Orrell Dylan O'donnell Wolf Creek Brisbane Ayman Mark Carlin Societas Japan America Africa China
FAA, Boeing And Fort Worth discussed on KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

FAA, Boeing And Fort Worth discussed on KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

"FAA has ramped up a marathon meeting in Fort Worth about the future of the Boeing seven thirty-seven max jets FAA acting administrator, Dan, L, well, says there were leaders from thirty three countries present tweeted people from South Africa, New Zealand Fiji has stralia anelle, well says the eight hour discussion was very constructive and productive among other things, the FAA discussed how it plans to certify changes to the maneuvering characteristics, augmentation system, or m s that Boeing introduced on the seven, thirty seven max L, well, says, once the FAA receives Boeing's completed application for changes to the cast, it will perform a final risk assessment and analysis will also take part in test. Flights of a modified seventy seven max way all the information together before making the decision to return the aircra-.

FAA Boeing Fort Worth Acting Administrator South Africa DAN Fiji New Zealand Eight Hour
"stralia" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"stralia" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Many movies that are not the vendors movie. Broken all the records. Not yet. It hasn't passed avatar yet. But it will. In fact, I think worldwide has James Cameron other congratulatory tweet showing the avengers logo sinking Titanic. That was pretty good. Titanic. Avatars is. Editor is the least remember least beloved blockbuster of all time. Everybody wanted to see because of the great technology involved. And it was really cool to look at that. Everybody was dances with wolves. With blue people. A monkey horsey blue person right tail but she was kind of like, but it was weird because at the same time still, yes. And. We have the same Worthington played the guy was paralyzed real life. But then his avatar could run around. It looked really great. They just announced this week. You know, he's making a millionaire movies. The last avatar movie will be the I think the twenty thirties. So we'll be dead. Why why why they've only had correct me if I'm wrong one appetite for us. So there hasn't even been a sequel, but they were announcing a whole mess load of these movies. I don't know if people really want them anymore. I mean, the first one was interesting Cameron decided that would be that'd be his entire career. Now, if he does just these avatar I'd rather see them to different stuff. So it never know how that's gonna go. But all that's already been billions of dollars on those sequels just in the development stage. But that's not in theaters now vendors endgame is still yelling at each other about it about different timelines and saying some people are the directors stupid because they they gave one theory about their own movie. No, that's not what happened in your movie. That's fun. But the great thing is more movies are coming out of enter then game. We'll be playing all summer long theaters. But we get new stuff every day and the the rebel Wilson. She's the stralia comics she was fat Amy in the pitch perfect. Who can I Dr to American audience Anne Hathaway can't be order? I guess might remember them. We call dirty rotten scoundrels from the eighties. Steve Martin, and Michael Cain. Right. It was a con man movie. It was actually that was actually a remake of David Niven Marlon Brando did way back in the day. This is now the twenty th century female reboot of it. So Anne Hathaway plays a very sophisticated con artists. Rebel Wilson plays the clunky Otis bowl China. Shop con artist who decide that they might have to team up in during the of France and start pulling up some cons. So here's rebel Wilson and Anne Hathaway movie called the hustle. Aches..

Rebel Wilson Anne Hathaway James Cameron Amy Editor France Worthington David Niven Marlon Brando Michael Cain Steve Martin
Only 60% of apps support links

podnews

02:08 min | 1 year ago

Only 60% of apps support links

"Testing how show notes display in over forty different podcast apps. Pod news has uncovered vast inconsistencies between different pod catches only sixty percent of apps support links to websites. Spotify and podcast. Addict are among the worst apps to display show notes based on total downloads pocket costs and overcast with a best. According to our tests willing to those today from our show notes and from our newsletter podcasts more popular than music. Playlists says an international study run by media research. Meanwhile, sounder uses Google stats to claim that podcasts are more popular than blogs. Edison research have released a few more pieces of information about infinite dialogue stralia two thousand nineteen as a webinar later this week with the full study Hindenburg and audio editor. Now exports directly to spreaker her podcast host it also exports to many others as well. Here's an event for you. Acosta and audio one are hosting a seminar on podcasting in Dublin in Ireland on may the fourteenth. And if you fancy coming to podcast day two thousand nineteen in London in June. We've got a discount code which can save you or your organization just over one hundred zero. If you wanted you need to be a subscriber to our newsletter and just Email us and ask nicely or updates pod. News dot net. It's a Mondays must be an opinion day. Ashwin Krishnan shares the five unexpected things. The podcasting taught him John Moore says you're not the BBC. That's good. I'll say and Bill Rosenblatt says that luminaries wobbly launch portends big changes in the podcast market. And in podcasts today under the bridge is a new podcast showing the weeks. Freshest new Sydney music from independent Sydney radio station. F B I radio sticking with the land down under Austrailia and true. Crime is celebrating hitting one hundred episodes with a special show and some live events and Melinda gates is the current guest in. But that's another story a podcast from McMillan about books that changed people's lives.

Pod News Ashwin Krishnan Sydney Melinda Gates Spotify Bill Rosenblatt Edison Research Audio Editor Acosta Mcmillan Austrailia Dublin London John Moore Ireland BBC Sixty Percent
Only 60% of podcast apps support website links in show notes

podnews

02:08 min | 1 year ago

Only 60% of podcast apps support website links in show notes

"Testing how show notes display in over forty different podcast apps. Pod news has uncovered vast inconsistencies between different pod catches only sixty percent of apps support links to websites. Spotify and podcast. Addict are among the worst apps to display show notes based on total downloads pocket costs and overcast with a best. According to our tests willing to those today from our show notes and from our newsletter podcasts more popular than music. Playlists says an international study run by media research. Meanwhile, sounder uses Google stats to claim that podcasts are more popular than blogs. Edison research have released a few more pieces of information about infinite dialogue stralia two thousand nineteen as a webinar later this week with the full study Hindenburg and audio editor. Now exports directly to spreaker her podcast host it also exports to many others as well. Here's an event for you. Acosta and audio one are hosting a seminar on podcasting in Dublin in Ireland on may the fourteenth. And if you fancy coming to podcast day two thousand nineteen in London in June. We've got a discount code which can save you or your organization just over one hundred zero. If you wanted you need to be a subscriber to our newsletter and just Email us and ask nicely or updates pod. News dot net. It's a Mondays must be an opinion day. Ashwin Krishnan shares the five unexpected things. The podcasting taught him John Moore says you're not the BBC. That's good. I'll say and Bill Rosenblatt says that luminaries wobbly launch portends big changes in the podcast market. And in podcasts today under the bridge is a new podcast showing the weeks. Freshest new Sydney music from independent Sydney radio station. F B I radio sticking with the land down under Austrailia and true. Crime is celebrating hitting one hundred episodes with a special show and some live events and Melinda gates is the current guest in. But that's another story a podcast from McMillan about books that changed people's lives.

Pod News Ashwin Krishnan Sydney Melinda Gates Spotify Bill Rosenblatt Edison Research Audio Editor Acosta Mcmillan Austrailia Dublin London John Moore Ireland BBC Sixty Percent
"stralia" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

WCBS Newsradio 880

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"stralia" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

"With very few details when stralia found itself tragically in a similar position to what we find ourselves. Now, they took twelve days to make the decision. We have taken seventy two hours. She's alluding to what Australia did in one thousand nine hundred Ninety-six six after a mass shooting. They're left thirty five people dead a government funded gun buyback in a virtual ban on owning semiautomatic rifles cut private gun ownership by almost a third. CBS news correspondent been Tracy reporting. It's eleven thirty four CBS news update. Authorities in the Netherlands have reduced the terror threat level in the city of attract following the arrest of the suspect in the tram shooting that killed three people CBS's. Vicki Barker says the suspect is identified as Thirty-seven-year-old C'mon. Tana's who was born in Turkey. Armed Dutch anti-terror police quickly surrounded the scene where a body covered by a tarpaulin lay next to the stopped travel. Some reports suggest the gunman had Jihadist links other speak of a family dispute. An investigation is underway into the motive for the shooting which had raised concerns about a terror threat in the country, Dench, prime minister, mock grew an act of terror is an attack on our civilization on our tolerant and open society. If this was indeed an act of terror that can only be one answer and the answer is the rule of law or democracy is stronger than fanaticism and violence nine people were wounded in the shoot. CBS news update. I'm Pam Coulter. It's eleven thirty five back around these parts lawyers for the man charged with killing eight people and the Halloween two thousand seventeen bike path terror attack in lower Manhattan, where they're now saying US intelligence had been watching their client for years, and maybe illegally the attorneys argued in a court filing today that they think Saif alot Saipa electronic communications with others may have been caught within bulk surveillance or as intelligence targeting people overseas, and they want more government disclosures to help defend Saipa Vanna death penalty case accused of driving a rented truck down at bike path along the west side highway running over cyclists and pedestrians before crashing into a school bus where he was shot by a cop and arrested..

CBS Manhattan Pam Coulter stralia Vicki Barker Saipa Vanna the Netherlands Tana prime minister Dench Turkey Australia Tracy Thirty-seven-year seventy two hours twelve days
"stralia" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"stralia" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Tax on an African American church. Must not be repeated the attack on a Senate must not be repeated attacked on a mask must not be repeated. There's a pretty good chance you live far far away from New Zealand, but this weekend everyone felt a little closer to the country. There were vigils held for victims of the Christ Church shootings across the world from stralia to Israel to Washington DC. No, I'm asking feld. You went to the vigil here in DC last night. And it sadly wasn't your first time reporting on a vigil after a shooting for the show. It wasn't. Unfortunately, I was in the exact same place for a vigil after the tree of life shooting back in October at that vigil people told me they weren't shocked and this time people were saying they felt the same way. I mean, it's very sad to say, but we've been through so many of these that things kind stay the same people move on unfortunately fast. This is Raza by he's a Muslim youth leader who organized the. Jill I mean, unfortunately, you know, we live in a constant state where every day is a threat. I mean, we my mom has had bomb scares people have came in, you know, try to break in and try to you know, hurt people, and that's sad reality. I don't think anything's gonna change. But resin says politicians can help change the inevitability that he and others have been feeling. I mean, if you look at the prime minister New Zealand her action was it's amazing. She went to the funerals individuals, and she were she wore a headscarf. Rightly that sitting in the mazing example world leaders immediately right after said this terrorist attack. It was it was fueled by white supremacy. It was filled by a nationalistic eight right? We don't accept that immediately. She said we need to take action for gun laws. Right. That's how you set an example for other world leaders. How do you take action in response to Horford events Haji, though, Naiman Harasha host the event of the law. Do God Ibrahim and forty five other beautiful Searle's taken from us of Arniston Baucus Thon Bangladesh. Indonesia, Egypt Turkey, Somalia, India, all parts of the world. But they were also Zealanders at the vigil. I also spoke with imam Yahya Hendi he's a Muslim chaplain at Georgetown University. And he's also the voice we heard at the top of the show. He said he felt let down by American politicians. The voice of President Trump has not made Muslims feel safe. It has not made Jews feel safe. It has let mid emigrants feel safe. He said that if politicians don't step forward people will have to we the people have the power to vote out those who speak a language of hate. I have enough in America. I have NF eighth in the part of the people to come together and honor what Muslims have done and continue to contribute to the United States of America imam. Hendi says this isn't just an attack on the Muslim community. What happened in the New Zealand is an attack on our human? Family. It is an attack on every June every question on every Buddhist on ever Hindu. And see if it is an attack on our very humanity, and therefore to come together with a United voice sing we're all United in. Our fight for peace is what this is all about. After the tree of life shooting. I started feeling a little scared to synagogue, I wonder if going to a mosque feels different at all I have heard from Muslim youngsters that language of fear. They're afraid of going to the mosque. My message to them. That's exactly what the terrorists want us to do the Weiss apprentice want us to do the one to stop going to our Musk's our synagogues, our temples, our churches, not going gives them the voice that they have one. We must continue to go and more than ever before. Yet again, eat or Judah any. Cheats, would any? Anna be sweetie. D E naked any apple woulda. My name is yes amino person, and I am a student touchstone university..

imam Yahya Hendi Jill New Zealand DC Senate Christ Church feld Raza Israel America Trump United States prime minister Weiss Naiman Harasha Anna Ibrahim Georgetown University Indonesia
"stralia" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

WCBS Newsradio 880

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"stralia" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

"Very few details when stralia found itself tragic. In a similar position to what we find ourselves. Now, they took twelve dice to make the decision. We have taken seventy two hours. She's alluding to what trillion did in nineteen Ninety-six after a mass shooting. They're left thirty five people dead a government funded gun buyback in a virtual ban on owning semiautomatic rifles cut private gun ownership by almost a third. Fifty people were killed and nearly as many wounded in the New Zealand mosque attacks. A retrial is now underway for the man accused of killing Carina the Tronto. She was the jogger murdered in a park near her home in Howard beach. Steve burns is following the case prosecutor Brad Leventhal started loud and only got louder over the course of his two. Our opening statement often emphatically pointing in the direction of toenail Lewis Carina citronella was murdered by the man who sits in this courtroom at that table, he yelled Lewis often look toward the jury, but otherwise states silent after a hung jury the first time he's now facing a second trial in the death of atronomer. Who is accused of sexually assaulting and strangling thousand sixteen is for Toronto was out for a jog in Howard beach. The defense. The first time around emphasize that Lewis's. Confessions may have been coerced that the physical evidence may have been compromised Leventhal look to address those head on detailing Lewis's, calm relaxed demeanor in the interrogation room and the great pains that we're taking to protect Toronto's body, her fingernails center phone at the crime scene. There's also a new addition to the list of people expected to take the stand for Toronto's mother, Catherine at queen's criminal court, Steve burns, WCBS NewsRadio. Eight eighty based drivers.

Brad Leventhal Lewis Howard beach Steve burns Toronto New Zealand mosque stralia Tronto prosecutor Catherine atronomer seventy two hours
Hayabusa 2 successfully touches down on Ryugu asteroid

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

03:18 min | 2 years ago

Hayabusa 2 successfully touches down on Ryugu asteroid

"Japan's I was the two spacecraft is briefly touched down on the surface of the asteroid riot go to collect samples for eventual retentive worth the spacecraft. I fight a small project out of the asteroid surface to loosen material. And then briefly landed at the impact side to collect the asteroidal rocks and soil sixteen twenty one seventy three right? You GU is a potentially hazardous near near earth. Object belonging to the Apollo group of earth crossing asteroids, the nine hundred and fifty meter wide diamond shaped space rock is a red type of asteroid known as a special type c g it includes properties of both common carbonaceous or high carbon seatac asteroids as well as relatively ridge e type asteroids, which contain strong ultraviolet absorption Phages suggesting Folles silicate minerals such as clays or mica Ryacudu orbits the sun. Enrich. Your grade that is in the opposite direction of the planet at a distance of between zero point nine six and one point four one Esther nominal unit every four hundred seventy four earth days and astronomical unit being the average distance between the earth and the sun a better hundred and fifty million kilometres or eight light minutes as for the name Ragu. Will it's Japanese for dragon palace, and it refers to a magical underwater palace in Japanese folklore were fishermen travelled on the back of a turtle returning home later with a mysterious box much like high the two returning with asteroid samples the Japan. Aerospace exploration agency Jaksa is now waiting for confirmation that high bushes sample collection was successful. If it gets the, okay Lenny be the second time in history that a spacecraft is collected a sample from an asteroid, I listened to his predecessor the original high was undertook a similar operation during its mission to the asteroid Itokawa back in two thousand and five. However, it collected any few grains of dust following a series of problems during the first descente tempt and a projectile firing failure during the second attempt. However, those precious few grains were successfully returned worth being checked in a special sample return capsule. Which parachuted down into the woman rocket range in outback South Australia in twenty ten highbush the twos. Autonomous the sent to the service of riot is also being considered a high risk maneuver taking twenty six hours, the slowly drop the spacecraft from an altitude of about twenty kilometers down onto a desolate grey boulder strewn surface, which could easily damage the spacecraft bird mission manages believe that based on everything they can see that assent and sample collection went according to plan. This time round highbush the two locked onto a previously position. Reflective target Martha a region chosen by scientists as the safest place on the rock covered. Asteroid to attempt the landing the spacecraft then fired a project. Into the surface Justice. It was touching down kicking up some soil pebbles and rocky material which would then have been quickly scooped into a sample collection chamber. The high was the to orbiter is shed it apart ri- ago in December swooping patio theatre later where it will check to sample return capsule, which like its predecessor is designed to parachute down into the warmer. Rocket range in outback saffir stralia.

Japan Lenny Jaksa Esther Apollo South Australia Martha Fifty Million Kilometres Twenty Kilometers Twenty Six Hours Fifty Meter
Global eyes on encryption laws

Correspondents Report

05:34 min | 2 years ago

Global eyes on encryption laws

"Encryption has become a hot topic in parliament this week with the federal government's new laws designed to catch criminals who secretly communicate with each other allies last minute deal secured the passage of the new laws, and it's a move that subtracting attention from internet policy. Experts abroad are spoke to one of them to gauge he's views. Daniel Watson is the director of the internet policy research initiative at the message, she sits institute of technology. I think it's right for governments to be tackling the issue of how to do effective investigations in the digital environment. No question that's important to all of us. I think what is risky is. When government puts the interest of investigators over the safety of everyone who uses the internet and mobile phones. So can you elaborate on that what sort of weaknesses ov- owner abilities could come with these? If the strategy in government gets access to encrypted communications the government will now have a thirty two. To require communications companies internet companies software companies to provide assistance to law enforcement in conducting surveillance. I think there's nothing wrong with providing assistance. What I think is concerning is when that assistance becomes a requirement actually redesign the services that everyone in the world uses and to actually diminish the security of the services that we all depend on. Specifically, we've heard from law enforcement that they have difficulty when they encounter in cryptic communications. That is when the communications are the data that we use is scrambled. So that no one, but the intended recipients can access it. This is done obviously to protect users from all kinds of of fraud and abuse from criminal activity. It's designed to make sure the terrorists can't take over systems that we all depend on if. The power that the Australian government is now getting is used to weaken the security of an infrastructure used by everyone. Then I fear. We really will have been a situation where we'll have a disproportionate response to what is a real problem that that the police have, but we don't want to enable police to solve one set of crimes and create the risk of much larger set of crimes in tax. So what could the ramifications be for US-based tech companies then because essentially this is about a government challenging day K selling points, and that's being able to communicate in a secure environment. One of the most important features that computer hardware, companies smartphone hardware companies internet service providers offer is the ability to communicate securely to keep our banking information secure to keep our health records, secure to keep our family information, secure to keep proprietary. Business information secure. And if company that does business globally is all of a sudden told by the Australian government, did it has to weaken at security in order to do business in Australia. Then it may think twice about whether it's really worth being in the Australian market at the price of weakening at security, or frankly, incurring major expenses just to satisfy the regulatory requirements of one country among many and even terms of actually enforcing this. Is it a situation where a perpetrator could simply circumvent these laws bind venting a new form of encrypted communication. So in other words, alternative platform to what sap that Kant be traced. Well, remember this law does not prevent any citizen of stralia or anyone else from using the strongest encryption possible. So the police may demand that apple or Android? Loyd a smartphone provider create back doors for law enforcement to do surveillance. But nothing in this law will stop any either criminal or just security conscious individual from adding applications and services that provide extra security. So we do have to wonder how effective these provisions really will be a determined criminal or a determined terrorist. You certainly going to be able to go out onto the internet today and get for free services that will lead the capabilities that this law is designed to help the police work around. It's really important. I think for countries that respect human rights such as a stray Ilya to think about the kind of example that is being set and the kind of standard that's being established particularly with respect to the behavior of countries like China or Russia or others than human rights violators. If democratic countries decide that it's except. Able to reduce the security provisions that are available to all users can be very hard for us to resist those same kinds of demands from China from Russia, and they're going to be used outside the context of the rule of law in much more aggressive ways, they will will violate individual human rights in a way that I think we'd really be concerned about so we have to think about the global standard that we're setting here as well. And whether we're living up to the the values that we have then you want the director of the internet policy research initiative and to MIT.

Australian Government Director Daniel Watson Russia China Fraud Apple Institute Of Technology Kant Australia Loyd Ilya MIT
Japan, Tokyo And Olympics discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

00:17 sec | 2 years ago

Japan, Tokyo And Olympics discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

"The region has long been dominated by US stralia and their allies Florida circuit court judges suspended some looming recount deadlines, but not the sweeping really Democrats had wanted the deadline for recounts still applies for the US Senate races. It still is on with the exception of Palm Beach. Democrats say they will file another lawsuit. First lady, Melania, Trump is demanding the ouster of national security advisor, John Bolton's top deputy mayor record Al apparently, she didn't like the way her security detail was handled on her trip to Africa last month for the second straight year. Donald melania. Trump will not be attending the Kennedy Center honors celebrating cultural achievement the White House. Also saying. Not likely to see any winners of the national medal of arts or sciences announced either this is as the Trump's continue to distance themselves from arts and sciences communities. Local news twenty four hours a day on air and talk on Twitter, powered by more than twenty seven hundred journalists and analysts in more than one hundred twenty countries in San Francisco, I'm Ed Baxter. This is Bloomberg. Juliette? Ed, thanks so much. Let's get by conversation with. Yes. Because CEO of wisdom, tree investments in Japan. We've been talking about the third quarter numbers that came through out of Japan today GDP, but I could pick up again in the fourth quarter and some of the other risks to the Japanese economy. Yes. But what do you think the bureau J can do now because we still have the sales tax hike flavored for October next year as well. Meaning that till we could still have to see a little bit of supportive policy. Absolutely. I mean, the Bank of Japan is decoupling from the Federal Reserve, I expect that we would see no changes to the interest rate policy from Japan really onto well past the Tokyo twenty twenty Olympics, and you put your finger on the pulse. Here the issue is fiscal policy. The consumption tax will go up in October two thousand nineteen so prime minister is now putting together a budget some fiscal policy to actually counter the drag from next year's tax side with additional spending you mentioned the Olympics in Japan in two twenty twenty as many as forty related sites have to be constructed including a new national stadium, and they are running into a problem right now with a shortage of workers, they're having to bring in folks, I believe five hundred thousand. From places like, Vietnam and Philippines. I'm wondering first of all if it's going to be sufficient now or whether we're going to find. Japanese authorities in a situation where they have to allow more workers in and secondarily, yes, but whether this is the thin end of the wedge as it were in redefining immigration policy. No, absolutely Japan is opening up. They have no choice. Like you point out. The war for talent in Japan is just intensifying and Joff the construction industry and some of the low end jobs, you find that some of the leading companies like he touchy or Toyota starting to have problems procuring engineers. And so, you know, prime minister Ave is putting together or pragmatic immigration policy. The changes did pass parliament. And I think slowly. But surely, you will see Japan becoming more diverse and more often immigrant country and to that end. How much of a boost is the twenty twenty Olympics gift to Japan just forward-looking when we are getting a lot of speculation that the global economy could hit that slowdown in two thousand twenty. Yeah. The construction boom is going on here. You know, I think that over. All the booze from the Olympics will be about one percent of GDP, and you may have seen that the accedes not just Tokyo, but some of the regional economies, for example, the sailing events, you know, he's going to be held somewhere in the regions of Japan. So you know, yes Tokyo is the main beneficiary of the Olympics. But some of the other parts of the country will also get their shot in the arm. So presumably in twenty twenty there's going to be a huge influx of tourists coming to Japan. But how is it the tourism industry right now? Oh, fantastic. I mean, you know, you find that the occupancy rates at the hotels are running in the high nineties, I mean, literally ninety five ninety eight percent if you wanted to get a room in one of the Tokyo hotels for the next couple of months. I mean, you would have to stand in line and queue up. And if you are paying in US stolas one hundred thirteen eighty three to the della intensive Jan, yes. Because always great to get your insight. Thanks so much for joining us CEO Wisden trae investments out of tikey there for us coming up. We'll take you through the market action. We have been seeing a little bit more subdued action coming through in Asian markets today. The ethics two hundred in Australia. One of the west performance down by one point three percents and good buying coming through in the EMC

Japan Tokyo Olympics United States Donald Trump Bank Of Japan Prime Minister Ed Baxter Donald Melania CEO Palm Beach Senate Bloomberg Twitter EMC Kennedy Center John Bolton White House Juliette
"stralia" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:57 min | 2 years ago

"stralia" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Global news in the Bloomberg nine sixty San Francisco newsroom. Ed. Yeah. That it is China taking the rotating presidency of the United Nations for the next month. And it's planning the whole debate this month on strengthening multilateral ISM. China's ambassador says a US has been pulling back to America first, and you have the trade war, and this is a way to combat it. This comes as president Xi Jinping is due to meet with President Trump at the twenty the end of the month. Meanwhile, stralia is trying to find a way to fit in between China and the US prime minister Scott Morrison telling Bloomberg it has to be very carefully done. I think what is important in managing that relationship is just we've got to be really clear about where the Lonza where the rules have we make decisions and do that for seeking a very courteous and engaging. Why says drawing of lines is the most important part of this to be pushed only so far Japan's Abba cabinet has approved a Bill that would allow foreigners into the country is blue collar workers to ease the labor shortage. They want it to pass in the current parliamentary session. Donald Trump very much stepping up the rhetoric aimed at the caravan of migrants heading north into Mexico, and then up to the US he saying no asylum for anybody illegally crossing the border, and then he makes threats anybody throwing stones rocks like they did to Mexico and the Mexican military Mexican place where they badly hurt. Police and soldiers of Mexico. We will consider that a firearm. Yeah. He says he doesn't know what the border guards would do and return, but Google the target of protests through Asia Europe. And the US today employees, saying Google has not been at all responsive to complaints regarding sexual harassment. Bloomberg's Nico grant has been at the Google headquarters in Silicon Valley ranges from making sure there's an end to forced arbitration. Meaning that when there is a sexual harassment claim it can be aired through a lawsuit rather than in a quite arbitration Rome to making sure there's an employee representatives on the board of the company also making sure that there's people pay for men and the protests seem to roll through the day. Google management says employees will not be punished for participating search teams in Indonesia. Have the flight recorder from the lion air crash. This is the carrier suspended some executives this after reports at the same aircraft had had safety issues the night before it was deemed safe to fly with the black box. They should be able to more. Definitively pinpoint the cause of the crash. Global news twenty four hours a day on Aaron attack on Twitter, powered by more than twenty seven hundred journalists and analysts in more than one hundred twenty countries in San Francisco, I'm Ed Baxter. This is Bloomberg. Bryan, sir. Thank you very much. Our guest is Brock silver is partner and managing director at Kairouan. Capital Brock we've had a lot of constraints on equity gains this year started out with fears of higher rates, and we had a strong dollar. We also had high oil prices and this China trade war with the United States. We seem to have kind of stabilized in a number of the area. Should we believe it or are the daggers still out? I'd say the daggers still seem to be out for me listening to your litany of gloominess makes me a bit depressed. I have to say, I think the daggers are still out a lot of the things that were holding us back in terms of equities up until now still exist. I think we found a bit of a respite as we wait for this. Trump she meeting, but but personally, I'm not so optimistic that that will really lead to a conclusion, I think afterwards, we'll be back to a bit of gloominess. You don't feel that a lot of this rhetoric around trade is for the benefits of voters hitting into the midterms. You know, there is some benefit for Trump to be hard on China. But that doesn't really strike at his voter base. Like, let's say his rhetoric on on illegal immigration that seems a bit more relevant for the midterms. I think there are some there are some legitimate legitimate issues that Trump is trying to address in China trade, and those remain outstanding. And I'm not sure that China is ready to sort of make to come to the table and do the kind of deal that Trump is hoping to get one of the other issues that I did not mention was the slowing in the Chinese economy. There certainly is slowing. Yeah. And I posed in some of the topic ideas for you this notion of well, even if we get a trade war is it possible that the slowing Chinese economy trumps, all right? You know, a trade war resolution, even if we assume a November surprise agreement that won't fix the Chinese economy. It will give the markets a pop and Brad. A strong pop, but it doesn't it doesn't fix slowing. It won't it won't sort of strengthen the renminbi. It won't it won't make rates not rise any faster than they have been. We still have a lot of economic issues in China, independent of the trade issue. Yeah. On the subject of the rim and respond. We see some strengthening in the off shore around now six hundred thirty eight do you think that that's just the polls as well? Could we be tasting seven again pretty soon? I think it's a pause, and my view is that seven is as good as a done deal. I think China has already signaled that it's prepared to allow further depreciation as a means to partially offset tariffs if it comes to that we might get a bit of a hold before the meeting. Okay. We want to get your ideas again on what is making the Chinese economy week every part of it's a trade war. And obviously part of it is the de risking campaign. But that's something that comes from the policymakers if they want they can flip a switch on that. Is it the debt overhang or are there other factors? We'll get more from Brock silvers in a moment from K on capital. And we'll update markets for you. Coming up next. This is Bloomberg. Business. Data is. Dreams our kids play. Goats? Many provide the water we drink,.

China Bloomberg President Trump United States San Francisco Google Mexico Xi Jinping United Nations harassment Brock silvers president Japan Brock America stralia Bryan Brock silver Scott Morrison prime minister
Huawei Mate 20 Pro throws in the kitchen sink (The 3:59, Ep. 474)

The 3:59

04:29 min | 2 years ago

Huawei Mate 20 Pro throws in the kitchen sink (The 3:59, Ep. 474)

"The. Nine hundred Chang and with special guest, Erica. Hello. A week, another flagship, Android, smartphone. It's whoa, is turn availing be may twenty family and these phones seemingly throwing everything, but the kitchen sink. We're talking about three different cameras. The bag one with three x, optical zoom, a fingerprint reader in the display and get this weird ability to wirelessly charge other devices. So it's not just you don't just charge this on wireless pad itself becomes wireless charging pad for other phones or devices. I don't even know why you'd want that. Yeah. Why wouldn't you want that? But they haven't. That's point. They just have it. Is it for people with two fell more? If you've got headphones or other accessories, you can theoretically charge on top of that phone? I think I don't actually know. It makes no sense to me, but while way through everything of this phone, because that's what filmmakers do now. So, yeah, what's your take is? Is it seem? Is that helpful to have so much stuff in a phone. It's, I think it's great for headlines. I think, wow, Wade is fairly successful. It's actually the second largest smartphone maker in the world now, but it's not in the US why? No one's really heard of it here. There are still a lot of lingering security concerns or issues with while way here in the US wills, a couple of countries like stralia. I think throwing all these felted these bells and whistles definitely gets people interested at least it's, you know, these are like the halo products. These are like the flagship products that get you interested in the brand, and you know it's worked elsewhere around the world in the US. It's still kind of unknown. Are, is this one of the low cost phones are? These knows in his misconception with a lot of Chinese phones, most of them are low cost while we actually makes a line of fairly high in phones. These are actually more on the price side. I don't have exact price with me, but I know there's like a Porsche addition, which is over a grand. So it is definitely more than Hyatt. Okay. So what's which scares and talk about scooters while you're here? I know nothing about the scooter drama SF since I live in New York and I don't care about us that much, but tell me more about what's going on. What's the way schools are back, right? Scooters are back in San Francisco, but they're, you know, this is it's a bit anticlimactic because. Over one hundred cities in the US now. So everyone has now experienced not everyone, but a lot of cities have experienced suits scooter craze. But San Francisco is one of the first cities to get him. They quickly bam them from the streets while they got their permitting process in place, and they rolled back out yesterday. Okay. And there's a bit of drummer because it's not the ritual companies that are back in chef, right? The main scooter companies people hear about our bird and lime and they were both spurned by the city. So the city gave the permits to two companies that are are very few cities right now scoot and skip. Yes. And. Yes, yes. And they are companies that have pretty much always played by the rules in every city they've gone into. They've gotten permission first. So they are doing kind of the anti Silicon Valley mode trying not to break things. Right, right, right. And so what happens with these other countries? They just heard them? Well, no. So also Uber and lift had applied for permits may also got spurned by the city. I think for doing rolling out there ride hailing service, six years ago without permission. So it's a little bit payback or will punishment. And so a lot of these companies are fighting back. Uber and another company filed appeals with the city lift Rhoda a letter to the mayor, begging her to reconsider and lime is actually suing the city saying the city's biased against it. There you go a lot there. We don't have a lot of time enough time to recap the entire drama, but a fall her for all the latest from it false ac- net, everything wall way or school related. Roger Chan I'm Derek base listening.

United States San Francisco Chang Erica Porsche Wade Roger Chan Rhoda New York Six Years
"stralia" Discussed on Tactical Tennis

Tactical Tennis

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"stralia" Discussed on Tactical Tennis

"And nobody would have call him over way. Now. That's sure what kind of results do they have a junior. I mean was this guy. Did he come out of nowhere was he was he completely off the radar for people or has he been a prodigious talent? Did he win multiple slams like some of these some of these players do? Okay. So you know, he definitely didn't come out of nowhere as junior he won the boy singles the two thousand eighteen strategy urban. And then also the boys doubles at the thousands eighteen Wimbledon championships. He turned professional after that. And made the quarters of two thousand fourteen Wimbledon manger. That was the Pete rough on the doll there. And then also, I guess gay, especially I'm in kind of a unique situation because I'm pretty close to a lot of the Australian coaches and a lot of people that were involved with Tennis Australia during that time back then right? Not so much now. But during that time, and in Australia, which of course, let me reiterate is very isolated. You know, this because you're a trillion, but for the rest of us, we forget, it's very hard to get to Austrailia. It's very isolated so expensive, and it takes a very long time. Yeah, it's really tough. And it's hard for juniors to get out of the country and get the the same wanting of results that say European players. Can't European players have access to far far more tournaments overall and a far better quality of tournament. Generally, speaking. Oh, absolutely. I mean, if you're a thirteen year old growing up in Europe, you can jump from one country to the other sometimes in a statement a car ride and be playing international tennis. Whereas stralia I mean realistically in this disrespect intended to Indonesia, Malaysia, and Fiji and the other countries that are closest to a strategy countries are not as good. I mean, even Japan is not as good at tennis. As generally speaking, the European countries are absolutely. So I'm saying to junior growing up at a show you had to go and play any of the big really tough to one against other international players. You have to be on a plane for at least thirteen or fourteen hours. Yeah. Yeah. And that stuff, and I didn't realize until I started going over Australia as a regular part of my job. I thought like well stralia you can just go to Japan like Japan's close it's nine hours, and that's going directly from the major city to the major city forget about if I mean, you might fly for. Four hours across Shelia as well. In order to get your nine hour flight just to get to Japan, and that's not even getting into the other parts of Asia. So you really really they're limited. There the reason this is important is because sometimes Austrailia can kind of fly under the radar. Yes. Very true. And sometimes I think that they're not necessarily ranked accurately as juniors right? But I mean in this case, he did he did get international travel. I mean, obviously had those results at some of the junior grand slam championships. And then once he hit the pro-choice he very quickly made his Mark. I mean, you're talking about in in the space of seven months, he's he's gone. He's ten professional made the quotas at Wimbledon and the quotas at these strain open in his home slam in in very short order. Yeah. And that's something that also stands out to me that I don't think people talk about a lot winning in Australia at your home, slam is something that's very hard for Australians to do yet. This is this is also true for the French very few Frenchmen win the French Open juniors or in the open. Right..

Austrailia Japan tennis Shelia Wimbledon manger Pete Europe Indonesia Asia Malaysia Fiji fourteen hours thirteen year seven months Four hours nine hours nine hour
"stralia" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

CRYPTO 101

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"stralia" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

"Cryptocurrencies organizations have the bigger picture in mind for the best interest of the individual of society or do you think that there's just you know maybe they don't really care and we have to take control of blockchain itself as individuals or the beautiful thing about blockchain in general is that if it's done the way that most of them are done is generally open source software so it's really not even that important who is one of the leaders as you say for example the leader of bitcoin is the toshi no one even knows who it is and that's great is not necessary even what we really need is trust and faith and the code and many people have looked at the code there's no back doors on it all works very well and so it's not that important and that's a really interesting shift as well that's that's the reason why something like bitcoin is so amazing there's no ceo there's no bitcoin office if there was a ceo he'd be in jail already already been on already seen that when someone says there's associate swat team show their house craig right in stralia said he was the toshi swat team showed up and started just going through every nook and cranny of house looking for him looking for stuff so yeah there was a ceo he'd be one time if there wasn't office at all ready swat team gone to it and they shut it down because this is the biggest risk to the power structure is a monetary currency that they can't control and so it's not important who the leaders are what they have in mind what's important is the technology and what we do with it and of course with these sort of things we have a lot of say in what we want to support or not support so for that reason i actually think bitcoin to an extent as have a number of shady characters enter into it and get involved in actually do some things that that got enough support onto make some changes which actually made bitcoin a lot more expensive last year and a lot slower ethic that was on purpose so it's a constant battle constant war to keep these things the way that they were supposed to be and you know bitcoin's a perfect example.

ceo craig stralia bitcoin
"stralia" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"stralia" Discussed on AP News

"To the stralia version on july first that's when australia will start imposing ten percent consumption tax on online read taylor's for goods bought from overseas sites and shipped to australia treasurer scott morrison's accused amazon being unwilling to collect australian taxes while other online retailers worked with the system employers picked up the hiring pace last month in ap washington correspondent saga megani says that's despite fears caused by trade disputes the economy continues expanding with employers adding two hundred twenty three thousand jobs in may the labor department says that pushed the unemployment rate down to three point eight percent the lowest in eighteen years some economists worry the trump administration's aggressive trade actions could hurt growth after it slap steel and aluminum tariffs on canada mexico and european allies and is threatening tariffs on china still the data show the economy's on firm ground after an earlier slowdown consumer spending in april jumped at the fastest pace in five months though some of that reflects higher gas prices way growth though remains sluggish saga megani at the white house sorry pitchy progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates price and coverage match limited by state law selfdriving minivans will join the fleet of.

australia taylor scott morrison amazon megani labor department mexico china treasurer canada eighteen years eight percent five months ten percent
"stralia" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"stralia" Discussed on AP News

"To the stralia version on july first that's when australia will start imposing ten percent consumption tax on online read taylor's for goods bought from overseas sites and shipped to australia treasurers got morrison's accused amazon being unwilling to collect australian taxes while other online retailers worked with the system employers picked up the hiring paste last month in ap washington correspondent saga megani says that's despite fears caused by trade disputes the economy continues expanding with employers adding two hundred twenty three thousand jobs in may the labor department says that pushed the unemployment rate down to three point eight percent the lowest in eighteen years some economists worried the trump administration's aggressive trade actions could hurt growth after its slap steel and aluminum tariffs on canada mexico and european allies and is threatening tariffs on china still the data shows the economy's on firm ground after an earlier slowdown consumer spending in april jumped at the fastest pace in five months though some of that reflects higher gas prices way growth though remains sluggish saga megani at the white house what do you get when you twist together the rush of a wood coaster with the gravity defying aerial throes of a steel coaster you get twisted timbers changed all new hybrid coaster you get speeding barrel rolls rumbling g forces and whiteknuckle inversions in other words it's a ride like nothing you've experienced before so prepare yourself for the unexpected thrills of twisted timbers the area's first hybrid roller coaster and for a limited time everyone pays kids price at kings dominion dot com selfdriving minivans will join the fleet of waymo cars the deal announced thursday's the latest sign of google spin off weymouth confidence.

australia taylor morrison amazon megani labor department mexico china white house canada google eighteen years eight percent five months ten percent
"stralia" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"stralia" Discussed on AP News

"To the stralia version on july first that's when australia will start imposing a ten percent consumption tax on online read taylor's for goods bought from overseas sites and shipped to australia treasurers got morrison's accused amazon being unwilling to collect australian taxes while other online retailers worked with the system employers picked up the hiring pace last month in ap washington correspondent saga megani says that's despite fears caused by trade disputes the economy continues expanding with employers adding two hundred twenty three thousand jobs in may the labor department says that pushed the unemployment rate down to three point eight percent the lowest in eighteen years some communists worry the trump administration's aggressive trade actions could hurt growth after its slap steel and aluminum tariffs on canada mexico and european allies and is threatening tariffs on china still the data shows the economy's on firm ground after an earlier slowdown consumer spending in april jumped at the fastest pace in five months though some of that reflects higher gas prices way wage growth though remains sluggish saga megani at the white house sorry it's pitchy progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates price and coverage match limited by state law selfdriving minivans will join the fleet of.

australia taylor morrison amazon megani labor department mexico china canada eighteen years eight percent five months ten percent
"stralia" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"stralia" Discussed on AP News

"Stralia inversion on july first that's when australia will start imposing a ten percent consumption tax on online read taylor's for goods bought from overseas sites and shipped to australia treasurers got morrison's accused amazon being unwilling to collect australian taxes while other online retailers worked with the system employers picked up the hiring paste last month in ap washington correspondent saga megani says that's despite fears caused by trade disputes the economy continues expanding with employers adding two hundred twenty three thousand jobs in may the labor department says that pushed the unemployment rate down to three point eight percent the lowest in eighteen years some economists worried the trump administration's aggressive trade actions could hurt growth after its slap steel and aluminum tariffs on canada mexico and european allies and is threatening tariffs on china still the data shows the economy's on firm ground after an earlier slowdown consumer spending in april jumped at the fastest pace in five months though some of that reflects higher gas prices way growth though remains sluggish saga megani at the white house sorry pitchy progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates price and coverage match limited by state law selfdriving minivans will join the fleet of waymo cars the deal announced thursday's the latest sign of google spin off weymouth confidence.

australia taylor morrison amazon megani labor department mexico china canada google eighteen years eight percent five months ten percent
"stralia" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"stralia" Discussed on WDRC

"And he's eric harley i'm gary mcnamara i can't believe that this story i mean it was breaking news a to start our show but we we can't believe that the media in general has not covered the story of collusion of outside uh people from outside this country attempting to control the outcome of the election in the united states and we're talking 2016 we're actually talking about the democrat primary i mean we've got we have the collusion right here we did not the illusion of story it's it's it's everything gets yes everything that we feared i it's i could be the end of democracy as we know it yet the federal election commission fine bernie sanders presidential campaign fourteen thousand five hundred dollars from accepting illegal inkind foreign contributions from the all stralia and labor party during the 2016 elections the ruling stems from eight february 2016 conservative ackford activist group project veritas video showing all stralia nationals working for the sanders campaign on the dime of the australian taxpayerfunded all stralia and labour party so sanders had also drilling and citizens working for his campaign being paid by the australian labor party we would have not found out if not for project veritas think about this the only known collusion so far and it was little project veritas the i said earlier that robert muller hasn't found any things spending millions of dollars project veritas did republican and former new hampshire a house speaker william o'brien filed a complaint with the fec a shortly after project veritas made the footage public alleging that the aol p had made prohibited foreign contributions to the sanders campaign why the australian labor party all these aussies listen crocodile lovers they are that insensitive their way but there but dangerous people if they'll throw.

eric harley gary mcnamara united states bernie sanders australian labor party robert muller fec william o'brien aol fourteen thousand five hundred
"stralia" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

02:32 min | 3 years ago

"stralia" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"While loosely rozier website at red eye radio show dot gov fouls gerry and eric and he's eric harley i'm gary mcnamara i can't believe that this story i mean it was breaking news to start our show but we we can't believe that the media in general has not covered the story of collusion of outside uh people from outside this country attempting to control the outcome of the election in the united states and we're talking 2016 we're actually talking about the democrat primary i mean we've got we have the collusion right here we did not the elucidatory it's it's it's everything it's yes everything that we feared i it's i could be the end of democracy as we know it yet the federal election commission fine bernie sanders presidential campaign fourteen thousand five hundred dollars from accepting illegal inkind foreign contributions from the australian labor party during the 2016 elections the ruling stems from a february 2016 conservative actor activist group project veritas video showing all stralia nationals working for the sanders campaign on the dime of the australian tax payer funded all stralia and labour party so sanders had also drilling and citizens working for his campaign being paid by the australian labor party we would have not found out if not for project veritas think about this the only known collusion so far and it was little project veritas at the i said earlier that robert muller hasn't found anything spending millions of dollars project veritas did republican and former new hampshire a house speaker william o'brien filed a complaint with the fec uh shortly after project veritas made the footage public alleging that the aol p had made prohibited foreign contributions to the sanders campaign why the australian labor party all these aussies listen crocodile lovers they are that insensitive their way but there but dangerous people if the.

"stralia" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"stralia" Discussed on WDRC

"I mean we've got we have the collusion right here we did not the deluge live ori it's it's it's everything gets yes everything that we feared i it's i could be the end of democracy as we know it yet the federal election commission fine bernie sanders presidential campaign fourteen thousand five hundred dollars from accepting illegal inkind foreign contributions from the alls trillion labor party during the 2016 elections the ruling stems from a february 2016 conservative acted activist group project veritas video showing all stralia nationals working for the sanders campaign on the dime of the australian taxpayerfunded all stralia and labour party so sanders had also drilling in citizens working for his campaign being paid by the australian labor party we would have not found out if not for project veritas think about this the only known collusion so far mm and it was little project veritas at the i said earlier that robert muller hasn't found any things spending millions of dollars project veritas did republican and former new hampshire a house speaker william o'brien filed a complaint with the fec a shortly after project veritas made the footage public alleging that the aol p had made prohibited foreign contributions to the sanders campaign why the australian labor party all these aussies listen crocodile lovers they are at insensitive their way that there'd be dangerous people if the australia were attempting to influence the election in the united states as they want us you know they want to take over our nation.

"stralia" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

02:59 min | 3 years ago

"stralia" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"Gary on six saturday kdoi while loosely browser website bad red eye radio show dot gov fouls gerry in eric and he's eric harley i'm gary mcnamara i can't believe that this story i mean it was breaking news to start our show but we we can't believe that the media in general has not covered the story of collusion of outside uh people from outside this country attempting to control the outcome of the election in the united states and we're talking 2016 we're actually talking about the democrat primary i mean we've got we have the collusion right here we did not the conclusion of this story it's it's it's everything gets yes everything that we feared i it's could be the end of democracy as we know it yet the federal election commission fine bernie sanders presidential campaign fourteen thousand five hundred dollars from accepting illegal inkind foreign contributions from the all stralia n labor party during the 2016 elections the ruling stems from a february 2016 conservative actor activist group project veritas video showing all stralia nationals working for the sanders campaign on the dime of the australian tax payer funded all stralia and labour party so sanders had all stralia and citizens working for his campaign being paid by the australian labor party we would have not found out if not for project veritas think about this the only known collusion so far and it was little project veritas at the i said earlier that robert muller hasn't found any things spending millions of dollars project veritas did republican and former new hampshire a house speaker william o'brien filed a complaint with the fec shortly after project veritas made the footage public alleging that the aol p had made prohibited foreign contributions to the sanders campaign why the australian labor party all these aussies listen crocodile lovers they are that insensitive their way that there'd be dangerous people if the australia were attempting to influence the election in the united states as they want us you know they want to take over our nation they you know this this that's the problem with you know australians if that they want they want to take what's ours we wanna make it known that our producer brian bean over in new zealand right now he has nothing.

eric harley gary mcnamara united states bernie sanders australian labor party robert muller fec brian bean william o'brien aol australia producer fourteen thousand five hundred
"stralia" Discussed on Reasons to be Cheerful

Reasons to be Cheerful

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"stralia" Discussed on Reasons to be Cheerful

"Taxation we do have the foundation force if we wanted to implement it again and tell us why you you an advocate of land taxes what's your big argument because your sleep you know you president of prosperous stralia which was henrigeorges league what what why why do you think it's the right kohl's for for australia to begin with yeah well len station is absolutely essential if you want to create a market ever for the pro housing land tech is the only tax but i know that weight loss and the reason is because landed fixed in supply usually when you tax groups you want to reduce society we would own all the pessimists produced in those good hostage the cost or in the price of those goods we lands hack when you tax for land landed fixed in locational supply cartridge used to supply the what happens when you had the land firstly it if you regimes price additionally be crucial painting per year a land tax it means that you really a stalled or it's very uneconomical to lease the land idle the not i need to bring the land price down in terms of what people can pay for the land the banks will lend for the man but it also stimulate the amount of accommodation some increases supply which means it then has a role on the set to bringing down rental crises because it's a right to supply of properties on the market so in then suddenly attacked have a lawsuit benefits to it and it has no dead weight loss tony beneficial to the economy so i listen to german i listen to you i am i think to myself here these two incredibly small people who make an incredibly compelling case for the land tights and did not boost view different ways basically cites a political nightmare now you this.

president stralia australia