35 Burst results for "Stralia"

"stralia" Discussed on Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

01:37 min | Last month

"stralia" Discussed on Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

"Reported in second half twenty thirteen. I have twenty one and three operators on that were types combined. Not specific defy gina. Bruce stralia besides ordinary australia. Sleeping one-billion-pound-plus chatterbox. Hello everyone and welcome to our coverage with strain survivor. Brains this wrong. I'm your host shannon gas here for officially postseason. The season is over. All the recaps are out. Go listen to those. If you haven't on with you doing the deep dive. I eat type of the season and it is one that i'm so excited for. It's one that i booked in a very long time ago. Because she was such a huge playoff so early on. I didn't know that she was necessarily gonna win. Look pretty good. I would say it was pretty good with that but i knew that she was going to be a force to be recognized and i would have to talk to her and now she is. The worst. Recent australian survival went up the chiwenga clean. Herself it's haley haley being. Hey i'm gonna go. I'd like i'd love one but the cheesy. Yeah i know you're really just like killing it on every level. Every single is being just like you've dominated in every respect.

Bruce stralia gina shannon australia haley haley
Australian Prime Minister Hints at End to 'Covid Zero' Amid Record Infections

Mike Gallagher Podcast

00:46 sec | Last month

Australian Prime Minister Hints at End to 'Covid Zero' Amid Record Infections

"And they're not locking down any word even countries that previously locked down. They realized they can't keep doing that. Australia plus stralia was a new zealand. These are countries that have been locking down over a few cases in a desperate effort to stop calvin from spreading. Well the prime minister over there has decided that the country's approach is not sustainable. And they're going to end their kovic zero policy they're going to wait until most adults are vaccinated and then the government will finally drop most restrictions

Stralia New Zealand Australia Calvin
Lessons From Australia: What Happens When You Give up Gun Rights

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:30 min | 2 months ago

Lessons From Australia: What Happens When You Give up Gun Rights

"I talk about what's going on in our stralia. Another english speaking country with the magna carta with the same heritage of individual rights the same cultures. We had founded not that long after we founded well at according to summit news. There's a proposal that is strongly favored. Which would do find stuff. Sorry beatles fines of up to eleven thousand dollars for posting information online. When you criticize the lockdown if you organized a protest against the lockdown in new south wales twenty thousand dollar fine wait a minute. Wait a minute. We're not talking about china. We're talking about australia. When i visited australia of maybe five or six seven years ago. I can't remember. But i just thought this is as close to america as a country that i've seen it just seemed to be kind of wonderful and free and sorta healthy in that way. I'm a little bit shocked john. Australia has taken this direction. This is really because all right. But i wanna finish if you attend the protests. Five thousand dollar fine if you share information on social media about these illegal protests eleven thousand dollar fines now. Why has australia taken this. I think it took this turn back in nineteen ninety six when after mass shooting incident. Australians guns were all taken away is why we have one in nine hundred ninety six. There was a mass shooting that resulted in thirty deaths. It was horrendous but in a hysterical panic the australians let themselves be completely disarmed. it's virtually impossible. You live out me. Outback and hunt kangaroos to have a weapon for self defense in australia. Any country with the citizens give up their guns eventually. This kind of thing is going to happen. Governments expand until they hit resistance. The power of the state keeps growing until something pushes back against it. That's why the american founders. If you read the debates over the ratification of the bill of rights the only question about the second amendment was our gun rights so obvious that it's insulting to even write them down. Thank god they wrote them down but one founder after another with no dissenters said an armed. Citizenry is the last backstop against

Australia Beatles New South Wales China America John Outback
Australian PM is vaccinated as rollout begins

Coronacast

09:50 min | 8 months ago

Australian PM is vaccinated as rollout begins

"Today is the day that vaccination start to roll out across australia but we got a little preview of that yesterday with the with the prime minister and world war two survivor and a couple of other people getting the vaccine yesterday. Yes they go to i. Those of the pfizer vaccine which also followed a day on saturday of anti xers demonstrating and being talked to list in one city by pete evans. Some people criticizing the prime minister. Full so-called jumping the queue to get the vaccine before anyone else does but maybe leading by example. I just don't think you can criticize our leaders for having the it's not as if whole parliament skating it. It's really just showing their confidence in the vaccine. I think it's really important. Thing down the track. You'll see the health minister leader of the opposition getting the astra vaccine or the chief medical officer. Getting the astra vaccine to show that the our leaders are. You do have trust in this. And do you do believe in science. And i mean it's like laser immune to getting the virus either. Pay dutton got covid early. Jia by tribe and you you want your leadership cupboard and there's tens of thousands of accents that are gonna roll at in just the next couple of weeks. So i suppose people sort of is on the horizon going cool vaccine zahia. That's a really big comfort in a time of pandemic. When do we start to see things going back to normal. That's the critical question. And it depends what you call going back to normal because in most parts of australia. Things are pretty normal. We've got very little if any covid. Nineteen virus around in australia and new south wales is going weeks so has so have other jurisdictions so available around so we're back to normal internally back to normal means opening the borders having international travellers and tourists coming to australia us being able to go overseas listening. You'll becoming part of the world again. I think that's what we mean by becoming not becoming normal and covered that on tonight's Seven thirty program by talking to a mortar spoke to chris. Murray who heads the institute for health metrics and evaluation and he's of the he runs one of the world's leading modeling groups and covered on the health report back in november. He predicted the dr the global downturn in cases of covid nineteen that. We're seeing now he. He predicted almost to the week and his was. That was going to be nothing to do with. Thanks to nation and everything to do with season. -ality that really. It would have itself out in terms of the winter surge in covid nineteen. Because it's so seasonal. So i decided to go back to him. Seen other vaccinations going out. What what what's your modeling moving forward and it was quite sobering. He says he's not as bullish. Nah as he was back in november the variables that he's taking into consideration people's behavior. Now remember we're talking about the northern hemisphere not stralia new zealand but of almost no virus. And we've got close borders visit. If people's behavior goes back to normal before you get down to very low levels of virus transmission then you. He believes that you could. Well see a third wave evolving at the end of the northern summer. Pretty much like you saw in in twenty twenty and what could make that. Which is the second variable that he's worried about our vaccine resistant. Very variants of the virus escaped the vaccine and that they could really muddle the muddy the water considerably. How does that fit with other data that seeing coming out saying that the vaccines are reducing transmission in places like i and that's a place where the at least the uk variant is very prevalent on the uk very sensitive to the vaccine it's african variant and other variants than meyer is including the brazilian variant. We're not much is known. And you'll remember that. We spoke some days ago. About the brazilian city minnows. Seventy six percent of people had been infected with the virus. There were only five hundred admissions to hospital in the beginning of december beginning of january first nineteen days of january. Three thousand five hundred hospitalizations in so vaccine trials a very high percentage of people where had had covid nineteen when they were into the trial and in the placebo group they got reinfected with the south african variant so these vaccine escape variants are really worrying in terms of reinfection. Saw the vaccine does is turns covered one thousand nine hundred common core. Which is why. I'm gonna take the astra and we're five. We'll take whatever is given to me. Because i don't want to die of covid. Nineteen but if what we are looking for an opening of the borders and international normalization at least in australia. According to chris murray. We've made the wrong bet with the astro vaccine. He says you really do need to be immunizing with pfizer or madeira. Or perhaps even novak so that still to be proved in the real world. We're much higher. Degrees of efficacy and reduction in transmission and remember the other issue reduction in transmission is that these new variants emerge in countries. Where there's a lot of spread where the virus is multiplying and replicating all the time. And that's where these new variants are being thrown off. They won't be thrown off in austria. Where there's no virus around they'll be thrown off in low income countries like sight words middle income countries like south africa. They'll be thrown off in the united states in britain and other places if the virus keeps on circulating. So what we've got to do is get to very high levels of immunization very very quickly with highly effective vaccines and hope that that minimizes these of virus. Which is resistant to the vaccines. And then what we gotta do. And it's got to be done right now actually getting vaccines op through visor. Moderna novak's which are designed to cope with the resistant variants. That are around. Perhaps the brazilian one certainly the south african one and within a few months star boosting with them. This is really demoralizing. When with sort of on the cusp of vaccine. Roll out of here in australia woman. And if i'm just an average person sitting at home listening to corona 'cause what should i take away from these. Iud urging people from getting vaccine that they often no. Because i think it's really important that we all get covered so that shoots so first of all we're going to have a layer of protection. The international evidence is increasingly by the pfizer vaccine prevents transmission. So that means with hotel. Workers bar workers being immunized and hopefully their families to and that's a really important part of the story. We are creating a ring of confidence around the hotel borders. We've also got to institute with the pfizer vaccine. Not the astros vaccine ring vaccination around outbreaks so that we are controlling this any outbreaks there and everybody else immunized with the astra vaccine so that we are turns it into the common colds. We create a very safe situation. The problem is wayne. Do we open up to international travel and windy relax on hotel quarantine and with a country. That's largely covered with the extra astro vaccine. Which is not very effective somewhere doggy. Effective at all against the south african variant certainly in terms of transmission. Then it becomes a very nerve wracking decision to make. So that's why we've got to be planning in twenty twenty one for a booster. Does of vaccine resistant covid nineteen. That's actually a question that we had from john who's in australia who leaves in the us. And he's basically asking now. The australian vaccination program is rolling out. Do we expect. When do we expect the quarantine might be lifted. And what kind of factors go into that decision making so you could be quite cool about it if you think that we are all. We've turned effectively. Destroyed population susceptibility to covid nineteen into the common cold. And it does look as though the it's pretty effective at doing that with you're talking about african variant or indeed other variants. So we're pretty protected so you could say well maybe sooner rather than later but you know. It's just a very nerve wracking theme because we variants from all over the world and we are not donating vaccine to low-income countries. At the rate which will get van covered quickly enough and they will be throwing off variants and those variance will come to look at hiv hiv started around contrast saw in zaire and then you tens of millions of people have been infected with. Its an died. It doesn't matter where these variants arise from. They will spread to other parts of the world. So we've got to get the globe immunized as quickly as possible otherwise. It's very hard to relax just when you thought you had this thing pinned down at escapes again. Norman so so becomes really does become a bit like flu where the first vaccination does protect us to very significant extinct in terms of dying and serious disease. That's why i'm lining up. For whatever vaccine i get and i would urge other people to do the same. But it means that the government has got to not be complacent about this any shape or form and has to star ordering what's called multi vaillant vaccines are trying to ranging them now so that by spring summer of this year. We're getting boosting booster shots with multi valent vaccines that will covers against the current range of resistant. Variants around the world and that swing will open up borders.

Australia Astra Pete Evans Pfizer Institute For Health Metrics A Stralia JIA Dutton Moderna Novak New South Wales Chris Murray UK Murray Meyer Madeira Chris Novak New Zealand Austria
How Real Estate Sells Cars with Gina McCartney

Talking Automotive

07:21 min | 8 months ago

How Real Estate Sells Cars with Gina McCartney

"Gina, welcome to . the It show is great to have you speaking to us today. Maybe just to kick things off can you maybe just tell us a bit about Gina McCartney - who you are and some background. . to thank Yes, I'm yourself sure, you so Gi for na McCartney having me here today. Super excited to see both. So my background if i go back to perhaps my brief - youth and into professional career. I really my whole life was distant creative: sculpting, painting, designing and off the back of that passion went to uni studied creative advertising and was destined. ..my path was to become a art director . My very early career was in advertising agencies and spent ten years ing servic some like pretty big clients ilo, . kohl's meyer group. Cbi off foundation and then some order client bmw and many were because of mine and it was during that time that i realized how much i loved as and surprised no surprise. I joined renault. Stralia and joining renault at the time was at a really pivotal point for the business. And that was all about preaching and finding every possible opportunity we could in the market and myra was to introduce the sierra digital program. Really lift the capability of the dealer network from a lead management perspective. Sur getting out outta rot on building confidence back in the network that we were providing leads to them in generating value from office and then from neymar roll moved into a brand and events role and so the full marketing swayed had an awesome time with the business and great team. And then my time was up. When i was tapped on the shoulder for all at anchor pinellas area group been realized real estate dot com to you joined the business not really knowing much about the role. I was joining. He'd go to market manager role and of bain there now close to seven years and moved my way through various segments. So we're two now. Residential business at develop a business emotional property meteorologisy and clients and also to stint in malaysia. And i leave the win. We acquired a southeast asia and helped with the integration of that business side at an awesome korea here. Rei and now run. I tame called the customer. Excellence team and so my team move. Twenty incredibly talented people help support our two hundred thirty sales teams across australia. And that includes the learning development perching old training ogata market siles support collateral and operations analytic. Kpi's commissions incentive sprints and really big a big team mission and vision is to pave the new way of selling and selling clock when you work for rei. Let's bit about my story. Love love gardening love dancing and eighteen. And that's how i spend most of my time let's it's an impressive story. How you you've migrated from during the karate stuff through to or i will now into real estate now. We can't get a bit of understanding as to real estate dot com o. Rei group and what's the back story of real estate. Dot com abc business was born in the garage. Dome koster and for those familiar with john. It's in the eastern suburbs of melbourne and in nineteen ninety five and they came up with a crazy idea of water. We put the photos of property onto online so people can see them on the internet and so literally scanning photo by photo by photo built this web sought. That looks very different today than what did obviously up. Twenty plus years ago and over the years to really brilliant simple idea to gos- and today with the leading australian property portal and we have hundred million plus is it as a month coming to thought trillions of photos from a perspective and yeah we service most property clients around australia and that includes real estate agents property manages developers homebuilders land developers media clients of less amount of probably. But almost all and anyone that wants to reach property. Sega's we do business. You know you've got a really interesting background. Having spent tom and credit in automotive value in real estate can you. Maybe just discuss some of the similarities. Between automotive and real estate i remember when i joined. Ra and it was probably a month thing. I thought wow. I didn't realize there was so many similarities between the two industries. And if i stop from a business structure perspective the similarities of utah franchise groups independence at relationship between head office and you know the small small businesses that are running in local and regional areas. I think that that pressure that applies with a small business to find the raw talent retain talent when there is no professional requirement This note there's no huddle to get into other industry. And i think that is a challenge that are still share today and another real estate industry in particular institute really trying to introduce their professional courses create more opportunities for the right people to enter the industry. So they've got really quality staff sieving consumers invincibles. And i think our remember. That was a challenge in the automotive industry finding the right talent and apprenticeship styles perspective perhaps a bit of bid process. But that was probably one thing that i saw straightaway is a big lesson. In automotive that i think real estate can learn with the handshake. Between sales and after-sales and if you think of the real estate version of that is the sales and rental market now rent rolls the most profitable part of a real estate agency and if you think about the handover in the importance of one to the other the ongoing retention of the customer. I think that's a really important similarity between the two some. I think some best practice sharing could happen more. And then the probably the other big similarity i would say is the is much smarter and much savia and this is probably not exclusive to automotive in real estate but their expectations have increased tenfold. And no longer. Can you get back to a later inquiry within a couple of days. We're now seeing consumer expectations at a couple of minutes. And i think that's something that dealerships deal with daily and you know the the now now now economy that exists within cosima world.

Gina Mccartney Na Mccartney Meyer Group Cbi Off Foundation Stralia Neymar Roll Ogata Siles Rei Group Dome Koster Kohl Gina UNI Myra Renault Pinellas Bain BMW KPI Australia
Australia will lift weekly caps on international arrivals in an effort to get stranded citizens home

AFF on AIR Podcast

04:39 min | 9 months ago

Australia will lift weekly caps on international arrivals in an effort to get stranded citizens home

"Be back but first. Let's begin with a roundup of the latest airline and frequent flyer news from the past fortnight and fiscally moist ustralian states will restore their international arrival caps to pre-january levels from monday. The fifteenth of february following a decision at yesterday's national cabinet meeting but western australia will retain its reduced arrival cap of just five hundred twelve passengers per week until further notice as perf emerged yesterday from its five day. Covid nineteen lockdown from the fifteenth of february new south. Wales will again double number of passengers at takes per week to just over three thousand queensland will restore its capacity from five hundred to a thousand a week and victoria will increase slightly as well as the stralia. The increase in rival caps is welcome news of course for the many trillion. Still desperately trying to return home from overseas but even with lost months capacity increase out the howard springs facility near darwin. The new arrival caps as of february are still below the old caps that were in place before January when the government temporarily half those caps in in many of the states prior to lost month's reduction australia had the capacity to accept around six thousand nine hundred weekly arrivals overseas including three the howard springs facility. The number right now is about four thousand five hundred fifty per week and this will increase from the fifteenth of february to around six thousand. Eight hundred weekly arrivals which is still just below what it was a ago. The government recently said that around thirty six thousand trillions currently registered with dave fat as being stuck overseas and this number has been repeated many times in the media as representing the number of australians. Trying to return but the tree number is likely far haya as many of the papal trying to come to his trail. You have not registered with fat qantas will wet lease up to fourteen embraer. One hundred ninety regional jets from alliance airlines for the next three years qantas plans to take delivery of. Its first three least jets in june this year for use on routes between adelaide. Alice springs and darwin the jets will be crewed by alliance airlines pilots and flight attendants but flights will be marketed by qantas in have accused flight. Number corner says that the nineties which have ten business class seats and four economy seats are the right size for flights between some of australia's regional centers and smaller capital cities. Lie ellen routes like alice springs to adelaide while also offering a great range. Then qantas links. Boeing seven one seven. The nineties can fly for up to five hours. Singapore airlines full service regional subsidiary silkair has been merged into the singapore airlines brand. Singapore airlines will gradually take over service on suk's existing routes starting with flights between singapore and pikit from the fourth of march. Nine of silk as boeing seven three seven eight hundred will eventually be transferred to the parent company and although the merger has been finalized at the moment with many of the airlines. Flights grounded covid nineteen. This was already planned a well before the pandemic began soak it has been a full service. Regional airline since it began operations in nineteen ninety-two but it had been viewed by some as the poor cousin of singapore airlines singapore airlines is now addressing some of these concerns by reupholstering. The seats on its silkair planes. It will also introduce a singapore airlines dining experience on regional flights including book the cook in business clause and on routes over five hours saute skew is fascinating business clause including on routes like hands to singapore which was previously so k. Route these seven three seven flights will also now be stopped by singapore airlines trained cabin crew wearing these singapore airlines uniform. And chris whoa in-flight entertainment will be available to stream on passengers. I devices these flights will also now be part of the star alliance which is great news for frequent flyers with star alliance partner airlines. He previously got no benefits when they were put onto a silkair flight. Although there's no change velocity members because velocity already made a upon of both silkair and singapore airlines qatar airways emirates and cathay pacific are among the latest group of airlines to provide a second year of t. Status extensions to their frequent flyers. Almost every airline gave as you probably know. Twelve months status extension to top team embassy in two thousand and twenty g to the covid nineteen pandemic and the associated travel restrictions which made it difficult for people to retain this status otherwise. But it's now quite clear that the travel restrictions and get lost in some form for longer than one year and so many airlines on out. Granting a second year of status extensions all existing silver gold and

Howard Springs Facility Qantas National Cabinet Dave Fat Silkair Darwin Singapore Airlines Singapore Adelaide Singapore Airlines Brand Western Australia Pikit Haya Australia Queensland Wales Singapore Airlines Singapore A Victoria Alice Springs
Beijing lists grievances against Australia, giving warning to other countries with tense China relations

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

07:23 min | 11 months ago

Beijing lists grievances against Australia, giving warning to other countries with tense China relations

"Relations between beijing and canberra deteriorating. Awhile have created spectacularly in recent months. Australia has excluded while away from australia's five g network. Australia has cold for an international investigation into the origins of the covid nineteen pandemic. It's spoken up in support of hong kong and protested against china's treatment of its wiegand minority and china has bristled at all of these moves. Some of china's responses have been merely rhetorical and calls medic including crudely goading australia. You've alleged crimes committed by string. Troops in afghanistan others had more measurable effects. Devastating tariffs on australian exports to china including especially ruinous levies on australian. Wine has china decided to full out with australia. How should australia or any other country. China has a popat react or adjust. And is there any way back to cooperation with china for australia or anyone else. This is the foreign desk. My advice to punish morrison repeatedly has do more say lis- do more is in fact. A series of concrete measures enhancing national security pows enhancing now fundamental economic cow enhancing population growth and strengthening our alliances and relationships with countries around the world. Or just the united states but in southeast asia and beyond as well so this kind of patriotism and chest puffing plays very well as china's coming out of covid domestically a want to show and deflect residual public anger over. Its cover up and handling. I'm so getting the country tonight. This way to show that they can stand up and push back against the west. I mean that's a really good message to be spending so it's really two birds. One stone the chinese government should be totally a shined of this past. It diminishes them in the world is hello and welcome to the foreign. I'm andrew muller. China is not a nation known for its impulsively where foreign policy is concerned but using tends to act carefully and deliberately so it should be assumed that it is acting carefully and deliberately towards australia for a look at what china is doing and why china is doing. It joined first of all from beijing by sophia yan china correspondent for the daily telegraph severe festival. I think what we're trying to establish here is whether this is a specific row between china and australia or something. We might see more of in china's dealings with western democracies in general but we will start with stralia. Does it strike you. That china is going out of. Its way to pick a fight with australia. Or is this something. That's just kind of happened. Organically absolutely china's definitely targeting australia. It's been going for some time and it's obviously hit a peak. Now it's every day. There seems to be something new in the sputtered. Diplomatic spat between beijing and camera. And what beijing's really trying to do is to make australia of retail. Australia is a major. Us ally part of the five. The lions and australia matches on values with america. So hunting. Australia is a way for china to send a message to other. Us allies or the country's just thinking about siding with washington and to try to prevent them from considering policies that china dislikes bans on chinese tech firms over national security risks while we issue for instance even territorial disputes in the south china sea being public about stances over hong kong and taiwan china does not want countries to get involved with what it thinks is its own backyard so pressuring australia. This way is just one way to show. Hey this is what can happen to your country if you dare to take on. There's an upside to this too. It's certain swagger for the domestic audience to show that this all powerful country china can finally stand up to the west. You have to remember that. For the chinese government and for many chinese people there is a very painful history and memory of what's called the quit century accumulation. That was the hundred years before the communist party took power in nineteen forty nine during which many say the glorious chinese empire crumbled at the hands of foreign powers. The brits the russians japanese china at the time lost almost all the wars fought. And actually that's when hong kong was ceded to the brits so this kind of patriotism in chest puffing plays very well as china's coming out of cova kovic domestically a want to show and deflect residual public anger over. Its botch cover up in handling and still getting the country two nights in this way to show that they can stand up and push back against the west. I mean that's a really good message to be sending so it's really two birds. One stone does a number of things going on there but let's just focus on one of them because it is a proximate cause of china's irritation with australia and indeed china's irritation with a few other countries. Which is far away and other chinese companies being locked out of five g networks. Why does china perceive that as an argument worth starting because it's not imaginable that any of these countries are going to change their minds. Way is in a way national champion. It's a private company. It's not state owned. But of course any company that succeeds in china is in some ways states approved so to succeed here. You definitely need to have certain. Party officials Tests the quench relationships and people in high positions in your corner and so while we the company that really shows and reflects the rise of china. It's headquartered in shenzhen which just two three decades ago with a rice patty backwater. Now it's silicon valley hub of china and this company itself really does show how quickly the economy here has grown china now. The world's second largest economy in china trauma very broad level wants to be taken seriously on the world stage and so attacking hallway company. That many would consider really national. Champion is attacking the status. That china now thinks it should have on the world stage so it's ironic also that there's concern from beijing. That other nations are talking about who as a national security risk because china itself has long said that it wants to keep certain industries telecoms utilities oil and gas within its own country at state-owned enterprises. Because they themselves. Beijing is concerned about the very same issue that foreign players could come into the country. Take a big share of the market and therefore be competitive domestically. They didn't want to see control here to foreign companies over the issue of national security. So it's actually a bit ironic for china to now be upset with other nations for saying that a chinese company coming in to build critical national infrastructure. Whether that's a nuclear plant or the telecoms network but then to say hey. You can't say that this is a risk. We don't pose a risk. it's it's it's it's. It's not very fairly for china to be saying that other nations

China Australia Beijing Andrew Muller Hong Kong Sophia Yan The Daily Telegraph Severe Fes United States Canberra Chinese Government Morrison Cova Kovic Afghanistan Asia South China Lions Washington Shenzhen
"stralia" Discussed on Bit Storm

Bit Storm

03:40 min | 11 months ago

"stralia" Discussed on Bit Storm

"Anything where that goes into the game is this is some sort of at some sort of party or like social situation and maybe this is the new version of of like prohibition in that like there's still providing alcohol. It's well providing drinks that say they've got alcohol but it's extremely reduced alcohol cantero down so it's sort of like never gonna. How many drinks you have you always going to remain sober because like because you can't drink it fast enough to get drug with the goal. Yeah and there's just something about prohibition but sort of gives gives that that different idea of different story gonna on now in the twenty s again twenties all right. Modern day prohibition what country we sending these even though he's saying stralia bring zine rules to say all right this this like alcoholism in culture has gone to asia. We are stopping all imports in oil production of alcohol in australia. And in now you'll part of like the underground speak easy running underground railroad running alcohol runners lose runners in australia. Yup does the harden come from you. Doing something with is to alike to hide it in trying to think of how you hiding somehow hiding calms smuggling home. It's all about the hard liquor you know. it's not. You're not trying to bring beer in or anything like that. It's all of that spirits k so get more bang for your buck hot and comes from like as a becomes from increasing the booze content. Make something hotter. That's good okay. What are we talking here. We talking like satisfactory style. Running trains underground. Yeah i think everything is all about trying to work at okay. We need to run the town. Which in this place in this place so you you sort of looking on top going. Okay i need to mock it from here to here. I'm going approximately this direction. And you try to work it out because when you're underground and you start sitting this thing going you know you can't break up to the surface and have a look around and see where you are you trying to match up the tunnels and get it all. So it's more about the logistics of digging these tunnels owners. Yeah i could see that working. That could be interesting having to like source materials to like run power down there so you say the people digging on the dock to get the the the rile. 'cause i think i think you've got some sort of cool electric data that you know you can use. Well what the problem is. You've raised enough money. Yeah i think the problem is. It's on an extension cold and the extension cord can only go so far doesn't have better. That's an upgrade that only lost like three feet of digging. Because then you're gonna take a couple of days and put them back in double is our..

cantero stralia australia alcoholism asia
Teaching Music in a Multicultural Classroom with Rachael Morgan-Jones

Emma & Tom's PGCE Podcast

05:26 min | 11 months ago

Teaching Music in a Multicultural Classroom with Rachael Morgan-Jones

"Just being very aware of the population in your local community and so on and really understand and getting to know your children is key to understanding what is going to make me tech in the classroom so i have put all those coat cultural backgrounds into three main areas to take into consideration. So there's the islamic tradition the western classical tradition and the oral tradition. So if you look at the islamic tradition you might cross children from north africa middle east pakistan. This country's per pack afganistan and those children are very likely to be muslim and islam. You have to members of multicultural cross continental religion so there will be a broad range is broad range of approaches to studying music and the feeling about music so the most conservative denomination doesn't allow music tall the engagement of music and the reason for that is because within the sharia law music is seen as being within a very negative context for example prostitution and gambling so there are some conservative very conservative muslims. Who don't believe in engagement and music. All the mainstream belief is that music is absolutely fine. Studied in the educational context. Although it's only the very liberal muslims who will consider taking music onto key stage four key stage five on maybe within the the kind of liberal groups you would expect the food. Fourth plus generation immigrants. So that's the the one group be quite mindful of then. The second group is the western classical tradition. Which is the group that really embraces music. Probably the one that most acquainted with stralia america britain and these musicians will be very used to listening to music in the house. They might study an instrument and music orchestral band instruments. They might be part of a band. So that's what would be the music associated with that group that british group i talks about. And then there's that food group oral traditionalist so those will musicians that may be learning instrument that has been passed down from generation to generation. They learn by eia improvise ation say features. Very heavy heavily in it. So those i would say with the three main groups and there are considerations and balances in order to to kind of cater for for those three groups. I was gonna say i you. Can you can as a often classically trained musician as as a new music teacher you can probably kind of get your head around the idea of moving away from you. Know travel cliffs and dotson sticks in music notation to kind of embrace the huge number of traditions in the world. The do that music through oral transmission. How do you kind of get going with group who believed that music is actually forbidden unlawful. Unlawful and against their religion. Because you know if you knew to the classroom you might be worried about getting them to sit down and stop talking and listen to you and the older you might actually be transgressing. Religious beliefs might be a bit of well the when it comes to that group. They are not very used to listening to music in the house and i would say physically. The mainstream belief is that music is fine in an educational context. And i can tell you that within pupil voice over the years and people voices taken with our external partners. The feedback is really positive and they enjoy music in the classroom. So don't be don't be frightened about that at all. Yes a have come across the odd pupil here in that that is coming from that consume conservative background. Brit just means having some conversations and maybe with the parents sometimes and saying we'll actually music as part of the school curriculum and you do have to embrace it and that after you've had that initial conversation it's fine of never had a problem after that and again you know you do find some liberal Muslims who will take music for key stage four but the main thing to remember. Is that it you know. Music is enjoyed in the classroom by children. These cultures i think the needs to be a sensitivity. And if you're going to be working in a school where there's a very large percentage of pupils who follow a faith maturities could be a catholic school for example. You would be very careful in terms of the music that you sharing with them. A lot of music these days very sexualize than you'd be careful anyway not to share things that are really explicit but you would then probably find an opportunity to introduce more classical music into your schemes of learning and. I think that's fair to say that. The schemes of learning that have developed over the years have really broad range of music with quite a generous amount of classical music. And that's that's something really positive. I think

Multicultural Cross Stralia North Africa Pakistan Britain America House Brit
French children's podcast platform Keeku launches

podnews

02:51 min | 11 months ago

French children's podcast platform Keeku launches

"Key coup is a new french children's podcast platform which has just launched it features curated children's audio content from a variety of publishers curated by age group theme or time of day. The company says it's good to the mid screen time sprouts have released. Their platform stands for october and will publish these online. Every month from now on apple is now forty seven percent and spotify twenty four point four percent of all the data includes podcast apps episode generation downloads over the first seven days and lots more. The reuters institute has published a new report about daily news podcasts. The research points to them being very successful in terms of total downloads and highlights four types of daily news. Podcast currently available as recline is leaving. Vox the company. He co founded and joining the new york times as columnist and podcast host. He starts in january and leaving luminary. Your lander sang when he is now senior director for programming at npr. Google podcasts third. Most popular podcast app has now reached fifty million installations on android the fat. Mary's podcast is a podcast from australian restaurant. As jake smith and kenny. Graham who in recent episode described their employee's whining and self entitled according to the sydney morning herald podcast producer. James atkinson says that ad-libbing is a risky approach to content curation and business insider writes about your stralia in podcasters who are quote earning thousands of dollars a month for decades a quiet and remote australian country town nurtured a world-class monster. A man who often more than half a century is only now coming into focus as possibly this nation's serial killer his name. Is vince dempsey. Psychopath gangster child killer rapist. That's one of queensland's best known investigative journalists matthew khandan. He's launched a new true crime. Original with bush ca studios ghost gate road examines vince so dempsey a multiple murderer who claims to have killed thirty three people. Though it's thought the real number is more than one hundred. How i found my voice banquets third season. Samir ahmed hosts and talk. Show host graham norton based guest and focus on foot has won the gold award and the people's vote best arts and entertainment. Podcast at the lovey awards season six. We'll start on december. The eighteenth with an extended episode with richard thompson.

Jake Smith Sydney Morning Herald James Atkinson Spotify Reuters Vince Dempsey NPR Apple New York Times Matthew Khandan Kenny Graham Vince So Dempsey Mary Google Samir Ahmed Queensland
"stralia" Discussed on The Goals Based Advice Podcast

The Goals Based Advice Podcast

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"stralia" Discussed on The Goals Based Advice Podcast

"Access to buy because it's few practices and they raise the bar on client money. If we're ever going to down get a wider section with Stralia access to good advice when it many won't financial. Planets. That, how I say myrow that powder FDIC's student eight minutes I is the K. way to ensure the financial future of Ustralian Justin. Prevention. Now, for practice looking obviously your your. Student engagement you do you also talked to practices that might be looking to take on professional rose at somebody else. We have some professional partners in practices per gram and you know they put their own Navigating the Merman Industry Policy Different advocacy points look if they if the.

FDIC Stralia
Is Europe copying Victoria's lockdown strategy?

Coronacast

04:54 min | 1 year ago

Is Europe copying Victoria's lockdown strategy?

"Say Norman. Let's talk about a place, which is now imposing a five Columba travel limit You can't go to the body shop anymore he conquered the beauty salons jeans I'm not talking about Victoria I'm talking about I land and it looks like pices in Europe adopting some USTRALIAN stall approaches to curbing coronavirus. Yes. Because despite all the complaints about lockdown in Victorian has unnecessary M- should. Just. Let it go climbing from some sources and how in complaining not letting up quickly enough lockdown is actually all you can do when it's getting out of control I mean as a Stralia being used as an example to the world or is this just best practice? No matter where you are let's talk about Ireland for a moment, which is a country that's got a smaller population than Victoria bending how you define. It is right about five million people in the past month if at seventeen thousand cases past week seven, thousand by yesterday twelve, hundred cases in a single day. So. That's getting pretty worrying from them and they they're locked on looks remarkably similar to victorious yet they're going into heights lockdown of his six weeks well, in Victoria. That wasn't long enough. Do you think they might extend it? Well, it's hard to say and it goes on modelling the Senate got more cases and more virus circulating and as we've said. Before on Corona, Cast University of Sydney modeling showed that for every day you delay lock tone when you're out of control, it's a week at the other end, which is one reason why Victoria has gone on a bit longer they try to ring-fence thirty six suburbs. It didn't work and that delayed things by a couple of weeks and we've probably shortened it by lot. At, the end effect on that but that's engine. Now the sorted out and the hopefully, we'll get done very levels, but it depends on how much virus there is around week or so ago a senior person at the W. H. O., the World Health Organization was saying lockdowns shouldn't be the primary way that countries control Khurana, virus, and that sort of headline went out. And I think a of the new Scott got in it because we are seeing countries using lockdown and it can be effective. So where's the? Where's the nuance here? So that's certainly not what was being said last week courting the World Health, organization and we for Monday's synthetically report I interviewed Dr Dave Navarro. Who's in fact, the same health official he's professor of public. Health. Imperial College London and his Special Envoy to World Health Organization on Covid Nineteen, and he feels that he's been misrepresented his view is that sure down is not the first thing that you do. It's not your primary means of control. Your primary means of control has to be testing and contact tracing and quarantine in isolation of the people you find in that process. However he does say that you can get to a point where locked is the only thing that you can do and you should use that lockdown to improve your contact and testing regime. And in fact, if you look at Victoria, that's really although in the first wave, that's what we did as a nation back in March we got our act together in terms of contact tracing. There are still deficiencies in Victoria and they have used the last few weeks to get much better and so the contact tracing regime now in Victoria is fantastic there. quickly, the locking off mystery cases in super-quick time, and that's what you've gotta get. So then fighting the of used that time well. It's not that they're against lockdown. It's just that it has its place. and. When you when it's out of control, the way it is in Europe you've actually got to be able to do that another problem. And, I don't know what they've done in Ireland here. But the problem is the borders and it was a really interesting study the other day looking counties in the United. States and showing that cross-border flow was a very important factor in both the sustenance and the growth of SARS COV to infections. and. If you don't control your borders and you still got people coming in from outside, it's very hard to get this done and on control it. So so really European. Countries are trying to do this with one hand tied behind their bank. Britain and Ireland could control their borders because they're islands but it's harder for other nations exactly and can we just come back to smoking before about Australia and we are doing the numbers that are coming out now looking really really promising do how close are we to having zero spread here in Australia, we're almost there new south. Wales still has cases popping up Victoria might get there before New South Wales because they're still in lockdown and those extra few days of Lockton make make all the difference I think New South Wales it's going to be really hard but they're. You know they're getting on top of it too. I think we're going to be very, very tiny sprayed, and maybe in Victoria, they'll get done to zero spread. And that will make it much easier to open things

Victoria World Health Organization Ireland Europe Dr Dave Navarro Norman South Wales Wales Senate Lockton Imperial College London Corona Scott Australia Cast University Of Sydney Lockdowns Official W. H. O. Britain
"stralia" Discussed on Zo Routh Leadership Podcast

Zo Routh Leadership Podcast

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"stralia" Discussed on Zo Routh Leadership Podcast

"Some pretty a factors to success and we really look at not just you making money because if you're miserable and you hate your job or you hate your family or whatever rich I mean that's not success to me like successes. Financially freight to give you the law and having which will give you the life you want but it's also being happy intro filled in your relationships being happy and fulfilled in your Korea or business. Being Healthy feet and all of those things really contribute to success where a very holistic. We take a very holistic approach and what we realized was this sort of full stings that will contribute to your success one is received really good financial advice and investment of us to is get that stuff done. So you know the administration and implementation side which part of what we do as well. Three is coaching and accountability. So actually coaching you toward your goals, keeping you on track keeping you accountable on an ongoing basis and those are not just financial goals but other areas of your life and the final paces community which you asked about. So it's that whole. You are the some of your the five people around G. Five closest friends or whatever it is. You, know because we. Deal. With high performers, high achievers, particular Stralia, they tend to be the people that you receive a lot of criticism. A lot of it's hard sometimes for other people in your life to understand you when you're someone who's out there really pushing debate the best she can be the what we want to do is create a community of those types of people and bring them together to support each other connect with each other. And just pay pot of each other's laws because we know that the such a power in surrounding yourself with similar people who are..

Korea Stralia
Why 1 million coronavirus deaths is only just the beginning

Coronacast

07:24 min | 1 year ago

Why 1 million coronavirus deaths is only just the beginning

"Yesterday Norman the world clock devote one million deaths from covid nineteen since this began less than a year ago it's been reported by the Johns Hopkins University. Dashboard, which is a pretty morbid side that keeps keeps an eye on all this sort of stuff apart from the one million deaths we've got thirty three point three, million cases in counting. And it's amazing to think that this all started from one person probably about less than a year ago. Yeah. Ten months ago November, that's the smart money is one person in China from a Bat Or Bats and moved into on ESPN. Is, an extraordinary number. And this is not necessarily going to slow down as many countries go into the second way. So we're at one million. What's the chance? Do you think we'll get to two million? Oh, I think that we'll get to two million without too much trouble unfortunately. We've got view of the United States figures on that Hopkins sites the United States numbers are going back up. There were going down a couple of weeks ago or through a few weeks ago and other going back up. Second Wave Solidifying in Europe France, not come back to France and a minute. So I think that we will get to the the the second million sadly tragically and low to middle income countries are really just getting going with this and there that just don't have the medical facilities that we do into in terms of helping people who've got severe illness. So unfortunately, this is going to go on. So when you look at also where the number of deaths really have. occurred it seems like about ten countries account for more than seventy percent of the debts. Obviously, the US is the big one there nearly a fifth. That's about two hundred and something thousand followed by Brazil India Mexico the UK Italy, where do you think that the new deaths will likely come from? Where is the the virus currently growing? It's going to come from those countries probably because they're the one seeing second wave in the second wave could well be worse than I. I wouldn't be surprised if that looks pretty similar. In some other countries, you're not necessarily going to know what's happening because they're not doing enough testing to really be sure how much corona virus they've got many people are dying of it. So I think it's in countries with doing testing that you're going to see the effect and it's likely I mean you see a million? It's likely that it's seven to ten million in reality. Because we are underestimating the amount of coronavirus around. So one million is just what we know about seven to ten is probably what the real figure actually is, and that's really scary. You mentioned the the second wives coming through a lot of countries and where in Europe, in particular saying a lot of cases suddenly jump up a lot from where they were. But. We're not actually saying the death toll yet follow. Why do you think that is all and do you think that it's likely that that's going to continue that trend so one reason you see a delay in the deaths appearing is that it takes a couple of weeks. People become seriously ill, and then we can be seriously over quite a long time. So that's one reason why it's a delay. There's probably a reduced death rate as well because the getting better at treating people in intensive care with decks meth zone, which reduces death rates by twenty percent nursing tummy not using ventilators and also the older people are so socially isolating themselves wearing masks. So they're tending not to get infected, and so the bias infections towards younger people who tend not to die of covid nineteen of Ova can get long-term effects we've spoken about. On Kurna cast before and you mentioned France before what did you want to say about France? France. Is reporting an upsurge and the authorities there are really getting worried in its report there that for example, one of the senior doctors and France as told newspapers that they're worried that there's going to be enough medical personnel to be able to deal with the the record number of cases that are appearing in France and that they may run out of intensive care beds. And it's patchy and it's also into an underprivileged areas such as Marseille where there's a lot of overcrowding and there's the worry that the capacity of the French hospital system to cope with could be welcomed a very good hospital system. So you mentioned testing before and there's been quite a few announcements recently about testing the other day we saw one from the World Health Organization about rapid testing and I think we also saw demonstration at the White House by President, trump what's the rapid testing? All about what what's it hoped that it'll achieve take overseas before we get to Australia, what the World Health Organization has done through the gates. Foundation is purchased one, hundred, twenty, million test kids rapid test kits. and. These test kits. One of them in particular is a bit like a pregnancy test where you do a swab, you shake it in some liquid and then you Putin liquid on a test strip and you went fifteen minutes into the. Shows the line or to bend your positive for the virus and it's pretty accurate. It's not quite as accurate as the PTR tests the wonder doing the moment but you don't need the artery. You don't need cars to take your samples to a laboratory then get an Aq- and wait for the results. This is done on the sport fifteen minutes. You've got an answer. So it's a way in resource poor environments to get an answer and it is cheaper than doing the PC artists. In countries like Austrailia, these tests could be used as a way of controlling the pandemic moving forward. What are we going to do in states like Batori and you South Wales even Western Australia with US tonight breaking the ship off the coast of port hedland where everybody's vulnerable to new infections coming in from overseas in particular? HOW ARE WE GONNA? Make sure there's no virus circulating that we're not aware of and mass testing particularly where people gather in large numbers is one way to actually see whether it's almost like screening the population see if you're missing any virus. And you can't really do mass screening with the existing resources because you're just going to clog up the system. If. It's instant testing people are more likely to agree to it because they don't have to hang around. They don't have to isolate themselves until they get a positive result. And it's a way of quickly finding out what's going on in an affordable way. Do you know any plans by the Australian government to get any of these rapid testing kits and and instigate that that type of program with therapeutic goods administration has stralia has approved several of these I think it's four or five of these rapid testing kits so that all they're already available in Australia. The one ones that w chose bought, which is like the pregnancy test. By Abbott, his is still under consideration for approval and there's no reason why wouldn't be approved. So the the tests are available here and available affordable price. The ideal here would be one that self contained. We don't need a little machine sitting on a desk some of them do you have to put it into machine? This one is a shake squeeze onto a strip and just wait for the result and there are others do that as well. So there's no reason why not? No in Victoria the DAUGHERTY institute is testing a way of doing mass testing using the PR test, which is the old test if you like the accurate using using saliva and they're testing that in the thousand members of the police force just to work. Out, what is the most efficient way of collecting the saliva? So you could mess testing with the old way of going about it, but the rapid testing is probably more flexible,

France United States Austrailia Europe Johns Hopkins University Norman Espn China World Health Organization Marseille Daugherty Institute Brazil India Mexico Australian Government Putin UK Port Hedland Foundation Abbott French Hospital
Has the COVIDSafe app been worth it?

Coronacast

03:44 min | 1 year ago

Has the COVIDSafe app been worth it?

"So it's been just over a month since the federal government released the COVID SAIF APP which is all about digital contact. Tracing at the time it was sold as a vital tool to reopen the Stralia economy to get things moving again. He is the prime minister. Scott Morrison said in early. May there are currently over three and a half million downloads and registrations of the COVID SAFE APP and there needs to be millions more. How has the APP being used since then? Has it been the key to get things moving ours? Has it been forgotten about well today? We got reported aerial. Bogle Vac to help answer those questions and many more. So I t and Hyneman. So what's going on with the APP? These days it was salt is a vital pot to get us out of look down but We haven't really heard much about in the last waco so that's right so back. In late April wind APP launched. The government was using really strong language around it. As you've discussed describing it as sunscreen tying really explicitly to the lifting of lockdown restrictions. It's like not putting on Sunscreen to go out into the blazing Sun. We need that too so we can open up the economy. And that's what's so important. So if you haven't downloaded the APP yet downloaded that rhetoric has kind of died off lightly and in fact we only know of one instant so far with APP has been used as part of the contact tracing process. That's in Victoria. Where it was used to identify one person who contact tracing had not picked up so we don't really know too much yet about the APP. Success do we know much about numbers downloads? But then also there was talk early on especially that perhaps it was hard to use it correctly. Do We know about downloads? Also usage figures. It's a good question so the government said as of this week more than six million. Australians have downloaded the APP. But that's pretty different number to those who are still using it. I mean some of that six million. They may have deleted the APP. What we really want to know is daily active users. How many people have the APP on their phone? Using it correctly with Bluetooth turned on all those things that make it work and those are the kinds of numbers. The government has repeatedly said it caught. Shame doesn't have access to or is really not measuring so we don't really know the exact number of Australians. You have quite a bit safe operating correctly on the fines today. So the digital transformation needed say they're responsible for the APP. There's a whole series of controversies around. Its use on the IPHONE. I've got an IPHONE and I keep on getting messages implying that it's not on when it is on just in the background. What'S THE STORY WITH? Iphones versus androids and the functionality. Well this was an issue early on so when the APP launch the government insisted that it worked perfectly a lot of people who had some technical expertise. This space. Question this from the start so as you might remember. Singapore has its own contact tracing APP and we all knew that Abbott. It had problems with performance on iphone and we were wondering has strategy fixed this problem. How they got around this it turns out they hadn't so it did emerge as weeks passed since the APP launch. The APP had reliability problems on iphone. So if the APP wasn't full grounded a visible on the screen and with the Foreign Arpan. It was not always reliably communicating those in crafted dazed funds with the APP or collecting them. So the government has continually updated the APP and it looks like they may have fixed some of these iphone issues but we still hearing reports of people running into problems when they using other Bluetooth Devices Sabo headphones so we really still need a bit more clarity. I think about just when the is performing as it should and on iphone even if some of those obtaining problems have now been fixed.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison Bogle Vac Stralia Bluetooth Devices Sabo Hyneman Singapore Victoria Abbott
Concerns over new mothers and babies during COVID-19

Correspondents Report

05:47 min | 1 year ago

Concerns over new mothers and babies during COVID-19

"They even though they've been classified as vulnerable group. Pregnant women have so far not shown themselves to be particularly vulnerable to the extremities of coveted non team. But there's no doubt that pregnancies and births around the world have been disrupted even in Australia. Pregnant women have missed out on important appointments and support services like mother's groups and birthing classes and for women who've been suspected or tested positive for the virus pregnancy and childbirth has been traumatic Catherine Gregory reports that maternal health experts are now looking at how to prevent any long lasting impacts. These pandemic could have on new mothers and their babies look. It wasn't sure she'd get to hear these miraculous. Sounds my waters break? I was thirty one weeks and six days so we came to the hospital. Thirty seven year olds spent the night Victorian Maternity Hospital by herself. Luckily I didn't gone to live within the next morning. I recall my husband and he left in a hurry but husband never got further than the hospitals front desk. You can't come into also and you need to get checked for carbon scandal. Has He was about to enter and found he had a favor. Sorry basically like a really sorry you husbands not going to be for the lie in ways to treat you like you have carbon sorry smashed up and secluded up. And that's when Abby Real nightmare began. She was facing childbirth alone. I'm by the side. A little bit of pioneer. That asked with some high relief and will live. You can't have guests now because you might have carbon then the stock transferred into special boosting room an isolated one by that stage. They checked me. I was now ten centimeters dilated and there was going to be our pain relief at all and now husband merciful person. Sorry I started freaking out a little bit and then came be pays Yoda me. We'd no drugs. I think I just Kinda ran into shock. Mars surreal experience. And because because you early doctors in the room whiting just standing there waiting to take him as soon as he was born only had thirty seconds with her newborn baby before nurses took him offer. Say I took them up to spatial. Katya and I was taken to isolation in the world so it's about three or four one of the midwives came in and she was almost in tears and I said I know you're GonNa Seiger's narrowing are it's we have the results yet. It's just I have to tell you the results come back positive until you've Corinthian Stralia. Since the pandemic began about half a dozen women who've been suspected tested positive for the virus have given birth in conditions similar to Abbey's it's brutal bought needs to protect doctors nurses and other patients from the virus overseas in countries with pandemic has been far worse the restrictions on more extreme lawyers and human rights advocates. In the United States a pushing the legally mandated. Birthing rights. Face ain't too many women even those that aren't sick. New York especially have been forced to give birth alarm and then separated from their baby here in Australia. Each Spain less of an issue hospitals have tried to ensure covered. Moms and Bob stay together but now as the virus appears to a Bite. Maternity experts a worried about the long term impacts of some of these measures. But it's really important that we don't intrude on oil impact on human rights. That are not necessarily going to be beneficial or even potentially harmful. That's Professor Hannah. Dolon from the School of Nursing Midwifery at Sydney University. Though I am concerned West some facilities are suggesting that the woman be accompanied by nobody not even have pa. We have had some concerning reports. Where Pediatricians Indiana technologists recommending in the case of cove in nineteen being a confirmed that the woman be separated from her baby And then there are some other things such as being excluded from water birth or not having it available at all in a hospital or not having guests in air. That are not necessarily based on strong evidence Jason's days reports are mainly coming from private hospitals. And she's heard of cases where partners aren't allowed in operating theatres for C. Sections even if there is no risk. The thing is while the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and gynecologists have issued guidance. The health practitioners. There's no standard approach across different hospitals. Health districts in states then needs to be some level of adherence particularly to the international guidelines. So one of the very concerning bits is where mothers and babies are separated when that strongly recommend that they have skin-to-skin all of the recommendations have come out saying that women should have a support person with her at. That's very concerning. When we see deviations I ask her about Abbie's experience I can tell you as a midwife hearing the Midwest speaking that they're the points we john heartbreaks. 'cause it's the last thing we want to do. All of us in on the planet at the moment with the best way forward. Sometimes we get it right.

Catherine Gregory Australia Victorian Maternity Hospital Katya United States Corinthian Stralia Spain BOB Whiting Indiana Midwest New Zealand College Of Obstetr Abbie New York Professor Hannah Abbey John Heartbreaks PA Jason
Aboriginal People of Australia

The Outside In

09:48 min | 1 year ago

Aboriginal People of Australia

"I'm just I'm shot and we are the outside. We're podcasts at syndicated to bursting your bubbles and opening up to new perspectives. And this time we're GONNA be talking about something been learning about the past few months. Which is the rights of Indigenous People in Australia? If you've been listening to our PODCAST You know that just Ni- are from South Africa in the United States separately. I'm from the United States justice from South Africa and we are not aboriginal people or in any way But we were very passionate about doing an episode on this topic because we've seen a lot of injustices in the world and in our travels yet to expand that all. Yeah well yeah like Charlet said neither of us are from indigenous groups and you were both like the colonizers in much. Yeah but I think that's one of the reasons why it's so important for us to be talking about this And finding a way to like raise awareness for the indigenous groups because a lot of the time people don't think about that and even back home in South Africa were like we've had a really good peace movement. People still don't like acknowledge the true ramifications of colonialism that has been that has had on our country and it's the same thing that we've noticed in Australia is people are very unaware in a lot of places and very very ignorant and I think it's important that we educate ourselves and talk about it. Yeah one of the reasons. I'm very interested in. This topic is during two thousand sixteen. When the d'appel North Dakota access pipeline was happening and the injustices that I saw towards native Americans really inspired me to try and make a change and currently have been researching a bunch on that topic and have connected to connected it a lot towards environmental racism and so that is why I wanted to focus on this topic today in our podcast super important to talk about. We're going to be going through some of the main terms that we're going to be using because this is different to our usual content. You might not know what's actually going on First term to talk about is colonialism. Now there's a whole lot of different types of colonialism but essentially one will be talking about most is settler colonialism and this is when one group of people move to another place moves to someone else's land and basically tries to take over that land so that can be in the case of places like Stralia and the states where people showed up and then said this is our land and that means everyone who was living here before copy here anymore or it could be in the case of like my country and South Africa were a small minority moved there but then took complete control even though the majority of the population were the people that were living there before So that's kind of what colonialism is. It's this inclination of like trying to take over the world in a way. Colonizers are the people who call our Joan people for the first nation people of Australia. The oldest people who've lived on the land and fun fact average Australians are actually the oldest surviving culture in the world with like traditions that date back sixty thousand years which is insane pretty amazing. Yeah Yeah and the colonizers that actually came over were the British. They were so they needed a place to put their prisoners in their convicts. They found Australia and they were like sick. Let's put these people here and one of the reasons because of that. Australia is very difficult back then to live on for people who don't know the land because of the amount of things that can literally kill you hear. The prisoner is like a really good experiment. Sent here I because it was like well then we can live. Yeah no yeah. It's a it's an intense story so the first colonisation of Australia happened in seventeen eighty eight. That was the first time that people actually settled on this land and before this there were more than five hundred indigenous groups that inhabited Australia and the way it worked back then was like it wasn't just one country. It was five hundred countries essentially or maybe less or more depending on the groups but it was divided up in the similar way to Europe and there are about seven hundred fifty thousand people living on this land cultured. Like I said that's developed for sixty thousand years and there were over three hundred languages spoken in total whereas today only about one hundred and forty five languages spoken with only eighteen being strongly spoken by lots of people so you can see immediately like the decline of the culture in the effect that that's had on original people because of this one. The colonizers were coming over. It's hard it was very hard for them to unite as like an aboriginal front. Because there's so many different tribes and Like currently like when it was being called as they're probably like still wars going on between tribes then as well so it wasn't like everyone is a one aboriginal nation it's all divided separately into different groups And then when we get further into so we're GONNA talk a bit about like how it is now and why that's difficult even unite. Today one of the things that was actually released pricing to us. Because we've spent seven weeks or six weeks now in Australia. Learning about indigenous cultures learning about that kind of stuff and we spent a week in Alice. Springs the rest of the time we've been in Melbourne. And what I found really interesting is when we first arrived in Melbourne we were welcomed by one of the aboriginal groups were under people with a smoking ceremony which is a typical welcome into the land. That when we went to central Australia near Alice Springs. We were told by the indigents people. They're like they don't have the thing and it was kind of a weird moment for me because I automatically assumed like. Oh this is what they blame. Everyone does it. Yes accents but you eventually realize that like those three hundred five hundred nations like were completely different groups and spanning across the country completely different cultures which makes it really difficult to unite even today so aboriginal. Australians are still facing a ton of issues today a ton of oppression from the White Australians and this is largely in part due to just the history of this country and the history of the racism that so institutionalized into the country's law so when the British first arrived in Australia they said Yeah. This land is free to take. Because they didn't recognize the aboriginal people as Human Beings. They were classified as flora and fauna so basically plants animals not human beings and that sentiment existed for years and it let it has led to a lot of the attitudes that sill exists today even if people are no longer classified that way they're classified as human beings like a It's still rings true. In the way the government treats these people one really good example of this In central Australia. There's this thing called the green credit card. Basically if you're aboriginal half of your income comes in whatever form you want and the other half needs to go on this card that basically you can only spend on assesses which they classify as clothes and food alcohol or tobacco products or anything like that. So if you're thinking of buying a house nope And this is a very big issue because they're basically controlling like where where you go in life if half of your income is stuck on that card then like that's that's it you know and this is just one way that the government really keeps control of Aboriginal people whereas they justify it as A. We're helping them because like many of them have addiction problems and things like that one in reality like no colonizers introduced alcohol to them and introduce tobacco products. And it's really actually your fault that that may be a problem in some communities but the people should still have a right to choose because they're people and this is where the whole flora and fauna thing connects back. I think it's a real real problem like this idea. And it was something that we encountered a fair amount in the northern territory yet. Definitely yeah we got to spend time not only with aboriginal communities but also like the settlers there and it was quite harsh because it was an attitude of we know best yes coming from the white people which was pretty horrific and you can see that through like that green card. We know best what you should be doing with your money rather than dealing with addiction problems at the source. Would you most frequently accident in? My research comes from like loss of culture. Loss of tradition like the oppression that's been placed on these people definite instead of focusing on that. It's it's just putting a band aid over the problem.

Australia South Africa United States Charlet North Dakota Melbourne NI Europe Stralia Alice Springs
Are financial institutions waking up to climate change?

FT News

13:23 min | 1 year ago

Are financial institutions waking up to climate change?

"Concerned about climate change is rising around the world on the streets in parliaments and among investors questions about the future of fossil fuels are putting new pressure on companies. He's and financial institutions so he was made to discuss what this means are hugh vents daynuss chair of the sustainable finance committee at UBS and former adviser to to Bank of England governor mark. Carney and billy nauman a reporter for the FTA's moral money. which covers the world of sustainable finance? I billy let's talk about some examples of the financial impact of climate change. What's been the economic fallout from the Australian? Bushfires that's a very good example I think and and it's one that's still kind of playing out obviously so it will take some time to see. The True Fallout Bank of America made some projections that the fires just for the first quarter of twenty twenty twenty could subtract at least zero point zero point four percent from Australia's entire GDP. So yeah. It's it's bad and probably a bit worse than people. Were expecting only a month six weeks ago absolutely. Yeah I mean the numbers were seeing on the insurance sector at this point they. They don't jump off the page. Necessarily I think they were close to nine. Thousand fire related claims from September until early January but that compares to just fourteen hundred fifteen hundred hundred for the yearly average of the last five years. I think so. It's a massive uptick in so much is still coming at this point. It's hard to say with the crisis. It's still playing out how bad it's going to be right. Hugh you recently wrote pace for the FDA about why investors and boards NATO take climate. I'm at risk into account now the Australian fires an example of that sort of risk. Or you have other. Things changed as well. Australia is clearly very stark reminder of the potential attention challenges but I think it's a much broader range of issues and I think there's always a push poll we're seeing regulators start to impose stress tests on the banks and their insurers shores particularly led by Governor Connie but also there have been some great initiatives to improve the quality of data. Because the key issue if you can't measure it you can't manage it and I think one of the companies and boards in particular realized they will increasingly be held to account through numbers which could be used both by investors by pressure groups. And we shouldn't underestimate the impact or pressure groups oops grabbing and using this data so far it's been a kind of voluntary initiative nine hundred of the biggest one thousand five hundred companies now starting to measure data but bit by bit is improving but the challenges as just investor behavior themselves. A growing number of vest design meet. Astonished say well they're all GONNA be big valley dispersions not just more Stralia. It could be from changes in tax. Six regulation or Brandon Pam if people think the company simply not honoring its responsibility. So it's it's a range of issues but there was definite groundswell in the market and that son what we're seeing in all business. Yeah you mentioned shareholder pressure there. We've just seen shareholders in Barclays Bank demanding that it starts the phase out financing companies that are not aligned with the Paris agreement. I wonder if both of you this seems to be something of a step up in relation relation to shareholder action when it comes to financial institutions. Is that how you say it or do you think. It's a trend already saying certainly I see. It's a growing trend and I think it comes from particularly some of the AH owners the big pension funds who are demanding action something like two thirds of all new mandates which are granted have some sort of sustainable finance aspect so they're pressurizing the managers to put their money where the mouth is but secondly on billy side of the pond in the states. There's a much richer. Set of data around proxy voting. One of the most striking statistics about the current round was the provos around environment were as frequent has governance. I think that's the first year that I've seen that. Yeah that's absolutely been the trend in it's been increasing and and one of the things I think is interesting is looking at some of these pressure groups some of these activist groups. And they're really ramping up their efforts. I was at a thing in in September around climate week here in New York and it was the principles for responsible banking which is a big. UN Consortium of banks talking about what their responsibility is as bankers anchors in terms of helping the world achieved the sustainable development goals and even at that event there was a group of protesters out there. And you could tell it really struck a chord with the bankers anchors. That were there. You know they're thinking well we're the ones that are doing well. We signed our names to this piece of paper and replacing to do this but from the activist groups. The message was that's not enough. We need to see action on this. And they're very adamant about keeping up this pressure on the banks that are financing fossil fuel companies. That's the case isn't Hugh that the banks are moving. They are taking steps to be more transparent in many cases but at the same time activists are saying listen. That's great but we just want. You should get out of fossil fuels. Yeah I think this is very challenging because you know let's face it finances the arterial system of the economy. And so we always you need power and and whilst I think many can be frustrated with the pace of change this will be more evolutionary than revolutionary some stats that McConnell US recently is one hundred trillion dollars of power and a sustainable projects which needs to be financed of the next decade and some of the going green so a new soda plant but some of them can try to be improving the quality of what we've God and we shouldn't underestimate improving. The bad to good is actually still step forward and I think that's a very nuanced and difficult argument for a financial innovation to make into a pressure. Group agree with what you said and it is very important that we have financing for going from bad to good from Brown to green. Or however you want to phrase it but I think that at that area gets very ripe for greenwashing for putting money into things that are not actually improving climate emissions. Like they might say they. Are you talking. In relation onto green bonds there perhaps green bonds is a perfect example. Yeah and then there's these things called transition bond which is a relatively new development. You Know Green bonds you run into the the problem where these companies are issuing green bonds for these projects that are allegedly going to improve carbon emissions. But it's just they were going to do anyway at stuff they're mandated to do you buy some new set of regulations and they are going out with this green bond and getting better terms as a result because they can label it his green the transition bonds. It's something that's offered offered to companies that might not usually qualify for green bond but they need to transition to be more green so this is a new category of financing financing available to these companies that helps them fund projects that move along that spectrum from Brown to green. Yeah and I mean greenwashing is a concern obviously and seems to me that more and more focus has come onto these sorts of bonds at some people find a suspect however broadly speaking. Isn't this a structural troll issue. I mean it. Doesn't it really point to the fact that there's not enough regulation either national or international of this market. I'm not sure if it's necessarily the regulation because you know if you make an example. Sir Chris hones dissolve all the company's portfolio disclose. Just this Christopher Hon who has a large hedge fund and here in London and. He said that he's not going to invest in any company that doesn't abide by the climate disclosure guidelines. That Mr Connie and you helped develop the Governor Carney server initiative but I think that the bottom line here is that actually sometimes the activists in the regulators may not be that far apart. Obviously there's a lot of good hard work to be done around the Standards Serum the investor point of view. Wouldn't it be great if as early as possible tomorrow. Really these guidelines which as you say currently voluntary were made mandatory. So I think actually in the best thing to do would be say within three years it will be mandatory and get companies to get on undo it there are still some some creases to iron out in the methodology but I think I would be very encouraging of that. Why should we wait three years when we've got the climate scientists telling us that this is a matter of extreme urgency and we really need eight to be cutting emissions as quickly as possible and therefore financing of fossil fuels needs to be effectively reigned in so for me? I would want all the companies to start today. Hey but you may not want to co defy methodologies. There's still a work in progress so I think it's by saying we will make it managed to in three years and we really rather expect you to do it. This year is sort of awed. Get to and billy what about the US. Do you think that you're going to be seeing. Regulators introducing mandatory disclosure anytime soon. No no I don't think the Political Otago Environment here is is going to lead to that at all. Unfortunately and what does that mean then if we have a world in which we have say European countries are making it mandatory the US and others a saying saying it's fine. You don't need to what then happens if we have a very uneven playing field. Well I mean I think we kind of saw something like this with GDP right where American companies have to abide by GDP CPR if they have European clients or do business in Europe so it's it's not ideal that the US is dragging its feet on these sorts of issues. But I do think that US companies will have to come around to some degree depending on what sort of regulation comes out of the you just moving onto another area. Do you think there are parts of the financial world old that Performing will when it comes to taking climate concerns into account for example green bond market is expected to keep growing this year. And we've forty saint extraordinary growth there there any other areas where we are starting to see a real change. You're starting to see a lot of sustainability linked loans Richard similar to green bonds where banks are incentivizing borrowers to hit targets whether it's emissions reductions by whatever means they can do it and if they do so they get better terms on their loans. That kind of stuff is growing a lot of support. You'll nap there's lots of really interesting pockets. One of the ones which is hardly reported about is the private equity quarter to also trying to become more sustainable an increasing number of creating their own sustainable funds. But also if you turn this around and it's not just climate if you've got a very concentrated portfolio do you really WanNa make sure your companies are being well run and that by the time you come until I was seldom they actually look as valuable as possible. So there's an increasing focus on what I'd say is the sustainability the inability of the franchise in all its manifestations and clearly firms will prioritize. But there's a growing market as well in private equity. I'm a little skeptical of of a lot of the claims coming out of the private equity market cricket and that's because of the lack of transparency. A lot of the major major companies have come out with these big impact funds. And when you look under the hood at some of the investments they've made aide you know there since there are no kind of set definitions on what is impact or how impact is measured. Some of them do a little dubious. I've been doing some research into one. One of the the bigger impact funds and just looking at some of the underlying investments. This is the Bane Double Impact Fund which is run by Duval. Patrick who's a former governor of Massachusetts. WHO's now running for president here in the US and A lot of the investments are in home health care which is a growing sector but is that really impact or is that just a play for a sector that they think. There's going to be growth in. I think more transparency from the private equity market would help a lot in terms of if they do deserve credit on this to give them that credit. But I'm skeptical of a lot of their claims this to be frank right. I'd like to ask both of you when you think we will see major banks in Europe and on wall all straight no longer financing fossil fuels. Never sorry to be a downer. But unless they're strict regulation that says you cannot do this someone will always do. Okay never look we will want to keep the lights on and so I. My sense is that this isn't evolution. And I got back the statistic if there's one hundred trillion over investments be made in energy clean energy and transition. That's an extraordinary amount of money. And fumbled in central banks buying and so whether it's capital markets all banks or insurers don't need be financing all the overall transition I think that what regulators can do and what I was certainly arguing for in the pieces through stress testing the banks us through providing better data. You can at least act to trump bring forward when that transition happens and that's probably the best one can hope for. I mean even the practice of with that transition though is likely to have an impact on a lot of industries. And how should that be managed. Well this comes down to the big public policy questions which you know the F. T. writes about so eloquently silently. I mean these are genuinely as much political questions other opportunities. I think that you know Al Gore says the investing in Green Tech is one of the biggest investment opportunities in his lifetime and at one level we need to also change the language so it was seen as much. The investment opportunities immobilized the capital in the way. That governor Connie is going to be going onto after the bank as much chaz trying to stress test and think through the risks. And I think it's a bit of sticks and carrots to try not just along but that's not going to take away the very big political challenges ages of you know who wants a carbon tax. I think that's an excellent point. Actually I I will amend my never if there is a disruptive technology that makes fossil fuel obsolete then then they will stop financing it because it will no longer be profitable. Think about whale oil. I suppose you could compare it to that. When fossil fuels came along and made will oil obsolete than nobody nobody is financing it anymore? So maybe if there is some sort of green technology that completely upends the energy sector then that could lead to it from a fan perspective. I suppose billy thank very much end. Hugh thank

Hugh United States Governor Connie Billy Nauman Australia Europe Brown Bank Of England Bank Of America UN Carney Green Tech UBS Al Gore Reporter Barclays Bank Brandon Pam
"stralia" Discussed on Banking Transformed with Jim Marous

Banking Transformed with Jim Marous

14:22 min | 1 year ago

"stralia" Discussed on Banking Transformed with Jim Marous

"Customer experience as a primary driver for digital transformation efforts in our research. Do you see that or as as in still kind of focus on cost. Containment is a goal and sometimes call that customer experience. Well I think the cost containment both an achievable and reasonable goal to go after while you doing to transformation and if you do it right then the cost containment and the idea of coherent client. Experience do much along. But if you just go after cost containment you can make some of those mistakes of of frankly locking yourself into more silos. And that's where I think some people lose the away so it goes back to being able to have a strategy. Have a picture in your mind of how your organization wants to evolve over time. When you turn about cost containment you know we sometimes avoid what. I'll call the elephant in the room. Which is the branch situation you know. The biggest cost that most organizations have in their distribution network. And even though those are being used less and less. That's one of those untouchables that create the biggest amount of difference between a traditional bank and a digital player. How you seen organizations addressing that in the marketplace is your reach out to your customers. Well you know it's interesting. You mentioned chase which privileged to have as a client for a Lotta years you know. They actually are adopting an active branch strategy because they recognize that you can contain the cost particularly with a lot of automation and and perhaps with branches designed differently. You can contain costs compared to what you used to do years ago but boy there were times. Somebody's life. Were being able to actually go in and talk to a person makes all the difference you know. Take a look at Amazon opening stores. The idea that you want to be a purely digital organization can make sense for a brand new startup but if you're an organization is looking to retain a reputation retain a customer segment. Then I believe you need a mix of channels to be able to engage the customers and the way they want to be engaged or you'll just driven business by the people who probably do the stuff more effectively we brought it up earlier is that and then more than just providing more channels these channels have to talk to each other. I would actually say it's even more important than talking to each other that they're designed so that the logic and the processes which at the heart of everything that happens in banking does that logic that processes don't get buried in any of the individual channels because otherwise the world's ossified into complex. We we talk about thinking from the middle out from being able to have an engine customer engagement engine which is for example. What Komo Stralia calls? The way they use the way I'm describing being able to do it engagement engine. That's going to drive consistent. Coherent personal engagement across all the channels tied to a workflow engine. That knows how to deal with the different back ends exist which in the future the bank may not even own in the world of open banking. That back end is somebody else's loyalty product. Somebody's else's credit instruments. You're just bringing it together and presenting it as a bundle thinking from the middle from the heart of your business out gives you a completely different perspective than than trying to think from the channel in or trying to do that sort of you know. Bs cost containment in little point solutions in the back office and we've seen organizations that are really starting to have meaningful impact my understanding. It's the way they draw the picture that makes a difference. It's interesting we'll take Amazon example. Again they realize that one of the pain points for consumers was returning things. Now Mind you. There's no place better than Amazon to return things because they continue to deliver whatever you need returned back to you in form you needed if it's different sites different color whatever they'll deliver it to you before even returned. Whatever it was that you need to return. But now they've worked with a different company in many cases. Kohl's being one of them where you can now return items purchased at Amazon to Kohl's and it'll be it is better than building a bunch of stores just returns but they're the using an outside retailer to provide a return vehicle. How great is that when you consider the fact that they want to build a bunch of stores to do that? They're building bind stores as well returning network. I think that is terrific. And you see evidence in other industries for example A tremendous amount of telephones sold through third party. Channels that onto the brick and mortar stores. That are over is. At and T. Might create it might be the best buy or some other channel and you know. Even in the banking industry we've seen banks pair up with supermarkets and other places to create much lighter touch personal interactions. But what we think is critical. Is that across all those channels? There's a coherent client engagement that the way the client is engaged. Your knowledge about the customer. What you tell the customer that you'd think they should be doing the needs to be just a wind and needs to be sensible needs to be real time. That's what we see the difference. Frankly regardless of industry you know the Research. We did on behalf of peg on digital transformation. We found that not surprising as we've seen in other research we'd done for the Digital Bank report that there's less than a robust use of a and advanced analytics and pretty much. A lot of it is still in the area of risk and security as opposed to personalization and more our facing allegations. Is this going to be an issue for the industry going forward? Well I think there's a lot of confusion about what is and when and how it should be used you know we have a an AI. Customer engagement platform that's used by one of the top three banks in the US. You know is using this literally millions of times a day to make that personalization happen for its clients and to do that. You're not just thinking about a I in a theoretical sense. Like how do I find patterns in the data you thinking about? How do I deliver that to the desktop to the call center to the ATM? How do I deliver they? I in an Omni Channel Way that his coherent and means that have a customer as an experience in one channel. Well the bank knows about it and can influence what happens in the next channel about it and that sort of thing to my mind is true in practice so much of what we see going on is kind of A and B S. A lot of it. A lot of it is really really just I think mis categorizing and in some cases involving risk to particularly a bag around some of the sensitive issues. We're hearing about around sometimes when I see two groups I say you know we've got to stop doing analytics for just better reports internally. We needed to do it for better experiences. And the challenge. I have is I use to top six banks one for business one for consumer side and go the fact that the banks really really really know me as not enough. They gotTA show me. They know me which isn't done very well if I went to. Let's say wells Fargo and said. Tell me everything you know about me. I'd probably be scared by all. They knew. The problem is on a daily basis. I don't get the sense that they really know me. So they don't deploy as you mentioned through the channels the way you'd hope that they would do. Well there's a big difference between being able to theorize and being able to operationalize and I think that's a gap that. Ai has fallen into and We're seeing some customers. Come through the other end of it. In Boise. Getting amazing returns. Yeah Yeah so we. We look at the changes happening in every industry. Not just in banking. I think one of the biggest again elephants and ruined referring tat phrase again is the lack of talent to really move organizations forward. Not only. Is there a gap because my son goes to university right now and he's taking digital analytics business analytics? Marketing and logistics egos is hard to find the teachers that can teach us now because so many of them have gone to private industry. How do you believe that organizations need to address this challenge going forward? Well I think they can rely on industry you know. I don't want to my own horn. But you know with the work that we've done and with our teams of experts and software experts. We've worked to make this real time a consumable as opposed to so much of the AI. That's out there. The Google or Amazon web service. Those things don't plug in to actual business solutions which you know in the banking industry. We understand what the key elements. Are that make somebody decide whether they need a new credit card or not or how they should divide their credit portfolio. And then how do you bring that to the customer in real time? What do the agents customers talking about in real time and if it doesn't work if that wasn't the right thing how do you learn from that and stop annoying the customer with the same offer? They don't want those are what I would describe as the linkage between the highly theoretical which of course you have to do to get started and the highly operationally I which ultimately is the difference between that sort of personal success and personal interaction. You and frankly it's obviously in the interests of the banks that are serving you as well when you look at automation. Also and you're looking at a lot of rules that are traditional banking roles at some managers may have had for fifteen twenty years as those change. You see organizations have to take it upon themselves to upskill reskill maybe transform towards an ongoing learning process to address this challenge from a standpoint of jobs are definitely gonNA be changing. Well I think that the opportunity here is to actually uplift and improve the technology that is now central to pretty much every job that exists in a financial services institution. And when you take a look at for example. Some of the problems that some banks have had around accounts. That shouldn't have been opened a lot of that is because the banks have rules and processes in roles that are not connected to a technical background. And there's a great opportunity to actually create tooling that makes it easier for people to change jobs and to do. New Processes engage with their customers but also puts the guardrails around that so that you know it's crazy to think that a computer system allowed somebody to sit down at the end of the day pounding in Kinda applications. That's a perfect example of where people try to layer on top of inadequate systems manual processes. That frankly didn't work and you see the time after time. That's why I think it's the perspective that these organizations have that needs to change and that will put them in the right mindset to digitally transform not digitally transformed the little transactions digitally transform the actual end to end customer experience what we call the micro journey that organizations with their clients all the time you talked about the micro journey we talk about implementing the technology. You know one of the things that we've discussed and we found on the researchers that is more than just buying the technology and it's more than just great partnerships around the technology they're still got to be a deployment and in discussions with peg in a lot of the other players out there. You know we keep on hearing the fact that as big of an issue as by the technology is really internally understanding how it needs to be deployed in the culture necessarily to give it a a platform for growth in for implementation. How are you dealing with the whole challenge of changing of culture in and getting people to really understand the power of what you're selling? Well I think there are two parts one is. We're looking to build. What's called design thinking concepts the whole way that you think about using and deploying that technology. We're actually building that into the technology itself so the technology guys you and walks you through the workflows that you need as an implementer to help make sure you're hitting your business objectives and we're really excited by the progress and the speed with which we have. We have clients go live with major systems in ninety or one hundred days that are game changing for them but let me say one thing the comment about you know. It's not just the technology it's more than that on one hand. That is absolutely true but on the other hand I see that being used as an excuse by companies. Whose technology isn't actually that very good. You know we have a bunch of companies out there. Now that are just amalgams or what? I call Franken stacks of dozens or more other. Companies that have been bought glued together had the power points merged but actually under the covers. It's a collection of technical data and a mess and I hear those companies sometimes talking to customers saying. Hey it's not the technology will help hold your hand. Well if the technology is wrong as we've learned in lots of industries you know there's a reason the windows phones don't exist right. The technology is wrong. You can be as big or successful or historically smart as possible and you will fail in the future and we actually see a lot of that happening. You know. It's a little bit like that old CBO promise just by. Siebel and everything was going to be better. Lots of new sables out there. That are just glued together. Frankly messes one other thing. That's interesting is and you mentioned how quickly you can get an implementation in place today. Agility and flexibility in the marketplace. Where do you see that plane a role? We didn't really ask it. In the survey we did about 'cause it's hard to define how somebody's going to self determine agility inflexibly how important is that in today's marketplaces opposed to lift.

Amazon AI US Siebel Komo Stralia Digital Bank Kohl Boise CBO wells Fargo Google Franken
The Rise and Fall of the El Camino

CarStuff

04:29 min | 2 years ago

The Rise and Fall of the El Camino

"A car that you particularly love? Kurt well Off off the top of my head El Camino comes to mind You've hit a pine the topic of today's episode so by the scenes things This is this is a weird way by scenes when you and I were working on our previous episode on the cars of breaking bad We also talked about the the spin off films. Breaking bad came out called El Camino and at some point. I don't know if we ever mentioned this on Air Man Dan but at some point we were both baffled that they're never been a car stuff episode on El Camino or as we call it here in the US the El Camino Camino which should be hilarious. Anyone who speaks a lick of Spanish. Because what we're saying is the the road you know it's like saying ATM machine or Orvin Number Ri- vehicle identification number number the El Camino man. By the way I'm GonNa Continue Calling the El Camino movie the The the alchemy of is a fascinating vehicle. It's it's sometimes like A. It's like a platypus of the road. You know what I mean. It's not quite fish. It's not quite foul. It's something different. Something unique a mix tape and you and I have some personal stories about the El Camino but I have the following proposition. Why don't we start with the origin story of the actual vehicle vehicle which may surprise some people some eighties? Babies may be surprised. How old this vehicle actually is? El Camino is introduced. The first generation was introduced in nineteen eighteen fifty nine. It was basically a response to Ford's Ranchero But even before that in Australia in the thirties a created this this vehicle known as the Coupe Utility. So the idea of a car that had some of the attributes of a truck The idea that was around for a while before they started showing up in America and even in the early Fifties Chevy and Ford made light-duty drums like the Chevy's made a truck called the task force. It was a light duty pickup truck but the El Camino brought in some of that I guess the elegant lines of the late fifties and early sixties the chrome trim some of the more visually appealing aspects of the sedan's at the time yet you can look at some pictures of the first generation El Camino and you can clearly see the aesthetic. You're talking about here. Kirk I do. I have to also confess. I have a weakness for those Those flowing lines that space-age retro-futurism so common in Ford's and Chevy's of the fifty s and into the sixties A. We do have a previous episode on car stuff about utes in Australia and their origin origin for anybody wants to check that out. There's a really cool quote that you found about the youth as well of from the like the way it was marketed in Australia. Stralia right yes so It was Farmer's wife in Victoria Australia she desired a car that quote to go to church in on Sunday in which to carry our pigs tomorrow on Mondays. And so that encapsulates the entire concept here. You know what I mean the the idea that instead of buying two separate vehicles for two separate specific task right you can buy something something that fulfils Both of those functions. This is a question that will come back to right. Because what we're what we're GONNA WANNA see here is going to be ultimately a battle between some of those functions like is a daily driver or your. You know your good-looking car right. Your Business car. Is that the same thing as your haller your work vehicle. The folks who made the Cameo carrier and the folks who made the El Camino and the voter made the utes in general. Were there answer due to that was yes it can be the same thing. Forward the future. What a time to be alive?

El Camino Camino Ford Chevy Australia Utes Kurt Orvin Number Ri United States Victoria Australia Kirk America Farmer
"stralia" Discussed on Core IM | Internal Medicine Podcast

Core IM | Internal Medicine Podcast

14:50 min | 2 years ago

"stralia" Discussed on Core IM | Internal Medicine Podcast

"Hi everyone the stralia <Speech_Female> this <Speech_Female> is a special episode <Speech_Female> because it marks the first <Speech_Female> episode that <Speech_Female> where we are partnering <Speech_Female> with ac pete <Speech_Female> the american college <Speech_Female> of physicians <Speech_Female> for see any credit <Speech_Female> will lengthy <Speech_Female> exact you around <Speech_Female> the show notes <Speech_Female> it's a pretty <Speech_Female> strong episode <Speech_Female> in my very humble <Speech_Female> unbiased <Speech_Female> opinion so <Speech_Female> if you're in training <Speech_Female> center this episode <Speech_Female> you're attending or <Speech_Female> someone else who could benefit <Speech_Female> from this means of continuing <Speech_Female> medical education <Speech_Female> in with <Speech_Female> that qb <Speech_Female> intro <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> this <SpeakerChange> <Advertisement> documentary <Speech_Music_Male> freed <Advertisement> after <Speech_Music_Female> tragedy <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> induct revenue <Advertisement> harmon <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> this <Speech_Music_Male> is the core i <Advertisement> am five <Speech_Music_Male> boroughs podcast <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> bringing <Advertisement> you hire <Speech_Female> as in space <Speech_Music_Female> pearls <Speech_Music_Male> today were discussing crossing stress <Speech_Music_Male> hosting corners <Speech_Music_Male> cpa's <Speech_Music_Male> part to <Speech_Music_Male> we <SpeakerChange> had the pleasure <Speech_Music_Female> of interviewing doctor <Speech_Female> pan douglas fir <Speech_Female> this episode professor <Speech_Female> cardiology <Speech_Female> at do <SpeakerChange> she <Speech_Female> has many research grants <Speech_Female> including from <Speech_Female> an age as well <Speech_Female> as heart float <Speech_Female> she's a former president <Speech_Female> of those american <Speech_Female> college of cardiology <Speech_Female> in american <Speech_Female> society an echocardiogram <Speech_Female> she <Speech_Female> kind <SpeakerChange> of a <Speech_Male> big deal i think <Speech_Male> we've covered a lot of ground <Speech_Male> and that might <Speech_Male> be understatement <Speech_Male> of the decade <Speech_Male> so this is part <Speech_Male> two of our corner <Speech_Male> diagnostic series <Speech_Male> the last five pro <Speech_Male> episode focused on <Speech_Male> stress testing and all <Speech_Male> the various flavors <Speech_Male> there of so <Speech_Male> by all means we invite <Speech_Male> you to take a listen to that <Speech_Male> besides doctor <Speech_Male> douglas you'll hear from doctor <Speech_Male> craig cat susan <Speech_Male> in while you cardiologist <Speech_Male> spit on a few of our episodes <Speech_Male> before <Speech_Male> including proponents <Speech_Male> and stress <Speech_Male> testing leader <Speech_Male> on me episode episode you'll hear <Speech_Male> from are period <Speech_Male> after a sheet it <Speech_Male> that he also <Speech_Male> from n y u <Speech_Male> n again <SpeakerChange> we <Speech_Female> are joined by a new <Speech_Female> friend <Advertisement> of the pie <Speech_Female> doctor <Advertisement> avin <Speech_Female> harmon from university <Speech_Female> of virginia <Speech_Female> hey <SpeakerChange> great to be <Speech_Male> bad guys and i think <Speech_Male> you'll agree that are <Speech_Male> losers would be just <Speech_Male> shocked paul <Speech_Male> what if they knew the technological <Speech_Male> hurdles i had to overcome <Speech_Male> to make this podcast <Speech_Male> work <Speech_Male> in terms of you know <Speech_Male> both think that wasn't doing <Speech_Male> me any favors <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> i didn't realize we <Speech_Male> still have my school power <Speech_Male> laptop <Speech_Male> l a <Speech_Male> m in <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> let's <SpeakerChange> start on <Speech_Male> the questions will be covering <Speech_Male> remember <Speech_Male> detest yourself after <Speech_Male> each of the five <Speech_Male> pearls <Speech_Female> remember the more you test <Speech_Female> yourself the deeper <Speech_Female> you're learning gains <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> role <Speech_Male> one overview <Speech_Male> of functional verse anatomical <Speech_Male> testing <Speech_Male> what <SpeakerChange> the differences <Speech_Female> between functional <Speech_Female> stress testing anatomical <Speech_Female> test <Speech_Female> and what are examples <Speech_Female> of each <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> pro <Advertisement> to coronary <Speech_Male> calcium scoring <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> what 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american college professor president
"stralia" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"stralia" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Dan, stralia and any third of relief. For a Baltimore as allowed three home runs in that game. The pitch Muncie fouls. This unjust got a piece of it still wanted to Padres broken through against the brewers who still have not scored in their two games so far San Diego four nothing Padres. Top of the eighth. Chato with a couple hits, he continues to appeal his suspension and have the young catcher who was struggling so much in the beginning of the year was sent back down to the minor leagues. Now called up Francisco me he he's got a two run Homer in that game. I. Back again. Dodgers fans getting impatient. With derek? And the rookie Logan, Allen. Left-hander just twenty two years old. Big majorly debut. Tonight for the Padres. Seven shutout innings pretty impressive one to Muncie grounds half athlete. Into right. Via Belgium, chairs around second heads were terrible. Always in five are made a good throw. The Bellinger, too fast. Muncie is aboard the base hit. Belgium goes around third. First and third one out against Holland in the seventh inning. Dodgers threatening to break it open. And they will use David freeze for Matt bady as a pinch hitter. Interesting. Maybe only me, but the giants used the second most pinch hitters in all of these blind figure that's going to be a nationally stat. Red's the most the dodgers third. Now Burs Boches coming out. Trevor got gotten up again in the last moment or so to get loose for a second straight inning. And after the pinch hitter announced bogies countdown and he's gonna make the pitching change. So holland. Gives up back to back hits to the lefties, Beller Muncie. Freeze coming up Trevor.

Muncie Dodgers Padres Beller Muncie Holland Belgium Trevor Dan Baltimore Bellinger brewers San Diego Francisco derek Matt bady Logan Red David Allen twenty two years
"stralia" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

02:47 min | 2 years ago

"stralia" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"And Secondly, the bullpen down the road in Washington might be historically bad, so and that's supposed to be a contender. But yeah, the, the Baltimore relievers, it's been a shuttle, so they're fun team nor folk they just moved guys back and forth in and out. You know they. Dan, stralia out there in the bullpen now because he's been a disaster starting pitcher Michael gives who they thought was going to be a nice piece of has just given up tons of runs late and games. So yeah, you're not out of it against these guys. Now Colorado showed that when they have there. Trevor stories did you see the numbers on him on seven Rb Trevor story? Listen, this fifteen home runs ties JJ hardy for the most by nationally shorts that before June in a single season. He is just gone crazy here, the Colorado Rockies scoring runs like like they used to score in Colorado. The getting a little bit of hitching, not great. But all of a sudden Colorado's back in this thing. Yeah. A little bit. I mean, they're certainly because the wild card race the national it's so I'd open just about everybody's there. I mean. There was a lot of talk here in Washington. What are they gonna do? They gonna start selling. And they they've made the point six games out of the wild card. And, you know, the first June. But yeah. I mean, the Rockies starting pitching has been in their minds very disappointing. Kyle freeland. It's been horrible. They thought he was going to be a real T piece of what they're doing. You know, they they're going to need to get more starting pitching. But but, you know, story gets overshadowed because everybody just automatically talks about Nolan Aaron idol, and rightly so in the guys, you know, world class, but, but story is you're right. Is done things that shortstops don't do. Yeah, I know part of its Colorado, but, but that's how they're gonna have to win. And what is it six in a row now for them, you know and this morning there are half game out of the wild card, and they've taken advantage of some, bad teams, some bad bitches, you mentioned the but they did the Baltimore Toronto is pretty similar not a lot of depth than you get into their bullpen, and that's a mess. So you know they're taking advantage of the teams you've got to beat. I like it. I like it. You know this wild card thing and again, the National League is going to be wild. Yes. I'm fortunate giants are on the bottom of this thing. And, you know, AMI yeah. Barely. That was not simple. But we had Scott mercan on today from MLB Dukla talking about the White Sox. Hey, the White Sox are in second place. And again we love baseball. It's as you said, it's June. You got four months..

Colorado Colorado Rockies White Sox Kyle freeland Michael Baltimore Washington Toronto Dan JJ hardy Trevor MLB Dukla Scott mercan Nolan Aaron baseball National League four months
Understanding Australian Indigenous Astronomy

Astronomy Cast

08:02 min | 2 years ago

Understanding Australian Indigenous Astronomy

"Right. This week we focus on the ARCO astronomy of another part of the world, this time from the indigenous people of. Another group of people whose lives depended on knowing what was happening in the sky from season to season are Pamela got a big continent. Here of what is the evidence of archaic astronomy from the continent of Australia. Well, what's kind of cool with a stray Elliot's? It's not so much ARCHE of strana me as it's modern anthropology that allows us to look, Pat back on sixty five thousand years of history with, with the aboriginal tribes of gelia were looking at a couple hundred different language groups. We are looking at a continent that has been peopled for sixty five thousand years, that hasn't undergone the same kinds of destruction that civilizations here in north and South America. Underwent? And so as. As we talk with the people who are there today, we can hear into days oral tradition evidence of Frincis, a meteor impact that was thousands of years ago, a supernova that was thousands of years ago, and we still they still pay attention to these stories. This is still part of how they live their lives and why they do and don't go certain places, and it's, it's really amazing culture, and they look at space in such a different way instead of having four seasons. Many of the different nations of Australia, Mark out six different seasons of the year that are marked out with when different of the constellations rise on the horizon, some constellations Mark out, this is when you should go and gather the eggs, this is when. These animals can be expected to be breeding, the dingoes for instance, it's different. And we've both had the opportunity now to be in Australia. I was there almost a year ago, thanks to Dylan O'Donnell and, and his, his got to speak at his conference star stuff. And then we got Carlin, I went on a road trip north from there into the, the jungle part of stralia north of Brisbane, and it was like the skies. There are just there stunning like it's, it's not surprising that anyone who, who lived there. With out light pollution and saw that sky. And it is, it's a Canadian we have dark skies as well here, and I've seen plenty of Milky Way. But the core of the Milky Way is down by the horizon. We see a little bit of it over the summer when the when we get to see Sagittarius and Scorpio and some of those constellations than the rest of the year. It's, it's, it's fine. It's fine. But, but there it is just right. Overhead it blazes, the planets moved through it, right. Overhead. There's like Ayman, if you have seen dark skies, you have not seen Australian dark skies. They are next level. They absolutely have the best view. The people in the southern hemisphere have the best view. Yes. To the core of the Milky Way that we just can't experience from from the north and like the peoples of South, America, and southern Africa. They include in how. How they Mark out the sky's the dark paths through the Milky Way. There is a tradition of seeing an emus spread out across the Milky Way were the coal shack nebula that super dark patch. I saw. Yeah. Societas once pointed out to you see it. And that that's only one of the stories, another one of the stories that are particularly love related to the Milky Way is they see the Milky Way as a dark river, through the sky. And it's the, the souls of men and women who have passed on to the heavens, that have their fires along that, that river and in some of their traditions when they see a shooting star, that is the soul of someone who died far from home returning. The home. It's cool stories. Yeah, I love I love that idea. What was it? There was a animation that came to a couple of years ago, but anyways idea of putting floating lanterns on like on a river and then letting them go and letting them all float downriver. You get this. They do that in, in Japan and China place like that. But it's, it's a very cool effect. So what are now you mentioned a couple of real big hitters. Supernova. Meteorite impact give me some more information. So, so I think the two really awesome things to come out of aboriginal astronomy is how they look at their crater covered lands, and actually maintain a history of. Yeah, these holes of the ground are actually craters, as, as well as their tradition of supernova. So let's start with the craters Australia is, is one of the oldest landmasses it has thirty confirmed craters that are well-structured. You look at them from an airplane, and you're, like, yes, that is a crater and the thing that really gets me is. They knew that these things in the ground were formed from things falling from the sky. In one case, the hen, very crater about four thousand two hundred years ago, a large nickel iron space rock hit central ustralia. And when it came down about one hundred and forty five kilometers south of siding, springs, it carved out a bunch of individual different craters. And when westerners I started visiting that land, and they had an aboriginal guide with them. The guide was like, no, we don't go there. That is the land that was formed when fire fell from the sky and, and right. They have a modern day tradition of fire fell from the sky. And formed this land, and that's oral tradition. That goes back four thousand two hundred years. There are many other craters across a stray Elliot that that they look at. And the various people know this was a crater here. Wolf creek craters is another one of these that is recognizes having fallen in this case when a star fell from the sky. And there are traditions of people going down in Orrell stories and exploring the sink holes and traveling them to through them to water in a great distant area, and it was a Mark of heroism to travel underground under these craters. And so there, there are clearly stories of when people explored and survived. And now people don't do that. Because. Those heroes did stupid things.

Australia Elliot South America Arco Pamela PAT Orrell Dylan O'donnell Wolf Creek Brisbane Ayman Mark Carlin Societas Japan America Africa China
"stralia" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"stralia" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"A lot of home runs. Like everybody is they've given up a hundred of them so far. Here's Boone, the Sanchez guy is some power. He's as lethal as anyone. And we are seeing it's on the ninth inning then in the first inning. Here's Sanchez a translator things are really starting to pay off for them to pay right now. And, you know, I keep saying, but, you know, I put a lot of work into controlling the sewn in a singing about businessman, speaking near the Yankees translator is better. You know it's very frustrating. Here's the Mingo on through that better translators so far. So good. You know, he's giving chance and opportunity here to help the team. And I've been doing that, then, you know, anytime you contribute you're gonna feel good about that now. Nine in one most wins in the majors. ERA went up slightly from two point five zero to two point six oh. But he went five four victory. The Yankees now thirty and seventeen two full games up on Tampa who lost to LA last night. The Orioles are fifteen and thirty three and for infielder Hanser Alberto, this is tough. That I for and a lot of losing. So he begs the baseball gods. Come back. Good ties going on at they're gonna come back with this team is not good looking up in the sky when he said, nice talking to the reporter context. What's that? How far away are? They really twenty years. The orioles. Would you think about it in terms of years, like how bad the Houston? I remember that. And then years gnashing, none zero, zilch. And they haven't for it feels like a decade. Even when they've got good position players, then I'm going to throw the ball. I don't know. I really have no idea right now. There are bad baseball team though, about the Dan stralia go tonight coverage on the fan at six twenty five over under- Yankees, won by nine runs or more. I'll say really medicine nationals last night. This game went back and forth and back and forth. And then finally in the bottom of the ninth inning with the game, even in a couple of guys on amid resort area wins winning.

Yankees Orioles Sanchez baseball Boone ERA Hanser Alberto reporter Dan stralia Tampa Houston LA twenty years
"stralia" Discussed on NASCAR on NBC

NASCAR on NBC

03:08 min | 2 years ago

"stralia" Discussed on NASCAR on NBC

"He's steamed the most today, but you could change like that he gets a sponsor from Google Gola tomorrow, that wants to be enough stralia, I promise you, he's going to do that. On very quickly back to CoCo. Yes. So you need some leader sheep that Leeson's to obviously to Roger and all the other team owners. But that I still have the whole picture. Know in front of them and, and a long term plan, and I think these guys have it defeats the so competitive right now. I really think that it is the best racing in the planet, the most competitive, you have to really optimize your body or did I ever you see stems pizza subs if you want to win any of you want to win the five hundred that everything has to go, your way such a long race. Seven eight beach, dubs thirty three cars, everything up, -solutely everything has to go your way to win that race. And, and I love it's bottom wouldn't make Indy-Car special that it's so competitive. And for example, we see we see this weekend, these team that I and speed. Which we've seen weaned races in L MP one in endurance. They're very, very accomplished calm here. And they're not only lost their second off the last guy. With that. I also want to give them a lot of credit, and I think they've actually. Of wake a lot of nice sympathy, and the powder and the fans because it had not happened in a long time that someone just arrives at the race that I go almost things that got of the trailer. And let's see what happens these guys, the program very late together. They had zero testing zero, so they're digging these testing and they're coming with speculations. And luckily but lay they did a good job yesterday. Qualifying we the timing and how the session went, and there's nothing great, but they're realizing how competitive I think they knew and they knew what were getting into, and I'm sure we're going to see them get better and better. And I'm going to thought of the team, I'm just reading it as an example of how competitive UD's like they have any Gable, engineers, very capable that. I've ever they were one sec on off the last guy on the field and the rest of the field is covered one second like this so tight, right? So it's amazing. It's addictive about this series more than anything else, people always ask me, you know, about the speed, of course. That's. That's a dictator. But what's most of the, the for me is that every two weeks? Let's say when you have it a race you have so many people in your team trying so hard to wean or do the best they can and Sunday gums, and you, you know, blogging wide you either. First second seventh thirteen and the guy next to you, they'd better or worse. And then you regroup you analyze in two weeks later, you try again. And he's right harder, and it's, it's fun. It's a lot of fun. So it's, you know, it's, it's what makes I think, in the special not to mention this three, the road because the ovals you have such different types of racing that dude always, you'd always on your dose, as a team or a diver I talked to you. I think it was at the sea bring tests, two thousand twelve I was doing a story about what it was like, for everybody coming here after Dan Wheldon 's death at Las Vegas was like returning..

Google Dan Wheldon Leeson UD Roger Las Vegas Gable two weeks one second one sec
"stralia" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

WAFS Biz 1190

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"stralia" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

"And when they may be heading next senior analyst ties in hunter street acumen with beg intelligence emphasis, Eli's research. Deep on the program intelligence, only on Bloomberg radio. Bloomberg radio. Humbly, beg dot com. Are we still altering comedy to finance St. see this as a technical correction in the markets move seismically? Bloomberg surveillance podcast mistakes. When you sound something because you need to sell donkey, Jonathan zero and the names that shape the world's markets secret professor show, her of Yale University, exclusive interview with the UK Prime Minister Theresa. Invert surveillance visiting today on Bloomberg business jazz. Podcasts, these Susan world where you can buy anything shipping meet anyone anywhere. Twenty four hours a day in the old days. It was simple should go for your business news to stand out for you in terms of the headlines, here, do you give a shared European budget in the next decade? Can you explain a what Exxon did wrong and what Chevron did? Right number of radio the Bloomberg business app, and bloombergradio dot com Newburgh the world is listening. Are you interested in challenging at exciting? Career one where you can be part of solving complex challenges across industries, and geographies. Bloomberg's ever-expanding technology data news and media services foster innovation empower clients over nearly limitless opportunities for career growth. Visit Bloomberg dot com slash careers. Today if you are current job opportunities Bloomberg L P is an equal opportunity employer. The address once again is Bloomberg dot com slash careers. Development. They know stralia.

Bloomberg senior analyst Eli Exxon Yale University Jonathan zero Prime Minister Chevron UK professor Twenty four hours
"stralia" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:47 min | 2 years ago

"stralia" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Many movies that are not the vendors movie. Broken all the records. Not yet. It hasn't passed avatar yet. But it will. In fact, I think worldwide has James Cameron other congratulatory tweet showing the avengers logo sinking Titanic. That was pretty good. Titanic. Avatars is. Editor is the least remember least beloved blockbuster of all time. Everybody wanted to see because of the great technology involved. And it was really cool to look at that. Everybody was dances with wolves. With blue people. A monkey horsey blue person right tail but she was kind of like, but it was weird because at the same time still, yes. And. We have the same Worthington played the guy was paralyzed real life. But then his avatar could run around. It looked really great. They just announced this week. You know, he's making a millionaire movies. The last avatar movie will be the I think the twenty thirties. So we'll be dead. Why why why they've only had correct me if I'm wrong one appetite for us. So there hasn't even been a sequel, but they were announcing a whole mess load of these movies. I don't know if people really want them anymore. I mean, the first one was interesting Cameron decided that would be that'd be his entire career. Now, if he does just these avatar I'd rather see them to different stuff. So it never know how that's gonna go. But all that's already been billions of dollars on those sequels just in the development stage. But that's not in theaters now vendors endgame is still yelling at each other about it about different timelines and saying some people are the directors stupid because they they gave one theory about their own movie. No, that's not what happened in your movie. That's fun. But the great thing is more movies are coming out of enter then game. We'll be playing all summer long theaters. But we get new stuff every day and the the rebel Wilson. She's the stralia comics she was fat Amy in the pitch perfect. Who can I Dr to American audience Anne Hathaway can't be order? I guess might remember them. We call dirty rotten scoundrels from the eighties. Steve Martin, and Michael Cain. Right. It was a con man movie. It was actually that was actually a remake of David Niven Marlon Brando did way back in the day. This is now the twenty th century female reboot of it. So Anne Hathaway plays a very sophisticated con artists. Rebel Wilson plays the clunky Otis bowl China. Shop con artist who decide that they might have to team up in during the of France and start pulling up some cons. So here's rebel Wilson and Anne Hathaway movie called the hustle. Aches..

Rebel Wilson Anne Hathaway James Cameron Amy Editor France Worthington David Niven Marlon Brando Michael Cain Steve Martin
Only 60% of podcast apps support website links in show notes

podnews

02:08 min | 2 years ago

Only 60% of podcast apps support website links in show notes

"Testing how show notes display in over forty different podcast apps. Pod news has uncovered vast inconsistencies between different pod catches only sixty percent of apps support links to websites. Spotify and podcast. Addict are among the worst apps to display show notes based on total downloads pocket costs and overcast with a best. According to our tests willing to those today from our show notes and from our newsletter podcasts more popular than music. Playlists says an international study run by media research. Meanwhile, sounder uses Google stats to claim that podcasts are more popular than blogs. Edison research have released a few more pieces of information about infinite dialogue stralia two thousand nineteen as a webinar later this week with the full study Hindenburg and audio editor. Now exports directly to spreaker her podcast host it also exports to many others as well. Here's an event for you. Acosta and audio one are hosting a seminar on podcasting in Dublin in Ireland on may the fourteenth. And if you fancy coming to podcast day two thousand nineteen in London in June. We've got a discount code which can save you or your organization just over one hundred zero. If you wanted you need to be a subscriber to our newsletter and just Email us and ask nicely or updates pod. News dot net. It's a Mondays must be an opinion day. Ashwin Krishnan shares the five unexpected things. The podcasting taught him John Moore says you're not the BBC. That's good. I'll say and Bill Rosenblatt says that luminaries wobbly launch portends big changes in the podcast market. And in podcasts today under the bridge is a new podcast showing the weeks. Freshest new Sydney music from independent Sydney radio station. F B I radio sticking with the land down under Austrailia and true. Crime is celebrating hitting one hundred episodes with a special show and some live events and Melinda gates is the current guest in. But that's another story a podcast from McMillan about books that changed people's lives.

Pod News Ashwin Krishnan Sydney Melinda Gates Spotify Bill Rosenblatt Edison Research Audio Editor Acosta Mcmillan Austrailia Dublin London John Moore Ireland BBC Sixty Percent
Only 60% of apps support links

podnews

02:08 min | 2 years ago

Only 60% of apps support links

"Testing how show notes display in over forty different podcast apps. Pod news has uncovered vast inconsistencies between different pod catches only sixty percent of apps support links to websites. Spotify and podcast. Addict are among the worst apps to display show notes based on total downloads pocket costs and overcast with a best. According to our tests willing to those today from our show notes and from our newsletter podcasts more popular than music. Playlists says an international study run by media research. Meanwhile, sounder uses Google stats to claim that podcasts are more popular than blogs. Edison research have released a few more pieces of information about infinite dialogue stralia two thousand nineteen as a webinar later this week with the full study Hindenburg and audio editor. Now exports directly to spreaker her podcast host it also exports to many others as well. Here's an event for you. Acosta and audio one are hosting a seminar on podcasting in Dublin in Ireland on may the fourteenth. And if you fancy coming to podcast day two thousand nineteen in London in June. We've got a discount code which can save you or your organization just over one hundred zero. If you wanted you need to be a subscriber to our newsletter and just Email us and ask nicely or updates pod. News dot net. It's a Mondays must be an opinion day. Ashwin Krishnan shares the five unexpected things. The podcasting taught him John Moore says you're not the BBC. That's good. I'll say and Bill Rosenblatt says that luminaries wobbly launch portends big changes in the podcast market. And in podcasts today under the bridge is a new podcast showing the weeks. Freshest new Sydney music from independent Sydney radio station. F B I radio sticking with the land down under Austrailia and true. Crime is celebrating hitting one hundred episodes with a special show and some live events and Melinda gates is the current guest in. But that's another story a podcast from McMillan about books that changed people's lives.

Pod News Ashwin Krishnan Sydney Melinda Gates Spotify Bill Rosenblatt Edison Research Audio Editor Acosta Mcmillan Austrailia Dublin London John Moore Ireland BBC Sixty Percent
"stralia" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"stralia" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The hour. We update markets every fifteen minutes here on Bloomberg radio thanking index futures started trading there about two tenths of one percent. We've had a move to the upside almost right across the board year. It's looking like a much more positive day than we thought when the show got underway. Few hours back. Let's run through some of the numbers for you. The Nikkei is up Lou more than a half of a percent. The ASX two hundred is up eight tenths of one percent tax in Taiwan two tenths of a percent. And again futures for China are moving to the upside mentioned this. There's a report out that come of Bank of stralia is working on a plan to cut more than ten thousand jobs, and perhaps close as many as three hundred branches out of thousand and on our markets live blog, Wissmann writes that this may actually help push policymakers closer to cutting interest rates, and so that's quite interesting RV deputy governor guide to Bill. Said this week that resolving the economy's contradiction solid jobs market and slowing economic growth will be central to the outlook for interest rates. Let's take a look at interest rates at least market rates the yield on the ten year. Now two point five zero percent. The spread between to'sign tens now fifteen basis points and looking at all prices WTI crude cruising along up a third of one percent, sixty three eighty and the gold price. Now twelve hundred ninety six dollars almost nineteen minutes past the hour. That's nothing market. That's gonna there's back through. All right, Bryan. Thank you, South Korea's president pushing for an easing on North Korean sanctions impact economic projects between the two US. President Trump says he thinks the sanctions are fair as they are.

President Trump Bloomberg ASX Bryan South Korea president WTI Lou China Taiwan Bank of stralia US Bill Wissmann one percent twelve hundred ninety six doll five zero percent
"stralia" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

05:43 min | 2 years ago

"stralia" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Rollover at four pm on April fifth that smack in the middle of Friday afternoon traffic. I think we're gonna notice she says we're gonna notice when we have that roll over and so the glitch April six will be April fifth at four pm here during rush hour traffic, apparently, you know, like I say times will vary depending on where you are. And what you're doing speaking of which Samuel frost railyard, calling unite the GPS systems aren't supposed to glitch until April six if you take a wrong, turn of Adelaide and wound up here. What happened buddy? Yeah. Something like that. Good good to have you. Like you. I work in import cast. I'm in the side of things and in L play up we use GPS trying to keep all of the videos, synchronized to switch video sources everything facing. And an outage to GPS would also, of course, we maintain to independence GPS cokes. Just in case phone switching between them creates very unpleasant splat some black to air and things like that. So I think that's certainly can say also on the show things postively radio as well. In areas that have difficult to I into both couched in. It's multiple transmitters that in the area to get the signal into everyone. Synchronized by. So by old broadcasting sync with each other otherwise fjords. GPS receivers filing deal having issues could cause all sorts of problems because one transmitter would be out of secrecy other and people get no signal. So we may feel a lot of TV and radio glitches on. Well here. Friday means probably gonna you're you're going to be affected prior where you are right. I think it's all the same time. 'cause it's midnight. Right. Just depends on what is this. I'm trying to think what would it be Australia time, though, when it happens to you. I mean, I figured it out for here listener did spore it's going to be four PM our time here in the Pacific northwest or the Pacific time so four PM during rush hour traffic on Friday. So it'll be the fifth for us not to six. It would probably make it probably late morning on the Saturday. Oh my gosh. So Saturday morning broadcasting is going to be glitch to bid for you to there in Australia. So I don't know it's on the other side of the globe will be affected by it. So. Has done relevant. Uprights? We went through a process upgrading our equipment for thought how much equipment out there, especially in places that might not have the engineering south on your. And on a scale one event. If we would have an actual GPS, Al the number of systems that would be it would become from us by that extrordinary. Yeah. Yeah. I I don't know what we're gonna feel win. This happens on the six. But you know, I just I don't know. There's gotta be a reason why they've kept it, quiet. I mean, a lot of people have known about been upgrades. I know, but they're finally coming around reporting it in mainstream newspapers, it'll probably wind up on TV tomorrow. And by Saturday, we're all gonna be wondering why why is the TV and the radio screwed up why? Or why are these things happening happening at because of non updated systems, I'm open systems have the patches. So we don't have to worry about it. But you don't hear you speak. You know, there may be some older systems that are in broadcast that aren't going to be sinking up properly. And then some of those will handle it just because I just ticking along the next time they have a pal reshoot, and they'll look onto a time twenty years ago. Yeah. Yeah. True. Well, Samuel thank you so much for calling me tonight on the program. And thank you for your valuable information and a good on your nostril. You thank you so much for calling. Thank you so much have a good night. Semyonov stralia gave us some really good information about TV sinking in radio thinking, we all run by clocks of the time is off you find that things. Get cut off things don't broadcast properly. So we may see some glitches in broadcasting GPS systems older GPS systems, not working traffic. If you stuck in traffic, you may feel the heat there people being lost. You're screwed up. Who knows what's going to happen? Be very careful. You don't know. What's going to happen? Split goes down. You have to be on your toes, you have to pay attention and not be so relied the reliable or rely on the GPS system. It may not be working properly. Aaa six seven three thirty seven hundred that's triple eight six seven three thirty seven hundred. I'm CLYDE Lewis jalousie Graham zero and we'll be back. At bluecross blueshield, our companies take.

Samuel frost railyard Australia bluecross blueshield Adelaide CLYDE Lewis Pacific Semyonov stralia Al twenty years
"stralia" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"stralia" Discussed on KCRW

"Responded in a surreal way. I started to hear from advocates about kids not eighteen or drinking not even responding to voices and falling into this almost catatonic state Olivia. Your story is gonna take us inside the lives of these kids and their families. So I wanna let listeners know that parts of this story will be tough to. Here also should say that Livia originally reported this story with your stralia Broadcasting Corporation and its show background briefing. They're our partners on this episode. So Livia can you start off telling us how you were able to connect with these kids on now rue sure in August last year. I was put in touch with Maya by an advocate is in regular contact with kids on now rue and for weeks, we talked on messaging apps mental health are in my house. Now, I'll really mental health who were they sing sing. My sister Meyer is outside in the sun. But she tells me his sister doesn't leave the house anymore. And she said she doesn't like to eat. She doesn't like to see anyone. She she talks with the dolls. Are he hits her head on the wall? She's eighteen but not very well. Like. Literally to niche and she's not drinking enough. And she talks by herself. And she cries every time she's like getting worse and worse. This is that contagion of despair. I mentioned earlier keeps.

Livia Meyer stralia Broadcasting Corporati
"stralia" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

03:46 min | 3 years ago

"stralia" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"This is gonna be another opportunity for stralia and the space industry to continue to grow to see rose already operating the Tidbinbilla complex for Nassar at camera of deep space network. We'll it'd be the same sort of arrangement. It's similar. It's not exactly the same. The difference between the two facilities is ISA will still be operating it remotely from Darmstadt in Germany, whereas the Tidbinbilla model is at the staff there operated from the facility itself. But with that said, the capability to operate from new nausea should be communication problems between the us and Europe that still in place that still needs to be implemented. If necessary. Exactly what does the facility. Do. It has a Jew purpose. Jer it basically it has his deep space tracking purpose at its fundamental role. So any vehicle transiting through the solar system. Whether it's just a space mission on an interplanetary mission as primary purpose is to track those vehicles, relay communications collect data and effectively just understand where is at any given time that's his primary role. So that's things like baby Colombo and Mars express. That's exactly correct. Yes. Yeah. With the baby Colombo just being launched an October. That's one of its critical mission requirements of current time. The secondary role of new nausea is to conduct launch attracting activities. What that means is that when rockets launched from earth, new nausea has a responsibility to track the trajectory until it gets into space. That's ground tracking station work lift off from Kourou. Yes. That is correct. So me a little bit about the facility. I what does it consist of? It's not a large facility. Ability. It is however holding one of the largest dishes industry, which is a taxi five meter pot of Bali antenna. That's his main asset for the deep space tracking. You do need large. Apertures like thirty five meters above to give you a good a good signal collection on that it also contains a four and a half meter Muller antenna. And that one is a faster moving one. And that's the one that's used for the actual launch tracking. It's not the tracking session that Easter operate like with necessary space network, which also has dishes in Madrid and Goldstone Acer. Does the same sort of thing doesn't it? That's exactly right. It's a it's almost a very similar model on a longitudinal aspect on earth with ISA. They have the new nausea here in trail. Yeah. They also have facility in Madrid just north of Madrid Subaru and their third facility is out in Argentina at Malawi. So effectively not an ISA have a similar model in that. They cover the Americas. They cover Europe, and they also. Oh, cover the Australasian us baked as well. As that. You guys have a rather lots sold Afam as well. Yes, it's not a new nauseous, not a bad sisal of farmers quake. A recent addition actually just something that we're learning about having only just entered into discussions with them a year ago with ISA so we've been doing this ongoing process for almost a year now to get into contract with them. So society was quite excited about the fight that we can take on this responsibility in new notion, big facilities to two and ten and a power plant with a solar farm, and the fact that it's one hundred and fifty kilometers north east of Paris introduces a bit of travel as well it used to be an old monastery didn't I just outside of their? It's basically it's about ten minutes south of the monastic tone of inertia, so basically the facility resides up a hill site, and if you travel north ten minutes, you'll get to new our show, which is the the monastic town, which currently has the monks practicing their religion there. And it's it's it's really quite it's quite. Special place, actually when you visit it it's really it's the real thing is the best time. It's in the middle of a farming community..

nausea ISA Colombo Europe Madrid Nassar Tidbinbilla Darmstadt Germany Kourou us Madrid Subaru Paris Acer Mars Americas Argentina Malawi
"stralia" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

03:46 min | 3 years ago

"stralia" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"This is gonna be another opportunity for stralia and the space industry to continue to grow to see rose already operating the Tidbinbilla complex for Nassar at camera of deep space network. We'll it'd be the same sort of arrangement. It's similar. It's not exactly the same. The difference between the two facilities is ISA will still be operating it remotely from Darmstadt in Germany, whereas the Tidbinbilla model is at the staff there operated from the facility itself. But with that said, the capability to operate from new nausea should be communication problems between the us and Europe that still in place that still needs to be implemented. If necessary. Exactly what does the facility. Do. It has a Jew purpose. Jer it basically it has his deep space tracking purpose at its fundamental role. So any vehicle transiting through the solar system. Whether it's just a space mission on an interplanetary mission as primary purpose is to track those vehicles, relay communications collect data and effectively just understand where is at any given time that's his primary role. So that's things like baby Colombo and Mars express. That's exactly correct. Yes. Yeah. With the baby Colombo just being launched an October. That's one of its critical mission requirements of current time. The secondary role of new nausea is to conduct launch attracting activities. What that means is that when rockets launched from earth, new nausea has a responsibility to track the trajectory until it gets into space. That's ground tracking station work lift off from Kourou. Yes. That is correct. So me a little bit about the facility. I what does it consist of? It's not a large facility. Ability. It is however holding one of the largest dishes industry, which is a taxi five meter pot of Bali antenna. That's his main asset for the deep space tracking. You do need large. Apertures like thirty five meters above to give you a good a good signal collection on that it also contains a four and a half meter Muller antenna. And that one is a faster moving one. And that's the one that's used for the actual launch tracking. It's not the tracking session that Easter operate like with necessary space network, which also has dishes in Madrid and Goldstone Acer. Does the same sort of thing doesn't it? That's exactly right. It's a it's almost a very similar model on a longitudinal aspect on earth with ISA. They have the new nausea here in trail. Yeah. They also have facility in Madrid just north of Madrid Subaru and their third facility is out in Argentina at Malawi. So effectively not an ISA have a similar model in that. They cover the Americas. They cover Europe, and they also. Oh, cover the Australasian us baked as well. As that. You guys have a rather lots sold Afam as well. Yes, it's not a new nauseous, not a bad sisal of farmers quake. A recent addition actually just something that we're learning about having only just entered into discussions with them a year ago with ISA so we've been doing this ongoing process for almost a year now to get into contract with them. So society was quite excited about the fight that we can take on this responsibility in new notion, big facilities to two and ten and a power plant with a solar farm, and the fact that it's one hundred and fifty kilometers north east of Paris introduces a bit of travel as well it used to be an old monastery didn't I just outside of their? It's basically it's about ten minutes south of the monastic tone of inertia, so basically the facility resides up a hill site, and if you travel north ten minutes, you'll get to new our show, which is the the monastic town, which currently has the monks practicing their religion there. And it's it's it's really quite it's quite. Special place, actually when you visit it it's really it's the real thing is the best time. It's in the middle of a farming community..

nausea ISA Colombo Europe Madrid Nassar Tidbinbilla Darmstadt Germany Kourou us Madrid Subaru Paris Acer Mars Americas Argentina Malawi